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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 12, 2017 10:00am-10:31am GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at 103m... remembering britain's war dead — services are held this morning for people across the uk to pay their respects to the fallen from two world wars and other conflicts. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, backs calls for the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, to lose hisjob following a series of gaffes. i think he's got to go. i think he's oui’ i think he's got to go. i think he's our foreign secretary, whose job is diplomacy and to work in the best effo rts diplomacy and to work in the best efforts for our country, and if theresa may was a strong prime minister she would have sacked him a long time ago. a former head of scotland yard confirms he was aware of allegations that pornographic material was found on a computer used by the cabinet minister damian green in 2008. also in the next hour — the spanish prime minister is visiting catalonia for the first time since he imposed direct rule on the region. yesterday hundreds of thousands
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of catalans took to the streets of barcelona to demand the release of the separatist leaders detained after declaring independence. and president trump and north korean leader kim jong—un resume their war of words over pyongyang's nuclear weapons programme. good morning and welcome to bbc news. services will be held around the country to mark remembrance sunday and, for the first time, the queen will be present at the national commemorations but will not lay a wreath. prince charles will take the monarch's place at the cenotaph, while she watches from a nearby balcony. sarah campbell reports the queen and the duke of edinburgh attending last night's festival of remembrance. this weekend is one of the most significant in the royal calendar,
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one the duke, despite now being retired, did not want to miss. but this year there will be one significant difference. her majesty's equerry hands her the wreath, which she places first at the foot of the cenotaph... the service of remembrance has changed very little over the years and one of the key moments has been when the queen lays her wreath on the cenotaph on behalf of britain and the commonwealth. it's a role she has performed all but six times throughout her 65—year reign. only pregnancy or absence due to foreign royal tours have prevented herfrom doing so. this year, instead ofjoining the line—up here on whitehall, the queen and the duke of edinburgh will instead watch proceedings from the balcony of the foreign and commonwealth office. the prince of wales will lay the queen's wreath on her behalf. music: last post. the decision to watch rather
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than physically take part in one of the key royal engagements will not have been taken lightly. it is a recognition that the queen is now 91 years old, and the ceremony requires standing in often cold temperatures for around half—an—hour, and then walking backwards, navigating a step along the way. but the change is also perhaps the most visible signal yet of the gradual transition of responsibilities from the queen to her son and heir. one day, it will be prince charles‘ role as king to lead the nation in remembrance. sarah is at horse guard's parade, where she's been speaking to some
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of the ex—serviceman who will be taking part in the remembrance day service later on. preparations here in horse guards are well underway for a very chilly march past the cenotaph just after ten o'clock. veterans have been arriving all the time and one of those that will be marching past is peter wright from the blenheim society. could you explain the blenheim society, please? society. could you explain the blenheim society, please ?m society. could you explain the blenheim society, please? it is a load of chaps who contributed, made donations to the rebuilding of blenheim, which took ten years or so. blenheim, which took ten years or so. she is beautiful, it is fine now, the queen is there. and your role, if you don't mind me saying, you are 97, you played a very active role in the second world war to do with the blenheims, explain what you did? i was under blenheim 39
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squadron before the war, and we eventually got down to a den, did a tour of operations in somaliland and abyssinia and all those lovely places, we were living in the sand, these beautiful green places in abyssinia, this was in 1940, and then we moved on to the middle east, then we moved on to the middle east, the mediterranean, malta, anywhere you like, and i came home in 1942. long time ago but i would imagine the memories, even now, are still quite strong? almost every single speck of sand is fresh in my mind. yes, we don't forget things like
