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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 12, 2017 9:00am-9:31am GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at 9am. remembering britain's war dead — services are being held this morning for people across the uk to pay their respects to the fallen from two world wars and other conflicts. iam i am live on horse guards, where vetera ns a re i am live on horse guards, where veterans are arriving in preparation to ta ke veterans are arriving in preparation to take part in the 10,000 strong march past the cenotaph on whitehall. a former head of scotland yard confirms he knew that pornographic material had allegedly been found on a computer used by the cabinet minister damian green in 2008. president trump and north korean leader kim jong—un resume their war of words over pyongyang's nuclear weapons programme. also in the next hour — the spanish prime minister is visiting catalonia for the first time since he imposed
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direct rule on the region. it'll be mariano rajoy‘s first appearance in the region since implementing direct rule there two weeks ago. yesterday hundreds of thousands of catalans took to the streets of barcelona to demand the release of the separatist leaders detained after declaring independence. and our sunday morning edition of the papers is at 9.35am — this morning's reviewers are the journalist and broadcaster shyama perera, and sian griffiths, the sunday times education editor. good morning and welcome to bbc news. thousands of services will be held across the uk to remember those who died in two world wars and other conflicts. in london, veterans and military personnel willjoin members of the royal family for the national service of remembrance at the cenotaph. for the first time, the queen will watch proceedings from a nearby balcony. 0ur royal correspondent sarah campbell has more.
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the queen and the duke of edinburgh attending last night's festival of remembrance. this weekend is one of the most significant in the royal calendar, one the duke, despite now being retired, did not want to miss. but this year there will be one significant difference. her majesty's equerry hands her the wreath, which she places first at the foot of the cenotaph... the service of remembrance has changed very little over the years and one of the key moments has been when the queen lays her wreath on the cenotaph on behalf of britain and the commonwealth. it's a role she has performed all but six times throughout her 65—year reign. 0nly pregnancy or absence due to foreign royal tours have
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prevented herfrom doing so. this year, instead ofjoining the line—up here on whitehall, the queen and the duke of edinburgh will instead watch proceedings from the balcony of the foreign and commonwealth office. the prince of wales will lay the queen's wreath on her behalf. music: last post. the decision to watch rather than physically take part in one of the key royal engagements will not have been taken lightly. it is a recognition that the queen is now 91 years old, and the ceremony requires standing in often cold temperatures for around half—an—hour, and then walking backwards, navigating a step along the way. but the change is also perhaps the most visible signal yet of the gradual transition of responsibilities from the queen to her son and heir. one day, it will be prince charles‘ role as king to lead
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the nation in remembrance. and we will get more from sarah a little later live from the cenotaph. a former metropolitan police commissioner has confirmed that he knew pornographic material had allegedly been found on a computer used by the first secretary of state, damian green, in 2008. sir paul stephenson said he was briefed about the claims but regarded them as a "side issue" to a criminal investigation into leaks from the home office. the allegations were first made public last week by former met assistant commissioner bob quick. this morning, mr green issued a statement saying that no allegations about the presence of improper material on his parliamentary computers had ever been put to him or to the parliamentary authorities by the police. he said he could only assume that they were being made now for ulterior motives. jon donnison reports. damian green, effectively the prime minister's deputy, is one
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of theresa may's closest colleagues. already under investigation over allegations of inappropriate behaviour towards a female activist, accusations he denies, the first secretary of state is facing more questions about pornography allegedly found on his computer. the claim dates back to 2008, when police raided mr green's office as part of an investigation into leaks from the home office. when the allegations were first made last week by a former senior officer in the metropolitan police, damian green offered a strong denial. he called the story "completely untrue" and a "disreputable political smear," saying police have never
