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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 14, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. a major milestone on the road to brexit, as mps begin debating the eu withdrawal bill. it will convert european laws into british ones, but it's unlikely to pass smoothly, with more than 160 amendments already tabled. good morning. it's tuesday, 1a november. also this morning: a call for compulsory eye tests for motorists, as new figures show many ignore warnings that they shouldn't be driving. thousands of survivors of a powerful earthquake that struck iran and iraq are spending a second night without shelter. it's more difficult to get another job if you're laid off or have to leave the workplace in your 50s and 60s.
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this morning, i'm speaking to campaigners about the impact that's having. good morning. in sport, it's going to be a world cup without italy after the four—time champions fail to qualify for the tournament for the first time in 60 years. i think it is time to drop the c bomb, christmas with carol. good morning. look at this gorgeous christmas tree. it will be lit up this evening and we have a sneak preview in all its glory. the weather is not glorious for england, wales and northern ireland. it will be fairly cloudy with some patchy rain, limited brightness. forthe north of northern ireland and scotla nd north of northern ireland and scotland it is much more bright with some sunshine. i will have much more details on all of that in 15 minutes. thank you, carol. see you later this morning. good morning. first, our main story. mps will today begin debating a key piece of brexit legislation, the eu withdrawal bill.
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it will help turn european laws into uk ones but opponents including tory rebels have tabled scores of amendments. our political correspondent leila nathoo reports. the prime minister. still the one in charge, theresa may last night the glittering —— at the glittering lord mayor's banquet in london, a break from brexit and potential trouble ahead. a key piece of the government's brexit legislation returns to the commons today and mps are trying to tinker with it. they are trying to tinker with it. they are proposing hundreds of changes to try to influence ministers‘ approach and so yesterday an apparent concession to one of their key demands. i can now confirm that once we have reached an agreement we will bring forward a specific piece of primary legislation to implement that agreement. parliament will be given time to debate, scrutinise and
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vote on the final agreement with strike with the european union. this agreement will only hold if parliament approves it. but with such a fragile majorityjust a handful of tory backbenchers siding with the opposition would lead to a government defeat and those minded to rebel seem unsatisfied with the ta ke to rebel seem unsatisfied with the take it or leave it vote the government has offered.” take it or leave it vote the government has offered. i have to say, a lot of us were insulted by this, i mean, because it sounded so good and then when you dug into the detail you realise this so—called meaningful vote was completely meaningless. there will be more contentious votes here in the coming weeks as mps test the government‘s fragile working majority. our political correspondent alex forsyth joins us from westminster. good morning. a concession, yes, but will it be enough? this is a really significant piece of legislation, bringing every eu law into uk law
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ready for the day we leave, and most mps agree with the idea behind that, so mps agree with the idea behind that, so there is not some sort of legal black hole when we finally x at the european union. but there are details they disagree with. everything from the fact they think it gives too much power to ministers. they are worried about the impact on scotland, northern ireland and wales. that is why the government came up ireland and wales. that is why the government came up with the idea of having a vote on the final brexit deal to try to stop mps voting against it on one part of this bill. but as you heard that hasn‘t gone far enough. mps say it comes to late in the process. we can‘t send this back to brussels to negotiate it. it isa back to brussels to negotiate it. it is a take it or leave it vote and thatis is a take it or leave it vote and that is not good enough. there was a meeting yesterday between the chief whip for the tory party in charge of discipline and tory mps and that was set to get pretty stormy. so far i don‘t think the government has stopped its critics. there are plenty of battles still to come on this bill and today is just the first day mps start to go through it
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line by line. exactly. it looks like it is going to take some time. and we will speak with anna soubry at 8:10am this morning. yes. earlier we saw theresa may at the lord mayor‘s banquet in london. she used the occasion to make her strongest attack yet on russia, in which she accused the putin government of threatening the international order. it is seeking to weaponise information, deploying its state—run media organisations to plant fake stories and photos shopped images in an attempt to so discord in the west and undermine our institutions —— sow. and undermine our institutions —— sow. so i have a very simple message for russia, we know what you are doing and you will not succeed. the television producer and writer, daisy goodwin, who created the itv drama, victoria, has claimed she was groped by a government official during a visit to number ten. she told the radio times the man put his hand on her breast after a meeting to discuss a proposed tv show when david cameron was prime minister. she said she wasn‘t traumatised, but was cross, adding she didn‘t report it at the time.
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thousands of people are spending a second night without shelter in near—freezing conditions after an earthquake caused devastation in parts of iran and iraq. more than a50 people were killed and around 7,000 injured. 0ur correspondent rami ruhayem reports from sulaimaniya, the town nearest the epicentre in iraq. rami what‘s the latest? this is the deadliest earthquake in the world this year. the border town of pol—e zahab here in western iran bore the brunt of it. homes were flattened in seconds, crushing everyone inside. the search for survivors has been frantic. early this morning, iranian officials called off the rescue operation. at this local hospital, many of the injured had stories of narrow escapes. translation: i fell from the balcony down. the earthquake was very strong. this mountainous area is prone to earthquakes.
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power cuts and landslides have made it difficult for rescue teams to get in. the most severely hurt have been airlifted out, some taken to hospital in the iranian capital, tehran. but overwhelmed by the sheer number of injured, the authorities are appealing for people to donate blood. and this is the moment this 7.3—magnitude quake hit in neighbouring iraq. a man runs for his life from the control room of this dam. boulders were tossed around like pebbles. and, with cracks appearing in the structure, there are now concerns about the safety of the dam. a picture of widespread devastation is emerging — hundreds dead, thousands injured, many missing. turkey has sent a convoy of aid trucks, medication, tents and blankets, and many have spent a second night outdoors, terrified by the after—shocks. so far, there have been more than 190 of them. a man and woman have been arrested on suspicion of murdering a teenager who has not been seen
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for nearly a week. 19—year—old gaia, pope who has severe epilepsy, was last seen on the seventh november. dorset police say a 19—year—old man and a 71—year—old woman were arrested after searches took place at two addresses in swanage. officers say they were both known to gaia. a 25—year—old man has been convicted of throwing acid across a crowded london nightclub, injuring 22 people. cctv shown in court showed clubbers clutching their faces and running off the dancefloor when arthur collins, the ex—boyfriend of reality tv star ferne mccann, carried out the attack in april. he was convicted of five counts of grievous bodily harm and nine of actual bodily harm against 14 people. he will be sentenced in december. later this morning we‘ll be speaking to one of the people injured in the attack and a lawyer who represents some of the victims. that‘s just after 7am.
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head teachers representing more than five—thousand schools across england have sent a joint letter to the chancellor, philip hammond, warning of inadequate funding. they say they are increasingly having to ask parents for donations. the government has already promised to move £1.3 billion of education funding into schools, but heads say they need another £i.7 billion of new money. now, how about a story to lighten up the winter gloom? some of the world‘s rarest gemstones are up for sale in geneva this week. to buy them you‘ll need a few spare million, but looking is free, so we sent imogen foulkes for a sneak peak. there is more than a little sparkle in geneva this dull november. every year the jewellery houses compete to show that one special stone, the rarest, the purist, the most vivid.
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but this year there is one extraordinary showstopper. at 163 ca rats, extraordinary showstopper. at 163 carats, this is the largest diamond ever to be put up for auction. now, to show it at its best, or maybe to make sure a potential buyer doesn‘t mistake it for an ice cube, it has been set into a string of emeralds, 5949 of been set into a string of emeralds, 59119 of them. been set into a string of emeralds, 5949 of them. we are expecting in the region of $30 million for it, and it is the largest deflawless diamond ever to come to the market and it is the finest colour, finest clarity and extraordinary proportions. and there is always a temptation with a diamond crystal to cut the largest possible and end up with a stone that maybe is a little lopsided or lumpy or thick just with a stone that maybe is a little lopsided or lumpy or thickjust to keep the weight. not here. this is perfection in every way. pink, yellow, nicholas kommer ring or ——
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necklace, ring or brooch, jewellery lovers are spoilt for choice. but many the look, with these multi— million—dollar pricetags, only a few will be able to buy. that‘s what we will be doing — just having a little look. yeah, having anything like that in my possession, i would feel far too responsible. you‘d have to be followed by security. i don't want that life. laughter what's security. i don't want that life. laughter what‘s going on in the world this morning? pain on the look of his face, isn‘t it. to end in failure to reach the world cup, now we have to think about the world cup without italy. the first time it‘s happened in 60 years. which, if you are, you know, from an english and possibly republic of ireland perspective, isn‘t it good news? some major names missing. the
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netherlands, the usa. i don‘t think they should have their own zero in they should have their own zero in the tournament tournament. the losers‘ tournament. yes. italy have failed to qualify for the world cup for the first time since 1958. they lost their play—off against sweden, after a goal—less draw in the second leg in milan. 0ne italian newspaper says the result is ‘the apocalypse‘. the match ends the career of goalkeeper gianluigi buffon after 175 caps. england manager gareth southgate says he "will not hesitate" to use his young stars in tonight‘s friendly against brazil. three players from the under—21 side have been drafted into the senior side and could be in line to make their debuts. rafael nadal has pulled out of the world tour finals in london with a knee injury, after losing in three sets to david goffin. the world number one is still yet to win the end—of—season event. and dan keating says that there is a culture of fear in british gymnastics and he says he experienced bullying and
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manipulation during his time as an athlete. it was a relief during his time in january. british athlete. it was a relief during his time injanuary. british gymnastics say that there are safeguards that are robust and they say anyone with are robust and they say anyone with a concerned should come forward. thank you very much for that. you will come back with the back papers ina will come back with the back papers in a moment. in the meantime. it is over 50 football, covered in lights, something to brighten a dark morning, it isn‘t carol, because she isn‘t that tall. morning, it isn‘t carol, because she isn't that tall. she is about five foot eight. look at that, gorgeous. morning. good morning. it is gorgeous. it is a lovely way to describe it. look at that christmas tree. it is a daunting sparkly lights with silver bobbles on it as well. —— it is adorned in in. as soon as well. —— it is adorned in in. as soon as this is over, the lights will be smack —— will be stripped. the tree will be lit at around 6pm
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to begin the christmas spirit. the weather is not very christmas lights. we had snow in scotland yesterday. today it is much more miles. for some parts of the uk the temperature at the moment is 1a degrees higher than it was this time yesterday morning, so quite a change. and generally the forecast for all of us today is a cloudy one and also a mild one with some exceptions. the exceptions will be across scotland. we start the forecast at 9am across scotland with showers in the north—west. for much of the rest of scotland it is a dry start, the cloud will not and we will see some sunshine. as we move south into england, there is a lot more cloud across england today and we‘re looking at some patchy rain, it isa we‘re looking at some patchy rain, it is a bit heavy at the moment, it will ease and ten to be mainly in the west by first thing it is in the midwest, the midlands, and it is grey and murky to start the day, but
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much more mild than it was yesterday. to the south—west of england it is a similar story and the same for wales as well with a weather front in the south, so it is cloudy with patchy rain around, murky conditions. northern ireland has something a little bit brighter in the north and that will carry on through the course of the day. so in scotla nd through the course of the day. so in scotland and the far north of northern ireland we will see some sunshine today. it will be pleasant with temperatures in double figures. it will be windy in the north of scotla nd it will be windy in the north of scotland with prolific showers later that are likely to be heavy. england, wales and the rest of northern ireland will have a cloudy day with some brightness. that will be limited. and some spots of rain which will be largely in the west on the coasts and the hills. as we had on into the evening and overnight period, once again it is going to be a cold night in scotland with some frost and patchy fog around but for england, wales and northern ireland, northern ireland to an lesser extent, seeing some fog, some of which will be dense, likely to be in
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the midlands, around lincolnshire, for example, north wales, some of it will be slow to clear first thing tomorrow morning. as a result, where we have the cloud and fog, it won‘t be very cold, but where we have the clear skies it is. and then heading through the course of tomorrow, where we start with clear skies we will have some sunshine. it will be bright tomorrow. fairly cloudy. some brightness and spots of rain coming out of the cloud, particularly so across england and wales. still windy in the north with some showers and later we will see some rain coming in. and as we head into thursday well the rain will be across the north—west of the country sinking steadily southwards. they will be a fair bit of cloud around, some brightness and we are still going to be in double figures. so in essence there is not a lot going on with the weather. some of us will see some rain. it will be cold for some. it will be mild for some. don‘t forget the fog tomorrow morning which could be dense and may be problematic. 0k, we have been
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warned. thank you. we will see you through the morning. it looks rather lovely because it is dark. thank you. that tree is wonderfully colour—coordinated. do you think she planned that? probably. she's wonderful! you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: ministers are bracing themselves for a parliamentary battle as the eu withdrawal bill, the key piece of brexit legislation, returns to the commons. theresa may has launched her strongest attack on russia yet, accusing moscow of meddling in elections and spreading fake news. let‘s take a look at today‘s papers. you mention theresa may and russia, the story on the front page of the daily mail. the story on the right—hand side, daisy goodwin, one of the stories we mentioned earlier, she was groped in number 10, the writer of itv‘s victoria programme.