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that, and you don't forget the people who you were with. u nfortu nately, people who you were with. unfortunately, well, i'm 97, for heaven ‘s sake, and i was the baby on the squad, so all those others have said goodbye. special and important for you to come and take pa rt important for you to come and take part in the march past the cenotaph. well, it is a very important day, isn't it? very important day. yesterday was the real day, always the one, my granddaughter in south africa got married yesterday! congratulations! yes, well done! thank you so much, and thank you for sharing your stories. vetera ns we sharing your stories. veterans we think of as being older but actually there are lots of young faces here today and one of them is lance corporal graham leonard, and thatis lance corporal graham leonard, and that is the thing, it is not necessarily people in the second world war now, there are much more recent conflicts? yes, think about the conflict with bosnia, northern ireland, afghanistan and more
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re ce ntly ireland, afghanistan and more recently iraq. and that was your experience, in iraq? yes, it was. i was a front line ambulance driver so i was between kuwait and iraq. since iraq you have suffered from some issues yourself, from ptsd. have you had the help and support, is it therefore vetera ns ? had the help and support, is it therefore veterans? it certainly is now, more than ever. we still need to raise mental awareness and the associations do, they are very good with the veterans, helping them through daily life, helping them to live on, basically, really. you are taking part in the march passed today, can i ask what you will be thinking about, what will be giving through your mind? today i reflect on, i represent the people, thousands of them did not return home, and that is what i will be reflecting on today when marching
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past the cenotaph, the comrades that really didn't come home and gave the ultimate sacrifice for their country. lance corporal, thank you very much indeed. powerful words, lance corporal, thank you very much indeed. powerfulwords, powerful stories from lots of individuals here, remembering those not able to tell their own stories. sarah campbell reporting. coalition forces in afghanistan has also been paying their respects on remembrance sunday. british troops joined with forces from other countries, including new zealand and australia, for a service this morning. lieutenant—general richard cripwell, who spoke at the service stressed the importance of the solidarity demonstrated by countries banding together to remember those lost in conflict. of course it is important for us at any time, it is part of the promise that we may, but it is important
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when you are on operations, for us here in afghanistan, it provides a focus to remember those have given their lives for their country, not just over the years but the centuries as well, we don't forget anybody. i think also one of the things about being on operations at this time is that we are part of the coalition and you will have seen this morning how many countries volunteer tojoin us this morning how many countries volunteer to join us in the service of remembrance, partly as an act of solidarity, partly as a way of remembering their own dead, and it is just part of what makes this coalition, any coalition, greater than the sum of its parts. stay with us here on bbc news — we'll have special coverage of the remembrance sunday service from the cenotaph at 10:55am this morning. the mayor of london says
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boris johnson should resign for making "a long line of mista kes". sadiq khan told andrew marr that the foreign secretary had shown poor diplomacy, adding that the prime minister it comes after mrjohnson was criticised for telling a group of mps that nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, a british—iranian woman being held in iran, had been "training journalists" in iran. our political correspondent, tom barton, is here. he is under increasing pressure this weekend? yes, he has been under pressure since a few days ago when he made comments to the foreign affairs committee that suggested nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, a british woman in prison in iran, had been in the country in order to train journalists. that is something that both her husband and employer, the thomson reuters foundation, say is untrue. it has led to a threat from iran to double miss
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zaghari—ratcliffe's prison sentence, because they say this provides evidence that she was doing what they allege she was doing. now, since then, borisjohnson has come under significant criticism both from opposition politicians and from herfamily from opposition politicians and from her family and employer. from opposition politicians and from herfamily and employer. he has sought to clarify his comments, spoken to the iranian government to lobby on her behalf, and today jeremy corbyn has told the observer newspaper that theresa may should sack borisjohnson, newspaper that theresa may should sack boris johnson, and newspaper that theresa may should sack borisjohnson, and this morning on the andrew marr programme, the labour london mayor, sadiq khan, made similar comments. he has offended the libyans. he has offended the americans, saying president obama is anti—british because... offended the spanish, offended six macro —— offended six. i think he has got to go. if theresa