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suggested improper material was found on his parliamentary computer. now, though, the former metropolitan police commissioner sir paul stephenson, seen here with theresa may in 2010, has confirmed he was aware that pornographic material had allegedly been found. he's told the bbc he was briefed about the allegation, but said it was a side issue and not relevant to the criminal investigation into the home office leaks. this morning damian green responded to sir paul's claim, but he did not deny the material was on his computer, only that the police had ever asked him about it. he said he reiterated that no allegations about the presence of improper material on his parliamentary computers had ever been put to him or to the parliamentary authorities by the police, and said that he assumed the allegations were being made nine years later for ulterior motives. theresa may has already lost two cabinet ministers this month. this story will only add to the growing feeling her government is under siege. 0ur political correspondent, tom barton, is here. tom, another twist in the saga about
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damian green's computer, what was or was not on it. how much trouble do you think he is in? sir paul stephenson wading into the argument makes the case about this material, this alleged material, feel a bit more, weighing heavily, i guess, a bit more strongly. it is all part of this inquiry into allegations surrounding damian green, both around this alleged material on a computer that was seized from his office and also allegations that he made inappropriate approaches to a conservative party activist back in 2015. now, on the allegations the material was found on his computer, when this was first suggested last
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weekend, mr green released a statement, he said the allegations about the material and the computer, now nine years old, are false and disreputable political smears. today we have had a fresh statement from him in which he says, he reiterates that no allegations about the presence of improper material on his parliamentary computers have ever been put to him or to the parliamentary authorities by the police. the sunday papers again today full of stories about the pressures on theresa may. interesting letter reported in the mail 0n theresa may. interesting letter reported in the mail on sunday from michael gove and boris johnson, reported in the mail on sunday from michael gove and borisjohnson, two of the brexiteers, putting more pressure on her? absolutely, as we heard injohn‘s peace there it has been a difficult few weeks but theresa may, pressure on one of her closest allies in cabinet, two of her cabinet ministers forced to resign in the last week or so, and, as you say, the sunday papers today, the mail 0n
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sunday talking about this letter which was sent by borisjohnson and michael gove, apparently saying they are profoundly worried about preparations within government on the prime ministers. and while we're on michael gove, the government planning a new watchdog to protect the environment post brexit? yes, this is ahead of the detailed parliamentary scrutiny starting on
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the eu withdrawal bill on tuesday and wednesday this week, this is a bill that will transfer european law on to the british statute books. the government has been under a lot of pressure around this, hundreds of amendments have been tabled, and across the political spectrum, including from some conservatives, there is opposition to parts of the bill and i think what we have got today, this proposal to launch a new environmental watchdog, one which will really focus on ensuring that green issues are front and centre in brexit, is partly an attempt by the government to illustrate to those mps particularly within their own party that, where there are real substantive issues raised in this bill, they are willing to listen and make changes. 0k, tom, thank you very much indeed for being with us. president trump and the north korean leader have resumed their war of words over pyongyang's nuclear weapons programme. in response to being called a "dotard" by north korea's foreign ministry,
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mr trump has tweeted, wondering why kim jong—un would insult him by calling him "old". the us president added that he would never call the north korean leader "short and fat". the fresh exchange came as the president began the latest leg of his five—nation tour of asia — a tour described by kimjong—un as a warmonger‘s visit. karishma vaswani reports. foes now turned new friends. us president donald trump received the official state welcome in vietnam. the two nations were once at war, but now there's pomp and ceremony at an event to show how close they've become. president trump needs his asian partners by him on trade and denuclearising north korea. and that's what he's made this trip about. he even made an offer of friendship to north korean leader kimjong—un. i think anything's a possibility.
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strange things happen in life. that might be a strange thing to happen, but it's certainly a possibility. if that did happen, it would be a good thing for, i can tell you, for north korea, but it would also be good for lots of other places, and it would be good for the world. but even on this international trip, domestic politics have taken control of the agenda. president trump had to clarify what he meant when he said russia's president putin didn't believe he had meddled in the us election. i believe that he feels that he and russia did not meddle in the election. as to whether i believe it or not, i'm with our agencies, especially as currently constituted with their leadership, i believe in our intel agencies, our intelligence agencies, i've worked with them very strongly. donald trump's asian tour was supposed to be a chance for him to show off us strength in the region and build new relationships with his partners here by putting america first in matters to do with trade, as well as tackle the issue of north korea.
