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tv   The Papers  BBC News  November 12, 2017 9:30am-10:00am GMT

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feel like two or three degrees, especially with persistent showers and the wind on the north sea coast. overnight tonight the wind will fall light because high pressure pushes them from the west, leaving us with clear skies and the perfect setup for a widespread frost overnight. imrul areas we could get down to “4, for example, across england and wales, perhaps —6 in parts of scotland. the chilly start to the new week, a bright one across england and wales. enjoy the early sunshine here, because the cloud will spread in for the afternoon which will make for a chilly feel, despite like the wind than today. further north, rain for northern ireland and scotland, wintry for a time across the higher ground of scotland. once those front start to come in, we topple away the ridge of high pressure and for tuesday and wednesday we are talking about a couple of days featuring a lot of cloud, some patchy outbreaks of rain, but the bigger change really will be for tuesday and wednesday a milderfeel, temperatures will be for tuesday and wednesday a milder feel, temperatures as you can see here behind me backed up in double figures and the air coming across the british isles will come from the west, so a very different feel from sunday and monday, tuesday and wednesday much greyer but also much milder. here is your week
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ahead, chilly and frosty start on monday, tuesday and wednesday starting to poor weather in from the atla ntic starting to poor weather in from the atlantic again, milder but rather grey. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines: remembering britain's war dead — services are being held this morning for people across the uk to pay their respects to the fallen from two world wars and other conflicts. a former head of scotland yard confirms he was aware of allegations that pornographic material was found on a computer used by the cabinet minister, damian green, in 2008. president trump and north korean leader kimjong un resume their war of words over pyongyang's nuclear weapons programme. the spanish prime minister mariano rajoy is to visit catalonia for the first time since he imposed direct rule on the region a fortnight ago. hundreds of thousands of catalans
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took to the streets of barcelona, demanding the release of the separatist leaders arrested after the independence referendum. coming up in a few minutes our sunday morning edition of the papers — this mornings reviewers are the journalist and broadcaster shyama perera and sian griffiths, the sunday times education editor. before the papers — sport, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's richard askam. republic of ireland managed a goaless draw in the first leg of their world cup play—off against denmark in copenhagen. the best chances on the night fell to the home side — darren randolph parried christian erriksen‘s shot and pione sisto fired wide with the rebound. randolph was called into action again late on tipping over yussuf poulsen‘s header in stoppage time. so the match is evenly poised ahead of tuesday's return match in dublin. it is what it is.
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we came out here and we know that we needed to do a job, which we've done. we've got 90 minutes now to try and get to the world cup. we're close, but it's going to be a real tough game. it was difficult tonight and we will expect more of that on tuesday. northern ireland play their world cup play—off second leg against switzerland this afternoon. michael o'neill‘s men are 1—0 down from a controversial penalty. they're aiming to qualify for a first world cup since 1986, and only the fourth in their history. we didn't press the ball as well as we could have done. as i say, we watched the game last night. the players certainly saw that and agreed with that and we know we can play better. sometimes we have to give credit to switzerland. i thought they played very well on the night. but we know we can play a lot better than that and the fact that the scoreline is 1—0 and we've still a lot to play for. all the pressure is on switzerland
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and we have nothing to lose so we have got to try and use that to our advantage. looking back on the game, perhaps we were cautious at times so we need to be braver in possession and also without the ball, in terms of pressing. it is still evenly balanced. in the women's ashes test, where england have draw they need to keep the series alive. with points awarded across all formats of the game, the australians would retain the ashes with a test victory. trailing after the first innings by 168 england have batted extremely well. after losing two wickets, georgia elwiss and heather knight came to the crease and are steering their team home, with knight particularly impressive. she's gone on to make a crucial half century. and with time rapidly running out for the aussies to force a win, it looks as though the series will now be decided by the three twenty20 matches to come. in rugby union there were mixed fortunes for the home nations in the autumn internationals.