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couldn‘t remember the word for it then, programme! the times talking about theresa may, we saw her making that speech earlier on breakfast, making an outspoken attack on russia for using fake news to sow discord in britain and other western nations. you can see some of the pictures they have used inside and made up stories about particular pictures, and it is snowy and cold, carol has been talking about that, this is from aberdeenshire. and this story, a handful of nuts five days a week makes you much more healthy. any nuts, brazil nuts, cashew nuts. what is your topknot? dry roasted peanuts. probably not that -- top nut. honey roasted cashews, they are magnificent. i don't think it includes being roasted but there you go! two johnsons on the front page of the daily mirror this morning,
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and househunting down under. stanley johnson is going to be one of the celebrities in the jungle johnson is going to be one of the celebrities in thejungle —— and. this is richard ratcliffe, who was on the programme yesterday. david davis has said there will be a vote in parliament on the final brexit deal, the daily telegraph talking about it and theresa may talking about it and theresa may talking about putin. and good news, talking about putin. and good news, talking about climate change, it could be that fewer dive from winter cold in the uk. what have you got? budget or toys ? the uk. what have you got? budget or toys? budget first -- fewer dive from. let's go with budget. in the financial times front page, first—time buyers hope for budget stamp duty cut. this may be something... we‘ve got the budget next week, loads of people, business lobby groups, shops, retailers asking for stuff from the budget.
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the financial times is saying philip hammond planning a stamp duty cut for first—time buyers next week, that could be one to keep an eye out for. a big decision. next wednesday? it is. let‘s do the tory one. hasbro toying with matel megamerger —— toy one. it has been a while! could end up one. it has been a while! could end up being my little pony and bar being under the same brand, that would be a huge merger locally —— and barbie. that could impact the price of toys and the kind of toys you get. thanks, good toy news. certainly giving them a bit of publicity! italy crashing out of the world cup in all of the sports pages. all the headlines are a bit
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like this. there's also a man amir in one of the papers. —— mama mia. the apocalypse was one of the lines in the italian papers. some thinking about what they should be doing instead of watching sweden at the world cup, suggesting cinema trips and going to their local village and concerts and things like that. england's cricketers doing their teambuilding ahead of the ashes, moeen ali cuddling a koala and then they get down to business and they doa they get down to business and they do a bit of paint falling to look that already. you're not afraid of injuries, stuart broad showing off a bruise on his arm quite proudly. —— pain bawling to look ready. —— paint bawling. there's a conversation here about cats being put on a diet. pet
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owners underestimate how much exercise they need with more than 1 million staying indoors. around one in ten of britain‘s 11 million cats are house cats who never go outdoors unsupervised. do you know it's official, working 9—to—5 isn‘t a way to make a living? two thirds of workers would prefer to start and finished the day earlier with eight to four being chosen by 25% of people. i would agree with that. it's probably a lot of parents. there‘s a big parental issue involved. for the same survey, they discovered we actually work 0.6 of an hour less than 20 years ago, so how are you spending your extra 36 minutes? i know how you are spending yours! what's that? i was looking at his phone and getting crucial news insights. thanks very much for that!
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thank you very much, both of you. drivers who are told their eyesight isn‘t good enough for them to be behind the wheel are carrying on driving. that‘s according to research by the association of optometrists. they want compulsory eye tests to be introduced, a campaign backed by the family of natalie wade, who was killed by a partially sighted driver. 0ur reporter ali fortescue has more. if she walked into a room, as the saying goes, she lit it up. she enjoyed every moment and was so looking forward to getting married. 28—year—old natalie wade died on her weight to buy a dressing down my wedding dress. she was hit by a driver with poor eyesight. there's a lwa ys driver with poor eyesight. there's always an empty chair and christmas, birthday, the day she would have been married, they are still very painful. the driver who killed natalie was blinded in one eye and partially sighted in the other but
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he died before being tried for dangerous driving. but natalie is just one of 70 people who are killed or seriously injured in serious incidents involving bad eyesight last year. the legal standard for eyesight involves being able to read a number plate from 20 metres but that‘s something that‘s only tested when you first take your test. at the moment peoplejust when you first take your test. at the moment people just need to fill out a form like this every ten years and that involves answering a question about your eyesight and if you‘re over 70 you have to fill out a slightly more comprehensive form every three years, but it‘s still a question of a tick in a box, there is no requirement to take a natural i test. the mechanism of self reporting isn‘t always reliable. we know that vision can change gradually over time so drivers might not be aware of their deterioration to their vision. the association of optometrists don‘t have a legal requirement to do anything if they‘re concerned about a patient‘s driving, it‘s down to the driver stopping more than one in three of their optometrist surveyed has seen
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a driver in the last three months he continues to drive despite being colbert vision is below the legal standard. nine in ten believe the current tests are insufficient and they want to see a change in the law. what we're calling for his vision screening to be carried out for all drivers when they first apply for the driving licence and then the requirement to prove that they continue to meet that standard every ten years. but the concern is it‘s not just every ten years. but the concern is it‘s notjust eyesight that needs testing. this is an enormous worried. we that surely got something we can point at and you can measure it and say i health is a big thing but there‘s all sorts of other medical issues which are simply not being taken into account as to whether people are fit to drive, and! as to whether people are fit to drive, and i think there should be. the department of transport say that all drivers are required by law to make sure their eyesight is good enough to drive. they also say if a driver experiences any changes to their eyesight or has a condition that could affect their driving they must notify the dvla and speak to an
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optician. ali fortescue, bbc news. we will be talking about that later in the programme, will be interesting to see what you think about that. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: it‘s the number one chronic disease in the uk but not much attention is focused on the risks of diabetes during pregnancy. we‘ll be finding out about the latest research just after 6:30am. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. something else we want to know from you this morning, carol is in covent garden with a big christmas tree. it's garden with a big christmas tree. it‘s christmas light season. in your house, when do you officially go full christmas? not until around the seventh or eighth of december. is that a bit early? so a three-week buildup. you have to go and get the treat. what if you go on december the first? no. what about you -- get the first? no. what about you -- get the treat. we are two weeks, around the treat. we are two weeks, around the 15th -- the treat. we are two weeks, around the 15th —— get the tree. let us
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know if you go super early. would be interesting to see. maybe some people have gone already. you never know! really? time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. a man has beenjailed following a hit—and—run in south london that left a woman paralysed. pascual petgrave, who‘s 21, has been found guilty of causing serious injury by dangerous driving. the car he was driving ploughed into two women in norwood high street in may 2016. he‘s been sentenced to 2.5 years in prison. a rise in the number of homeless families in reading has prompted
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the local council to buy temporary housing units for them to live in. the prefabricated homes are being driven to a site in caversham park. there‘ll be 28 in total, stacked in two storey blocks. a lorry driver has been branded a hero after driving his lorry in the way of a gang of moped thieves preventing them from getting away. this footage was filmed last thursday in fitzrovia showing the suspects getting increasingly frustrated by the driver, as he stopped and then refused to move. use the horn to scare them away and make them run away because i cannot stop three guys by myself. 0nce make them run away because i cannot stop three guys by myself. once i saw there not going away and they arejust moving saw there not going away and they are just moving around the lorry, just make sure they cannot move the moped or the scooter from there. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube there is a good service on all lines this morning. 0n the trains, southeastern has delays between st pancras and ashford because of signalling problems. 0n the roads, in acton the main traffic lights have been replaced by temporary ones causing delays on the aao at gypsy corner. in hackney, rendlesham road and monteagle way are closed following a stabbing overnight. and finally, central london,
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waterloo bridge is down to one lane for roadworks until christmas. let‘s have a check on the weather now. good morning. some good news to start the day, not feeling quite as cold as it did this time yesterday. it means that it is rather cloudy. this cloud is going to stay with us for much of the day. there‘s the chance of a spot or two of light rain and rizal mainly towards the north but most places staying dry. a gentle south—westerly breeze is what‘s helping to make things feel less cold than yesterday, the maximum temperature up to ten. we hang on to the cloud into the evening and overnight, still the chance of some light rain and some drizzle but also a bit of mist and murk developing and if we get a clear spell overnight, some quite dense fog. the minimum temperature not dropping from today‘s maximum, a mild night, ten or 12. not dropping from today‘s maximum, a mild night, ten or12. a not dropping from today‘s maximum, a mild night, ten or 12. a misty and murky start tomorrow and mist and
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fog will be slow to clear at first into low cloud. the cloud will lift a little turning brighter into the afternoon and temperatures getting up afternoon and temperatures getting up to 12. heading through thursday, a similarday up to 12. heading through thursday, a similar day until thursday night when that cold front sweeps through. again some rain not especially heavy but once it clears it leads to fresh airas we head but once it clears it leads to fresh air as we head into friday. a much colder day on friday, that fresher air bringing some sunshine, maximum temperature getting up to nine but expect a bit of frost as we head into saturday morning. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it‘s back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. it‘s 6:30am. we‘ll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: as the former—boyfriend of reality tv star ferne mccann is found guilty of carrying out an acid attack at a london nightclub, we‘ll hear from one of his victims. also this morning: are you a bit of a language buff or is it all,
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well, double dutch? we‘ll hear why learning a foreign language is more important than ever. # heart ache on the dance floor. # moving through my mind. and he‘s given up the mean streets of walford for the lure of country. and he‘s given up the mean streets shane ritchie will be here to tell us about his new album. good morning. here‘s a summary of this morning‘s main stories from bbc news. mps will today begin debating a key piece of brexit legislation, the eu withdrawal bill. it will help turn european laws into uk ones but opponents including tory rebels have tabled scores of amendments. yesterday the brexit secretary davies —— david davis promised parliament would get a vote on the final brexit deal.
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theresa may spent the evening at the lord mayor‘s banquet in london. aside from brexit, she used the occasion to make her strongest attack yet on russia, in which she accused the putin government of threatening the international order. it is seeking to weaponise information, deploying its state—run media organisations to plant fake stories and photoshopped images in an attempt to sow discord in the west and undermine our institutions. so i have a very simple message for russia, we know what you are doing and you will not succeed. the television producer and writer, daisy goodwin, who created the itv drama, victoria, has claimed she was groped by a government official during a visit to number ten. she told the radio times the man put his hand on her breast after a meeting to discuss a proposed tv show when david cameron was prime minister. she said she wasn‘t traumatised, but was cross, adding she didn‘t report it at the time. downing street said they take
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all allegations very seriously and would look into any formal complaint, should one be made. thousands of people are spending a second night without shelter in near—freezing conditions after an earthquake caused devastation in parts of iran and iraq. more than a50 people were killed and around 7,000 injured. officials in iran say the rescue operation after the earthquake on sunday has largely been completed. a man and woman have been arrested on suspicion of murdering a teenager who has not been seen for nearly a week. 19—year—old gaia pope, who has severe epilepsy, was last seen on the seventh november. dorset police say a 19—year—old man and a 71—year—old woman were arrested after searches took place at two addresses in swanage. officers say they were both known to gaia. a 25—year—old man has been convicted of throwing acid across a crowded london nightclub, injuring 22 people. cctv shown in court showed clubbers clutching their faces and running off the dancefloor when arthur collins, the ex—boyfriend of reality
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tv star ferne mccann, carried out the attack in april. he was convicted of five counts of grievous bodily harm and nine of actual bodily harm against 1a people. he will be sentenced in december. head teachers representing more than 5,000 schools across england have sent a joint letter to the chancellor, philip hammond, warning of inadequate funding. they say they are increasingly having to ask parents for donations. the government has already promised to move £1.3 billion of education funding into schools, but heads say they need another £1.7 billion of new money. and the very best headline in the newspaper today is spaghetti oops. that is because. sad story for italians everywhere because there is no italian team in the world cup. for some people it is unthinkable. but it is going to happen. so many
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people follow the team. they have won the tournament four times. look at the paint on the goalkeeper's face, bufon. that sums it up, his la st face, bufon. that sums it up, his last game for italy. the manager hasn't resigned yet. it is the papers, the italian papers... you know. well done, sweden. congratulations, sweden. italy have failed to qualify for the world cup for the first time since 1958. they lost their play—off against sweden, running out of ideas against determined opposition. even veteran keeper gianluigi buffon was sent into the attack in injury time, but it finished goal—less in milan. so sweden are off to russia, while italy‘s manager giampiero ventura has resigned and buffon has quit international football. 0ne italian newspaper described the result as ‘the apocalypse‘. another suggested candidates to replace the manager, who has not actually officially resigned yet. the republic of ireland could join england at next summer‘s world cup if they can beat denmark in dublin this evening. the first leg in copenhagen ended 0—0 and ireland manager
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martin 0‘neill knows his side will have to do a lot more going forward to beat the danes. i think that we will try to be a bit more expensive if we can, try and deal with the ball a wee bit better and if that‘s the case, well, we wa nt to and if that‘s the case, well, we want to try to win the game, we have to find a way to win a match. and these players have been unable to do that in the last couple of years. england versus brazil has produced some classic moments from the past. gordon banks‘ save from pele in 1970s, in the maracana in ‘84. tonight england manager gareth southgate says he "will not hesitate" to use his young stars in tonight‘s friendly against brazil. three players have been drafted into the senior side from the under—21‘s and could receive debuts. this follows five players earning their first caps in the draw against germany, including man—of—the—match reuben loftus—cheek. it is incredible really that he has
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had so few in the premier league that we are putting him in that environment, but we believe in him, he did really well, but now, you know, sometimes the first game is easier because nobody is aware of you. the boss of the professional footballers‘ association has called for under 11s to be banned from heading balls untilfurther research has been done into the possible impact on players‘ brains. gordon taylor has also defended his organisation against accusations they‘ve been slow to deal with the issue of a potential link between heading and dementia. the issue was highlighted in alan shearer‘s bbc documentary on sunday. all i can say is when we see request for help we don‘t turn anybody down and anybody who wishes to know what we are doing in this area is very welcome to come and go through all our files, not just welcome to come and go through all ourfiles, notjust for welcome to come and go through all our files, notjust for the welcome to come and go through all our files, not just for the moment, but i would say since the ‘90s. moeen will play for his first game of the tour after getting to know
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some of the wildlife in townsville. he will play the cricket australia 11, which begins tomorrow. they look close to finalising the team with gary ballance left out again.|j close to finalising the team with gary ballance left out again. ijust love that picture of a koala. it is quite cute. commonwealth champion dan keatings says there is a very real "culture of fea r" within british gymnastics, after claims of appalling leadership by a group of coaches. keatings says he experienced bullying and manipulation during his career as an athlete but he wasn‘t able to speak out for fear of losing his funding. british gymnastics say their safeguarding processes are robust and they encourage anyone with a concern to come forward. rafael nadal‘s season is over after he pulled out of the world tour finals in london with injury. the world number one lost his opening match despite saving four match points in the second set against david goffin to force a decider. the belgian seventh seed came through 6—4 in the third set and less than an hour later nadal pulled out of the tournament with a knee injury. he hasn‘t ever won this event. now, when was the last time you were told off by your mum. for england head coach eddiejones it was on saturday.
