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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 14, 2017 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. today at two. the battle of brexit: mps debate the small print of the government's legislation for leaving the eu. first the quake — now the freeze: iranians living outdoors in sub—zero temperatures make desperate pleas for help. steady as she goes — the uk inflation rate defies many analysts‘ forecasts — and remains at 3%. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. ido i do not know the italian forehead, but they are not happy. they are calling it the apocalypse, an embarrassment. they miss out on a world cup for the first time in six yea rs world cup for the first time in six years and i'd tell you how sweden celebrates in half an hour. thank you. and with the weather, beautiful? you do not have to go very far to change the scene. to the east midlands, bright enough out to the west, much more cloud, but also in halfan the west, much more cloud, but also in half an hour i'll be witty with an update in central parts of the
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mediterranean. thank you. also coming up, the night runner. the knight runner. sir mo farah receives his knightood from the queen at buckingham palace. hello. this is afternoon live. they're a set of laws from 1539 — and they could be about to give theresa may a huge headache. the so—called henry 8th powers will be used to help the government steer through vital brexit legislation. and as mps begin line by line scrutiny in the house of commons — that's not her only problem. hundreds of amendments have been tabled to the eu withdrawal bill — by labour and conservative rebels. here's our political correspondent alex forsyth. pages and pages long. this is the bill that will bring all eu law into uk law, ready for the day of departure, so there is no legal
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black hole when we leave. but several mps are worried about some of the detail in this bill. secretary david davis. yesterday, the government gave in and tried to offer an olive branch to those concerned, promising a new act of parliament on the brexit deal. parliament will be given time to debate, scrutinise and vote on the final agreement we strike with the european union. this future act would put the withdrawal agreement between the uk and the eu into law once it is negotiated, including things like citizen's rights, the financial settlement, and details of any transition period. the government says mps will be able to examine and vote on the deal when both sides reach an agreement. they have said they want to achieve a withdrawal agreement deal by october next year. that would give plenty of time for parliament to vote on and discuss this legislation and make sure that parliament has the final say on both the withdrawal agreement itself and of the implementation period.
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so, according to ministers, mps will have a crucial say. do you think this is a meaningless vote being offered? not all agree with the government. their critics say take the deal or leave without one isn't a choice at all. not only does it not give mps the final say because they are being offered a false choice, but it could come very late on the 23rd hour, which wouldn't give us time to do anything to stop it or ask the government to think again so it is completely meaningless. the government had hoped by putting the final brexit into law, promising a vote, it would appease mps with concerns. it doesn't seem to have worked. in fact, now there is opposition to theresa may's plan to set the final brexit date into law, with some of her own mps threatening to vote against her. a lot of people, more than i would have imagined, who are deeply loyal backbenchers, many ex—ministers and people of real credibility, are so cross about this that they may well vote against their party's whip.
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stop brexit! so parliament is set to become something of a brexit battle ground. this is just the start of complex laws that must be passed. each one a test of the government's authority. our chief political corresponded vicky young is at westminster. today gets very serious, doesn't it? yes, we have had a blizzard of amendments which tells you there are many mps in the house of commons who want to change this bill, you want to put safeguards into it and really the main concern of many is that mps, not today, but later in the process to have a meaningful say in any kind of deal that theresa brings back from brussels. it is a complicated process , from brussels. it is a complicated process, but this afternoon, and for the other days we will follow this, we will try to help people through it and today i'm joint by a member
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of the assembly who will also help of the assembly who will also help of that. the snp didn't want brea kfast cu p of that. the snp didn't want breakfast cup —— exit, were deduced this bill to block brexit?” breakfast cup —— exit, were deduced this bill to block brexit? i think leaving the eu is a bad idea and i'm joint by the majority of scots who think it is a bad idea and have voted against it. but as a parliamentarian i have a responsibility to my constituents, but also elsewhere in the uk to make the best of a bad lot, and that is actually something all of that parliament should be thinking about, how does it impact our constituents? on the education sector as well. it is ourjob to scrutinise the work of government and right now the government and right now the government is doing a very poorjob and that means we are in the mess we are fiow. and that means we are in the mess we are now. what are the areas, let's ta ke are now. what are the areas, let's take today for example, what are the areas to date that you will be focusing on? one of our amendment for today is amendment 69 which would set a reset. what it means is