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england, ireland and scotland all won, but wales' torrid run against australia continues. alex gulrajani rounds up all the action. the autumn sets north against south. a chance to suss out enemies from further afield and, for warren gatland, time to get settled back into the welsh hot seat. a nice and easy welcome back. 12 games with australia, i2 defeats for wales. an early home try spread hope around cardiff. it didn't last long. a lapse in defence pounced upon and punished. gap found there and more from kurtley beale. the full—back taking full advantage of a welsh defence slow to react, as he pinched in and raced away. a late rally closed the gap for wales as they take positives going forward. hopefully people can see what we're trying to do. i think we probably hurt ourselves in the first half. credit to australia, put pressure on. hopefully people can see the positive way we are trying to play. there was more evidence of attacking rugby in ireland. they were rampant against south africa. they clashed, but the only team scoring was the irish. 38—3 was the margin of victory. a record win for the hosts over their visitors. samoa arrived on these isles amid financial woes and fears for their future, but all those
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problems were left off the field. a frantic match with scotland saw stuart hogg return to action with an early try. but scotland couldn't get away from their wily opponents. ii tries in total, a late samoan rally held off by gregor townsend's men. not as much excitement down at twickenham, though, as england just about emerged victorious over argentina. nathan hughes's early try gave them the foundation but they never really took off. eddie jones far from content. an off day from the argentine kickers helped, as did a final try. but england's know they need to improve. we need to be a lot better. this is the start of the international season, so we'll take that result, but we need to step up the intensity and application to beat australia next week. and that's just what eddie jones is hoping for. in rugby league, england are about to kick off
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in the world cup against france — that's in about half an hour. a win for enlgand will see them through to the quarter finals to meet papua new guinea. in the final match for both teams, ireland are beating wales 22— 6 in the world cup — this converted try from ben morris putting the welsh on the scoresheet as they attempt a comeback. there was more british success at the track cycling world cup in manchester last night. great britain's men's pursuit team made sure of a gold medal on day two of the event. the team ridden by steven burke, kian emadi, ed clancy and ollie wood beat denmark in the final. i'm well happy we've won. the home crowd was awesome, as always. we love racing on this track. but we've got to see this as the starting point and it is. if we can do this time, with that amount of work, we won't see an investment on that until further round the track season. so we're in a good place, but hopefully this is just the beginning. the success didn't end there, britain's kate archibald and elinor barker secured gold in the women's maddison. they scored 32 points overall and pipped world champions belgium to the top prize byjust two
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points. lewis hamilton will start from the back of the grid and declared ‘we're all human‘ after crashing in yesterday's qualifying session for the brazilian grand prix. he lost control of his mercedes at 160 miles an hour on turn six of the interlagos circuit, before hitting the barrier. hamilton has already won his fourth formula one title but starts on the back row as he didn't register a time. his team mate valtteri bottas will start in pole postion. it was a strong day for great britian at the trampoline world championships in bulgaria. the british team won four medals in total, including a gold for the men's tumbling team. kristof willerton, elliott browne, greg townley and kallum mulhall finished ahead of of china and denmark in theirfinal. lucie colebeck took bronze in the women's tumbling individual final. there were also two silver medals on the trampoline. that's all the sport for now. hello and welcome to our look
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ahead to what the papers will be bringing us. with me are the journalist and broadcaster shyama perera and the sunday times education editor, sian griffiths. let's look at the front pages. the observer leads onjeremy corbyn‘s calls for borisjohnson to quit, after comments he made about a british mother imprisoned in iran. the sunday times says a0 tory mps have agreed to sign a letter of no—confidence in theresa may. the telegraph leads on plans by the environment secretary, michael gove, for stronger environmental policy following brexit. meanwhile, the mail on sunday says mr gove and boris johnson are holding theresa may to ransom
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in order to secure a hard—brexit. the sunday express says the economy is in for a £3 billion windfall after brexit. let's kick off was the mail on sunday story, boris and michael doe plot to hijack number ten, sian. —— michael gove. it is spread across the pages and the make quite a big deal of it. it is a leaked letter written by michael gove and boris johnson. it basically tells theresa may how she should be running her cabinet and makes a series of veiled threats, according to the mail on sunday, and it spells out the divisions within theresa may's cabinet between the hard brexit supporters and those taking a softer