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but, instead, this trip has been overshadowed by the issue of whether russia meddled in the election in the united states, questions that will follow him as he makes his final stop on the last leg of his tour in manila. a man has died after being beaten by a gang armed with baseball bats in east london. the attack took place on high road in ilford shortly in the early hours of this morning. the metropolitan police has launched a murder inquiry. two more teenagers are facing murder charges after a 17—year—old boy was stabbed to death at a park in south—east london. michaeljonas was fatally wounded in penge earlier this month. police say the 1a and 17—year—old boys are due to appear at bromley magistrates‘ court tomorrow. two other teenagers have already appeared in court, charged with murder. the spanish prime minister, mariano rajoy, is due to visit catalonia later today for the first
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time since his government took control of the region and sacked its leadership. on saturday, hundreds of thousands of catalans took to the streets of barcelona to demand the release of separatist leaders detained by the spanish courts. andrew plant reports. a demonstration in barcelona. more than half—a—million people on the streets, their banners and placards showing the faces of the ten people they see as political prisoners. translation: the social majority and politicians are protesting today to ask for freedom, demand freedom for the political prisoners. these are independent supporters, and the people in jail held for their roles in the referendum and protest rallies in catalonia last month. eight catalonian ministers and two activists are currently in custody, accused of sedition and rebellion. and the former catalonian president is in self—imposed exile.
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spain has requested that carles puigdemont be extradited back from belgium. translation: we are appalled and angry at this situation. people don't deserve it. we do things peacefully with the desire to build a country and without any desire to hurt anyone. after the unrecognised referendum, spain's national government dissolved the regional government in catalonia. next month there will be new elections here. those in favour of independence hope to win and open the door for another attempt to break away from spain. the spanish prime minister, mariano rajoy, will visit catalonia today. meanwhile, the condemnation of the arrests here appears to be uniting the pro—independence supporters.
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andrew plant, bbc news. the husband of a british iranian womanjailed in iran has told the bbc he will discuss his wife's case with the foreign secretary today. nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe is accused of spying. her family have said they fear her sentence could be extended after borisjohnson gave the false impression she'd been teaching in iran. the headlines on bbc news... services are being held this morning for people across the uk to pay their respects to the fallen from two world wars and other conflicts. a former head of scotland yard confirmed he was aware of allegations that pornographic material was found on a computer used by the cabinet minister damian green in 2008. president trump and the north korean leader kim jong—un have president trump and the north korean leader kimjong—un have resumed their war of words over pyongyang's nuclear weapons programme. as we've been hearing, services will be held across the uk to remember britain's war dead.
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a two—minute silence will be observed at 11am. for the first time, the queen will watch the national commemorations from a balcony near the cenotaph while prince charles will lay a wreath on her behalf. let's speak to our correspondent sarah campbell, who's at horse guards parade. the commemoration is a little bit different this year? indeed, a small but significant change with the prince of wales laying the wreath under half of the queen, rather than her doing it herself, the first time in her 65 year reign that that has been the case. 0ther year reign that that has been the case. other than that, the ceremony will continue as normal, and, as you can see behind me, veterans and vetera ns‘ can see behind me, veterans and veterans‘ associations lining up here at all scots ready to take their place on the march past, that is the women‘s royal army corps
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association you can see in green, many more taking part, 10,000 marching past altogether. so many people here, when you have the privilege of speaking to them, have the most amazing stories, including alex knibbs. you were from the flower class corvette association, can you explain what your ball was during the war? the association gets people together that have been serving on corvettes during the war. we have a regular meeting each year and we get together then and we come to the senedd —— the cenotaph each year to remember those who have not come back after the war. to explain, you were a teenager when you signed up, you were on the corvette, what was your role exactly?” up, you were on the corvette, what was your role exactly? i went as a telegraph list, i joined was your role exactly? i went as a telegraph list, ijoined at 18 and i did further training in signals and