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may was a strong prime minister, she would have sacked him a long time ago. questions about why she appointed in the first base, she did, but surely he has to go. sadiq khan, meryl blunden, with his view, but also speaking on the andrew marr show boz michael gove, boris johnson's fellow brexiteer. what has he been saying? michael gove was on the andrew marr programme to announce plans for a new environmental watchdog which will take over many of the functions of the eu after brexit, this is something ahead of the eu withdrawal bill facing parliamentary scrutiny on tuesday and wednesday next week, the first stage of the detailed scrutiny, but of course this boris johnson issue came up, he faced a number of questions from andrew marr about boris johnson's number of questions from andrew marr about borisjohnson's position. michael gove's view was that the media, politicians should be focusing the blame on the saudi arabian regime rather
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than his colleague. we make a big mistake, andrew, if we think the right thing to do is to blame politicians in a democracy who are trying to do the right thing for the plight of a woman who is being imprisoned by a regime that is a serial abuse of human rights. who is in the dock it? iran. it should be the actions of a judiciary and revolutionary guard. nazanin's husband will be meeting and talking to borisjohnson a little later today as moves made by the foreign office to do what they can to limit the damage from those comments a few days ago. all right, tom, many thanks indeed. a former metropolitan police commissioner has confirmed that he knew pornographic material had allegedly been found on a computer used by the first secretary of state, damian green, in 2008. sir paul stephenson said he was briefed about the claims but regarded them as a "side issue" to a criminal investigation into leaks from the home office. the allegations were first made
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public last week by former met assistant commissioner bob quick. this morning, mr green issued a statement saying that no allegations about the presence of improper material on his parliamentary computers had ever been put to him or to the parliamentary authorities by the police. he said he could only assume that they were being made now for ulterior motives. jon donnison reports. damian green, effectively the prime minister's deputy, is one of theresa may's closest colleagues. already under investigation over allegations of inappropriate behaviour towards a female activist, accusations he denies, the first secretary of state is facing more questions about pornography allegedly found on his computer. the claim dates back to 2008, when police raided mr green's office as part of an investigation into leaks from the home office. when the allegations were first made last week by a former senior officer in the metropolitan police,
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damian green offered a strong denial. he called the story "completely untrue" and a "disreputable political smear", saying police have never suggested improper material was found on his parliamentary computer. now, though, the former metropolitan police commissioner sir paul stephenson, seen here with theresa may in 2010, has confirmed he was aware that pornographic material had allegedly been found. he's told the bbc he was briefed about the allegation, but said it was a side issue and not relevant to the criminal investigation into the home office leaks. this morning damian green responded to sir paul's claim, but he did not deny the material was on his computer, only that the police had ever asked him about it. he said he reiterated that no allegations about the presence of improper material on his parliamentary computers had ever been put to him or to the parliamentary authorities by the police, and said that he assumed the allegations
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were being made nine years later for ulterior motives. theresa may has already lost two cabinet ministers this month. this story will only add to the growing feeling her government is under siege. the headlines on bbc news: services are being held across the uk to pay respects to those fallen in the two world wars and other conflicts. sadiq khan backs call for boris johnson to lose his job after a series of gaffes. a former head of scotland yard confirmed he was aware of allegations that pornographic material was found on a computer used by the cabinet minister damian green in 2008. sport now, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's richard askam. let's start with the women's ashes
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test, where england have drawn today's match to keep the series alive. trailing after the first innings by 168, england batted extremely well. after losing two wickets, georgia elwiss and heather knight came to the crease and steered their team home, with knight particularly impressive. she's went on to make a crucial half century. the series will now be decided by the three twenty20 matches. northern ireland play their world cup play—off second leg against switzerland this afternoon. michael o'neill‘s men are 1—0 down from a controversial penalty. they're aiming to qualify for a first world cup since 1986, and only the fourth in their history. we didn't press the ball as well as we could have done. as i say, we watched the game last night. the players certainly saw that and agreed with that and we know we can play better. sometimes we have to give credit to switzerland.
