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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 12, 2017 1:00pm-1:46pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at one: a two—minute silence has been observed at ceremonies around the country to honour the dead of two world wars and other conflicts. the queen watched the national commemorations from a balcony while prince charles placed a wreath on her behalf at the cenotaph memorial. and they werejoined and they were joined by thousands of members of the public who packed the streets of whitehall here in remembrance. the bbc understands the foreign secretary has contacted the husband of a british woman who's in prison in iran. michael gove says iran should be facing criticism, not his cabinet colleague, over her detention. no one is unsackable. we are all there do ourjob and i think boris is doing a good job as foreign secretary.
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a former head of scotland yard confirms he was aware of allegations that pornographic material was found on a computer used by the cabinet minister, damian green, in 2008. also in the next hour: the spanish prime minister visits catalonia for the first time since he imposed direct rule on the region. he'll be campaigning for his people's party ahead of next month's early regional elections. and the travel show goes to china to meet the daredevil spider men — that's coming up later on bbc news. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news.
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prince charles has led the tributes at the cenotaph as the nation comes together for remembrance sunday. big ben chimes. music: last post. prince charles laid the first wreath at the foot of the cenotaph, with the queen watching on from the nearby balcony at the foreign and commonwealth office. prince charles was follwed by the duke of cambridge and prince harry, both of whom have served in the armed forces themselves. the prime minister theresa may led
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the leaders of the main political parties. they were joined by hundreds of former armed forces personnel for the service at the cenotaph. and we can speak to our correspondent sarah campbell, who's at the cenotaph. a chilly day there, and the queen observing from the balcony at the foreign office, so rather different from normal proceedings? that's right. six times in her 65 year reign, she hasn't laid the wreath herself on the steps of the cenotaph. four times, she was away on royal tours and twice, she was pregnant with princes andrew and edward. but this is the first time she has been in whitehall, but has
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observed from the balcony of the foreign and commonwealth office. buckingham palace issued a statement last month when the decision was made known, and it was the queen's decision. she wanted to be on the balcony with the duke of edinburgh. but clearly, there is the fact that she is 91 years old. standing on whitehall requires standing for a least half an hour and walking backwards after placing a wreath and navigating a step while doing so. it is also seen as the most visible sign yet of the transition of roles, of duties from the queen to prince charles because of course, one day as king, he will lead the nation in remembrance. other than that change, the ceremony, has it done —— has done since 1920, ran as it always does. a moment of remembrance and reflection, the two—minute silence, and a chance to serving personnel and a chance to serving personnel and former personnel to reflect on
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their experiences and those of their friends and comrades. i have one of them here with me. this is officer gary edwards, 33 years in the royal air force. what goes through your mind during the two—minute silence? during the silence, it is very humbling. ithink during the silence, it is very humbling. i think what a privilege it is to represent my unit, her majesty'sforces in general, but also the public as well. it is that time when we reflect in this ever—changing world, to stop a whole city for two minutes and think about what has happened in the past. you said to me that this is your first time at the cenotaph. you said two isa time at the cenotaph. you said two is a very different experience. you put it well, stopping a whole city. yeah, normally i represent the units at the local villages and as the first time i have done the cenotaph. when you hear the cannon fire and for a whole to go into silence, it
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has an amazing effect on me. you have experienced three tours of afghanistan, two in iraq, one in kosovo. but one of your distant relatives, it is 100 years since the battle of passchendaele and your a ncestor battle of passchendaele and your ancestor was involved ? battle of passchendaele and your ancestor was involved? yeah, private alfred edwards, my great—grandfather, joined up in 1914 and served at passchendaele. unfortunately, he was wounded at passchendaele, but he survived his injuries and was invalided out. so my thoughts at this 100 year point are with him. you must have a particular understanding, because at raf holton, you have a world war i trench that was used for training, so trench that was used for training, so you get a trench that was used for training, so you get a sense trench that was used for training, so you get a sense of what it must have been like. definitely. i have the distinct honour to look after some trenches that were built in 1915 by the zist some trenches that were built in 1915 by the 21st division. it is one of kitchener's formations and they
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we re of kitchener's formations and they were used for training. to walk through those trenches now, which we re through those trenches now, which were abandoned in 1917, and then to come here and think about my great—grandfather, private alfred edwards, really brings it home to me. warrant officer, thank you for talking to us. it is a day when you hear lots of stories of amazing acts and acts of remembrance, people remembering the many people who have died or been injured by war over the yea rs. died or been injured by war over the years. sarah, thank you. coalition forces in afghanistan have also been paying their respects on remembrance sunday. british troops joined with forces from other countries, including new zealand and australia for a service this morning. lieutenant general richard cripwell stressed the importance of the solidarity demonstrated by countries coming together to remember those lost in conflict. of course it's important for us at any time.