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he‘s apologised for swearing on tv, after receiving a telling off from his 93—year—old mother. jones admitted to being frustrated by his side‘s lacklustre performance at twickenham, and was caught on camera losing his cool during saturday‘s 21—8 win over argentina. usually i am pretty good, you know. and i have apologised for the language i use. i got a phone call from my mother this morning, 93, wrapping me over the knuckles. she still tells me not to swear. so i am in trouble with my mother. so that isa in trouble with my mother. so that is a big enough punishment for me. i am in the dog house and i certainly won‘t do it again. and because he has been told off i believe it won‘t happen again. and because he has been told off i believe it won't happen again. once your mum speaks, you just have to listen. it happens to me all the time. what happened last time? whingeing about my kids. she is a stern 1970s midwife, so it is official advice as well as motherly
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advice. oh, so honest. thank you. see you later. good morning. stories about diabetes are never far from the news but less attention is focused on the risks of the disease during pregnancy. every year thousands of women in the uk develop the condition. it can have an impact on the health of both the mums—to—be, and their unborn babies. now a new study suggests the risks can be reduced through a new way of monitoring the disease. dr eleanor scott is from the university of leeds, which led the research. morning to you. let‘s just talk about this type of diabetes, because it can happen when people — when women are pregnant. yes, it can. diabetes is very common, one in seven otherwise healthy women will have diabetes in pregnancy. the most common form is gestation or diabetes. the woman develops it in pregnancy. we also see it with women with type one and two diabetes before they get pregnant —— gestational. how is it helpful going forward , gestational. how is it helpful going forward, how will it impact on the
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nhs and other organisations? the biggest risk of any woman with diabetes in pregnancy is her baby is going to be exposed to too much extra glucose and grow too big. that can lead to problems with delivery and a problem for the baby long—term. and in order to get the blood sugar back down to normal we normally get them to monitor the blood sugar using a finger prick checker. but what we‘ve now got available is continuous glucose monitoring. that is able to monitor the blood sugar every five minutes across a 24—hour day for up to two weeks at a time. and we have been looking at using that to try to establish what the glucose patterns are across the 24—hour date that are associated with women getting these convocations in pregnancy —— day. and you found it fluctuates a lot. yes, very much. the period that we particularly see it is overnight. we wouldn‘t normally detect it if we did the finger prick checker. so in terms of the fact that having
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diabetes can have when you are pregnant. in terms of the mother and child as well, what should we be looking for? so, for the babies, particularly, it is that the extra sugarin particularly, it is that the extra sugar in the mum‘s bloodstream goes to the baby and is extra calories for the baby and it grows too big. that can lead to problems during labour and delivery, increase the chance of caesarean section and risk to the babies, and the chance of a baby needing to go to neonatal intensive care. what about the long—term impact? intensive care. what about the long-term impact? we know that babies exposed to mum having diabetes, if it is not controlled, they are at increased risk of diabetes. so what is the chance and could it be rolled out and hell helpful would it be? a study we participated in that was led by canada and the uk which has only recently been published has shown that if you give women continuous glucose monitors during pregnancy
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that it substantially improves the amount of time they spend in glucose targets and also has an impact on the baby‘s outcomes. so the babies are smaller and are less likely to need neonatal care. what should these mums be doing and what should they be checked out for? yes, so, women who already have diabetes have to seek advice before they think about getting pregnant because there isa about getting pregnant because there is a lot we can do to improve things beforehand. women who are potentially at risk of type 2 diabetes are the same women at risk of gestational diabetes. that is women who are overweight or have a history of diabetes, come from south asian family origin or previously have had a big baby. they should be tested in pregnancy so we can do something about it. thank you very much indeed. carol is out and about this morning. she is in covent garden with a rather big christmas tree behind
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her. we have been asking you about getting into the festive mood. 0ne viewer, look at this, definitely is. this is from quest, who says he has gone very early. this was over the weekend. it november. really? you are genuinely upset. weekend. it november. really? you are genuinely upsetlj weekend. it november. really? you are genuinely upset. i was shocked when i went into the supermarket and they are playing merry christmas. it is november. i went surprisingly early on mince pies, mid september i was mince pieing it. carol is not very impressed with this. the tree looks beautiful.m does look beautiful and we are in covent garden and that tree stands 55 feet tall, it has between 25000 and 30,000 lightbulbs and it‘s gorgeous. tonight it will be lit for real, we‘ve seen a sneak preview this morning and after the programme the lights will be switched off.
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festivities kick—off at covent garden at 5:30 p.m., the cast of 42nd street coming down and they will be performing, pudsey bear will switch on the lights as well. he‘s going to dance and he has some special guests. i‘ve been trying to drag out from the covent garden chaps who they are but they are saying nothing, other than they are very special. something to see in london this evening. cloudier for most of us compared to yesterday, and milder, but some exceptions, as ever, especially across scotland. 9am across scotland, showers across the north—west but most of scotland at this stage is dry with variable cloud and also some brightness. that cloud and also some brightness. that cloud will thin and melt through the days. across england, it is cloudier and again we have a couple of weather fronts sinking south with some rain on them at the moment, that rain will turn more patchy as
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we head through the day. that same band of rain affecting parts of wales as well this morning. quite a murky, grey start to the day with a lot of cloud across wales. in northern ireland, some brighter brea ks northern ireland, some brighter breaks but the best of the brightness today will be in the north of northern ireland. for the rest of northern ireland it‘s going to be fairly cloudy. if we look at the weather for the rest of the day across the uk, you can see for england and wales it will remain fairly cloudy. a bit of brightness developing but not a lot. we‘ll still have some patchy light rain, most of which will be in parts of the west on the hills and coasts. in scotla nd the west on the hills and coasts. in scotland and the north of northern ireland, we‘re looking at a bright day with some sunshine and it will feel pleasant in the sunshine. for most today we will see temperatures peaking in double figures, as opposed to single figures like yesterday. as we head through the evening and overnight, the showers, which will be heavier in the afternoon and more prolific in scotland, will ease. here it will be
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windy. under clear skies, a widespread frost with patchy fog. for northern ireland, england and wales, a lot of cloud and spots of rain but also fog developing. we see it in many areas but it will be especially so across lincolnshire, the midlands and east anglia and some of that could be dense and slow to clear tomorrow. through the course of tomorrow, again fairly cloudy for england, wales and northern ireland to start with. the fog slow to lift. still some spots of rain, especially so in the western. whereas for scotland, you‘re in for a brighter day once again with some sunshine but we should see some of the brightness extending into northern england through the day but by the end of the day we‘ll have a weather front coming into the north—west, introducing wet and windy weather, and during thursday that will sink steadily south, leaving us with a fairly cloudy day on thursday but not particularly cold. temperatures around where they should be at this
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stage in november. thanks very much. i love everything about the christmas tree but the decorations up a little bit too early, nothing to do with you! good clarification there! almost a third of people aged 50 to 64 are not in work and many of those feel like they‘re trapped, according to research from a charity out today. sean‘s taking a look. good morning. a lot of these issues will be familiar to a lot of people. this is research from the centre for ageing better, looking at those aged between 50 and 65. and a million of them, almost a third of that age group, are out of work not because they want to be but because of issues such as ill health, caring responsibilities or redundancy. that can really take it‘s toll on someone‘s confidence and of course finances. qurab ahmed is 55 and tod us her story. when my daughter became ill and we
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learned what the circumstances were going to be, i had sort of given up and thought, this is my life now, i‘m going to be a full—time carer, i‘m going to be a full—time carer, i‘m not going to be able to go back to work and i need to think about letting my employers know that that would be the position. i was always encouraged not to make a decision just then and let things pan out. i‘m so grateful that my employer was encouraging and supported me through this difficult time, and we kept in touch. also that feeling that i‘m still wanted, that they needed me at work. not many employers provide that flexibility. some people will just stop and they‘ll never be able to get back into work. sympathetic employer for qurab but that isn‘t necessarily the case for everyone. jemma mouland is senior programme manager at the centre for ageing better, which carried out this research. when we look at qurab‘s situation,
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she had carer responsibilities that weren‘t there before hand. if you‘re ina similar weren‘t there before hand. if you‘re in a similar situation and you‘re in work, what can you do to aid any going back to work in the future? absolutely, if you‘re in work already you have the right to request books about working but it‘s up request books about working but it‘s up to your employer to determine whether they accept the request —— flexible working. it‘s interesting for this age group, they are the prime age for caring, and employers need to make sure they offer that flexibility that enables those ca re rs flexibility that enables those carers to retain their work as well as managing caring responsibilities. if you‘ve ended up out of work because of that and you‘re looking to get back into the workplace, how do employers look at the fact your cv says or five years you‘ve been caring for a family member, how do they treat it? it varies by employer but something we found in our research was there‘s a perception that employers are less willing to
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employ older workers, especially if they‘ve been out of the labour market for a while, and potentially favouring younger employees instead. that‘s a shame because we‘re talking around 1 million people between 50-64 around 1 million people between 50—61; who are ready and willing to be in the workplace, and these individuals have a lifetime of skills and experience they can bring to work and employers aren‘t taking full advantage of that at the moment. is there a reason why it might hit people harder after 50 if they lose their job might hit people harder after 50 if they lose theirjob than younger people? there‘s pressure is on all age groups, as we often talk about. what we‘re finding is they are often forced out of work due to issues like ill health and caring responsibilities or in voluntary redundancy but they are finding it difficult to get back into work. they‘re more likely to be out of work for longer than younger age groups and least likely to get a job. in our research we found there was a whole host of different issues
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for this age group, to highlight a few that were coming up, issues with ill health and caring responsibilities were a significant barrierfor responsibilities were a significant barrier for people getting back into work because they really needed that flexibility at work which wasn‘t on offer. another issue that was quite common was the sense employers were perhaps less willing to recruit older workers for various different reasons, and that had a negative impact on people‘s self—confidence. individuals started to see themselves as too old to be at work and almost gave up on the idea of ever working against quite if you‘re having those thoughts, what‘s the first step you should take? there‘s lots of employment support available and it‘s about engaging with the support and not feeling it‘s not there for you and you‘re not able to access it. don‘t be shy of putting yourself forward for these opportunities. it‘s really important to have that first conversation about your needs for flexibility at
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work with potential employers. there‘s the possibility that flexibility will be offered if it‘s asked for, but we know that‘s not an easy thing for this work group to do. both national and local government need to do more to provide better support for this age group, to support them to have those conversations and to get back into work. gemma, thanks very much. if you‘re familiar with these stories. and if you‘re over 50 and struggling to find work let us know. tweet us @bbcbreakfast or drop us an e—mail, bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk. they are the actors breaking down barriers in scottish theatre. the first group of students from the uk‘s only degree course for deaf performers is taking to the stage with a new production that blends british sign language and english. it‘s hoped the adaptation of caryl churchill‘s play love and information will challenge perceptions and make sign language more visible. 0ur scotland correspondent lorna gordon went to meet them. it isa
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it is a play with big themes that affect us all. love and how we make sense of things in an increasingly frenetic world. the 50 short scenes, each with a different set of characters, are all performed by ten actors who happened to be deaf. i think the play‘s very, very powerful because it is able to show different perspectives in that deaf people are similar to hearing people in that environment and that we‘re all similar, we‘re all the same and i think that play really demonstrates that. mr rushmore, if you could just open the door... their performance in a mixture of english, captioning and british sign language a chance to showcase the actors‘ talents. and british sign language itself. it's a wonderful opportunity and we‘ve really enjoyed it. absolutely because sign language can be so big, so rich, so
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expressive and in a theatre setting means we can show also solve levels of emotion. the actors, all students at glasgow‘s royal conservator, are on the country‘s only degree course for deaf performers. embracing deafness as part of their identity and hoping their performance will help others do the same. it's a great way for me to carry on and show people that it‘s to carry on and show people that it's ok to carry on and show people that it‘s ok to be who you are, because i kind of old before i was being shuffled off into the background like i was a liability or i was just a burden to someone else, i thought i'll a burden to someone else, i thought i‘ll say nothing and back off, now i‘m thinking, you know what, i‘m going to step forward and let them see me for who i am. the scottish government recently announced plans to integrate the use of sign language into everyday life and the play‘s director believes this performance will help with challenging perceptions in the theatre and the arts. i think it's about british sign language being more visible, being more out in the
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open and recognised as a language. soi open and recognised as a language. so i think this production and the degree programme here at the conservator are is part of that movement. another step in showing that british sign language should be celebrated as a language in its own right. lorna gordon, bbc news, glasgow. that looks fantastic. carol is in covent garden this morning, she‘s got a big christmas tree with her, doing the weather from their. people have got in contact after we showed a picture of someone with their decorations up over the weekend. claire said it never stops, carols all year long, i leave decorations up all year long, i leave decorations up all year round in strategic places that nobody can reach! claire! i leave them up by mistake! john said it starts on the third of december this year once i am home run the banter dash. i suspect we all have our own traditions, is november to early? mike says
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christmas eve is when it‘s starts, boxing day is when it ends —— santa dash. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m alex bushill. a man has beenjailed following a hit—and—run in south london that left a woman paralysed. pascual petgrave, who‘s 21, has been found guilty of causing serious injury by dangerous driving. the car he was driving ploughed into two women in norwood high street in may 2016. he‘s been sentenced to 2.5 years in prison. a video showing what to do in event of a terror attack is to be made available to schools across the capital. pupils will be urged to run to safety, hide and tell police if they get caught up in a knife or gun attack. the lesson isn‘t compulsory but the met has asked head teachers to ensure their students are prepared for the unlikely event of an act of terror. a lorry driver has been branded a hero after driving his lorry in the way of a gang of moped thieves preventing them from getting away.