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i thought they played very well on the night. but we know we can play a lot better than that and the fact that the scoreline is 1—0 and we've still a lot to play for. we're ina we're in a position where the pressure is on switzerland, we have got nothing to lose, so we've got to try to use to our advantage. possibly looking back on the game there were times when we were possibly a little bit cautious, so we've just got to get the balance, bea we've just got to get the balance, be a bit braver in possession and without the ball as well in terms of repressing. but of course it is evenly balanced, even 1—0. republic of ireland managed a goaless draw in the first leg of their world cup play—off against denmark in copenhagen. the best chances on the night fell to the home side — darren randolph parried christian eriksen's shot and pione sisto fired wide with the rebound. randolph was called into action again late on tipping over yussuf poulsen's header in stoppage time. so the match is evenly poised ahead of tuesday's return match in dublin. rugby league, england
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have justed kick off in the world cup against france. a win for enlgand will see them through to the quarter finals to meet papua new guinea. in the final match for both teams, ireland have beaten wales 34—6 in in perth, australia, this converted try from ben morris putting the welsh on the scoresheet but the irish were always in control. rugby union, and england head coach eddiejones said his team will have to improve after a battling victory against argentina yesterday. england played some untidy rugby. they face australia next, who meet wales in the series of autumn internationals. lewis hamilton will start from the back of the grid and declared, "we're all human," after crashing in yesterday's qualifying session for the brazilian grand prix. he lost control of his mercedes at 160 miles an hour on turn six of the interlagos circuit,
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before hitting the barrier. hamilton, who was unhurt, has already won his fourth formula one title but starts on the back row as he didn't register a time. his team mate valtteri bottas will start in pole postion. it was a strong day for great britian at the trampoline world championships in bulgaria yesterday. the british team won four medals in total, including a gold for the men's tumbling team. kristof willerton, elliott browne, greg townley and kallum mulhall finished ahead of of china and denmark in theirfinal. lucie colebeck took bronze in the women's tumbling individual final. there were also two silver medals on the trampoline. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport. i'll have more for you in the next hour. president trump and the north korean leader have resumed their war of words over pyongyang's nuclear weapons programme. in response to being called a "dotard" by
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north korea's foreign ministry, mr trump has tweeted, wondering why kim jong—un would insult him by calling him "old". the us president added that he would never call the north korean leader "short and fat". the fresh exchange came as the president began the latest leg of his five—nation tour of asia — a tour described by kimjong—un as a warmonger‘s visit. karishma vaswani reports. foes now turned new friends. us president donald trump received the official state welcome in vietnam. the two nations were once at war, but now there's pomp and ceremony at an event to show how close they've become. president trump needs his asian partners by him on trade and denuclearising north korea. and that's what he's made this trip about. he even made an offer of friendship to north korean leader kimjong—un. i think anything's a possibility. strange things happen in life. that might be a strange thing to happen, but it's certainly a possibility. if that did happen, it
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would be a good thing for, i can tell you, for north korea, but it would also be good for lots of other places, and it would be good for the world. but even on this international trip, domestic politics have taken control of the agenda. president trump had to clarify what he meant when he said russia's president putin didn't believe he had meddled in the us election. i believe that he feels that he and russia did not meddle in the election. as to whether i believe it or not, i'm, with our agencies, especially as currently constituted with their leadership, i believe in our intel agencies, our intelligence agencies, i've worked with them very strongly. donald trump's asian tour was supposed to be a chance for him to show off us strength in the region and build new relationships with his partners here by putting america first in matters to do with trade, as well as tackle the issue of north korea. but, instead, this trip has been overshadowed by the issue of whether russia meddled in the election in the
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united states, questions that will follow him as he makes his final stop on the last leg of his tour in manila. karishma vaswani, bbc news. a man has died after being beaten by a gang thought to be armed with baseball bats in east london. the attack took place on high road in ilford shortly in the early hours of this morning. the metropolitan police has launched a murder inquiry. two more teenagers are facing murder charges after a 17—year—old boy was stabbed to death at a park in south—east london. michaeljonas was fatally wounded in penge earlier this month. police say the 14 and 17—year—old boys are due to appear at bromley magistrates' court tomorrow. two other teenagers have already appeared in court, charged with murder. the spanish prime minister, mariano rajoy, is due to visit catalonia today for the first time since his government took control of the region and sacked its leadership.