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it's part of a promise we make. but it's particularly important and poignant when you're in operations, and for us here in afghanistan, it provides a focus to remember those men and women who've given their lives in the service of their country not just in recent years, but over the centuries as well. we don't forget anybody. also, one of the things about being on operations at this time is that we are part of a coalition. you will have seen this morning how many countries opt to join us in this service of remembrance, partly as an act of solidarity, partly as a way of remembering their own dead. it's just part of what makes any coalition greater than the sum of its parts. the environment secretary,
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michael gove, has said he doesn't know what a british—iranian woman jailed in iran had been doing in the country before her arrest. he told the andrew marr show that too much focus on borisjohnson‘s comments — which gave the false impression that she was training journalists — was playing into the hands of the iranian authorities. our political correspondent, tom barton, is here bring us up—to—date on where we are with what the government is now saying about this woman who is in jail in iran. this row started earlier this month, when boris johnson told the foreign affairs committee mistakenly that nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe had been in iran training journalists, rather than on holiday. that led to pressure piling on borisjohnson holiday. that led to pressure piling on boris johnson from holiday. that led to pressure piling on borisjohnson from herfamily, from her employer, the thomson
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reuters foundation, and from opposition politicians. last week, borisjohnson was opposition politicians. last week, boris johnson was forced to opposition politicians. last week, borisjohnson was forced to the house of commons to deliver a statement to mps making the government's position clear. he told them that the government has no doubts that she was on holiday in iran when she was arrested and that that was the sole purpose of her visit. given that statement, it is curious to hear what michael gove said to andrew marr this morning. what was she doing in iran?|j what was she doing in iran? i don't know. you don't know? i want to stress that there was no reason why nazanin zaghari— ratcliffe should stress that there was no reason why nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe should be in prison in iran so far as any of us in prison in iran so far as any of us know. no evidence has been produced which suggests that she should be detained. we know that the iranian regime is capable of abusing the human rights of its own citizens. it appears here to be harming the human rights of someone whose plight moves us all. you say you don't know what she was doing. her husband is clear that she was there on holiday with her child. her husband is clear that she was there on holiday with her childm
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that case, i pick exactly her husband's assurance in that regard. those comments have drawn criticism from the labour party today, saying michael gove is more interested in protecting borisjohnson‘sjob michael gove is more interested in protecting borisjohnson‘s job than he is in the liberty of a british citizen in iran. and i was more pressure on boris johnson citizen in iran. and i was more pressure on borisjohnson today on the same programme from the mayor of london? absolutely. we have already had todayjeremy corbyn, the labour leader, saying for the first time that it was time for borisjohnson to go, calling his comments on this issue the latest example of his serial bungling. those comments were underlined on the andrew marr programme by labour's londoner, sadiq khan. he's offended the libyans in relation to what he said
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about sirte and dead bodies. he's offended the sikhs with what he said about whiskey tariffs in the gurdwara. he has got to go. he is a foreign secretary, whose job is diplomacy and representing the best interests of our country. if theresa may was a strong prime minister, she would have sacked him a long time ago. there are questions about why she appointed him in the first place. she did, but surely he must have done enough to go. that was labour's london mayor, sadiq khan. michael gove was also on that programme, and he said that actually, there is a mistake here. we shouldn't be blaming boris johnson for this, mistake here. we shouldn't be blaming borisjohnson for this, we should be aiming fire at the iranian regime which is holding nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe in jail. we make a big mistake if we think the right thing to do is to blame politicians in a democracy who are trying to do the right thing while ignoring the plight of a woman who's being imprisoned by a regime that is a serial abuser of human rights. who's in the dock here? iran. earlier today, borisjohnson spoke
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to richard ratcliffe, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe's husband, for the first time since this row broke. that phone call was described by whitehall sources are constructive and were out of the two will meet in person in the next two weeks. a former metropolitan police commissioner has confirmed that he knew pornographic material had allegedly been found on a computer used by the first secretary of state, damian green, in 2008. sir paul stephenson said he was briefed about the claims but regarded them as a "side issue" to a criminal investigation into leaks from the home office. the allegations were first made public last week by former met assistant commissioner, bob quick. this morning, mr green issued a statement, saying that no allegations about the presence of improper material on his parliamentary computers had ever been put to him or to the parliamentary authorities by the police. he said he could only assume that they were being made now for ulterior motives.
