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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  November 13, 2017 5:00pm-6:00pm GMT

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today at 5, the brexit secretary tells parliament they will be able to examine any brexit agreement before britain leaves the eu. in what's being seen as a concession by some, the new piece of legislation will mean that mps will be able to debate and vote on the final deal. parliament will be given time to debate, scrutinise and vote on the final deal. this agreement will only hold if parliament approves it. we will have the latest from westminster. the other main stories. at least 400 people have been killed and thousands injured following a powerful earthquake in iran, a huge rescue operation is underway. the foreign secretary apologises publicly to the family of a british womanjailed in iran for allegedly spying after he made controversial remarks which risked putting her position under further threat.
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i apologise to nazanin zaghair— ratcliffe and her family if i inadvertently caused them any further anguish. arthur collins, the former boyfriend of reality tv star ferne mccann, has been found guilty of carrying out an acid attack in a london nightclub. 14 people were injured in the attack i have 5a first cousins. i am the one who is going to break ranks. we'll be talking to the real boy with the top knot — writer and author sathnam sanghera, about the new bbc drama based on his memoirs. it's five o'clock. our main story. in the last half—hour
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the brexit secretary david davis has told the commons that parliament will now be able to scrutinise and vote on the brexit agreement with the eu via a new bill. it is seen by some as a concession by the government ahead of the commons debate on the eu withdrawal bill. our political correspondent ben wright is in westminster. how significant what the brexit secretary announced today? how significant what the brexit secretary announced today7m how significant what the brexit secretary announced today? it is a big concession and could have big implications in terms of how a final brexit deal is implemented and it increases the voice of mps who have pushed for this on both sides of the commons in recent weeks. the eu withdrawal bill, which transfers eu law into the uk statute book and would repeal the 1972 act, starts its passage through parliament this week. one big risk the government
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faces, that it did face an amendment put down by a tory mp calling for this, a new act of parliament to put on the statute book the final withdrawal agreement. he insisted it was necessary legally and vital mps had that moment to put into statute the withdrawal agreement and i think perhaps facing possible defeat on that, with labour feeling perhaps facing possible defeat on that, with labourfeeling the perhaps facing possible defeat on that, with labour feeling the same, the government has done what it has done and promised another act of parliament towards the end of the brexit process. the commons, david davis, he explained what the bill would seek to do. i can confirm that once we've reached an agreement, we will bring forward a specific piece of primary legislation to implement that agreement. it has been known as the withdrawal agreement and implementation bill. this confirms that the major policy set out in the withdrawal agreement will be directly implemented into uk law by primary legislation. not by secondary legislation of the withdrawal bill. this also means parliament will be given time to
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debate, scrutinise and vote on the final agreement we strike with the european union. this agreement will only hold if parliament approves it. we expect this bill to cover the contents of the withdrawal agreement, that includes issues such as an agreement on citizens' rights, any financial settlement and a details and implementation period agreed between both sides. mps are still questioning david davis to understand how the new act fits into the sequence around the end of the end—stage brexit and david davis has said the aim on both sides of the negotiating table is to come up with a deal by this time next year, giving eu countries and the eu parliament and westminster time to scrutinise and pass the deal they hope to reach. that is the position he thinks we could be in in october and at that point parliament
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would be asked to pass or reject the principle of the agreement and if it is passed, the new act of parliament is passed, the new act of parliament is put before mps, as david davis said, to debate and amend critically, so a moment for mps to try to change possibly the terms of the final withdrawal deal and what happens after that is not clear because david davis said we would leave a nyway because david davis said we would leave anyway so exactly what purpose the bill would have in terms of changing the final deal is not quite clear but i think it is emboldening mps who want a bigger say on the shape of the final agreement, and the labour party welcome this. this is keir starmer. the second half of the statement is not a report back. it isa the statement is not a report back. it is a recognition by the government that it is about to lose a series of votes on the withdrawal bill. labour has repeatedly argued
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since the bill was first published injuly the article since the bill was first published in july the article 50 deal since the bill was first published injuly the article 50 deal required primary legislation including a vote in this house, a point made forcefully at second reading. now, oi'i forcefully at second reading. now, on ve is of crucial amendments, we have this statement under the cloak of rapport back from brussels —— on the ease. business leaders meeting the prime minister to express their concerns about what they see as uncertainty surrounding the brexit process? exactly. brexit has so many stages where it is happening with the drama in westminster and negotiations in brussels and business leaders being more anxious that progress seems stalled and the clock is running down quickly. we know the government hopes the next european council meeting in december that the eu will agree to open the door to proper