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this footage was filmed last thursday in fitzrovia showing the suspects getting increasingly frustrated by the driver, as he stopped and then refused to move. i used the horn to scare them away and make them run away because i knew cannot stop three guys by myself. once i saw they‘re not going away and they are just moving around the lorry, just make sure they cannot move the moped or the scooter from there. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube there is a good service on all lines this morning. 0n the trains, southeastern has delays between st pancras and ashford because of signalling problems. 0n the roads, in acton the main traffic lights have been replaced by temporary ones causing delays on the aao at gypsy corner. it is moving pretty well so far. in hackney, rendlesham road and monteagle way are closed following a stabbing overnight. and finally, central london: waterloo bridge is down to one lane let‘s have a check on the weather now. good morning.
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some good news to start the day, not feeling quite as cold as it did this time yesterday. what it does mean is that it is rather cloudy. this cloud is going to stay with us for much of the day. there‘s the chance of a spot or two of light rain and drizzle mainly towards the north but most places staying dry. a gentle south—westerly breeze is what‘s helping to make things feel less cold than yesterday. the maximum temperature up to ten. we hang on to the cloud into the evening and overnight, still the chance of some light rain and some drizzle, but also a bit of mist and murk developing. if we get a clear spell overnight, some quite dense fog. the minimum temperature not dropping from today‘s maximum, a mild night, nine orten. a misty and murky start tomorrow and mist and fog will be slow to clear at first into low cloud. the cloud will lift a little, turning brighter into the afternoon and temperatures getting up to 12. heading through thursday, a similar day until thursday night where that cold front sweeps through. again some rain not especially heavy, but once it clears it leads
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to fresher air as we head into friday. a much colder day for friday, that fresher air bringing some sunshine, maximum temperature getting up to nine, but expect a bit of frost as we head into saturday morning. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it‘s back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. a major milestone on the road to brexit as mps begin debating the eu withdrawal bill. it will convert european laws into british ones,
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but it‘s unlikely to pass smoothly with more than 160 amendments already tabled. good morning. it‘s tuesday, november 1a. also this morning: after a man is convicted of an acid attack in a packed nightclub, one of his victims tells us how it‘s changed her life. a call for compulsory eye tests for motorists as new figures show many ignore warnings that they shouldnt be driving. good morning. living costs are on the up and i am going to look at how prices are rising and that will affect decisions in next week‘s budget. good morning. in sport, it‘s going to be a world cup without italy
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after the four—time champions fail to qualify for the tournament for the first time in 60 years. and carol is getting into the christmas spirit already. good morning from covent garden. you can see the beautiful christmas tree behind me. it has been lit especially for us. straight after brea kfast especially for us. straight after breakfast this morning it will go off. then it will be lit again this evening. the first time covent garden and children in need have worked together. scotland and northern ireland in with some bright and sunny weather. for england, wales and the rest of northern ireland it is fairly mild with spots of rain. i will have more in 15 minutes. thanks, carol. we will have more at 7:15am. good morning. first, our main story. mps will today begin debating a key piece of brexit legislation, the eu withdrawal bill. it will help turn european laws into uk ones but opponents including tory rebels have tabled scores of amendments. 0ur political correspondent leila nathoo reports. the prime minister.
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still the one in charge, theresa may last night at the glittering lord mayor‘s banquet in london, a break from brexit and potential trouble ahead. a key piece of the government‘s brexit legislation returns to the commons today, and mps are trying to tinker with it. they are proposing hundreds of changes to try to influence ministers‘ approach, and so yesterday an apparent concession to one of their key demands. i can now confirm that once we have reached an agreement we will bring forward a specific piece of primary legislation to implement that agreement. parliament will be given time to debate, scrutinise and vote on the final agreement we strike with the european union. this agreement will only hold if parliament approves it. but with such a fragile majority, just a handful of tory backbenchers siding with the opposition would lead to a government defeat.
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and those minded to rebel seem unsatisfied with the take it or leave it vote the government has offered. i have to say, a lot of us were insulted by this. i mean, because it sounded so good and then when you dug into the detail you realise this so—called meaningful vote was completely meaningless. there will be more contentious votes here in the coming weeks as mps test the government‘s fragile working majority. 0ur political correspondent alex forsyth joins us from westminster. we heard from david davis yesterday, parliament will get a vote on the final offer, the final bill. is it enough to stave off any rebellion? many mps agree with the broad idea behind this withdrawal bill and they recognise that there has to be something in place when we leave the eu to fill the hole left by the regulations and laws that we
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currently abide by. it is lots of the detail of this pill that they are not happy with. everything from the fact that some think it gives uncheck power to ministers. 0thers concerned about the impact on wales, northern ireland and scotland. there was a threat that tory mps from the backbenches and labour mps would come together to vote against the government. that is why the government. that is why the government has said that they will have an act of parliament with a final brexit deal to try to stop the rebellion. as you heard from leila, that hasn‘t gone far enough. many mps say they haven‘t got the chance to send to read is a mate to brussels to negotiate. it is a take it or leave it vote. so it hasn‘t so far pierced those threatening to rebel. the passage of the bill starting today is still looking very tricky. ok. i know it is going to be a long process. thank you very much. earlier we saw theresa may at the lord mayor‘s banquet in london. she used the occasion to make her strongest attack yet on russia, in which she accused the putin government of threatening
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the international order. it is seeking to weaponise information, deploying its state—run media organisations to plant fake stories and photoshopped images in an attempt to sow discord in the west and undermine our institutions. so i have a very simple message for russia, we know what you are doing and you will not succeed. the television producer and writer, daisy goodwin, who created the itv drama, victoria, has claimed she was groped by a government official during a visit to number ten. she told the radio times the man put his hand on her breast after a meeting to discuss a proposed tv show when david cameron was prime minister. she said she wasn‘t traumatised, but was cross, adding she didn‘t report it at the time. downing street said they take all allegations very seriously and would look into any formal complaint, should one be made. thousands of people are spending a second night without shelter
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in near—freezing conditions after an earthquake caused devastation in parts of iran and iraq. more than a50 people were killed and around 7,000 injured. sarah corker reports. this is the deadliest earthquake in the world this year. the border town of pol—e zahab here in western iran bore the brunt of it. homes were flattened in seconds, crushing everyone inside. the search for survivors has been frantic. but early this morning, iranian officials called off the rescue operation. at this local hospital, many of the injured had stories of narrow escapes. translation: i fell from the balcony down. the earthquake was very strong. this mountainous area is prone to earthquakes. power cuts and landslides have made it difficult for rescue teams to get in. the most severely hurt have been airlifted out,
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some taken to hospital in the iranian capital, tehran. but, overwhelmed by the sheer number of injured, the authorities are appealing for people to donate blood. and this is the moment this 7.3—magnitude quake hit in neighbouring iraq. a man runs for his life from the control room of this dam. boulders were tossed around like pebbles. a picture of widespread devastation is emerging — hundreds dead, thousands injured, many missing. turkey has sent a convoy of aid trucks, medication, tents and blankets, and many have spent a second night outdoors, terrified by the after—shocks. so far, there have been more than 190 of them. a man and woman have been arrested on suspicion of murdering a teenager who has not been seen for nearly a week. 19—year—old gaia pope,
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who has severe epilepsy, was last seen on the seventh november. dorset police say a 19—year—old man and a 71—year—old woman were arrested after searches took place at two addresses in swanage. officers say they were both known to gaia. in the last few minutes we‘ve had an update from our biggest supermarket, tesco. a huge deal that we've talked about a couple of times as the competition and markets authority the regulator have looked at whether tesco would buy booker, one of the biggest wholesaler, whether it was a good dealfor customers, nearly £a billion, and the issues people raised were booker actually have the smaller convenience stores you might see like premier. they are owned by booker. if tesco by these as well, will they be able to put prices up?
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there may not be as much competition. they have looked at it and they don‘t think it will be an issue. in any towns where there is a premier and a tesco express, they think that there will be enough competition in the market generally to keep prices competitive. that was one issue. also, wholesalers in the wholesale market. they thought, if tesco is buying a wholesaler they might be able to get a way better deal with booker than others might get because other people supply tesco as well. and again the regulator thinks it will be ok. so they have given the merger the all clear which is a huge move for the retail industry, one of the biggest supermarket buying the biggest wholesaler. it could be set to go ahead. thank you very much. the largest diamond of its kind will be put up for auction in geneva today.