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approach. they make a series of demands an ugly out their hard brexit manifesto and the criticise philip hammond for not being sufficiently energetic, as they see it, but hard brexit. it comes at a time when theresa may's cabinet is in disarray, continuing leadership speculation, she has lost two cabinet ministers with two more under investigation and the overwhelming feeling is it is a mess. borisjohnson is mess. boris johnson is one mess. borisjohnson is one of those a lot of people are saying should be out of people are saying should be out of the cabinet. that feels like a last—ditch effort by borisjohnson, yet that feels like a last—ditch effort by boris johnson, yet again with michael gold alongside, to put his mark on the race he seems to have been losing because every single time he opens his mouth he puts his owi'i time he opens his mouth he puts his own foot in it. they remind me of
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the political equivalent of the tamworth two. they have broken through the fence and running crazily. of course it was michael gove who famously stabs boris johnson in the back, or the front. these two ultimately rub each other the wrong way and do not get on yet how all the back together again and yet how prescient, i think, because i think it gives us some sense of how this effort to undermine theresa may will go. apart from anything else, there is nobody ready tojump in and take her place and philip hammond, when we speak of him having insufficient energy, that isjust personal because he isjust so laid back. all of this feels quite personal. it is personal but also critical for what kind of brexit we have. it is personal but also critical for what kind of brexit we havem it is personal but also critical for what kind of brexit we have. it is, and we have the eu withdrawal bill coming through parliament this week and we seem to be completely stuck
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at the moment with the hard brexit supporters and those wanting a softer option and battling it out, unable to move forward and the idea we will not pay will not agree to pay the £60 billion bill and move forward with trade talks. the sunday times, labourare making forward with trade talks. the sunday times, labour are making massive capital, jeremy corbyn is writing about this and saying if theresa may cannot govern she should go and make way for a cabinet, a government that can take brexit forwards and can somehow free up this stock position we seem somehow free up this stock position we seem to have been in for a long time. the sunday times have tory turmoil as a0 mps say theresa may must go. if that is right and there are a0 mps who want her out that is reaching a critical mass. it is because you only need eight small. —— eight is more to unseat
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her. coming back to the first story although there are lots of detractors, nobody is actually offering to take up the role and one wonders by creating this moment of critical mass, what is the party doing? it is imploding. reading it just as a punter, you think, what are the hoping to achieve? theresa may is immovable, all this will do is cause a panic which she will take six or seven days to respond to and by which time the next crisis within the party and the brexit negotiations. all i feel is this sense of anxiety and tension and headless chicken moment. the point of critical mass is when we discover the pen is full of headless chickens. you have those two wings of the
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conservative party, the remaining and leave, with different views of what brexit should be. and on top of that you have all these other things. borisjohnson that you have all these other things. boris johnson and that you have all these other things. borisjohnson and michael gove writing this letter, but boris johnson himself is under immense pressure with people calling for him to quit because of the way he handled the case of the british mother imprisoned in iran. it is not just you have divisions in the cabinet, you have a whole lot of other things, the sexual harassment allegations also going on. i think it must look from brussels as though our cabinet is it must look from brussels as though ourcabinet is in it must look from brussels as though our cabinet is in complete disarray. let's move on, still in the sunday times, another of her cabinet ministers in danger, one might say,
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about his cabinet future, damien green, effectively the deputy prime minister and according to the sunday times button‘s most senior police officer saying he was tall pornography was discovered and damien green's parliamentary computer back in 2008. borisjohnson and now damien green under threat perhaps. i cannot work out what is a meaningful about the damien green story. there was the accusation of some inappropriate texting and now the suggestion pornography was found oi'i the suggestion pornography was found on his office computer but we are told it was not illegal pornography so told it was not illegal pornography so what exactly is being suggested here? did he use his office time to serve things he should not have surfed? 0k, why is that newsworthy? 0r surfed? 0k, why is that newsworthy? orare we surfed? 0k, why is that newsworthy? or are we saying this implies something other damien green which i cannot see what it is implying.