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talks on trade and a transition agreement that there is no certainty thatis agreement that there is no certainty that is the case and business leaders from the eu in uk, pressing for the urgency to crack on with this otherwise they will activate contingency plans for a possible no deal scenario and after those talks, a member of the cbi talked and explained what she had heard from the prime minister. businesses in a sense they care about the outcome and what we've got here isa negotiation that needs to pick up pace. it needs to recognise how urgent this is. we have surveys showing 60% of businesses will have triggered their contingency plans by march of next year, and we are hearing similar stories from european businesses. i think this is a message to both sides that there is such strong mutual interest here about jobs and prosperity and the performances and success of businesses, we really need to get on with it and pick up the pace. accelerated talks the demand from
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businesses but we think the kiefer that the government is money and if the eu are going to open the door to trade talks and get the transition agreed —— the key for that. then the uk will be far more candid about the money they are prepared to pay. thank you. we could talk more about the concerns of business. with me in the studio is nina skero, head of macroeconomics at the centre for business and economics research, which is an economic think tank. how do you see the main concerns about brexit from business leaders and company executives? what business leaders in the uk and europe want more than anything is clarity, clarity about will there be a transitional deal and if so what kind of deal? and clarity on after that transitional deal, whether it
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ends, probably in two years, what will be the ultimate agreement the uk is striving for. at what stage do you think some companies are? we have heard some talking about relocating, especially banks potentially relocating jobs. how much time is there before most businesses really hit a crunch before they have to make a key decision? there is little time in terms of business planning especially for large businesses. planning is done one, two business yea rs planning is done one, two business years in advance and in that time scale, ina years in advance and in that time scale, in a sense, brexit is already happening and in terms ofjobs, you have to keep in mind at the heart of uk business interest is employees' interests, for people who may need to relocate, starting in 2019, they
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will probably want to relocate next summer 01’ will probably want to relocate next summer or autumn s0 will probably want to relocate next summer or autumn so children can start school in new places and keeping this in mind, i think businesses have their finger hovering just above the go button in terms of relocation. this is not just british business concerned by the lack of clarity, it is european business and people talk often about german car—makers, selling vehicles in this country, they want certainty as well. understandably and i think perhaps the most powerful message coming out of today's meeting, the message that businesses need more clarity and they would like a transitional deal as close as possible to the status quo is not new, but what is somewhat new is the rather obvious realisation there are parties and businesses in the uk and europe who stand to gain or lose a lot and so i think the message that
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it is in everybody‘s best interest to progress is key. thank you. rescue workers are desperately searching for survivors after a powerful earthquake in western iran killed more than 400 people, and injured thousands. iran's emergency services say they're having trouble getting rescue teams to the affected areas, as roads have been cut off by landslides. the epicentre of the quake — which measured 7.3 — hit the border between iran and iraq, just under 20 miles south of halabja — and was felt as far away as lebanon and turkey. richard galpin reports. at a big dam in the region last night, suddenly the duty officer runs for his life as the earthquake hits. sending huge boulders smashing into the complex. in the aftermath this morning it seems the dam has survived. but in the western provinces of iran there has been significant damage,
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with entire buildings collapsing. leaving many people trapped underneath. in just one district at least 200 people are now known to have been killed. and the hospitals in this region are trying to cope with thousands of injured. many lucky to still be alive. translation: i fell from the balcony down, the earthquake was very strong. the earthquake shattered the window which fell on me and wounded my hand and face. the moments the earthquake hit was also caught live on tv. the studio guest on the left trying to keep calm as the building shakes violently. this is across the border in northern iraq, where houses have also been brought down
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and a hospital is seriously damaged in a kurdish province. further south, this mosque was badly damaged, and in the light of day people try to clear away the rubble. this man said there had not been any casualties here. and overall in iraq, the number of those killed is relatively low, we have evacuated medical cases to hospitals and also there is damage in houses, ten houses completely damaged in one district in the province and we have partial damage in the hospital. the earthquake with a magnitude of 7.3 was felt across much of the middle east. but it is iran and iraq that have suffered the most, with the epicentre on the border between them. thousands of people in the region are now in need of shelter.