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jon donnison reports. damian green, effectively the prime minister's deputy, is one of theresa may's closest colleagues. already under investigation over allegations of inappropriate behaviour towards a female activist, accusations he denies, the first secretary of state is facing more questions about pornography allegedly found on his computer. the claim dates back to 2008, when police raided mr green's office as part of an investigation into leaks from the home office. when the allegations were first made last week by a former senior officer in the metropolitan police, damian green offered a strong denial. he called the story "completely untrue" and a "disreputable political smear", saying police had never suggested improper material was found on his parliamentary computer. now, though, the former metropolitan police commissioner sir paul stephenson,
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seen here with theresa may in 2010, has confirmed he was aware that pornographic material had allegedly been found. he's told the bbc he was briefed about the allegation, but said it was a side issue and not relevant to the criminal investigation into the home office leaks. this morning, damian green responded to sir paul's claim, but he did not deny the material was on his computer, only that the police had ever asked him about it. he said he reiterated that no allegations about the presence of improper material on his parliamentary computers had ever been put to him or to the parliamentary authorities by the police, and said that he assumed the allegations were being made nine years later for ulterior motives. theresa may has already lost two cabinet ministers this month. this story will only add to the growing feeling that her government is under siege. the headlines on bbc news: a two
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minute silence has been observed at ceremonies around the country to honour the dead of two world wars and other conflicts. the queen watched the national commemorations from a balcony while prince charles placed a wreath on her behalf at the cenotaph. in other news, the bbc understands the foreign secretary has contacted the husband of a british woman who's in prison in iran. michael gove says tehran should be facing criticism over the case, as he rejected calls for borisjohnson to resign. sport now, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's richard. england and australia have drawn the women's ashes test, a result which keeps
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the series alive. georgia elwiss and heather knight steered their team home, with captain knight making a crucial half century. the series will now be decided by the three twenty20 matches still to come. from sydney, our correspondent andy swiss reports. a day which began with australia with a real chance of winning both the match and the ashes ended with england securing a draw ultimately fairly comfortably, although they did have a few scares in the first session, when they lost two wickets, both openers out. tammy beaumont was bamboozled by wellington for 37. a few moments later, lauren winfield was trapped lbw. at that stage, australia must have felt as if they were in with a chance of securing the ashes. but from there, england managed to come back thanks to a captain's innings from heather knight. she knuckled down and she and georgia elwiss guided england to safety, heather knight finishing unbeaten on 79.
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for a draw with an hour of scheduled play still remaining. so england secure the draw, but that means they have to win all three of the remaining twenty20 matches if they are to regain the ashes. that is some tall order. even so, they will be delighted to have kept this ashes series alive. the first men's ashes test starts a week on thursday in brisbane. england will have been boosted by a convincing win in their latest tour match against a cricket australia xi and the news that fast bowler jake ball is likely to be fit, despite suffering ankle ligament damage in the match. coach trevor bayliss has also been pleased with the newer batsmen in the side. the more inexperienced batters have spent time the start of the series. they're the ones under pressure the most. they've not had much experience, but they've spent some time in the middle.