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if you don't reach a deal, rather than crashing with a new deal and implications forjobs than crashing with a new deal and implications for jobs and than crashing with a new deal and implications forjobs and the economy. we say, we're not quite there yet, we fall back on membership and we take it from there. that takes the sting out of there. that takes the sting out of the tail. the government is trying to push ahead with this, even though it isa to push ahead with this, even though it is a parliament minority. the government should be reaching out other parties and seeking a compromise. we have offered a compromise. we have offered a compromise. being part of the single market but leaving the european union. that was a big step us, but let us see the government to step up also. you know what critics will say. they will say you want to stay in the single market, you want to stay in the european union. that is not reflecting the british people's view. people who voted league told us we view. people who voted league told us we could retain membership and have full access to the supermarket. he was holding them to account? just
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as we are proposing right now, who is holding them to account over £350 million extra funding? you make promises when you're a in parliament you are meant to be held accountable. we also want to push on this compromise. nobody is going to make any progress unless parliamentarians like myself are willing to compromise. what about this idea of a meaningful vote at the end of the process? david davis had been given what others have called a meaningless concession. saying that parliament and mps will get a say. you could block a deal that he brings back that you are happy with? david davis is only made matters worse —— worse for himself. what he is offering is do you want a bad deal or a really, really bad your? that is not much of a choice. what was striking is the backlash from his own backbenchers on this
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issue. just as we have had all along, the government have been very bad in the handling of this. that is why we want to see a meaningful vote. we shouldn't forget this has an impact on us all, ourjobs, the economy, every sector of life and the environment. opportunities were young people in the future. that is why we have a responsibility to question the government and hold it to account as much as we can. and just a word on getting consent from the scottish parliament, one of the issues cropping outed the —— cropping up today. we should leave and left the scottish parliament give their consent? yes, that is something we wanted to see. even before the referendum. normally when you are acting on areas that are devolved competence, the scottish parliament has a say on that. any issues with the eu will involve the
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scottish parliament and there will bea scottish parliament and there will be a consensus nation that the scottish parliament will be seeking to improve. these problems could be ove i’co [ti e to improve. these problems could be overcome if the prime minister... the devolved administration will be as affected as the house of commons will be as well. none of us have all the answers, which is why it is astonishing that the minority government is trying to shove this through without consideration of anybody else. the snp view that. thank you. today put my particular debate getting underway soon. there will be a series of votes today and later on this evening. and another seven days in the weeks get to look forward to. what does pretty soon mean? it depends when the previous debate ends. no one knows. ok, thank you. don't forget — you can let us know what you think tweet us
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us using the hashtag afternoonlive theresa may has made her strongest attack yet on russia — accusing it of using technology to undermine the international order. speaking at the lord mayor's banquet in london last night, the prime minister said state—run russian organisations were planting stories, meddling in elections and using fake news to undermine societies. it is seeking to weaponise information, deploying its state—run media organisations to plant fake stories and photoshopped images in an attempt to sow discord in the west and undermine our institutions. so i have a very simple message for russia. we know what you are doing and you will not succeed. our correspondent steve rosenberg told us what the reaction had been in moscow. well, they heard what she was saying but they didn't like it. one brush and senator says these are
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groundless allegation. another senator said to be some may have made a fool of herself will stop the message and mocks go —— moscow is clear, we do not care what you think we are doing. and part of us think the moscow government do not care about being criticised, because they see theresa may is a weak leader. this is the country that invented the phrase i lady to describe margaret thatcher. but president putin does not see theresa may as an lady, rather as a weak minister. contrary to the strong message was trying to get across. there is another reason they do not care about being criticised. as bizarre as it sounds, the kremlin seems a benefit in being criticised by countries such as britain. because soon there will be in an election in russia and already there is the idea that kremlin is... it will help you