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it is cold in the night and there have been more than 100 after—shocks since sunday. the foreign secretary has apologised for comments he made about the british woman jailed in iran, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. borisjohnson had suggested to mps she had been training journalists when she was detained. but now he says the government acknowledges she was on holiday when she was arrested. he also called on iran to release her on humantitarian grounds. the british government has no doubt that nazanin zaghair— ratcliffe was in iran on holiday and that was the sole purpose of her visit. as i said in the house last week, my remarks oi'i in the house last week, my remarks on the subject before the foreign affairs select committee could and should have been clearer. and i acknowledge the words i used were
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open to being misinterpreted and i apologise. i apologise to nazanin zaghair— ratcliffe and her family if i inadvertently caused them any further anguish. mr speaker it is not good enough. if it is a matter of pride the foreign secretary is refusing to admit he has made a mistake, i feel bound to say to him his hide matters not one ounce compared to nazanin's freed and in conclusion, after a week of bluster and obfuscation, will he take the opportunity to day two states simply and unequivocally for the removal of any doubt, either here or in tehran, that he simply got it wrong? emily thornberry the shadow foreign secretary there. our diplomatic correspondent james landale is here. another apology, was it different from the apology we heard from boris
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johnson the other day?” from the apology we heard from boris johnson the other day? i think he has gone further. before he was equivocal and much less now, said he got it wrong and he admits the mistake. i think he had no alternative. he was in brussels today he was summoned back by labour calling the emergency debate. the scale of political pressure on him, meant he had to turn up and also to apologise to draw some of the sting because what a lot of people fear, on both sides of the debate, there isa on both sides of the debate, there is a risk the debate, the hot politics about mrjohnson‘s future could potentially have a negative impact on this case. and criticism of michael gove yesterday on similar grounds? adding to the uncertainty. a suggestion the british government could offer her diplomatic protection. how might that help? this is something that richard ratcliffe, her husband, has asked for and boris johnson said
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ratcliffe, her husband, has asked for and borisjohnson said he would consider. it is not like diplomatic immunity, it is an old legal clause that says if a state gives this protection it says it is no longer a private concert the matter it is an issue between the british state and the iranian state and potentially opens the possibility of legal action. it is a huge diplomatic escalation. i think there is uncertainty whether it is practical in this circumstance but an option downing street says is on the table and which campaigners asked for the question is whether it will be the right decision strategically, which isa right decision strategically, which is a judgment. thank you. the former boyfriend of the reality tv star ferne mccann has been found guilty of carrying out an acid attack in a nightclub in east london. arthur collins, who's 25, was convicted at wood green crown court, of five counts of grievous bodily harm and nine of actual bodily harm against 1a people. this is the moment when a bank
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holiday night out became scars for life, at the nightclub in east london that of the collins threw acid at clubbers. 17 people suffered horrific injuries, some of which we re horrific injuries, some of which were seriously disfiguring. this woman's injuries were so bad she did not want her face to be seen. ever since it has been nonstop hospital and therapy appointments, because it is not just physically and therapy appointments, because it is notjust physically damaging, it is notjust physically damaging, it is mentally, which is probably harder, and i have not stepped in a clu b harder, and i have not stepped in a club since then. i am a 23—year—old girl. australian sisters isabella
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and prudence were in the club and spoke to a tv channel in australia that their injuries. someone ran into me and had acid or something over their face into me and had acid or something over theirface and into me and had acid or something over their face and i felt it on my back. i thought somebody had scratched me. i realised my shirt was stuck to my skin. i could not find isabella and i felt my arm burning and somebody said acid had been thrown. lauren was also caught up been thrown. lauren was also caught up in the attack. i touched my neck and saying that is not a joke, that is acid. my neck the skin was coming off in my hands. collins is seen here with the reality tv star ferne mccann who was not with him at the type of the incident and is best known for her appearance in towie and i'm a celebrity get me out of here. she urged him to fully cooperate with the police. today,
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collins was found guilty of five cou nts collins was found guilty of five counts of grievous bodily harm and nine counts of actual bodily harm against 1a people and a spokesperson for the cps said... there is understandable concern about this issue and these convictions showed that those who choose to use acid as a weapon can expect to face serious criminal charges. collins will be sentenced on the 19th of december at wood green crown court. our reporter iain palmer is at wood green crown court in north london. tell us about what happened in court today. mr collins was in —— impassive as he heard the verdicts
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in court which is in stark contrast to members of his family in the public gallery who gasp it and were sobbing as the verdicts were read out. just to add to some of the cps reaction you heard in the report, the cps said the prosecution has proved the acid attack was no accident and that collins went to a nightclub with a container which he knew contained strong acid and was willing to use it. there has been reaction from the met police saying that it thanks the efforts of the victims for their strength and bravery in being forced to give evidence in court and during the trial they gave and had to relive some of the horrific instances they suffered in the nightclub and the met police say it hopes at least they will take some solace from knowing collins will go to prison and on that note, thejudge knowing collins will go to prison and on that note, the judge told collins that he will be going to
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prison for a substantial amount of time and added that ordinarily he would sentence straightaway but he said the seriousness of the crime and circumstances and numbers injured meant that he wanted to get further reports on mr collins because he believes he could present a danger to the public in future. mr collins, it was told in court, that mr collins has an existing conviction for actual bodily harm in a nightclub that was carried out in 2015. the charge, as you heard, he will sentence collins on december the 19th for the crimes he committed in the nightclub on the 17th of april this year. thank you. bob geldof has returned his freedom of the city of dublin in protest against the burmese leader aung san suu kyi , who has been given the same honour.
