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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 12, 2017 3:00pm-3:30pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm reeta chakrabarti. the headlines at 3:00 — first secretary of state damian green insists police never told him about pornography allegedly found on his computers. he says the allegations have an ulterior motive. the bbc understands the foreign secretary has contacted the husband of a british woman who's in prison in iran. michael gove says tehran should be facing criticism over the case, as he rejects calls for borisjohnson to resign. a two—minute silence has been observed at ceremonies around the country to honour the dead of two world wars and other conflicts. also in the next hour — the spanish prime minister visits catalonia for the first time since he imposed direct rule on the region. ahead of next month's early regional elections, he launched his people's party's campaign in barcelona. and the inside out team find out
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whether the emergency services could have acted any faster on the night of the manchester arena bomb. good afternoon, and welcome to bbc news. theresa may's closest ally in the cabinet, damian green, has insisted that the police never informed him of allegations that pornography had been found on a computer at his office in parliament. a former head of the metropolitan police, sir paul stephenson, has said his force was aware that material had been found in a search of the offices, back in 2008. previously, damian green had described the claims as "completely untrue". our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani's report contains some flashing images. at the heart of the government, the prime minister's right—hand man.
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but now damian green, first secretary of state and de facto deputy prime minister, is under increasing pressure about allegations that he says are untrue and a smear. it all goes back to this 2008 raid on mr green's office. special scotland yard detectives were hunting a home office insider who was leaking documents to the then shadow front bencher. they never got to the bottom of, but nine years on, claims of what they did find have surfaced. last weekend, the sunday times reported that officers had found pornographic material on one of damian green's parliamentary computers. no action was taken at the time. in a statement, mr green said... but now, the former metropolitan police commissioner, sir paul stephenson, seen here in 2010 with theresa may, says he, too, was aware of the pornography claim.
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he told the bbc that the find involved no criminality, no victims, and in his view, no extraordinary public interest. this morning, damian green reiterated that the police had not told him about the alleged find. he can only assume that it had now surfaced for ulterior motives. this statement did not repeat last week's insistence that the allegation was completely untrue. last week, mr green gave evidence to the whitehall enquiry into the claim, which could report as early as next week. he says he has done nothing wrong, and with two cabinet resignations in a fortnight, the prime minister can ill afford to lose one of her most trusted confidants. the environment secretary, michael gove, has said he doesn't know what a british—iranian woman, jailed in iran, had been doing in the country before her arrest. he told the andrew marr show that too much focus on borisjohnson‘s comments — which gave the false impression she was training journalists — was playing into the hands
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of the iranian authorities. 0ur political correspondent tom barton explained the political ramifications of mrjohnson‘s comments. this row all started with boris johnson earlier this month telling the foreign affairs committee that nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe had been in iran training and journalists rather than on holiday as her family and her employer said. as a result of those comments, pressure piled on the borisjohnson, and forced him to the borisjohnson, and forced him to the house of commons on tuesday last week, to make the government's position clear. and he did make it crystal clear. he said, the government has no doubt that she was on holiday and that that was the sole purpose of her visit. hearing that statement, it makes it very interesting to hear what michael gove had to say to andrew marr this
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morning. what was she doing when she we nt morning. what was she doing when she went to arundel? i don't know, one of the things i want to stress is that there is no reason why nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe that there is no reason why nazanin zaghari— ratcliffe should that there is no reason why nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe should be in prison in iran so far as any of us no, no evidence has been produced which suggests that she should be detained. we know that the iranian regime is capable of abusing human rights of its own citizens and it i'iow rights of its own citizens and it now appears to be harmony, and rights of someone whose plight necessarily moves as all. you say that she does not know what she was doing. her husband is very clear that she was there on living with her child. in that case, i take exactly her husband's assurance in that regard. labour are right using michael gove of compounding the problems caused by borisjohnson, saying that he is more interested in protecting his colleague's job than in the liberty of a british citizen. meanwhile, pressure is growing on mr johnson and self. we had jeremy corbyn calling on him earlier this
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morning to resign. similar as were made earlier by the london mayor, sadiq khan. he's offended the libyans in relation to what he said about sirte being the new dubai if they get rid of the dead bodies. he's offended the americans, saying president 0bama is anti—british because he's part kenyan. he offended the spanish. he's offended the sikhs with what he said about whiskey tariffs in the gurdwara. he's got to go. he's our foreign secretary, whose job is diplomacy and representing the best interests of our country. if theresa may was a strong prime minister, she'd have sacked him a long time ago. there are questions about why she appointed him in the first place. she did, but surely he must have done enough to go. michael gove defended boris johnson in that interview today, saying that the focus of criticism should not be on a british democratic politician, but instead an the regime in iran, which is holding nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. which is holding nazanin zaghari-ratcliffe. we make a big mistake, andrew, if we think that the right thing to do is to blame