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this was discovered in angola last year. it is set into a necklace of 6000 and rules with 800 smaller diamonds. it is expected to fetch around $30 million, which is almost £23 million — quite extraordinary. 7:11am. you‘re watching breakfast. acid attacks can cause brutal, life—long injuries and police are warning they are on the rise. in london alone, over the last year there were almost a00 victims. yesterday the perpetrator of one of the worst incidents was found guilty of an attack he carried out in a london nightclub. arthur collins, the ex—boyfriend of reality tv star ferne mccann, sprayed acid over people during a night out in april. in total, 22 people were injured, with one man suffering third—degree chemical burns to his face, which required a skin graft. lauren trent was another victim of the attack and is in our london newsroom, and ayesha nayyar
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is a solicitor representing some of the other people who were injured and is with us in the studio. morning, both. thank you forjoining us. lauren, first of all, just tell us, you were celebrating a birthday — what happened, when did you know something serious happened? yes, so, i was celebrating my 22nd birthday with my best friend and other friends. to be honest, the moment eve ryo ne friends. to be honest, the moment everyone fell to the floor, you know, the acid hit me when i went down to pick up my back as we were about to leave. i remember everyone was standing and suddenly the dancefloor, it looked like a swamp all, you know, like a hole opened in the middle and people were running. stea m the middle and people were running. steam was coming off the floor. you knew straightaway, even the smell, it wasn‘t something normal and your skin blistered within seconds, you
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know, it is the smell, the steam, everything. i knew straightaway that this wasn‘t something normal and you just knew it was acid. lauren, i am so sorry. etihad friends as well who we re so sorry. etihad friends as well who were injured. what kind of effect has it had on you and your friends? 0bviously has it had on you and your friends? obviously there was nothing to indicate that night to ask, you know, what was going to happen, so to be in this place, you know, i am extremely anxious. if i can‘t see what‘s going on, if they fight brea ks what‘s going on, if they fight breaks out, the first thing that goes through my head is what are they going to do, what will they pull out. you know, all sorts of things. you know, it is one of those situations that you don‘t expect, you know, to see coming. you know, moving forward, you know, you try to deal with, you know, the best of the situation and, you know, i am less outgoing than i used to be and i am more selective about where i go and
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obviously, you know, it is usually places, you know, where drinks are not being thrown around or it is not busy. and we have just seen a picture of your injuries. we will come back in a moment. thank you. ayes ha, come back in a moment. thank you. ayesha, you represent other victims caught up in the attack. in terms of the law in this country at the moment, is it fit for purpose, should it be changed? at present, carrying acid, and collins was charged with causing grievous bodily harm, there is a sentence of maximum life imprisonment. we hopejustice will be done. moving forward there are proposals to ban the sale of acid under the age of 18. there is also proposals at present carrying acid on its own doesn‘t have — doesn‘t carry a charge. to be guilty of the offence, the proposals are that anybody carrying acid without lawful reason. at present, you have
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to show intent to injure. the changes will be carrying acid without lawful reason. hopefully the changes proposed come about and will introduce tougher sentences. he‘s going to be sentenced next month, how have the people you represent reacted ? he denied guilt, they had to give evidence, some people broke down, others gave evidence behind a screen so they were relieved. he put his victims, not just what so they were relieved. he put his victims, notjust what happened on the night of the attack, but throughout the five weeks where evidence was given, he put them through an horrific ordeal. lauren, you met with others injured in the attack last night, what was the general tone of the conversation? from the moment the verdict came out, it still hasn't sunk in. at one point for us we didn't think we were
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going to getjustice in terms of that sentence, but it was a big sense of relief. it's only up until now that we can talk about things and hear the trial and things like that. it's a massive sense of relief, doesn't change what happened, but it is more of, 0k, something has been done and this is setting the standard for anyone thinking about doing something like this. it is putting them off doing something like that. lauren, we heard from ayesha that a number of victims gave evidence from behind a screen but you chose to look arthur collins in the face. he didn‘t look back at you, though, what was that like and why did you make that decision in the court room? it's not a natural environment. your name is across newspapers and things like that, your name is read out on a charge sheet. for me it is your own preference. i wanted to look him in the face. i was there for my 22nd
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birthday, imagine if that was a memberof my family birthday, imagine if that was a member of my family or a close friend of his? —— his family. i'm young, ididn't friend of his? —— his family. i'm young, i didn't deserve to be involved in something like that and neither did anyone else. at some point people have to face people in the face and said, this is what you've done. lauren trent, thanks very much, and ayesha nayyar, thanks for coming in to talk to us. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: carol is getting into the festive swing of things in covent garden this morning. good morning. look at the christmas tree behind me, it is 55 feet tall and it is the largest hand—picked christmas tree in london. there‘s about 25 to 30,000 lights on it, lots of bubbles. pudsey bear put the last one on this tree. —— baubles. he will be back here tonight because
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this christmas tree has been lit up the specially for us this morning as a preview of what will happen later today. it will be switched off when we come off air at 9:15am and then this evening it will be switched back on again. lots happening this evening. festivities start at around 5:30pm and go on for some time. the stage will be set alight by the cast of a2nd street, who will be doing dancing and they‘re very famous songs, and pudsey bear will be doing aged with some of this own special guests and lots of other activities tonight as well. the weather should be fine for that. the weather for most is milder than yesterday but it‘s also cloudierfor a most is milder than yesterday but it‘s also cloudier for a large chunk of the country. the exception is across scotland and the north coast of northern ireland, although you‘ve got cloud this morning, it will brighten up nicely. across the north—west of scotland this morning, a few showers, many more before the end of the day in the north and the
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wind will strengthen but a lot of dry weather first thing. in northern england, in fact all of england, a cloudier start, two weather fronts going sour, both producing patchy light rain as they do but increasingly during the day that will become confined to the west —— going south. in the south—west a cloudy start, as in wales, one weather front draped across central and southern parts of wales so that is producing rain this morning. as we go across the irish sea into northern ireland, quite a bit of cloud around but the north coast will see the best of the brightness today. for northern ireland, the north coast, and scotland, expect sunshine. a lot of showers in the north, some will be heavy and windy in the north of scotland, temperatures in double figures. for england and wales, you‘re going to hang ona england and wales, you‘re going to hang on a lot of cloud today, patchy rain mostly confined to westwood coasts and hills in the west today —— inland. limited brightness but for many we‘re looking at
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temperatures in double figures, yesterday we only got to single figures as the maximum temperatures. as we head on into the evening and overnight, many showers in the north of scotla nd overnight, many showers in the north of scotland will fade. where we‘ve had the clear skies it will be cold, frost across scotland and patchy fog forming, some will be freezing fog. for northern ireland, england and wales, a lot of cloud, patchy fog and also dense fog patches forming across east anglia, lincolnshire and the midlands in the tick hello. this will be slow to clear tomorrow —— in particular. keep an eye on that. keep aware of it if you‘re travelling. for england, wales and northern ireland tomorrow, cloudy, spots of rain here and there, not everywhere, and fairly light. in scotland, another bright day with sunshine. still windy, still with showers in the north and later that will be replaced by rain. 0n thursday, the rain that‘s been coming into the north—west of scotla nd coming into the north—west of scotland by the end of wednesday will be careering steadily south,
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into northern england, northern ireland, wales. a lot of cloud around on thursday with some brighter breaks, temperatures roughly where they should be at this stage in november. all in all the weather is fairly quiet, not much going on i‘m glad to say! really looking lovely at the moment there, i shall go and have a look before christmas. do you think the tree is leaning a bit to the left? it is ever so slightly. no. it is absolutely straight! is it, it must be our camera angle? hankie very much. carol can go and give it a pushover —— thank you very much. drivers who are told their eyesight isn‘t good enough for them to be behind the wheel are carrying on driving. that‘s according to research by the association of optometrists. they want compulsory eye tests to be introduced, a campaign backed by the family of natalie wade, who was killed by a partially sighted driver. 0ur reporter ali fortescue has more.
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if she walked into a room, as the saying goes, she lit it up. she enjoyed every moment and was so looking forward to getting married. 28—year—old natalie wade died on her way to buy a wedding dress. she was hit by a 78—year—old driver with poor eyesight. there‘s always an empty chair at christmas, birthdays, the day she would have been married, they are still very painful. the driver who killed natalie was blind in one eye and partially sighted in the other, but he died before being tried for dangerous driving. but natalie is just one of 70 people who are killed or seriously injured in similar incidents involving bad eyesight last year. the legal standard for eyesight involves being able to read a number plate from 20 metres, but that‘s something that‘s only tested when you first take your test. at the moment, everyone needs to fill out a form like this every ten years to renew their driving license, and that involves answering a question about their eyesight. and if you‘re over the age 70 you have to fill out a slightly more comprehensive form every three years, but it‘s still a question
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of putting a tick in a box, there is no requirement to take an actual eye test. the mechanism of self reporting isn‘t always reliable. we know that vision can change gradually over time so drivers might not be aware of their deterioration to their vision. the association of optometrists don‘t have a legal requirement to do anything if they‘re concerned about a patient‘s driving, it‘s down to the driver. more than one in three of their optometrists surveyed has seen a driver in the last three months he continues to drive despite being told their vision is below the legal standard. nine in ten believe the current tests are insufficient and they want to see a change in the law. what we‘re calling for is vision screening to be carried out for all drivers when they first apply for the driving licence, and then the requirement to prove that they continue to meet that standard every ten years. but the concern is it‘s notjust eyesight that needs testing. this is an enormous worry.
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thank gosh we‘ve got something we can point at and you can measure it and say i health is a big thing but there‘s all sorts of other medical issues, bundles of them, which are simply not being taken into account as to whether people are fit to drive, and i think there should be. the department of transport say that all drivers are required by law to make sure their eyesight is good enough to drive. they also say if a driver experiences any changes to their eyesight or has a condition that could affect their driving they must notify the dvla and speak to an optician. ali fortescue, bbc news. and ali joins us on the sofa now. the department for transport say anyone with concerns should report to the dvla. do they give details of what counts as concerning and should be reported ? what more do we know about that? the information is there if you look for it. in the appendix of the form you fill out when you renew your license, it says if your eyesight is
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worse than 6/12, you can‘t read a number plate from 20 metres, you should tell them and you should tell them if you‘ve got other concerns, if you are partially sighted or can‘t see out of one eye. as far as other medical conditions go, it lists several, some form of diabetes, epilepsy, severe learning difficulties. having those conditions weren‘t necessarily mean you can‘t drive but it will mean you need to let the dvla no. what about healthcare professionals, do they have a duty of care to tell the dvla if they have concerns? it's really interesting, it‘s a careful balance between what‘s in the wider public interest and their duty of patient confidentiality. in extreme circumstances they can let the dvla know if they think someone is of serious risk to themselves or the public and breach patient doctor confidentiality but they don‘t have to do that, it‘s a situation the association of optometrists don‘t feel cut double with, so the onus is
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on the driver to make sure they are fit to drive —— comfortable with. i‘m feeling like i have learned something, i didn‘t know you had to renew your license every ten years. neither did i until a couple of days ago! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m alex bushill. a second store on regent street has been targeted by moped thieves within 2a hours. ten people riding five bikes smashed their way into the canada goose shop, stealing luxory goods and clothes. yesterday, tens of thousands of pounds worth of phones, tablets and watches were stolen from the apple store opposite and there have been no arrests. a rise in the number of homeless families in reading has prompted the local council to buy temporary housing units for them to live in. the prefabricated homes are being driven to a site
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in caversham park. there‘ll be 28 in total, stacked in two storey blocks. a lorry driver has been branded a hero after driving his lorry in the way of a gang of moped thieves preventing them from getting away. this footage was filmed last thursday in fitzrovia showing the suspects getting increasingly frustrated by the driver as he blocked them in. i used the horn to scare them away and make them run away because i knew cannot stop three guys by myself. once i saw they‘re not going away and they are just moving around the lorry, just parked to make sure they cannot move the moped or the scooter from there. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube there is a good service on all lines this morning. 0n the roads, and in chadwell heath, the traffic lights on the a12 at the moby dick junction aren‘t working. that camera might study for a second and you can see the police are diverging traffic and directing it,
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which is causing delays. in hackney, rendlesham road and monteagle way are closed following a stabbing overnight. in wembley, the high road remains closed for sewer works between park lane and wembley hill road. let‘s have a check on the weather now. good morning. some good news to start the day, not feeling quite as cold as it did this time yesterday. what it does mean is that it is rather cloudy. this cloud is going to stay with us for much of the day. there‘s the chance of a spot or two of light rain and drizzle mainly towards the north but most places staying dry. a gentle south—westerly breeze is what‘s helping to make things feel less cold than yesterday. the maximum temperature up to ten. we hang on to the cloud into the evening and overnight, still the chance of some light rain and some drizzle, but also a bit of mist and murk developing. if we get a clear spell overnight, some quite dense fog. the minimum temperature not dropping from today‘s maximum, a mild night, nine orten. a misty and murky start tomorrow and mist and fog will be slow to clear at first into low cloud. the cloud will lift a little, turning brighter into the afternoon and temperatures getting up to 12.
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heading through thursday, a similar day until thursday night where that cold front sweeps through. again some rain not especially heavy, but once it clears it leads to fresher air as we head into friday. a much colder day for friday, that fresher air bringing some sunshine, maximum temperature getting up to nine, but expect a bit of frost as we head into saturday morning. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it‘s back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. it is just it isjust coming up it is just coming up to it isjust coming up to 7:30am. here‘s a summary of this morning‘s main stories from bbc news. mps begin debating a key piece of
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brexit legislation for the eu withdrawal bill. it will help turn european laws into uk ones but opponents including tory rebels have tabled scores of amendments. yesterday the brexit secretary david davis promised parliament would get a vote on the final deal. earlier we saw theresa may at the lord mayor‘s banquet in london. she used the occasion to make her strongest attack yet on russia, in which she accused the putin government of threatening the international order. it is seeking to weaponise information, deploying its state—run media organisations to plant fake stories and photoshopped images in an attempt to sow discord in the west and undermine our institutions. so i have a very simple message for russia, we know what you are doing and you will not succeed. the television producer and writer, daisy goodwin, who created the itv
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drama, victoria, has claimed she was groped by a government official during a visit to number ten. she told the radio times the man put his hand on her breast after a meeting to discuss a proposed tv show when david cameron was prime minister. she said she wasn‘t traumatised, but was cross, adding she didn‘t report it at the time. thousands of people are spending a second night without shelter in near—freezing conditions after an earthquake caused devastation in parts of iran and iraq. more than a50 people were killed and around 7,000 injured. 0fficials officials say the rescue operation after the earthquake on sunday has been largely completed. a man and woman have been arrested on suspicion of murdering a teenager who has not been seen for nearly a week. 19—year—old gaia pope, who has severe epilepsy, was last seen on the seventh november. dorset police say a 19—year—old man and a 71—year—old woman were arrested after searches took place at two addresses in swanage.