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but scoring 60s is not enough. we need 160s. england are through to the quarter finals of the rugby league world cup after a 36—6 victory over france in perth. england ran three tries in the first eight minutes and had five by the break, the fifth courtesy ofjohn bateman. it wasn't quite as easy in the second half, but two more scores came from jemaine mcgillray to complete the emphatic win. england will play papa new guinea in the last eight next sunday. they are a great team and it will be a tough challenge, but for us, it is about what we do. we have to make sure we are doing ourjob individually and if we do, we will get thejob done. northern ireland are building up to their crucial world cup play—off against switzerland later today. michael o'neill‘s men trail 1—0
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after a controversial penalty in the first leg in belfast. they're aiming to qualify for a first world cup since 1986, and only the fourth in their history. lewis hamilton will start from the back of the grid in the brazilian grand prix after he lost control of his mercedes at 160 miles an hour on turn six of the interlagos hamilton has already won his fourth formula one title, but starts on the back row as he didn't register a time. his team mate valtteri bottas will start in pole postion. there'll be coverage of the race on five live sports extra at 3.30. skiing, and a fall by britain's dave ryding in the second run cost him the chance of victory in the first slalom world cup of the season in finland. great britain have never had a world cup win in an alpine race before, so there were high hopes for ryding — but then disaster. germany's felix neureuther took the win, but ryding can take heart from his earlier performance going into the rest of the season. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. cctv will be installed in abattoirs
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in england as part of government plans to monitor animal welfare. environment secretary michael gove said it will ensure high standards in food safety and animal welfare. any slaughterhouses that fail to install cctv could face a criminal investigation. the british veterinary association have been campaigning for cctv to be installed in abbatoirs and joining me now from belfast is theirjunior vice president, simon doherty. do you welcome this? we absolutely welcome this. the british veterinary association has been campaigning for this move for the last number of yea rs. this move for the last number of years. it is very much in line with oui’ years. it is very much in line with ouranimal years. it is very much in line with our animal welfare policy which we published in the last few years as well. we have been pushing harder and having a lot of conversations with defra over the last few years. is this something that happens in
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other countries, or is it quite rare? it is certainly carried out in other countries. ultimately, it's about consumer confidence in animal welfare. as we head towards an exit from the eu, there is a clear statement being made here that we are putting animal welfare first and foremost in terms of producing high—quality products that are safe, but that are also meeting the highest welfare standards. so cctv in abattoirs in england. and what about the role of vets? they will be used in all abattoirs as well. what will their role be? vets served in a number of key roles and have done for a number of years abattoirs. firstly, when the animals arrive, they have a role to play in ensuring
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they have a role to play in ensuring the health and welfare of the animals as they arrive from the farm to the abattoir. they will also be responsible for inspections to make sure that their health and welfare is maintained during that time there. and once they have been slaughtered and go on to the production line, vets play a key role in advising the meat inspectors on aspects of public health. and i think these measures will give the food standards agency vets u nfettered food standards agency vets unfettered access to the last 90 days of footage. in the past, we have seen secret filming sometimes in abattoirs, which has revealed abuses. so i guess the hope is that this will prevent that. that's right. these changes are bringing a level of standardisation. it is worth mentioning that the vast majority of abattoirs have cctv
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already in place. but this is allowing for the remaining abattoirs to also be pushed towards installation of those systems. and as you mentioned, allowing vets 24/7 and limited access to at least the last 90 days of footage. thank you very much. a man has died after being struck by "a number of vehicles" on the m4 motorway in south wales. the m4 at bridgend was closed in both directions for more than 10 hours as police investigated the incident between pencoed and sam. south wales police said the man died at the scene after the incident at about nine o'clock last night. officers are "urging" motorists driving on that section of m4 around the time of the incident to contact them. president trump and the north korean
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leader have resumed their war of words over pyongyang's nuclear weapons programme. in response to being called a "dotard" by north korea's foreign ministry, mr trump has tweeted, wondering why kim jong—un would insult him by calling him "old". the us president added that he would never call the north korean leader "short and fat". the fresh exchange came as the president began the latest leg of his five—nation tour of asia — a tour described by kimjong—un as a warmonger‘s visit. spain's prime minister is visiting catalonia for the first time since he imposed direct rule on the region a fortnight ago. mariano rajoy, who called regional elections for december, is at a campaign meeting of his centre—right popular party party ahead of the vote. he urged businesses not to leave catalonia as uncertainty over its independence bid carries on. those are the main stories. let's get a look at the weather. today,