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politicians any democracy who are trying to do the right thing for the plight of a woman who is being imprisoned by a resume that is a serial abuser of human rights. who is in the dock here? iran. it should be the actions of the judiciary. so this controversy about nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe has been continuing for the last few days, but ina continuing for the last few days, but in a way, it is the commendation ofa but in a way, it is the commendation of a very difficult ten days for the prime minister. it has been an extremely turbulent period for the prime minister. she has lost two cabinet ministers, the defence secretary michael fallon and the international development secretary, priti patel. 0f international development secretary, priti patel. of course, there is the developing row around damian green, who is, of course, her closest ally in the cabinet. the first secretary of state, essentially her deputy prime minister. pressure building there, and then of course, this row around boris johnson, and there, and then of course, this row around borisjohnson, and today's intervention from michael gove as well. it has been a difficult period
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for theresa may, and as we head into this week, where the government is facing the scrutiny of the eu withdrawal bill, she is good to be really hoping that she can stabilise things as brexit comes back front and centre onto the political agenda. veterans, politicians, and members of the royal family have taken part in remembrance sunday services, commemorating those who've lost their lives in conflict. a two—minute silence was held across the country at 11:00 prince charles led tributes by laying a wreath at the cenotaph, with the queen watching on from a nearby balcony. it's the first time she's not carried out the symbolic duty whilst at the service. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. it is, there is little doubt, the way things will increasingly be. forfirst time in her reign, the queen took her place on a balcony overlooking the cenotaph. still presiding as head of state, but in a way which recognises her advancing years.
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beside her on the balcony was her husband, the duke of edinburgh. below, on whitehall, the prince of wales led other senior members of the royal family to their positions at the cenotaph in readiness for 11:00, and the start of the national two—minute silence. big ben chimes last post plays in whitehall, after the sounding of the last post, the prince of wales laid the queen's wreath on behalf of the united kingdom
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and the commonwealth in memory of all those who lost their lives in the world wars and other more recent conflicts. and then, on a morning which had been damp and cold, the veterans who had been waiting in their columns began their tribute, marching past the cenotaph to lay their wreaths. very few of those on parade now have memories of the second world war, for that generation has passed the obligation to remember to its successors, to men like bill speakman who won the victoria cross in korea, and johnson beharry, awarded the vc in iraq. and to the many thousands of other service men and women, who are today remembering those who never came home from war. earlier, i spoke to our correspondent sarah campbell who was at the service this morning at the cenotaph. whitehall starting to get back to
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normal now after this morning's events. you can see lots of people looking at the leaves that have been laced during the ceremony. at its height, and the crowd was ten deep. —— looking at the wreaths. lots of people came to take part in the act of remembrance. lots of veterans here as well, something like 8800 vetera ns here as well, something like 8800 veterans taking part in the march down here, all with their own personal thoughts to the act of amendment. i have a of the seven personnel with me now, regimental sergeant major kevin stacey from the black watch division, and this is something yourfamily black watch division, and this is something your family have had a connection with the rover 100 years. it is actually 115 years continuous service between my grandfather, dad, uncle and myself, who have all obtained the rank of regimental sergeant major. so it is a very proud achievement for my family, so
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lam proud achievement for my family, so i am delighted to be here today. tell me all about what it has been like to be here at the cenotaph on amendments sunday, seeing all the members of the public coming out to share in this act of remembrance, thinking about all the sacrifices that have been made. —— amendments sunday. this is my first time here, so sunday. this is my first time here, so to see the support the public give to the armed forces has been a tremendous honour. give to the armed forces has been a tremendous honourlj tremendous honour. i cannot thank the public enough. forthis tremendous honour. i cannot thank the public enough. for this order to go on operations, knowing that he has got the full backing and support of people back home, family, friends, and the general public, it has been a tremendous honour to be here and see this and feel at first hand. and presumably, things must come to your mind of the two minute silence. you have been an operational tour, severely injured in iraq 200a. what goes through your mind during that silence at 11 o'clock? i'll was think of a young