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officers say they were both known to gaia. a 25—year—old man has been convicted of throwing acid across a crowded london nightclub, injuring 22 people. cctv shown in court showed clubbers clutching their faces and running off the dancefloor when arthur collins, the ex—boyfriend of reality tv star ferne mccann, carried out the attack in april. he was convicted of five counts of grievous bodily harm and nine of actual bodily harm against 1a people. he will be sentenced in december. earlier one of the victims of the attack told us how she felt after the verdict. a massive sense of relief, you know. but it doesn‘t change what happened whatsoever. i think it is more, 0k, something has been done, this is setting the standard for anyone thinking about doing something like this, you know. it is putting them off doing something like that. britain's biggest supermarket tesco has the green light to buy the biggest food
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wholesaler booker. the competition and markets authority says it does not raise pricing concerns. booker has a retail brand and also makes money in the catering industry. tesco said it would bring benefits for smaller retailers and consumers and staff. let‘s have a look at a little bit blink. it is an a little bit, is it? the largest diamond will go under the hammer in geneva. it is 163 ca rats, the hammer in geneva. it is 163 carats, if you wanted to know. it was discovered in angola and is set into a necklace of 6000 emeralds and over 800 slightly smaller diamonds. it took ten months to cut and is expected to fetch $30 million, or £23 million. that is proper blink, wasn‘t it? i was at an awards ceremony and i had to look after the
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under 17 world cup trophy for a —— around one hour. i was so nervous. i couldn‘t look after that. it is too expensive. did it go ok? and i was desperate for the toilet as well! too much information!” desperate for the toilet as well! too much information! i was giving it to phil foden. i had to give him that as well. i said, look after that. well, that is all ok. that diamond is so big that itjust looks fake. you can't say it is fake. it looks fake. it is so big. you got me in trouble with seal yesterday when he came on yesterday and asked, who had said that in actual seal is coming on? it wasn't a joke, it happened in the office. you have to be careful with these things.|j know, i am be careful with these things.|j know, iam really be careful with these things.|j know, i am really sorry. you would be glad to know i am going home tomorrow. talking about the under 17
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world cup. no italians. can you imaginea world cup. no italians. can you imagine a world cup with no italy? first time in 60 years. look at the pain on buffon‘s face. he said sorry to all of italian football and the blame has to be shared. now, talk for rebuilding the team. italy have failed to qualify for the world cup for the first time since 1958. they lost their play—off against sweden, running out of ideas against determined opposition. even veteran keeper gianluigi buffon was sent into the attack in injury time, but it finished goal—less in milan. 0ne italian newspaper described the result as ‘the apocalypse‘. another suggested candidates to replace the manager, who has not actually officially resigned yet. sweden are in for the first time since 2006. singing.
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2-0 2—0 italy. 2-0 italy. and still baggio. he is taking them all on. that is a fantastic goal! that is the goal they've all been waiting for. not so much part of —— cannavaro, more so can you believe it? italy are world champions for the fourth time. the most successful european nation ever and now just most successful european nation ever and nowjust one behind brazil. germany, 2006. the republic of ireland could join england at next summer‘s world cup if they can beat denmark in dublin this evening.
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the first leg in copenhagen ended 0—0 and ireland manager martin 0‘neill knows his side will have to do a lot more going forward to beat the danes. i think that we will try to be a bit more expensive if we can, try and deal with the ball a wee bit better and if that‘s the case, well, we want to try to win the game, we have to find a way to win a match. and these players have been unable to do that in the last couple of years. after the success of english youth team, gareth southgate when hesitate to use the young stars in the friendly against brazil at wembley tonight with three players drafted in from the under 21s after five players and their first against germany. it is incredible really that he has had so few in the premier league that we are putting him in that environment, but we believe in him, he did really well, but now, you know, sometimes the first game is easier because nobody is aware of you. moeen ali will play for his first
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game of the tour after getting to know some of the wildlife in townsville. he will play the cricket australia 11, which begins tomorrow. they look close to finalising the team with gary ballance left out again. now, when was the last time you were told off by your mum. for england head coach eddiejones it was on saturday. he‘s apologised for swearing on tv, after receiving a telling off from his 93—year—old mother. jones admitted to being frustrated by his side‘s lacklustre performance at twickenham, and was caught on camera losing his cool during saturday‘s 21—8 win over argentina. usually i am pretty good, you know. and i have apologised for the language i use. i got a phone call from my mother this morning, 93, wrapping me over the knuckles. she still tells me not to swear. so i am in trouble with my mother.
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so that is a big enough punishment for me. i am in the dog house and i certainly won‘t do it again. and i believe him, ithink. punishment enough to be told off by his mum. you said earlier that you we re his mum. you said earlier that you were told off by your mom. all of the time. do you speak any other languages? english is my second language. i was the kid at school who couldn‘t speak english at the age of three, so i learnt to read instead. i think and stream in everything in english. instead. i think and stream in everything in englishlj instead. i think and stream in everything in english. i speak spanish... i have a degree in spanish... i have a degree in spanish and i can speak and little bit of french and understand italian as well. i think once you have one language, to languages, it is easier to understand others?” language, to languages, it is easier to understand others? i did latin in gcse because i wanted to be a doctor, not useful any more. it is
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made to be good for grammar. understanding other languages. we are talking about languages. when it comes to languages, are you a polyglot, conversing in a number of foreign tongues, or a basil faulty? we have meet here in the building, rememberthat? faulty? we have meet here in the building, remember that? the british council says we will lose out economically if we don‘t update these skills. and upgrade them as well. with the uptake of languages for a—levels falling, are we missing out? french, i‘m afraid, i didn‘t really try very hard in when i was a little boy because we didn‘t travel, we didn‘t meet french people, so it was a strange thing that happened over on the continent.
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i wish i had paid attention now, and learnt it better, basically. i didn't pay attention at school. it didn't pay attention at school. it didn't seem necessary. it seems very rude almost when you go on holiday and you are ordering just simple food and drinks and you even say simple words to the waiter or talk to people around you. the fact that we can only speak one and most other people can speak two puts us at a disadvantage in business. and language is a gateway to learn value systems and with that everyone can learn better on both sides. thank you for taking part in that. we are joined sides. thank you for taking part in that. we arejoined by sides. thank you for taking part in that. we are joined by the sides. thank you for taking part in that. we arejoined by the head teacher ian fenn and lily beng, mandarin teacher. what of the importance of a second language, more important than ever? it is more important than ever and i was once a languages teacher. having the facility of another language opens
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your horizons, it makes you much more aware of what‘s going on in the world, it makes you a more interesting person. there are a lot of benefits to a second language. you teach mandarin. what is the uptake, and is there a fear of languages in this country? at the moment i am teaching year to two years six and they have a real fear. — year years six and they have a real fear. —— year two to year six. i start with an informal way of speaking and different songs and different culture. so they are really fascinated by it. and then they progress until year 6. if you think beyond that, around job prospects going forward in a global market, mandarin is one of those languages which is essential. i remember speaking to someone who was an expert in the future generations and make them as good at computers as possible and they are armed for the next generation. yes. lots of people
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across the world in every country now have mandarin. is the pressure on schools so much now that they just are having to concentrate on english, maths, science, ratherthan languages. what is going on? english, maths, science, ratherthan languages. what is going 0mm depends on the needs of the school and we have to have literate, new rich or in. so in my school we have a huge amount of effort put into that because it is the passport to jobs. and the vast majority of people coming out of schools won‘t be using a second language in their work. but they will need to be numerate and they will have to be literate. so you can see in terms of priorities, that is where resources are going to go rather than language teaching which is... i was once a languages teacher myself. however it is the basics that we have to focus on with many children. what is the key thing, if you are a parent, lots of pa rents key thing, if you are a parent, lots of parents watching the programme,
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what is important for parents as they are learning languages at school? talking about different groups, one, probably, who put focus on numerous sea and literacy, they are probably struggling, but others have ability to work additional languages or arts —— numeracy. so we should give them the option to do so. leigh we should provide them with the opportunities. we need to focus on literacy and numerous sea and we lose the opportunity for others. and what happens with the impact if you don‘t focus on languages? i think we are losing out already because other countries who speak english learning different languages, like us and australia. they already have to learn languages. and then people who are learning english now have their own language and in the world english
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people, they are more lingual, so they are the only people left with one language. we had a situation, it is embarrassing when you go abroad asa is embarrassing when you go abroad as a brit, and many of us struggle to conversing any language other than english. we suffer from the fa ct than english. we suffer from the fact that english is the international language, and because of that many cannot see the need to learn another language. what about, looking at, for example, brexit, will it be more important, do you think, to learn the language is?” really don‘t know and i can‘t foresee what the brexit affect will be. 0nce once people realise they have to learn alaba language, that‘s how they‘re going to get on, they will be much more amenable to it —— another language. we‘ve been trying for many years to force people into learning a second language, it became a requirement but itjust didn‘t work. you need a perceived need and then you‘ll learn it.
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didn‘t work. you need a perceived need and then you'll learn it.” have a spanish degree, it is so much fun being able to convert in a different language. did we lose that somewhere along the way as well? -- conversed. absolutely. when we came in you were trying to speak mandarin, or trying to, and that enriches the conversation, makes us feel more close. when you say speaking mandarin, you said hello andi speaking mandarin, you said hello and i said thank you. that‘s about it! thank you very much indeed and good to talk to you. let us know your thoughts on that. idid learn i did learn to say hungry like awol in polish a few years ago. in a restau ra nt in polish a few years ago. in a restaurant in poland you get an extra bit of meat and potatoes if you say that —— like a wolf. very important! carol‘s getting into the festive spirit in covent garden with the weather. i think you‘ve got some explanations about the tree? yes, you thought the tree was wonky, it isn‘t at all, it might look wonky
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but nigel, our cameraman, is going to show you it‘s actually straight. this is what is called spherical aberration. we are using a wide—angle lens which makes everything around the edges looked like it is curving inwards, but as you can see, it is straight as a pole and that would be good news for the hundreds of people that took 126 hours to put it up. it has been lit especially for us this morning, it will be switched off after the programme, and it will be switched on again this evening by pudsey bear. the festivities at covent garden start around 5:30 p.m., the cast of a2nd street will be here singing and dancing some of their best—known numbers and pudsey bear might be doing a jig himself with some special guests. covent garden aren‘t telling us yet who this special guests are but pudsey bear was the person that put the last bauble on the tree and he will be the one lighting it up again in all its glory efficiently. the weather
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today, fairly cloudy for most of the uk with one or two exceptions and it is certainly milder than yesterday. for some, a good 1a degrees milder and this time yesterday. let‘s start in scotland, we do have is showers in the north—west, this is at 9am, and a lot of dry weather. some brightness around as well. as we move brightness around as well. as we m ove a cross brightness around as well. as we move across england, this is the forecast for all of england, we have two weather fronts sinking south, they are both fairly weak but they‘re producing some rain and some grey and murky conditions. today there will be a lot of cloud across all of england and still some spots of rain. in wales, you have a weather front crossing southwards so you also have some rain. quite a murky start. as we move across the irish sea into northern ireland, here too there is quite a bit of cloud first thing but the north of northern ireland will brighten up and we‘ll see some sunshine. as we go through the course of the day, scotla nd go through the course of the day,
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scotland will also see a fair bit of sunshine, a beautiful day for you, as it will be in the north of northern ireland, but showers turning heavier through the day in the north of scotland and here it will be windy. fall of england and wales it will be fairly cloudy, some brightness as we head into the afternoon but it will be limited and by then most of the rain will be in the west in coast and hills. temperature wise, higher than yesterday, everyone will see double figures today. through the evening and overnight, where we‘ve had the sunshine is where we will have the clear skies so we‘re looking at frost especially in scotland and patches of fog, some will be freezing. in england, wales and most of northern ireland, it will stay cloudy, spots of light rain and drizzle but fog forming, patchy fog. the densest and probably in parts of the midlands, lincolnshire and east anglia. that could be problematic first thing. if you‘re travelling early, keep in touch with the forecast. i say early but it will
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ta ke forecast. i say early but it will take some time tomorrow before it eventually clears. tomorrow again it will be cloudy for many, some brightness, especially in the north, some showers here as well and later in the day the wind will strengthen and we will see rain coming in across north—west scotland. during thursday, that will sink southwards, taking the rain with it, it‘s a narrow band and once again a fair bit of cloud around, some brightness and ten is still in double figures, where they should be at this stage in november. thanks very much, carol, and thank you for explaining to dan about the tree. well, wow! lots of our viewers were wondering about your spiritual aberration, thanks for clearing that up for us! you're very welcome! if you are justjoining us, the tree isn't wonky, it is because of a wide—angle lens, if you go in the middle it looks straight, but as you move away because of the spherical aberration it looks wonky but it's
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not! i'm glad you took notice of that! she actually sent a text saying i will explain later, we have been told off by carol so thanks for plugging us straight on that one. —— putting. later this morning we‘ll find out just how much the prices we pay for some of lifes basics have been changing. it‘s a big theme in the economy at the moment, and has a knock on effect on our wages, jobs and future. sean is taking an in—depth look. it could affect the budget for the chancellor as well next week. morning, all. now, as you‘ll know, from weekly trips to the supermarket, or filling up your car, the price we pay for lifes essentials can fluctuate. back in september, the average price of a range of goods we all buy regularly, something called the consumer price index, was up 3% on last year, and that is the steepest increase in prices since 2012. so why is it happening? since the vote to leave the eu the value of the pound has dropped, meaning buying danish bacon, italian wine is more expensive. fuel costs were also up.