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the musician described the treatment by myanmar‘s military of the rohingya muslim minority community as "mass ethnic cleansing". the live aid organiser said his home city had honoured aung san suu kyi — but that now she had shamed dublin. you know, i don't want to give this up. i don't want to. i'm really proud of it, you know. i get handed things by states and cities around the world, but i'm a dub, and this meant very much to me. as i say, it doesn't mean much to anybody else, but to me, i don't want to do it. but it's the most i can do, and the least. we can speak to the sinn fein lord mayor of dublin, micheal mac donncha. what you think of what bob geldof has done? i think he is making a
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point in relation to the persecution and ethnic cleansing of the rohingya people and this issue has been addressed by dublin city council and ias addressed by dublin city council and i as mayor in the city of dublin have protested strongly to aung san suu kyi and to the myanmar authorities about the ethnic cleansing of the rohingya people and i have met the range of people'srepresentatives in ireland. whether it is the appropriate way to highlight this by handing back the honour he received from the city of dublin is another matter. we have looked at the freedom of the city for aung san suu kyi and the could not find agreement of the city council across all parties to remove that honour put that in no way blu nts that honour put that in no way blunts our condemnation of unsung suji and in particular the burmese
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military of what they have done —— aung san suu kyi. you have been critical of bob geldof saying it is ironic he is giving this on the back to dublin but holding onto his british knighthood, despite what you call from the shameful colonial past of the british empire. indeed, he is a knight commander of the order of the british empire. it is entirely inconsistent that he would hand back his civic honours in dublin on the basis of human rights, yet he retains a knighthood of the order of the british empire, which as we know, throughout history, has been responsible for human rights abuses across the globe and in more recent times for example he did not hand back his honours in protest at the iraq warand back his honours in protest at the iraq war and britain's part in the illegal invasion of iraq.|j iraq war and britain's part in the illegal invasion of iraq. i suppose he would argue that this is
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something rather different. whatever the british empire may have done, this is about aung san suu kyi and about the rohingya people and he has been saying that he does not want to been saying that he does not want to be quote, on a select role of wonderful people with a killer, someone wonderful people with a killer, someone at best a handmaiden to genocide and an accomplice to murder. that is the point he is making. i and dublin city council have strongly condemned the ethnic cleansing of the rohingya people. it is horrendous. aung san suu kyi, not only failed to condemn it but failed to acknowledge it. we have that much in common. bob geldof contacted the city council last night to say he was going to hand back the honour. he made no contact with me as mayor of the city, all with city councillors, to discuss the issue in a nyway councillors, to discuss the issue in anyway and even how to work together
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on this civil rights issue. he simply phone last night, landed in dublin this morning and gave back the honour. i will continue to work with the rohingya people representatives in ireland on human rights solidarity with their people. good to talk to you. that is the lord mayor of dublin. thank you. an inquest investigating the death of sacked welsh labour minister carl sargeant has found hanging at his home. carl sargeant has found hanging at his i clearer. a sprinkling of will be clearer. a sprinkling of showers across the north. one of those days for many to the wise, there could be dense patches of fog around. but i am
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hopeful once it clears, and it will be slow progress, there will be brightness and getting temperatures into double figures with more rain moving up the western side of scotland. this is bbc news. the headlines: the brexit secretary makes what's being seen as a concession by some and confirms parliament will be allowed to examine any brexit deal before britain leaves the eu. parliament will be given time to debate, scrutinise and vote. this agreement will only hold if parliament approves it. at least 400 people have been killed and thousands injured following a powerful earthquake in iran. a huge rescue operation is underway. the foreign secretary apologises publicly to the family of a british womanjailed in iran for allegedly spying. he's due to meet the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe
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later this week. arthur collins, the former boyfriend of reality tv star fearne mccann, has been found guilty of carrying out an acid attack in a london nightclub. 14 people were injured in the attack. the england manager, gareth southgate, says his team need to learn how to execute under pressure ahead of next summer's world cup in russia. his focus will be on penalties, with southgate believing his country's poor record in international tournaments — including his own penalty miss in euro 96 — comes down to understanding the situation. clearly, it is something we are looking at very closely. we have to have a plan for that. we need to put