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soldier who tragically lost his life oi'i soldier who tragically lost his life on that day, august 12 2004. —— i always think. i also think of all the soldiers who were there that day, because some of them are still suffering from the mental events the experience on that tour. i saw think of the families who have lost their loved ones, because it is a crying shame for these families. we must never, ever forget all the veterans, i think about them and their service, what they have given, the best parts of their lives to queen and country. so it is a very deep honour to stand here today. you have a personal connection with veterans from the iraq war, 2004 when you we re from the iraq war, 2004 when you were there, but you also took part in nearby great to commemorate the battle passchendaele, a 700 mile bike ride for that. so veterans from recent conflicts, but also from 100
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yea rs recent conflicts, but also from 100 years ago. that's correct, it was just to follow the route that the 6th battalion took. passchendaele had a lot of scottish servicemen, who ultimately lost their lives across the. the 6th battalion and the black watch formed up in crieff, and marched down to the battlefield. soa and marched down to the battlefield. so a good 17 others from edinburgh and the black watch jumped so a good 17 others from edinburgh and the black watchjumped on our bicycles and cycled the route that they took. each day, we read a snippet of war diary about what they we re snippet of war diary about what they were doing on that particular day 100 years ago. so it was very good, culminating in passchendaele. kevin stacey, thank you very much for talking to us today. lots of stories we have heard today, lots of acts of remembrance, and not just we have heard today, lots of acts of remembrance, and notjust here in london. this is where the national service took place, but of course
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services taking place at war memorials across the united kingdom today. coalition forces in afghanistan have also been paying their respects on remembrance sunday. british troops joined with forces from other countries, including new zealand and australia, for a service this morning. the headlines on bbc news — first secretary of state damian green insists police never told him about pornography allegedly found on his computers. he says the allegations have an ulterior motive. the bbc understands the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has contacted the husband of a british woman who's in prison in iran. his cabinet colleague, michael gove, says tehran should be facing criticism over the case as he rejects calls for mrjohnson to resign. the prince of wales has led the nation in honouring britain's war dead on remembrance sunday.
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england and australia have drawn the women's caches. england beat france 36-14. and women's caches. england beat france 36—14. and northern ireland play switzerland for a place in the world cup. switzerland have a 1—0 advantage from the first leg. spain's prime minister says regional elections next month will help end what he called the "separatist havoc" in catalonia. mariano rajoy was addressing a campaign event during his first visit since imposing direct rule a fortnight ago. he told supporters a victory for his party would boost spain's economic growth. he also called on people opposed to catalan independence to vote. translation: we want the december 21st election
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to have a massive turnout, so a new political stage can be set in motion, bringing peace, normality and coexistence. we want to bring back the catalonia that belongs to everyone, with democracy and freedom. we will achieve this if the silent majority turns out to voice their vote. 0ur correspondentjames reynolds is in barcelona. he explained how the spanish prime minister's speech went down with his supporters. they were all gathered in a hotel ballroom, just next to barcelona's main train station. perhaps it had been booked anyway to overflow. several hundred of them cheered and listened to the prime minister during his 25 minute speech. he talks about the past, why he had imposed direct rule here in barcelona. he said it was in order to return to legality and normality, to return to legality and normality, to stand up for those who were fed up to stand up for those who were fed up with what he called the
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separatistss‘ actions. he also looked to the future, calling regional elections here for the 21st of december. he wanted what he called a silent majority of catalans to go out and vote for april ‘s been movement, he had his party or others. the price for him is simple— mac if a pro—spain majority wins the elections in december, the crisis for him, the attempts to break away for him, the attempts to break away for catalonia, those will recede. president trump and the north korean leader have resumed their war of words over pyongyang's nuclear weapons programme. in response to being called a "dotard" by north korea's foreign ministry, mr trump has tweeted, wondering why kim jong—un would insult him by calling him "old". the us president added that he would never call the north korean leader "short and fat". the fresh exchange came as the president began the latest leg of his five—nation tour of asia — a tour described by kim jong—un as a warmonger‘s visit. karishma vaswani reports. foes now turned new friends. us president donald trump
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received the official state welcome in vietnam. the two nations were once at war, but now there's pomp and ceremony at an event to show how close they've become. president trump needs his asian partners by him on trade and denuclearising north korea. and that's what he's made this trip about. he even made an offer of friendship to north korean leader kimjong—un. i think anything's a possibility. strange things happen in life. that might be a strange thing to happen, but it's certainly a possibility. if that did happen, it would be a good thing for, i can tell you, for north korea, but it would also be good for lots of other places, and it would be good for the world. but even on this international trip, domestic politics have taken control of the agenda. president trump had to clarify what he meant when he said russia's president putin didn't believe he had meddled in the us election. i believe that he feels that he and russia did not meddle in the election.