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the weather is about how it feels, rather than how it looks, and how it feels is chilly. we have brought cold air across the british isles from the arctic, accompanied by a strong and gusty northerly wind. it will feel chilly for the remainder of this remembrance sunday. showers in the west will clear this afternoon, but in the east as the wind strengthens, some of the showers will be brought onshore. overall, a lot of sunshine on offer through the afternoon, but temperatures are deceptive because you have to factor in how chilly the wind will feel. in northern ireland, brightening prospects in the afternoon. in scotland, showers persist across the northern and western isles, and they could be wintry across higher ground. let's look at how those temperatures translate when you take into account the effect of the wind. some areas will barely feel like more than two
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or three degrees with that nagging wind along the north sea coast. overnight, the wind will fall light, because high pressure pushes in from the west, leaving us with clear skies and the perfect setup for a widespread frost overnight. so a chilly start to the new week. gabe wright one across england and wales. but enjoy the early sunshine, because cloud will spread, bringing a chilly feel. further north, some rainfor a chilly feel. further north, some rain for england and scotland. once those fronts start to come in, which pull away the ridge of high pressure and that for tuesday and wednesday, well talking about a couple of days featuring a lot of cloud, some patchy outbreaks of rain. but the bigger tent will be for tuesday and wednesday and the milder feel. temperatures will be back up into
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double figures and the air across the british isles will come from the west, so different feel from sunday and monday. by tuesday and wednesday, we are greyer, but milder. so a frosty start to monday, and by tuesday, we pull our air in from the atlantic and it will be milder, but greyer times. from the atlantic and it will be milder, but greyertimes. —— grey from the atlantic and it will be milder, but greyer times. —— grey at times. hello. theresa may's closest ally, damian green has insisted that the police never informed him of allegations of pornography found on a computer in his office in parliament. a former head of the metropolitan police says that his force was aware of material found in search of the offices back in 2008. previously damian green had described the claims as completely untrue. our home affairs correspondent reports. his report
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contains flashing images. the prime minister's right—hand man. now the defunct or deputy pm is under increasing pressure as allegations that he says are untrue and a smear. it goes back to this 2008 raid on mr green's office. specialist detectives were hunting a home office inside and was leaking documents to be shadow frontbencher. they then got at the bottom of it, nine years on claims of what they did find have surfaced. last weekend the sunday times reported that officers had found pornographic material on one of damian green's computers. no action was taken at the time. in a statement mr green said the story was completely untrue, a disreputable political smear. the minister also insisted police had never said that improper material had been found. now the metropolitan police commissioner
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paul stephenson, seen here in 2010 with theresa may, says he was aware of the pornography claim. he told the bbc that the find involved no criminality, no victims, and in his view, no extraordinary public interest. this morning damian green reiterated police hadn't told him about the alleged find, and he could only assume it had now surfaced for all to your motives. his new statement didn't repeat last week's assertion that the allegation was com pletely assertion that the allegation was completely untrue. last week mr green gave evidence to the white all enquiry into the claim, and could report as early as next week. he says he's done nothing wrong. with two resignations in a fortnight the prime minister can ill afford to lose one of her most trusted confidants. the foreign secretary borisjohnson has spoken on the phone with the husband of a british woman, naza nanin zaghari—ratcliffe, who is imprisoned in iran. mrjohnson is facing to calls to resign after suggesting that she was training journalists in iran. her family insist she was on holiday
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visiting relatives. today the environment secretary michael gove was asked why she was there... what was she doing when she went to iran? erm, i don't know. one of the things i want to stress is that there is no reason why nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe should be in prison in iran. so far as any of us know, no evidence has been produced which suggests she should be detained. our political correspondent, tom barton, is here. this case of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe continuing to have real ramifications at the top of the government. yes, this row started with those comments from boris johnson suggesting that she had been in iran training journalists, rather than on holiday. as a result of the comments pressure piled on him and he was forced into the house of
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commons last week to make the government position clear to mps. he told them the government has no doubt that she was on holiday, that was the sole purpose of her visit. given that statement, these comments today from michael gove that he doesn't know why she was in iran have drawn criticism including from neighbour who said the comments compounded the problems caused by borisjohnson, compounded the problems caused by boris johnson, and showed compounded the problems caused by borisjohnson, and showed that he is more interested in protecting boris johnson'sjob than more interested in protecting boris johnson's job than the liberty of a british citizen in jail in johnson's job than the liberty of a british citizen injail in iran. pressure is growing on boris johnson, jeremy corbyn has said it's time for him to go, this is the latest exa m ple, time for him to go, this is the latest example, says jeremy time for him to go, this is the latest example, sasteremy corbyn, of his serious bungling. boris johnson has spoken to nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe's husband, we hear that was a constructive conversation. we will hear later today what richard ratcliffe made of the conversation. veterans, politicians, and members of the royal family have taken part in a remembrance sunday