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players in the precious scenarios. also, we have got to be good enough to get to that stage. penalties did not knock us out of the last two tournaments. first and foremost, we have got to make sure we have a clear way of playing, everybody knows the role and responsibility and under pressure in the 120 minutes we are able to adjust and adapt to that. chris coleman says the welsh fa needs to share his vision if he's to stay on as manager of his country. coleman is preparing his side to face panama in a friendly and hopes his future will be resolved by the end of the month. the structure needs to be a bit better for this current staff. i cover my bunker staff. for us to ta ke cover my bunker staff. for us to take it forward. certain things have to bea take it forward. certain things have to be a bit different. but that is my opinion. that is what i think and
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need to improve what we have got. grigor dimitrov admitted he felt pretty nervous in his atp world tour finals debut, but he still managed to beat austria's dominic thiem in three dramatic sets on his atp finals debut. the bulgarian number six seed battled through, 6—3, 5—7, 7—5 in the opening round—robin match in the pete sampras group. the other match in that group today sees rafa nadal takes on david goffin at 8pm. i'm not going to lie. i was pretty nervous for my first match at it. it is not the same. we have been practising on this court, great conditions, all of a sudden you comment and you feel the weight on your shoulders, in a positive way, of course, but i am really grateful to win that match, especially in that manner. it is never easy to come out here and play for the first time. jamie murray and doubles partner bruno soares have lost their opening match in london. the pair were taking on the legendary bryan brothers
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from the us and ended up losing an epic encounter in three sets, 5-7, 7-6, 8-10. chris froome has told the bbc that he's targeting more tour de france victories and is not considering retirement. the team sky rider won the event for a fourth time injuly and then followed it up by winning the vuelta a espana — just the third rider to do so. now 32, froome says he's still hungry for more success. i definitely do not feel as if i am the yet. i know when the time is right but, for the time being, i am still hungry and motivated to win another tour de france and i am just going to take it one year at a time. as long as the body is able to do this, i will keep going. centre jamie roberts has been recalled to the wales squad for the rest of the autumn internationals. having won 93 caps and after captaining wales to victories against tonga and samoa on their summer tour, roberts was a somewhat surprising omission
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from the original 36—man party. he comes in due to concerns over jonathan davies following his ankle injury in their defeat by australia on saturday. scotland prop wp nel will miss the remaining autumn tests after breaking his arm against samoa. he's set to be replaced by zander ferguson and, with lock tim swinson and flanker rob harley also out, newcastle propjon welsh has been called into the squad as cover. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport and i'll have more for you in the next hour. scientists at a united nations climate conference in germany say global emissions of carbon dioxide are projected to rise in 2017 for the first time in four years. they say the main cause for the expected 2% increase is the greater use of coal in china as its economy expands. our environment correspondent,
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matt mcgrath, is at the conference in bonn. according to scientists, 2017 will be one of the three warmest years on record, with the impacts of increasing heat felt right across the world. the key task for the 20,000 delegates and negotiators in bonn is tackling the root causes of these rising temperatures — emissions of carbon dioxide. for decades, these rose strongly on the back of china's rapid economic expansion but, in 2014, and for the next two years, these emissions stalled. scientists wondered if a global peak had been reached. however, today's figures show that levels of carbon are back on the rise. it's so urgent that the emissions decrease rapidly. it's absolutely urgent. people don't realise emissions need to disappear, essentially, for the warming to stop. and there's only one way to do that,
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and that is to develop the policies, the actions and technologies and use them so that our emissions decrease everywhere. many delegates here have been surprised by the reported rise in co2 emissions in 2017, partly attributed to the greater use of coal around the world. while there is no clear science on the subject, many negotiators are linking that rise to the growth of extreme weather events all over the planet this year. for small island states from the caribbean and elsewhere who have experienced what they see as climate related devastation this year, the latest co2 figures translate into a very real threat. what we do here is not cerebral or academic. we need to make sure that real lives are saved. livelihoods are maintained and sustained. we need to minimise the effect of climate change on islands such as ours, which are at the front line of the fury of climate change. that view won't cut much ice with us president donald trump, who wants
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to leave the paris climate pact. his advisers are in bonn to promote what they call "clean coal", but whether anyone here is prepared to listen to that message is doubtful. people in england and wales who have guns, firearms and ammunition can hand them into police over the next fortnight without automatically facing punishment. the national ballistics intelligence service, which is co—ordinating the surrender, says many firearms are held without people realising they're illegal. those handing in guns won't be prosecuted for illegal possession but, if the weapon is later linked to a crime, they could be questioned. sima kotecha reports. hand in your guns and no questions will be asked. that is what police forces across england and wales are saying today to try and get as many firearms off the streets. yusuf sonko was shot dead in liverpool in june.