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as to whether i believe it or not, i'm, with our agencies, especially as currently constituted with their leadership, i believe in our intel agencies, our intelligence agencies, i've worked with them very strongly. donald trump's asian tour was supposed to be a chance for him to show off us strength in the region and build new relationships with his partners here by putting america first in matters to do with trade, as well as tackle the issue of north korea. but, instead, this trip has been overshadowed by the issue of whether russia meddled in the election in the united states, questions that will follow him as he makes his final stop on the last leg of his tour in manila. karishma vaswani, bbc news. a man has died after being beaten by a gang thought to be wielding baseball bats in east london. the attack took place on high road in ilford in the early hours of this morning. the metropolitan police has launched a murder inquiry. a man has died after
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being struck by a number of vehicles on the m4 motorway in south wales. the m4 at bridgend was closed in both directions for more than 10 hours as police investigated the incident between pencoed and sam. south wales police said the man died at the scene after the incident at about 9:00 last night. officers are urging motorists driving on that section of m4 around the time of the incident to contact them. football now and northern ireland are in basel for the second leg of their world cup playoff match against switzerland. they trail 1—0 after the first leg in belfast on tuesday which they lost due to a controversial penalty. 0ur sports reporter jessica creightonjoins me now from basel city centre. last chance for northern ireland to stay in the world cup. yes, a crucial game here in basel. i am in the confines now of the
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stadium where the match will be played. it will host one of the most crucial games of northern ireland's football history. lots of fans around me, in high spirits! lots of chanting. thousands of switzerland fa ns chanting. thousands of switzerland fans and thousands of northern ireland fans making the trip over from belfast. lots of red and white, lots of green and white. the fans seem lots of green and white. the fans seem to be getting on very well indeed. it is sure to be an electric atmosphere once the match gets underway and a couple of hours. let mejust remind you of underway and a couple of hours. let me just remind you of how we got to this point. from that first leg, northern ireland conceded that rather crucial goal, and it was under quite controversial circumstances. the referee judged the northern ireland player, corry evans, to have hand balled, despite the ball seeming to have had him on the ball seeming to have had him on the back of the shoulder. it was because of that penalty that was scored that northern ireland now
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trail this tie 1—0. but the mood within the camp, mummy fans i have spoken to northern ireland, is quite positive. —— among the fans. they are upset that the manner in which they lost the first leg but they are quite upbeat. the fans, the players, the mood, the manager, michael o'neill, the mood, the manager, michael 0'neill, all in very high spirits, all feeling as though the pressure is actually an switzerland and their players now to come and finish the job, because this is as close has northern ireland have ever been probably to qualifying for a world cup. the atmosphere really building here, just a few hours away from chekhov. atmosphere building incredibly well, and the fans are getting on well for now. but if you look at this match on paper, northern ireland are very much the underdogs, way below switzerland in the world rankings. they are on this losing streak of three matches, what they have scored just one goal. but
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northern ireland have certainly been a surprise package in european football in recent years, just five yea rs football in recent years, just five years ago in 2012, they were ranked way outside the world's top 100. and now, they are just outside the world's top 20, so a remarkable rise for them is testament to the work that the manager, michael 0'neill, has done to get this team to being a formidable force in european football. as i say, not long now until kick—off. atmosphere really building, it is sure to be an electric atmosphere once the match does get underway. jess, thank you. a 100—year—old former soldier who fought in the second world war and survived more than two years in auschwitz is marking 35 years as a poppy seller. ron jones, from newport, says he will never retire from carrying out charity work in memory of his fallen comrades. tomos morgan reports. every year you'll find him selling poppies, as he has done for over 35 years. and even at 100 years old...