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0n the whole, shops and restaurants had been trying to protect us consumers from rises, but lots of big names, like m&s and sainsbury‘s, have said that is becoming increasingly difficult. it pushes up the cost of imports, lots of our business imports of stuff and they choose to pass that on in prices and. it didn‘t happen immediately and we wouldn‘t have expected it to. it‘s about now we would have expected it to feed through and it is and we‘re seeing it especially in things like food and clothing, they happen to be things low income households spend more of their money on. you may not notice your weekly shop getting more expensive if you had more money coming in. but average take home pay for british workers has increased atjust over 2% over the last year. now, one reason for that is because public sector pay rises have been capped at 1%, something which may well change in next week‘s budget, while many benefits
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payments have been frozen. 0n the flipside, pensioners, because of the triple lock have seen the state pension increase at the same rate as prices. but there‘s still a real sense of a squeeze. as prices rise faster, the impact of the public sector pay cap on workers in that sector gets all the harsher. but perhaps even more importantly for lower income households who are particularly feeling the effects at the moment is the freeze on nearly all working age benefits. that gets harsher the faster inflation rises and the chancellor could definitely do something about that when he stands up for the budget in nine days‘ time. so the chancellor philip hammond will again be paying close attention to the latest inflation figure later this morning ahead of next week‘s budget. that national debt still looms very large and the loans the government take on to pay for things from our schools to our hospitals are often linked to inflation. so as prices rise,
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so can how much we owe, with one regulator warning it could add another £26 billion to our repayments. just over a fifth of what we spend on the nhs. so keep an eye out at 9:30am this morning for the latest figures, and see if prices are rising faster or slower than they were last time round, when it came in at 3%. we‘ll see how quickly they might be rising this time around. thank you very much. the first group of students from the uk‘s only degree course for deaf performers is taking to the stage with a new production that blends british sign language and english. it‘s hoped the adaptation of caryl churchill‘s play love and information will challenge perceptions and make sign language more visible. 0ur scotland correspondent lorna gordon went to meet them. it is a play with big themes that affect us all. love and how we make sense of things in an increasingly frenetic world. the 50 short scenes, each with a different set of characters, are all performed by ten actors who happened
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to be deaf. i think the play‘s very, very powerful because it is able to show different perspectives in that deaf people are similar to hearing people in that environment and that we‘re all similar, we‘re all the same and i think that play really demonstrates that. mr rushmore, if you could just open the door... their performance in a mixture of english, captioning and british sign language a chance to showcase the actors‘ talents. and british sign language itself. it‘s a wonderful opportunity and we‘ve really enjoyed it. absolutely because sign language can be so big, so rich, so expressive and in a theatre setting means we can show also solve levels of emotion. the actors, all students at glasgow‘s royal conservatoire, are on the country‘s only degree course for deaf performers. embracing deafness as part of their identity and hoping their performance will help others do the same. it‘s a great way for me to carry
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on and show people that it‘s ok to be who you are, because i kind of old before i was being shuffled off into the background like i was a liability or i was just a burden to someone else, i thought i‘ll say nothing and back off, now i‘m thinking, you know what, i‘m going to step forward and let them see me for who i am. the scottish government recently announced plans to integrate the use of sign language into everyday life and the play‘s director believes this performance will help with challenging perceptions in the theatre and the arts. i think it‘s about british sign language being more visible, being more out in the open and recognised as a language. so i think this production and the degree programme here at the conservatoire are is part of that movement. another step in showing that british sign language should be celebrated as a language in its own right.
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lorna gordon, bbc news, glasgow. i know some of you do watch us using sign, interpreted version of our programme. you can find that on the news channel from 6:a5am. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m alex bushill. a second store on regent street has been targeted by moped thieves within 2a hours. ten people riding five bikes smashed their way into the canada goose shop, stealing luxory goods and clothes. yesterday, tens of thousands of pounds worth of phones, tablets and watches were stolen from the apple store opposite and there have been no arrests. a video showing what to do in event of a terror attack is to be made available to schools across the capital.
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pupils will be urged to run to safety, hide and tell police if they get caught up in a knife or gun attack. the lesson isn‘t compulsory but the met has asked schools to prepare for the unlikely event of an act of terror. a lorry driver has been branded a hero after driving his lorry in the way of a gang of moped thieves preventing them from getting away. this footage was filmed last thursday in fitzrovia showing the suspects getting increasingly frustrated by the driver as he blocked them in. i used the horn to scare them away and make them run away because i knew cannot stop three guys by myself. once i saw they‘re not going away and they are just moving around the lorry, just parked to make sure they cannot move the moped or the scooter from there. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube there is a good service on all lines this morning. 0n the roads, and in chadwell heath: the traffic lights on the a12 at the moby dick junction aren‘t working. police are directing traffic.
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in hackney, rendlesham road and monteagle way are closed following a stabbing overnight. in wembley, the high road remains closed for sewer works between park lane and wembley hill road. let‘s have a check on the weather now. good morning. some good news to start the day, not feeling quite as cold as it did this time yesterday. what it does mean is that it is rather cloudy. this cloud is going to stay with us for much of the day. there‘s the chance of a spot or two of light rain and drizzle mainly towards the north but most places staying dry. a gentle south—westerly breeze is what‘s helping to make things feel less cold than yesterday. the maximum temperature up to ten. we hang on to the cloud into the evening and overnight, still the chance of some light rain and some drizzle, but also a bit of mist and murk developing. if we get a clear spell overnight, some quite dense fog. the minimum temperature not dropping from today‘s maximum, a mild night, nine orten. a misty and murky start tomorrow and mist and fog will be slow
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to clear at first into low cloud. the cloud will lift a little, turning brighter into the afternoon and temperatures getting up to 12. heading through thursday, a similar day until thursday night where that cold front sweeps through. again some rain not especially heavy, but once it clears it leads to fresher air as we head into friday. a much colder day for friday, that fresher air bringing some sunshine, maximum temperature getting up to nine, but expect a bit of frost as we head into saturday morning. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it‘s back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. a major milestone on the road to brexit as mps begin debating the eu withdrawal bill. it will convert european laws into british ones
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but it‘s unlikely to pass smoothly with more than 160 amendments already tabled. good morning. it‘s tuesday, 1ath november. also for you on the programme this morning... a call for compulsory eye tests for motorists as new figures show many ignore warnings that they shouldn‘t be driving. good morning. living costs are on the up, we‘ll find out by how much, later, so i‘m going to take a look at why prices are rising and how that will shape the big decisions in next week‘s budget. good morning. in sport, it‘s going to be a world cup without italy after the four—time champions fail to qualify for the tournament for the first time in 60 years.
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good morning, carol. it will be busy tonight when the christmas tree lights are switched on. they will be switched off at the end of our programme. you can expect some sunshine in scotland, but for england and wales a bit more clout with limited brightness this afternoon. i will have more details in15 afternoon. i will have more details in 15 minutes. thank you, carol. good morning. first, our main story. mps will today begin debating a key piece of brexit legislation — the eu withdrawal bill. it will help turn european laws into uk ones but opponents including tory rebels have tabled scores of amendments. yesterday, the brexit secretary, david davis, made a surprise concession, promising parliament would get a vote on the final brexit deal. 0ur political correspondent leila nathoo reports. the prime minister. still the one in charge, theresa may
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last night at the glittering lord mayor‘s banquet in london, a break from brexit and potential trouble ahead. a key piece of the government‘s brexit legislation returns to the commons today, and mps are trying to tinker with it. they are proposing hundreds of changes to try to influence ministers‘ approach, and so yesterday an apparent concession to one of their key demands. i can now confirm that once we have reached an agreement, we will bring forward a specific piece of primary legislation to implement that agreement. parliament will be given time to debate, scrutinise and vote on the final agreement we strike with the european union. this agreement will only hold if parliament approves it. but with such a fragile majority, just a handful of tory backbenchers siding with the opposition would lead to a government defeat. and those minded to rebel seem unsatisfied with the take it or leave it vote the government has offered. i have to say, a lot of us were insulted by this. i mean, because it sounded so good and then when you dug
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into the detail, you realise this so—called meaningful vote was completely meaningless. there will be more contentious votes here in the coming weeks as mps test the government‘s fragile working majority. 0ur political correspondent alex forsyth joins us from westminster. alex, good morning. is this likely to get through? i think many mps support the idea behind this eu withdrawal bill because it‘s trying to bring eu law into uk law so there will not be a big black hole in our laws and regulations. then the government and parliament can go through and change any they want to and ditch the ones they don‘t like. the problem is some of the details in this bill. some people think it gives too much power to ministers,
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some think it would have a negative impact on scotland and northern ireland, the administration ‘s there. the government have said we will put through parliament the final brexit deal but some are saying the vote on that comes too late in the process. yesterday david davis said if you don‘t vote for it, we will leave the european union a nyway we will leave the european union anyway so there‘s a lot of unhappiness on the backbenches. today the first day mps start scrutinising this chunky legislation line by line. this will go on for some time and i think we will see some time and i think we will see some parliamentary fights yet to come. thank you, and we will be speaking to anna soubry in a few moments. theresa may, as we saw in that report, spent the evening at the lord mayor‘s banquet in london. aside from brexit, she used the occasion to make her strongest
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attack yet on russia, in which she accused the putin government of threatening the international order. it is seeking to weaponise information, deploying its state—run media organisations to plant fake stories and photoshopped images in an attempt to sow discord in the west and undermine our institutions. so i have a very simple message for russia, we know what you are doing and you will not succeed. the television producer and writer, daisy goodwin — who created the itv drama, "victoria" — has claimed she was groped by a government official during a visit to number ten. she told the radio times the man put his hand on her breast after a meeting to discuss a proposed tv show when david cameron was prime minister. she said she wasn‘t traumatised, but was cross, adding she didn‘t report it at the time. downing street said they take all allegations very seriously and would look into any formal complaint, should one be made. one of the victims of an acid attack in a london nightclub has told bbc
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breakfast that she felt... arthur collins — the ex—boyfriend of reality tv star ferne mccann was convicted of throwing acid across a crowded london nightclub, injuring 22 people. he will be sentenced in december. his victim said she still struggles with anxiety more than six months after the attack. being in busy places, i‘m extremely anxious. if i cannot see what‘s going on or a fight breaks out, the first thing that goes through my head these days is what are they going to do. it‘s only now i can talk about things. a massive sense of relief but it doesn‘t change what happened whatsoever. i think it is more, 0k, something is being done, this is setting for the —— setting the
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standard for anyone thinking of doing something like this. a man and woman have been arrested on suspicion of murdering a teenager who has not been seen for nearly a week. nineteen year old gaia pope who has severe epilepsy was last seen on the seventh november. dorset police say a 19—year—old man and a 71—year—old woman were arrested after searches took place at two addresses in swanage. officers say they were both known to gaia. head teachers representing more than 5,000 schools across england have sent a joint letter to the chancellor, philip hammond, warning of inadequate funding. they say they are increasingly having to ask parents for donations. the government has already promised to move 1.3 billion pounds of education funding into schools, but heads say they need another £1.7 billion of new money.
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here is the story of a very large expensive gemstone, the world‘s rovers gemstones are up for sale in geneva this week but you will need some serious amounts of money. the good news is you can look at them for free so good news is you can look at them forfree so imogen good news is you can look at them for free so imogen went to look for a sneak peak. there is more than a little sparkle in geneva this dull november. every year the jewellery houses compete to show there is more than a little sparkle in geneva this dull november. every year the jewellery houses compete to show that one special stone, the rarest, the purist, the most vivid. but this year there is one extraordinary show stopper. at 163 carats, this is the largest diamond ever to be put up for auction. now, to show it at its best, or maybe to make sure a potential buyer doesn‘t mistake it for an ice
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cube, it has been set into a string of emeralds, 5,9a9 of them. we are expecting in the region of $30 million for it, and it is the largest deflawless diamond ever to come to the market and it is the finest colour, finest clarity and extraordinary proportions. and there is always a temptation with a diamond crystal to cut the largest possible and end up with a stone that maybe is a little lopsided or lumpy or thick just to keep the weight. not here. this is perfection in every way. pink, yellow, necklace, ring or brooch, jewellery lovers are spoilt for choice. but while many will look, with these multi—million—dollar price tags, only a few will be able to buy. you are watching bbc breakfast.
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let‘s get more on our main story now. theresa may has promised to make a success of brexit but her government could face defeat on its flagship bill this week. the european union withdrawal bill, sometimes referred to as the great repeal bill, will be debated in the house of commons from today. it‘s the piece of legislation that will convert eu laws into uk ones and it has proved divisive. over 180 pages of amendments to the bill have been proposed by mps, covering everything from the single market to the role of the european court ofjustice. and as the government only has a working majority of nine it would only take a handful of tory rebels to derail theresa may‘s plans. conservative mp anna soubry is one of the most vocal critics of the government‘s approach. she joins us now from westminster. ahead of what will be a really busy week in westminster, you are one of the most outspoken tory rebels. we have heard from david davies that parliament will now get a final say.