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he wasjust 18. his mum had this to say. i have a broken heart. somebody killed my son. and the killer is still walking around. an innocent boy. ijust ask people, if they have a gun in their house, they have to hand it to the police. a gun, a knife, is very dangerous. this is a selection of firearms that we have seen... officers say, when a fire arm is surrendered, nobody will be interrogated. however, if the weapon is traced back to a crime, they could be questioned. we offer an amnesty at the point of surrender. so if you are in possession of a firearm and you give it to the local authority or police officer, then we will offer an amnesty at that moment in time. that does not mean that we will not pay attention to what the weapon has done in the past, so we will look to examine that forensically and ballistically to see if the weapon has been involved in a crime in the past.
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it was here on this road that a 36—year—old man was recently killed in a drive—by shooting. five men have been charged with the murder of mikael stirling. police hope that the surrender will make an impact in areas like this one where gun crime is nothing out of the ordinary. latest figures show there were almost 7000 crimes involving firearms in england and wales last year. that's an increase of 27% on the year before. but the number of crimes is still far less than a decade ago when it was 31% higher. police say the surrender is part of a strategy to reduce gun crime. we are realistic enough to realise that we are not going to get hardened gang members who are in possession of weapons they intend to use, hand in a gun. but this is part of our response to try and make it as difficult as possible for those people to come into possession of any type of weapon at all. critics say those who want a gun will always find one. the surrender begins today and lasts for two weeks.
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the church of england has issued guidelines to its primary schools, suggesting that any child should be free to wear a tutu, tiara or superhero cloak when playing, without expectation or comment. the archbishop of canterbury, justin welby — who's written a foreword to the new advice — said sexual orientation should never be grounds for bullying or prejudice. here's our religious affairs correspondent, martin bashir. the church of england educates a million pupils in almost 5000 schools and first issued guidance on homophobic bullying three years ago. today's announcement updates the advice to help children considering transition from one gender to another. the new guidelines say that children should be able to try out many cloaks of identity without being labelled or abused. that nursery and primary school in particular is a time
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of creative exploration. and that a child may choose the tutu, princess's tiara, or a fireman's helmet, without expectation or comment. the church and christians have different views on sexuality. this is not a document about human sexuality. it is a document about how we counter any form of bullying. so we are simply saying that the advice that we are giving and the documents and the resources that we are providing help children to know that they can have that kind of safe experience of a school which enables them to flourish. but the issue of human sexuality is at the centre of conflict within the church, and some evangelical christians say these guidelines are another attempt to erode the authority of the bible and embrace popular culture. a kind society, a compassionate society says to children that are confused in their gender identity, we can help you live in the gender that you were born in,
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the biological sex that you were born in. as parents, as teachers and indeed as the church, the kindest and most compassionate thing we can do is to help a child who is confused about their gender. that is what is kind and good. the archbishop of canterbury, who supports the new guidance, said today that every single one of us is made in the image of god and that no child should be described as a stereotype or a problem. six months ago, we brought you the story of matthew bryce, who was stranded at sea for two days after his surfing trip went disastrously wrong. matthew almost died and was rescued 13 miles off the coast of northern ireland, vowing never to surf again. well, time is a great healer, and matthew has decided he's ready to get back in the water. alex gulrajani has been along to meet him. a moment matthew bryce thought would never happen again.
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i knew i was going to die. it wasn't a question, it's... it was a fact. lucky to be alive — that's how belfast coastguards have described a surfer who was rescued from the irish sea last night. matthew bryce was picked up 13 miles off the argyll coast... i was thinking i was going to die. i was almost convinced. i didn't think i'd see the sunrise. i'd totally given up. i'd resigned myself to the fact i was going to die. i'm sitting here in the dark — i can't describe how cold. it's not as if you went out for a snowball fight and your hands are a bit cold. it's like life is just being sapped out of your core. six months on, matthew bryce is ready to get back into the water. but any fear or apprehension he had has been replaced by pure excitement. how are you feeling? i'm excited. i'm going to go in now. i'm going tojump in right now. yeah, i'm buzzing.