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in the box, love. ..ronjones is still doing his part in making sure we remember those that gave their lives. thank you very much. why do you still do it at 100 years old? well, i'm able. as long as i can get a lift, taking me back and forth. so you will be there next year, 101? well, i say, i don't know. i'm getting a bit shaky on my legs. as an ex—serviceman, remembrance sunday and the poppy is personalfor ron. in world war two he endured horrors that scarred him for years, after his squad was captured and they spent two years as prisoners of war near auschwitz. by far the worst experience they endured was the death march. they marched us through the carpathian mountains, czechoslovakia, bohemia, saxony, bavaria, and down into austria.
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i was on a march for about 17 weeks. we lost... around about 100 men died. and when you finally came home, just describe the state and the toll that auschwitz... i was in a shocking state when i came home. for instance, my wife put me in the bath that first night and she started to cry cos i looked like somebody from belsen. isaid, "0h, don't cry, love. "i left men out there who's never going to come home". ron suffered with post—traumatic stress, flashbacks and nightmares that haunted him for years, but he overcame it all thanks in no small part to the woman he will never forget. i think my wife saved my life. i think my wife was marvellous. super woman. today, britain remembers all of those that have fought
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for our country over the years. ronjones will be doing the same for the friends he lost more than 70 years ago. this year's rockefeller centre christmas tree has arrived in new york and is set to be decorated with more than 50,000 lights. the tree is 75 feet tall and 50 feet wide, and has been set to feature for a long time after the centre's gardener spotted the norwegian spruce seven years ago. time now to take a look at the weather forecast. some sort of heavy sheriffs today, especially on the north sea coast, continuing overnight with a strong wind keeping the temperature above freezing. —— heavy showers. we will also have a widespread frost.
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temperatures colder in the countryside, well below freezing for some of us, parts of northern ireland, southern scotland and northern england in particular. some of us will be scraping the ice off the car. still one or two showers clipping coastal england along the north sea coast, into tomorrow, fading in the afternoon. thicker cloud moving into scotland and northern ireland, bridges and some rain and snow at higher ground in scotland, perhaps in two parts of the pennines as well. how much for how long, still open to question so keep checking the forecast going into tomorrow morning. it will be another cold day with cloud increasing across the uk, but milder aircoming in increasing across the uk, but milder air coming in for tuesday and wednesday. but with lots of cloud, by for now. hello, this is bbc news with me, reeta chakrabarti. the headlines: first secretary of state damian green insists police never told him about pornography allegedly found on his parliamentary computers. he says the allegations have an ulterior motive. the bbc understands the foreign secretary, borisjohnson has contacted the husband of a british woman who's in prison in iran.
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his cabinet colleague,michael gove says tehran should be facing criticism over the case as he rejects calls for mrjohnson to resign. the prince of wales has led the nation in honouring britain's war dead on remembrance sunday. a murder investigation has begun after a man was apparently beaten to death in east london by a gang wielding baseball bats. the spanish prime minister visits catalonia for the first time since he imposed direct rule on the region. he's campaigning for his people's party ahead of next month's early regional elections. now on bbc news, the week's strongest stories from the bbc‘s inside out teams. hello and welcome to inside out. tonight, could the emergency services have acted any faster on the night of the manchester arena bomb? i said we need paramedics, we need paramedics now.
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how life after top—level sport can be traumatic. when you are part of the team it is brilliant, and when that got pulled away from me it had a massive impact on my mental health. and why liverpool is the star of a new hollywood movie. i just want to go back to liverpool. say it again. liverpool. 0h...wow.

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