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so you think his job cannot see what it is implying. so you think hisjob is not in danger? i think his job is clearly in danger because people are gunning for them but at this stage i do not quite understand what he has done. sian, are you any clearer? that is an enquiry into his conduct and this evidence will go forward to that enquiry. i think this is significant because we broke the steely —— broke the story that extreme pawn had been found on his parliamentary computer —— extreme pornography. and now we see sir paul stephenson has found extreme pornography was found on these computers. the one would willingly admit to having a look at pornography. it is something so intensely private and i do not blame him for saying, it could not have been me. that is the whole point, who looks at
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pornography in work on a work computer? i suspect at least two thirds of all men in offices. and a good number of women. i don't know. when we think pornography is the most accessed subject on the internet it is probable most offices will have pornography accessed from. in most offices i have worked and it is absolutely a disciplinary matter if you have looked at pornography on your work computer. we mention the borisjohnson your work computer. we mention the boris johnson and left your work computer. we mention the borisjohnson and left his job was under threat. lots of people have been calling for him to go on a very strong words about him from jeremy corbyn, not just the strong words about him from jeremy corbyn, notjust the usual calls strong words about him from jeremy corbyn, not just the usual calls for him to resign but saying boris johnson has undermined our country and put our citizens at risk with his incompetence and colonial throwback views. pretty tough words
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from jeremy corbyn. absolutely. i worked on this story this week and i was shocked, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe's mp and i realised when i spoke to her mp they have been trying to get boris johnson or someone in the foreign office to look at this case for 18 months. there has been a petition signed by 200 mp5, e—mails, letters, visits, they could not even get a visits, they could not even get a visit in the diary, the meeting, and nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe's british husband also could not get a meeting in the dining with borisjohnson. this is a british citizen imprisoned —— could not get the meeting. this isa —— could not get the meeting. this is a british citizen held in solitary confinement in iran and her daughter is also out there. surely
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we should be protecting citizens abroad and the idea you can have 18 months ago passed and no one will even look at this case is appalling. it may be sometimes the foreign office say a softly softly approach behind the scenes is better than a public campaign. but then you can still engage with the family but as far as i understand today that is supposed to bea understand today that is supposed to be a phone call between richard ratcliffe and borisjohnson, the first one for 18 months. she has said she has even stopped in the lobby, doorstep him to try and get them to at this. she set up a meeting with the tory mp who also has a constituent imprisoned in iran and that was postponed for two weeks and that was postponed for two weeks and when it finally happened that was when borisjohnson made that terrible mistake in the house of commons when he said nazanin
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zaghari—ratcliffe was training journalists in iran. do you think he will go or not?” think he should publicly apologise for his mistake, we try it and make it clear it is the british government's official position that nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe be released. but that still has not happened. we also do not know how many other criticisms are being held in iran. do you think he will go on this?” do not think you well, he is like teflon. -- i do not think he will. on that, michael gove hasjust been saying there is no reason she should be held in prison in iran. let's look at the observer. armistice day and commemoration services around the country today. the picture there of younger people with the headline, we shall not
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forget them. it is important the young remember as well. it is a telling picture but there is quite a lot of news about this this year because the queen and prince philip will be watching the ceremony rather than taking part. watching from the balcony. but we will miss her putting her wreath on. there was some outrage yesterday because harry and william we re yesterday because harry and william were rugby matches when the rest of the royal family were were rugby matches when the rest of the royalfamily were marking were rugby matches when the rest of the royal family were marking the 11th. it has been interesting because suddenly everything is changing. ithink because suddenly everything is changing. i think the literal changing. i think the literal changing today is a very serious moment. understandable, it is called, lots of standing for the queen. it says a lot about the changing of our establishment. let's finish off with the sunday telegraph. how words and phrases are disappearing from the english