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have you got what you wanted? u nfortu nately have you got what you wanted? unfortunately not. this so—called meaningful vote is meaningless because he couldn‘t guarantee you would have the vote before we left and of course if there is no deal, and of course if there is no deal, and unfortunately it is not impossible there will be no deal, then parliament has no say so it means your viewers, through their elected representatives, will have no say, no part in finally determining frankly our country‘s future. this is serious stuff and we need to get it right. it‘s important this place behind, after all people voted to take back control, and u nfortu nately control voted to take back control, and unfortunately control is into the hands of a very small number of ministers and i‘m afraid to say i think theresa may is really pandering to 35 hard brexit —— brexiteers in my party. let me put
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to you what david davies said, he said parliament will have time to scrutinise and vote on the final agreement, he has been clear. but he couldn‘t say that wouldn‘t happen until after we left, completely meaningless. we need to be sure we can discuss, debate and have a vote on any deal the government gets and also in the event of no deal. he made it clear that if there is no deal it will not come back to parliament, we will crash out of the eu without further discussion and that would beat it and that would be disastrous for our country. they think your viewers want us to have a competent country that gets on with brexit and i agree with that but we have got to do it right. are you getting on with it? we know there are hundreds of amendments, will that be delaying the process? not at all, that‘s another big miss. there‘s probably half a dozen
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serious amendments. a lot of that is technical and constitutional, which is important because the government has this power grab and we don‘t wa nt has this power grab and we don‘t want that. there‘s probably only five or six amendments with eight parliamentary days to discuss it but so we should. this is the most important thing our country has done since the second world war so we need to get this right. we need to build a consensus, get everyone backing the prime minister and at the moment unfortunately every time we make progress we get a great speech in florence, it‘s like we then take ten steps backwards and then take ten steps backwards and the division comes back in again and thatis the division comes back in again and that is bad. are you backing the prime minister? absolutely, i back her florence speech 100%, the tone and content spot on so we need to have more of that and less of this division and less pandering to probably at the most 35 hard
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brexiteer i —— ideological driven brexiteers in the party. the parliament has accepted the result, we now want to get on and get the best dealfor our we now want to get on and get the best deal for our country and i think she should be listening to the majority, not pandering to some hardliners in my party.” majority, not pandering to some hardliners in my party. i want to talk to you about a meeting last night, i understand you were at a meeting with the whips which was described as stormy, what would you say the atmosphere was like?m described as stormy, what would you say the atmosphere was like? it was stormy because you have people at that meeting who have never spoken out. they have gone along with the government. the dates going into the bill has really upset a lot of really top—quality backbench conservative mps. i know the labour party also, a lot of their backbenchers also upset about this. i‘m talking about what some people would call the grandees and those peculiar terms but these are
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ex—ministers, highly respected, and genuinely crossed about this. the government must listen to those people. i‘d like them to listen to me as well but everybody knows my views and i get these labels attached to me. there are some people there who have never rebelled and are now talking about rebelling. how serious is for the government, for theresa may? well, what i want theresa to do is not to keep pandering to knees people who do not represent the conservative party. they certainly don‘t represent conservative voters. they want a ha rd conservative voters. they want a hard brexit. jump off the cliff. this is the one thing that business doesn‘t want and the majority of members of parliament don‘t want and i think the majority of your viewers don‘t want it either. she should be building a consensus with the sensible people in the conservative and generally and listening to business. business does not want this hard brexit. that‘s what theresa should be doing. can i ask
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you something on a different subject about harassment and we have heard there are now allegations from a tv writer and producer saying she was groped whilst she was at ten downing street sometime ago. what‘s your reaction to that? that's appalling. that‘s a criminal offence. i am a criminal barrister. it sounds to me like sexual assault. if she wants to, she should report it to the police. if she wants to, she should report it to number ten. i know that theresa‘s closest aide takes these matters extremely seriously and if she needs support, there are support groups that are out there, because for a lot of women, it doesn‘t matter who you are, it doesn‘t matter who you are, it doesn‘t matter how much bravado people think you have, this sort of assault and it is an assault, is often deeply traumatic and we need to wake up to what it really is. and we need it ta ke what it really is. and we need it take action when it‘s required so we ta ke take action when it‘s required so we take these things seriously and what we wa nt take these things seriously and what we want is what the pm wants and theresa has led on this. we want an independent mechanism where anybody who comes into this place and
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politics here in westminster and in other constituency offices has exactly the same protections and rights as any worker in any other workplace and we have got to change the culture as well and men should keep their hands to themselves. anna soubry, thank you. carol is in covent garden with the weather. good morning. the christmas tree is 55—feet tall. it has got between 25,000 and 30,000 lights on it. it is spectacular! now it has been lit for bbc breakfast this morning. we have got a lovely sneak pre—view of it. after the programme it is being switched off and it will be lit this evening by pudsey bear. it is the first time that children in need and covent garden worked together. there
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will be the cast of a2nd street performing and it promises to be a good evening. the weather shouldn‘t be too bad. it will be cloudy in london. the forecast for most of us todayis london. the forecast for most of us today is a cloudy one and also a milder one than it was yesterday. there is an exception and that‘s across scotland and also northern parts of northern ireland. so if you start off at 9am in scotland, there is showers in the north—west, but much of the rest of scotland is dry. cloud around this morning will thin and break and you will see sunshine. for all of england and wales, it‘s a cloudy start. we have got two weather fronts heading south and both are producing patchy rain. so it‘s quite grey across england and wales. but through the day, most of that rain will become confined to western areas where it will be light and patchy on the coasts and also the hills. for northern ireland, you have got a fair bit of cloud around this morning, but it will brighten up this morning, but it will brighten up nicely from the north and here too, we should see some sunshine as
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we go through the day. so talking about through the day, you can see how across scotland and the north of northern ireland, sees the sunshine. across the north of scotland there will be showers. they will be turning heavier through the day and more prolific and the wind will strengthen. for england and wales, we hang on to a lot of cloud. still spots of rain in the west. but we will see some brightness, but the brightness today will be limited, but really wherever you are, it‘s going to be milder than it was yesterday. yesterday‘s top temperatures were in single figures. today, we‘re into the low double figures. 0vernight, clear skies. today, we‘re into the low double figures. 0vernight, clearskies. so we will start off with some frost and it will be a frosty night across parts of scotland. the showers tending to fade, but it will be fairly windy. for northern ireland, for england and for wales, it‘s going to be another cloudy night. as well as that, there will be patchy light rain and we will see patchy fog forming. it might prove to be
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problematic. it will lift tomorrow. and then again for much of england and wales, it‘s going to be cloudy. there will be some brightness developing particularly later in the day across the north. for northern ireland and scotland, again some brightness, but the brightest skies will be in scotland. however, later in the day, we will see another weather front coming into the north—west introducing wet and windy weather. 0n north—west introducing wet and windy weather. on thursday, that‘s going to be pushing southwards, taking a narrow band of rain with it, into northern england and northern ireland. 0n either side of it, some bright skies, still a fair bit of cloud and just one or two showers. but temperatures roughly where they should be at this stage in november, dan and lou. it is really wonderful that tree. it‘s just guy another mus, isn‘t it carol. that tree. it‘s just guy another mus, isn't it carol. 55-feet tall. if you stand under the bow, it is much taller than me and i‘m 5‘7". if you stand under the bow, it is much taller than me and i'm 5'7".” have been watching people walk past.
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it's have been watching people walk past. it‘s twinkling beautifully. drivers who are told their eyesight isn‘t good enough for them to be behind the wheel are carrying on driving. that‘s according to research by the association of optometrists. they want compulsory eye tests to be introduced — a campaign backed by the family of natalie wade, who was killed by a partially sighted driver. 0ur reporter ali fortescue has more. if she walked into a room, as the saying goes, she lit it up. she enjoyed every moment and was so looking forward to getting married. 28—year—old natalie wade died on her way to buy a wedding dress. she was hit by a 78—year—old driver with poor eyesight. there‘s always an empty chair at christmas, birthdays, the day she would have been married, they are still very painful. the driver who killed natalie was blind in one eye and partially sighted in the other, but he died before being tried for dangerous driving. but natalie is just one of 70 people who are killed or seriously injured in similar incidents involving bad eyesight last year. the legal standard for eyesight involves being able to read a number
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plate from 20 metres, but that‘s something that‘s only tested when you first take your test. at the moment, everyone needs to fill out a form like this every ten years to renew their driving license and that involves answering a question about their eyesight and if you‘re over the age 70 and if you‘re over the age 70 you have to fill out a slightly more comprehensive form every three years, but it‘s still a question ofjust putting a tick in a box, there is no requirement to take an actual eye test. the mechanism of self reporting isn‘t always reliable. we know that vision can change gradually over time so drivers might not be aware of a deterioration to their vision. the association of optometrists don‘t have a legal requirement to do anything if they‘re concerned about a patient‘s driving, it‘s down to the driver. more than one in three of their optometrists surveyed have seen a driver in the last month who continues to drive despite being told their vision is below the legal standard. nine in ten of them believe the current tests are insufficient and they want to see a change in the law. what we‘re calling for is vision
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screening to be carried out for all drivers when they first apply for the driving licence and then the requirement to prove that they continue to meet that standard every ten years. but the concern is it‘s notjust eyesight that needs testing. this is an enormous worry. thank gosh we‘ve got something we can point at and you can measure it and say yes, eye health is a big thing but there‘s all sorts of other medical issues, bundles of them, which are simply not being taken into account as to whether people are fit to drive and i think there should be. the department for transport say that all drivers are required by law to make sure their eyesight is good enough to drive. they also say that if a driver experiences any changes to their eyesight or has a condition that could affect their driving they must notify the dvla and speak to an optician. ali joins us on the sofa now. do they give details about what
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might bea do they give details about what might be a concern that you should alert the dvla about? yes, the information is there if you look for it, in the appendix of the form you need to renew your photo licence. if you have a paper licence it is recommended you renew that every ten yea rs recommended you renew that every ten years as well. it tells you if your eyesight is any worse than six over 12, you can‘t read a numberplate from 20 meters away, you will need to let the dvla know. it lists several conditions including some form of diabetes, epilepsy, having those conditions won‘t mean you can‘t drive, but it will mean you need to let the dvla know so they can ask you some more questions. some interesting comments. jean says, "i had a neighbour whose eyesight was so bad, he couldn‘t recognise me at six feet. his wife sat next to him and she told him when to turn. the onus maybe on the drivers to give up, but it is a matter of independence and pride
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which is hard to let go." keith raises a point which i wanted to ask you about, "i was diagnosed with dementia and my consultant had a duty of care to report my illness to the dvla. i lost all my employment. keith says i don‘t know why opticians aren‘t obliged to report eyesight." opticians aren‘t obliged to report eyesight. " it opticians aren‘t obliged to report eyesight." it is opticians aren‘t obliged to report eyesight. " it is a opticians aren‘t obliged to report eyesight." it is a careful balance between patient confidentiality and what‘s in the wider public interest. so in extreme circumstances gps are and optometrists can let the dvla know if someone‘s eyesight is so bad that they shouldn‘t be on the road and they are putting people‘s lives in danger. it is something that the association of optometrists don‘t feel comfortable with. the onus is on the driver and the dvla says if anyone experiences any change to their medical that could affect their medical that could affect their driving, they need to let them know. thank you. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. a less school day,
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sunspots waking up to temperatures 10 degrees less warm than yesterday. the best of the brightness today will be in the north. you can see the cloud has been sinking south as we move through the night so the best of the brightness is certainly for scotland today. some scattered showers in the far north should be fairly heavy. elsewhere is cloudy outbreaks of rain and drizzle and it could turn grey and murky in the far south as we move into the afternoon. temperatures milder than we saw yesterday, largely in the double figures. the odd break in the cloud, largely cloudy from northern ireland, just the best of the brightness in the far north and you can see the sunshine for scotland but feeling cooler with those clear skies. the showers have the potential to be quite heavy in the far north but they will tend to ease as we move through the evening and
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overnight, the clear skies staying in the north. cloudy in the south with outbreaks of rain and drizzle but we could see patches of fog developing which could be dense. milder in the south where we have more in the way of cloud. the chilly start in the north, fog patches taking their time to lift so on the roads they could cause difficulty. the brightness extending further than we have seen, cloud increasing as we move into the afternoon for the north and west of scotland, cloudy for much of england and wales again with temperatures in the double figures. we will see a cold front sinking south through thursday, brightening up behind it with sunny spells and temperatures largely in double figures. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. the us president trumpets 300 billion dollars in deals agreed
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during his trip to asia. but the devil may be in the detail. live from london, that‘s our top story on tuesday the 1ath november. president trump says he‘s open for free and fair international trade but asian leaders trade but asian leaders still have their doubts — we get an expert view on just how successful the mammoth
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