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service — commemorating those who've lost their lives in conflict. a two minute silence was held across the country at 11 o'clock. prince charles led tributes by laying a wreath at the cenotaph — with the queen watching on from a nearby balcony. it's the first time she's not carried out the symbolic duty. parade turn! it is, there is little doubt, the way things will increasingly be. for the first time in her reign the queen took her place on a balcony overlooking the senate. still residing outside of state, but in a way which recognises her advancing years. beside her was her advancing years. beside her was her husband, the duke of edinburgh. below, on whitehall, the prince of wales led other senior members of the royal family to their positions
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at the cenotaph in readiness for 11am and the start of a national two—minute silence. big ben chimes in whitehall, after the sounding of the last post, the prince of wales labour green's we found that half in memory of all those who lost their lives in the world wars and more recent conflicts. —— laid the queen's wreath. on a morning that
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was damp and cold veterans who had been waiting in their columns began their tribute, marching past the cenotaph to lay their readers. very few of those on parade now have memories of the second world war, that generation has passed the obligation to remember to its successors, men like bill speakman who won the victoria cross in korea and johnson bihari awarded a vc in iraq. and the many thousands of others will remember those who never came home from war. the spanish prime minister, mariano rajoy, is campaigning in catalonia, ahead of december‘s regional elections. it's the first time he's visited the region since he sacked the catalan government in the wake of their controversial declaration of independence. he called on supporters to ensure a massive turnout for next month's vote. our correspondent, james reynolds, is in barcelona. how important is this visit by the
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spanish by minister? it's important because he wants to win votes. for a short while hear the man who will ultimately rules catalonia has been in catalonia. it was a controlled venue, he spoke to supporters and called on them to vote. he says there is a silent majority in catalonia in favour of staying in spain. he wants that silent majority to come out and vote in december. his speech was incredibly well received by his supporters in that venue. i asked received by his supporters in that venue. iasked him received by his supporters in that venue. i asked him afterwards whether or not he would meet any opponents. he said, yes, but didn't say where or when. thank you. thank you. in cricket, england's women kept their ashes hopes alive with a stubborn draw against australia. an australian victory would have seen them retain the trophy, but they were unable to bowl england out on the final day of the test in sydney. our sports correspondent, andy swiss, reports. england's batters emerged with their ashes hopes hanging in the balance. their challenge — to survive
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the day and salvage a draw, and tammy beaumont‘s stylish start seemed to bode well. but then, on 37, she was bamboozled by a piece of magic from amanda jade wellington, and england suddenly had problems. lauren winfield not so much leg before as toe before wicket, gone for 34, and australia sensed the ashes could be in sight. but come the second session, england knuckled down. heather knight with a captain's innings. boundaries were a rarity, but it didn't matter. with the help of georgia elwiss and a lifeless pitch, knight coolly edged her team closer to safety. unbeaten on 79 when australia decided enough was enough, and the captains shook hands. not the win england would have wanted, but a battling draw to keep their hopes alive. this was a gritty performance from england, but to regain the ashes they will now have to win all three of the remaining matches. not impossible, but it will be some challenge. andy swiss, bbc news, sydney. you can see more on all of today's
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stories on the bbc news channel. the next news on bbc one is at 5:55pm. bye for now. you are watching bbc news. donald trump and russian president vladimir putin have agreed to fight so—called islamic state in syria until its defeat. a statement was released after the leaders met briefly on the sidelines of an asia—pacific summit in vietnam this weekend. nearly 250,000 people have now fled raqqa, once seen as the is stronghold, during the military offensive to drive out the islamic state group from the city. ahmed is one of them this is his story. my
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my house was hurt, my whole family we re my house was hurt, my whole family were inside. the air strike didn't differentiate between ies militants and my family. i tried to help, i managed to pull my wife from under the rubble. but i was not able to save my son. and my little boy. we arrived at the meeting place. they were about 300 of us. we got to
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a crossroads on the way out of the city. you could see the opposition troops on the other side. we started walking towards them. suddenly, a land mine explodes, i go deaf. there are body parts flying around me. a doctor shouts, take him to the operating theatre. we amputate his legs. i hear that and pass out. i wake up three days later, thank god i'm still alive. i asked the nurse for a glass of water then i ask about my family. she says they are waiting for me. at a refugee camp. later, ifind out my wife and my son were killed in the landmine explosion. all i have left
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in the world is my daughter. the time is quarter to two, much more news coming up the time is quarter to two, much more news coming up at 2pm. now on bbc news it's time for the travel show. this week on the travel show — as the world marks armistice day, we are in america to explore a fleet of abandoned first world war ships. we meet the spider men and women of guizhou in china. the potomac passes some of washington, dc‘s most iconic landmarks.
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