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language, as spoken in the uk. disappearing from the english language, as spoken in the ukw disappearing from the english language, as spoken in the uk. it is a very sweet story. it says grade adverbs, it gives examples of quite, rather unfairly, are in decline. i used, actually, all the time. the study by an expert in linguistics at lancaster university, it shows use of these words are seen as a middle or upper class way of speaking. some of these other words, like frightfully, awfully, terribly, they are seen as a frightfully, awfully, terribly, they are seen as a bit too posh, perhaps. i thought, word we all talk you have to deliver bad news as a sandwich, something good, then say something bad and then something good. these add to allow us to do that. you've
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done really well here but i wasn't awfully happy with the middle bit. these are what we use all the time to deliver bad news. a super—centre pabst —— super sensitised society, like we have no, i pabst —— super sensitised society, like we have no, lam pabst —— super sensitised society, like we have no, i am amazed pabst —— super sensitised society, like we have no, lam amazed me no longer use these. i think the application is because of the american influence, which is perhaps simpler with fewer adjectives and fewer adverbs. we have a lot of very, very bad, very, very good. is that the wii english language is going in the uk? i wonder if it is due to the effects of texting because if you are texting you would not text frightfully, that is too long. and such once up to ia 140 characters. i would like to see a gendered study on this because i
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suspect women used frightfully and awfully more so than men... but they are diplomatic words. they are about creating a moment where everybody can be consensual, though i suspect theresa may has been using too many of these words! i suspect all of these stories link up and the problem with the bodice is he does not use enough of these which is why he messed up over nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe —— the problem with borisjohnson. i would like to see we are frightfully, terribly, grateful to both of you for coming in. thank you to shyama and sia. we take a look at tomorrow's front pages of the evening on bbc news at 10:a0pm every evening. goodbye for now. today the weather is more about how
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it feels instead of how it looks, and it feels chilly. strong gusty northerly winds. chilly for the remainder of the day. showers in the west clear u p remainder of the day. showers in the west clear up this afternoon but in the east some well move inshore into east anglia, lincolnshire. overall lots of sunshine on offer through the afternoon but temperatures are somewhat deceptive because you must factor in the wind. for scotland still some showers persisting across northern and western isles, highlands and grampians and could be winter the cause higher ground. let's look at how temperatures translate once you factor in the
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wind. feeling like barely one or two celsius. high pressure pushes into light from the west leaving us with clear skies and the perfect setup for the widespread frost overnight. rural areas could reach minus four celsius, perhaps even lower in parts of scotland. chilly start to the new week, bright one across england and wales. enjoy the early sunshine because the cloud will spread in junein because the cloud will spread in june in the afternoon, lighter winds than today. read on for northern ireland and scotland and higher ground of scotland will see something more winsomely. that ridge of high pressure moves away and on tuesday and wednesday feature lots of cloud, patchy outbreaks of rain but the biggest change will be tuesday and wednesday with it feeling more mild. temperatures back into double figures and the air
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coming from the west, so a very different feel from sunday and monday. much more grey but also much more mild. a chilly and frosty start on monday and tuesday and wednesday we stuck to pool our weather in from the atlantic, more mild but also grey at times. this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at 10am... remembering britain's war dead — services are held this morning for people across the uk to pay their respects to the fallen from two world wars and other conflicts. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, backs calls for the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, to lose hisjob following a series of gaffes.
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i think he's got to go. i think he's our foreign secretary, whose job is diplomacy and to work in the best effo rts diplomacy and to work in the best efforts for our country, and if theresa may was a strong prime minister she would have sacked him a long time ago. a former head of scotland yard confirms he was aware of allegations that pornographic material was found on a computer used by the cabinet minister damian green in 2008.
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