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and with the support of his friends, he was back where he once said he would never venture again — on a surfboard. how cool was that, seeing him back out there? it's awesome. keeping his passion going, and everything. this is perfect. eventually, he even found his feet. not bad for six months away. there were a couple of points where i was getting tossed a bit in the water, and you're thinking, whoa — hang on, it's fine. and reunited on water with the surfboard that saved his life. this board, matthew, must mean a lot to you? it's a special board for me. i could never get rid of this. if i'd lost the board, if i hadn't been able to get back to it, if the leash had snapped, if i'd decided to throw it away, i would have died. it was the only thing that was keeping me safe. even if i stop surfing,
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it'll go on the wall. yeah, i'll always keep it. but there are no plans to hang it up just yet. in fact, the ocean is calling. matthew and his friends will be back in the sea this weekend, determined not to give up on his passion. i want to go and, you know, live as much as i possibly can. i hope to god i'm never going to experience anything that horrific again, and i'd never wish it on anyone, either. but, if i can take some positives out of it and if i can try and get a message out to people to be safe, go out with friends, don't go surfing alone, don't be reckless like me, i think some good can come from it. this is bbc news at five — the headlines: the brexit secretary tells parliament they will be able to examine any brexit agreement before britain leaves the eu. at least 400 people have been killed
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and thousands injured following a powerful earthquake in iran, a huge rescue operation is underway. the foreign secretary apologises publicly to the family of a british woman jailed in iran for allegedly spying after he made controversial remarks which risked putting her position under further threat. an update on the market numbers for you — here's how london's and frankfurt ended the day. and in the the united states this is how the dow and the nasdaq are getting on. a new bbc drama which airs tonight explores the emotional story of growing up as a second—generation indian in britain. based on the real life memoirs of sathnam sanghera, the boy with the topknot is a personal account of growing up in wolverhampton with traditional sikh parents — how he juggled his family, love life and career. the programme also tackles the difficulties sathnam faced when he discovered that
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both his father and sister were diagnosed with schizophrenia. in a moment, i'll be speaking to sathnam, but first let's take a look at a clip from tonight's programme. daddy? can i ask about when you first came to this country? when you we re first came to this country? when you were young? you were younger than me, won't you? i used to ride a bike. did you? are used to go everywhere on it. i went everywhere on the bike. everywhere. he can't
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ride a bike! i can, i can! you didn't have a bike! when was that? when i first came to this country in 1986. 1986! it was 1979! i rode a bike. iwas 1986. 1986! it was 1979! i rode a bike. i was the strongest man in this country. and i used to lift weights. why are you asking him all of these questions? i ask strangers about their lives. i don't know the first thing about my family. and sathnam sanghera is here with me now. we rana
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we ran a trailer a bit earlier on, saying the story of love, secrets and lies in wolverhampton. we will come onto the love that in a minute that tell us about your parents. it was an arranged marriage, they were very young, your mother was 17. they got married in wolverhampton. i did not know anything about the story. that's quite a common thing. we tend not to see our parents as people but the aryan of warmth, food and money, but to sit down and get the story was not a thing. —— as people but vague areas. you asked them a lot of questions. what did you find out? my father and sister both suffer from schizophrenia and it is quite something to get to the age of 30 without knowing that. in some way i knew but i chose not to know because i wanted to escape wolverhampton and livability life in london. but
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eventually i had a crisis and i wa nted eventually i had a crisis and i wanted to find out more. so, in a way, these memoirs about schizophrenia and growing up as a young asian in this country, but specifically about schizophrenia as well. what do you hope will be the message that comes out of this?|j hope message that comes out of this?” hope people understand a bit more about schizophrenia because it is such a misunderstood illness. it is not a death sentence. you can get over it, you can be a good parent, sister, and it does not need to be the end. but i also hope it encourages people generally to talk to theirfamilies encourages people generally to talk to their families and ask some questions. it is a common regret when people died that you did not sit down with your father or mother and get the story. it is an awkward thing to do but i recommend it and you might discover your parents and siblings are quite interesting, possibly amazing, people. tell us about the pressures on you as you we re about the pressures on you as you were growing up and you were
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yearning for this freedom. that is why he went to london, the getaway from yourfamily why he went to london, the getaway from your family and the structures that there were on you and what you could do romantically? the punjabi sikhs in britain are working—class community. most of the men in my family were factory workers but i went to a grammar school in cambridge so i became different. it is quite common british family, to from a working class background and become middle—class, then i could no longer related why was my family. it is the billy elliot story. to reconnect is a hard thing. the book is mainly about that, how do you reconnect with your past? you talked about how you were almost living two lives, one in london and one when you went back to see your family in wolverhampton. my parents wanted me to have a marriage with someone of the same background as me whereas i