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i became a telegraphist and myjob was to communicate with other ships when we were at sea. was to communicate with other ships when we were at sea. essentially you we re when we were at sea. essentially you were looking for submarines, escorting convoys looking for submarines underneath and one of the most significant days was during the d—day landings, tell me of your involvement? the job of corvettes was to protect convoys, and it patrolled around convoys and tried to keep a submarines away so that they did not think the ships going across “— they did not think the ships going across —— sink the ships, not always successfully, but ourjob was to find them and to depth charge, keep them away, and to destroy them if possible, really. a very significant, important role, and on a day like today, when you will be marching past the cenotaph, can i ask what you will be thinking of,
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what you will be remembering? this isa what you will be remembering? this is a very special day when people like me do remember those that didn‘t come back, really. i was one of six boys in ourfamily, four of us of six boys in ourfamily, four of usjoined the of six boys in ourfamily, four of us joined the navy, of six boys in ourfamily, four of usjoined the navy, one in the air force, and we all came through the war safely, so we are very thankful, my parents felt blessed that we had all done that. but we know there are all done that. but we know there are a lot of people that did not come back, and we remember them, because although it is 70 years ago, for that period of time after that we have lived useful, fruitful lives, largely, i think, have lived useful, fruitful lives, largely, ithink, and have lived useful, fruitful lives, largely, i think, and those people just didn‘t have the opportunity, and that is a very sad, and that is what i remember and think of, particularly young people of my age whojoined up particularly young people of my age who joined up at particularly young people of my age whojoined up at my particularly young people of my age who joined up at my age and just are not with us now, that is very sad. beautifully put, thank you very much.
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this is what will be going through people‘s minds as they march past the cenotaph, but of course services taking place not just the cenotaph, but of course services taking place notjust here in london but across the uk and indeed across the world remembering those who, as alec said, did not make it back from conflict over the years. thank you very much indeed, and full coverage of those services on bbc news. 0ut—of—hours palliative care for seriously—ill children in england is "patchy and inconsistent", according to a new report seen by the bbc‘s 5live investigates programme. the research, carried out by the together for short lives charity, also suggests many families are forced to go to a&e overnight and at the weekends. the department of health says it will look at the report‘s recommendations closely. the open university and the institute of directors have written to the chancellor, calling for tax breaks for companies and employees willing to re—train to meet skills shortages. they want next week‘s budget reflect
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a "cultural change in attitudes to life—long learning". our business correspondent joe lynam has the details. from artificial intelligence and robotics to driverless cars and financial advice from computers, technology is changing and the uk workforce needs to change too. that‘s the message from employers and educational groups, who want the chancellor, philip hammond, to provide tax incentives so that we can all learn new skills. the iod and open university have written to the chancellor, urging him to raise the personal tax allowance for employees to be spent exclusively on further education. they also want employers to get a special reduction in corporation taxes to help pay for staff to do very specific courses which would benefit the economy. technology is threatening lots of jobs. it‘s also going to create newjobs, so people need to be helped to improve their skills, to be able to take advantage of that technological revolution. but tax policy is skewed. it favours investment
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by business in equipment, rather than in people. so a rebalancing of tax policy, which ensures people can learn while they earn, will improve economic productivity and also improve many people‘s life chances. the government said its proposed industrial strategy white paper would address british workers obtaining the skills they need to thrive in the 21st century workplace. let‘s tell you an extraordinary story from argentina. it involves two young men, both seriously ill, who made a remarkable discovery at a clinic where they were being treated. it‘s a discovery that has changed their lives. the bbc‘s tim allman takes up the story. a manual and francisco both suffer from huntington‘s disease. it is a rare condition typically inherited from a parent or parents that
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destroys brain from a parent or parents that destroys bra i n cells from a parent or parents that destroys brain cells and can lead to mental and physical impairment. both of them were being treated at the same rehabilitation centre when they started asking questions. translation: i told started asking questions. translation: itold my started asking questions. translation: i told my mother, started asking questions. translation: itold my mother, i said, mum, there is a boy that has the same illness as me, and he has a cleft lip. she said, he must be your brother. i didn‘t believe her. she found emmanuel‘s dad and that is when our stories came together. the two men adopted as babies by different families now reunited as adults, completely by chance. it is not all brotherly love, they support rival football teams, but the ups are much better than the downs. translation: my father told me, are much better than the downs. translation: my fathertold me, i was very happy because they have a brother and he lives here and i see him every day. translation: for us