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yesterday, hundreds of thousands of catalans took to the streets of barcelona to demand the release of separatist leaders detained by the spanish courts. andrew plant reports. a demonstration in barcelona. more than half—a—million people on the streets, their banners and placards showing the faces of the ten people they see as political prisoners. translation: the social majority and politicians are protesting today to ask for freedom, to demand freedom of the political prisoners. these are independence supporters, and the people in jail held for their roles in the referendum and protest rallies in catalonia last month. eight catalonian ministers and two activists are currently in custody, accused of sedition and rebellion. and the former catalonian president is in self—imposed exile. spain has requested that carles puigdemont be
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extradited back from belgium. translation: we are appalled and angry at this situation. people don't deserve it. we do things peacefully with the desire to build a country and without any desire to hurt anyone. after the unrecognised referendum, spain's national government dissolved the regional government in catalonia. next month there will be new elections here. those in favour of independence hope to win and open the door for another attempt to break away from spain. the spanish prime minister, mariano rajoy, will visit catalonia today. meanwhile, the condemnation of the arrests here appears to be uniting the pro—independence supporters. andrew plant, bbc news. out—of—hours palliative care for seriously—ill children in england is "patchy
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and inconsistent", according to a new report seen by the bbc‘s 5live investigates programme. the research, carried out by the together for short lives charity, also suggests many families are forced to go to a&e overnight and at the weekends. the department of health says it will look at the report's recommendations closely. let's check out the weather prospects with susan howell. plenty of sunshine around this afternoon but the way the weather feels is the key today. we have pulled air south across the british isles from the arctic and, with a chilly, gusty winds this afternoon, that really will emphasise the cold feel. showers in the west will tend to clear in the coming hours, in the east they will get pushed onshore into the likes of yorkshire, lincolnshire and east anglia. here isa lincolnshire and east anglia. here is a better indicator when we factor in the effect of the wind of how temperatures will feel out and about. overnight tonight the wind
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will fall right, ridge of high pressure building will kill off the showers and with clear skies it is the perfect setup for a widespread frost first thing on monday. rule those could get down as low as —4 —5 across parts of northern england and scotland. a chilly start on monday, early sunshine for england and wales, enjoyed that, much cloudier come the afternoon which will make things feel chilly. reina riding further north, wintry across scotland. —— further rain arriving. you are watching bbc news with ben brown. the latest headlines... remembering britain's war dead, services are held this morning for people across the uk to pay their respects to the ball in from two world wars and other conflicts. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, backs calls for the foreign secretary boris johnson backs calls for the foreign secretary borisjohnson to lose his job after a series of gaffes.|j
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think job after a series of gaffes.” think he's got to go, i think he is our foreign secretary whose job is diplomacy, and working in the best interest of our country, and if theresa may was a strong prime minister she would have sacked him a long time ago. the former head of scotland yard confirmed he was aware of allegations that pornographic material was found on a computer used by the cabinet minister damian green in 2008. the spanish prime minister mariano rajoy is to visit catalonia for the first time since he imposed direct rule on the region a fortnight ago. yesterday, hundreds of thousands of cata la ns to yesterday, hundreds of thousands of catala ns to streets of barcelona demanding the release of the separatist leaders detained after declaring independence. now on bbc news, a special programme from britain's city of culture, hull. welcome to autumn in city of culture. summer might be over but the culture keeps coming. this huge new art
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installation is the latest. it fits in with the tunrer prize in town. we still have the biggest uk spoken word and poetry festival which has attracted a hollywood star as well as fresh new talent. also, some of the world's finest ballet dancers come back to hull, where they took their first dance steps. so many amazing dancers have come from hull, it is quite incredible. we go behind the scenes as the turner prize moves from london to hull. we will see what the public think of the short listed artists. this one here. it should be piled high and set alight. hello and welcome to the show.
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this is a huge new art installation being installed here in front of hull minster. this is one of many venues taking part in the contains strong language festival. and in this weather i'm glad we've got somewhere to go indoors. have you got room in there for a little one? who is the little one? kate tempest has just finished rehearsing. she is one of the headline acts here at britan's biggest spoken word festival. this festival is called contains strong language, four days over 60 acts and if you thought poetry was just similes, stanzas and sonnets, think again. bbc radio 1xtra were here last night. i went last night and it was incredible. but there is much more than rap.

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