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was dating freely. would they have liked to have had an arranged marriage, orjust somebody of your background? introductions are like dating with emotional blackmail! i just got tired of lying and living a secret life. it is very much like being gay in being in the closet. eventually the anxiety and pressure to keep the secret becomes too much. we have got another clip from the programme that shows exactly that.” said, i have told, iwill tell programme that shows exactly that.” said, i have told, i will tell mum! when did your parents get back? the day before yesterday. and you didn't tommy? —— tell me. day before yesterday. and you didn't tommy? -- tell me. i have 54 first cousins, and all of them have married... seek girl or boy, i know this. i would be the first. it is
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possible and probable i will be discerned. so you will never tell them about me because you can't? he would just live two separate lives. you are wrong. you are so wrong. i will drive up and tell them now! and imean will drive up and tell them now! and i mean right now! enough is enough! without spoiling what happens, did you drive off and tell them right now? it took quite a long time, otherwise it would be a very short book! tell us what it is like to see your life, yourself, represented in atv your life, yourself, represented in a tv drama like that. it is very strange very flattering because the actor is a good—looking guy and great actor. you are good-looking guy! but equally it deals with most people things that happen to me. it has been a real emotional roller—coaster so i'm really excited
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about tonight but i cannot wait for it to be over. on to write an honest memoir which is then made into tv show, everybody will be thinking, what will my family think of this, what will my family think of this, what will my parents think of it? they are so central to your story. what have they made the?” they are so central to your story. what have they made the? i did it with the approval i said if they did not like admitting they would take out. my sister asked for the whole chapter to be deleted which i hated at the time but it meant i came out with her support. she has read the book four times, which is four more times than i have. schizophrenia, people ignore you in society, so for her to have her story told is a really powerful thing. i feel really proud that she likes it. it has got something to say about schizophrenia, but what about what it says the young asians growing up in this country? it is very old story integration. as the clip
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explains, i come from a very large family, and since i read the book loads of my cousins have had interfaith marriages. one person has to make the first move and u nfortu nately to make the first move and unfortunately that was me but i got a book out of it, and a tv series! thank you so much for being with us, fascinating, i'm really looking forward to seeing it tonight. and you can watch the boy with the topknot on bbc two at 9pm. a heart—warming tale to a rather chilly scene here. this was scotland earlier on today. still really by the glorious the finish of the day. the reason for the difference? there isa the reason for the difference? there is a transition from the cool of the
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weekend and the cold start that many experienced today, milder air has already swept in across scotland, the north of england and into northern ireland, brought in behind these weather fronts which will gradually ease the wayjust a little bit further south joined the cause of the evening and overnight. it is this mechanism that cuts off the supply of cold air we saw on the northerly and replacing it with something south west, hamada direction. no longer the chance of minus five degrees but more like 9 degrees in the forthcoming night. on tuesday, at its brightest across scotland, a scattering of showers through the northern and western isles, clipping into the north of the mainland. once you at south of the mainland. once you at south of the central belt, we pile on the cloud of the canal for rain. the central belt, we pile on the cloud of the canalfor rain. go the central belt, we pile on the cloud of the canal for rain. go for ground as well. maybe the eastern side of the pennines, that cloud high and thinner. but we have to come right down towards the southern counties of england to see any more
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brightness. we will have a lot of cloud around. it will take a good pa rt cloud around. it will take a good part of the day and some hills to your west have a prospect of brightening things up. eastern side of the pennines, eastern side of wales. temperature is a good deal higher than they have been today because we have finally completed that transition from the cooler air into something milder. that frontal system having come back further south through the night and into the first part of wednesday goes further north. to the south of it, this is my concern. there could will be dense fog patches around the england and wells, especially across the southern counties, but they will be found elsewhere. murky to say the very least. brighter skies into the northern parts of scotland, the weather front wafting its way further north, dragging the prospect of rain to the western side of scotland. further south, after that dull start, it may brighten in some
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spots. temperatures 12—13d. wednesday into the rest of the week, eventually, this frontal system pushes right down and then we get into something fresh again to conclude the week. tonight at six. the government has guaranteed that parliament will be given a vote on the final brexit deal. in what's being seen as a concession, mps will be given a chance to debate the bill. there will be new legislation for mps to debate. we'll have legislation that puts it into effect, in other words the house will be able to go through it line by line and agree it line by line. these questions have been pressing for months. this last—minute attempt to climb down brings them into very sharp focus. if mps vote against the deal the government says we'll still leave the eu, but without an agreement. also tonight. the moment an earthquake struck the iran—iraq border. more than 350 people dead
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and thousands injured. the british citizenjailed in iran. for the first time boris johnson admits making a mistake over how he's handled the case. a warning from climate change scientists.
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