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it was weird because, living in the same city, they never met on the street or anything. and then they need here, both with a rare genetic disease. if they were not brothers, they had to be relatives. now they wa nt to they had to be relatives. now they want to find their older siblings, all 17 of them, and they will also have to deal with the challenge of their medical condition, a challenge they will face together as brothers. a former soldier who fought in the second world war and survived more than two years in auschwitz, 100—year—old ronjones, has been selling poppies for more than 35 years. he says he will never retire from carrying out charity work in memory of his fallen comrades. tomos morgan went to meet him. every year you‘ll find him selling poppies, as he has done for over 35 years. and even at 100 years old... in the box, love. ..ronjones is still doing his part
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in making sure we remember those that gave their lives. thank you very much. why do you still do it at 100 years old? well, i‘m able. as long as i can get a lift, taking me back and forth. so you will be there next year, 101? well, i say, i don‘t know. i‘m getting a bit shaky on my legs. as an ex—serviceman, remembrance sunday and the poppy is personalfor ron. in world war two he endured horrors that scarred him for years, after his squad was captured and they spent two years as prisoners of war near auschwitz. by far the worst experience they endured was the death march. they marched us through the carpathian mountains, czechoslovakia, bohemia, saxony, bavaria and down into austria. i was on a march for about 17 weeks.
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we lost, around about 100 men died. and when you finally came home, just describe the state and the toll that auschwitz... i was in a shocking state when i came home. for instance, my wife put me in the bath that first night and she started to cry ‘cause i looked like somebody from belsen. isaid, "0h, don‘t cry, love. i left men out there who‘s never going to come home". ron suffered with post—traumatic stress, flashbacks and nightmares that haunted him for years, but he overcame it all thanks in no small part to the woman he will never forget. i think my wife saved my life. i think my wife was marvellous. super woman. today, britain remembers all of those that have fought
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for our country over the years. ronjones will be doing the same for the friends he lost more than 70 years ago. this year‘s rockefeller centre christmas tree has arrived in new york and is set to be decorated with more than 50,000 lights. the tree is 75—feet tall and 50—feet wide, and has been set to feature for a long time since the center‘s gardener spotted the norwegian spruce seven years ago. let‘s check out the weather prospects with susan howell. today, the weather is all about how it feels, rather than how it looks, and how it feels is chilly, we have cold air all the way across the british isles from the arctic accompanied by a strong gusty northerly wind, very chilly for the
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remainder of this remembrance sunday. the showers in the west will tend to clear this afternoon but in the east as the wind strength in some of the showers will be fetched onshore into the likes of east anglia, yorkshire and lincolnshire. 0verall, anglia, yorkshire and lincolnshire. overall, though, a lot of sunshine on offer through the afternoon but these temperatures are somewhat deceptive because you do really have to factor injust deceptive because you do really have to factor in just how chilly the wind will feel. northern ireland, brightening prospects scotland still some showers persisting across the northern and western isles, the highlands and grampians could be wintry across higher ground. let‘s look at how those temperatures translate into what it will be like when you add in the effect of the wind, in some areas it will barely feel like two or three degrees, especially with persistent showers and the wind on the north sea coast. 0vernight tonight the wind will fall light because high pressure pushes them from the west, leaving us with clear skies and the perfect setup
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for a widespread frost overnight. imrul areas we could get down to “11, for example, across england and wales, perhaps —6 in parts of scotland. the chilly start to the new week, a bright one across england and wales. enjoy the early sunshine here, because the cloud will spread in for the afternoon which will make for a chilly feel, despite like the wind than today. further north, rain for northern ireland and scotland, wintry for a time across the higher ground of scotland. 0nce those front start to come in, we topple away the ridge of high pressure and for tuesday and wednesday we are talking about a couple of days featuring a lot of cloud, some patchy outbreaks of rain, but the bigger change really will be for tuesday and wednesday a milderfeel, temperatures will be for tuesday and wednesday a milder feel, temperatures as you can see here behind me backed up in double figures and the air coming across the british isles will come from the west, so a very different feel from sunday and monday, tuesday and wednesday much greyer but also much milder. here is your

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