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to get elected. more than 500 people are now known to have died after sunday's powerful earthquake in iran. more than 8,000 people have been injured. officials have called off the rescue operation, saying it's unlikely that more survivors will be found. the iranian president hassan rouhani has visited the affected area. richard lister reports. the earthquake shook much of the middle east, but this is where it did most damage. hundreds of people in sarpol—e zahab lost their lives, tens of thousands lost their homes. many of these buildings were built by the government as cheap housing after the war with iraq in the 1980s. the question some here are asking is why did so many collapse in an area long prone to earthquakes? visiting the town today, iran's president pledged that anyone who'd failed to follow proper building standards would be held accountable but, for now, he's focusing on the survivors. translation: we'll provide tents for those who need them,
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and give loans and grants to all those whose houses were damaged and are unsafe. we will give money to everyone who needs temporary accommodation. an estimated 70,000 people need emergency shelter. helicopters are bringing them supplies, while many roads are still blocked by landslides. the challenge is to keep these survivors healthy as the winter temperatures continue to fall. this is another challenge for the authorities — the town's only hospital was so badly damaged it's unusable. more than 1,000 of the injured are being treated at hospitals around the region. they are far from home and many won't have houses to return to. across the border in iraq, hundreds were injured, but only a handful were killed. aid agencies there say they are ready to assist iran if needed. in case of any need from our iranian
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brothers, we will definitely provide, across the border, the support they ask for. sarpol—e zahab had to be rebuilt after the war with iraq. now it will have to be rebuilt all over again. richard lister, bbc news. the welsh assembly has been paying tribute to the former minister carl sargeant. the tribute to the former minister carl sargea nt. the ao—year—old tribute to the former minister carl sargeant. the ao—year—old was found dead at his home after he was sacked. following an investigation of inappropriate behaviour. a minute silence was observed today and tributes were held. i first met carl in the labour club many years ago. when he was elected here in 2003, we became friends. his particular
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talents came to the fore when he was chief whip, when i saw with my own eyes he was capable of gentle separating when necessary. two on one occasion taking a reluctant ams defeat to persuade them to vote the right way. a man of many talents. in all the years he never had a crossword. we spent a lot of time working together, talking about the challenges of being a dad and the challenges of being a dad and the challenges of being a dad and the challenges of politics. he was a lwa ys challenges of politics. he was always full of advice. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. mps begin scrutinising the eu withdrawal bill, which will move eu laws onto the uk statute books. the desktop writers as after iran's at great. inflation remains unchanged last month at 3 % — a five year high —
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despite a rise in food prices. this is offset by fuel prices. in sport, italy is denied the world cup. republic of ireland try to get their place in the world cup, they ta ke their place in the world cup, they take on denmark. bowlers after the fall ‘s first play. not bothered by the aussies, he says bring it on as he singled out by australia ahead of the first ashes test. i will have more on those stories at half past two. inflation remains unchanged last month at 3% — a five year high — despite a rise in food prices. earlier this month the bank of england raised interest rates for the first time in a decade to try and deal with the threat of higher inflation. our economics correspondent andy verity reports. upward pressure on prices. this bristol manufacturer in bristol ma kes hig h— pressure safety valves used in everything from
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refrigeration to transport. the raw materials it uses that once passed through bristol's nearby docks have to be brought in foreign currencies from the euro to the dollar. because of the weaker pound, you need more pounds to buy the same amount of copper to make a valve. we have seen a 30% increase of raw material prices since january last year. that is a really substantial issue for us. it is about two thirds of that is weakness of the pound, one third of that is caused by commodity price changes increases. the company can't risk passing on those higher costs to its customers, so its profits are being squeezed, meanwhile the workers face higher prices on the supermarket shelves. cost of living goes up, cost of things in shops, food etc. we just seem to stay at a certain level. you're not buying as much as you
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work with the same money before. you are spending more. 3% inflation might not seem too high, but then you see what is driving it — food and clothing. and low income households spend more of their money on those items, so they are hit harder in this new bout of inflation. the overall rate of inflation was 3.0%, slightly less than expected, but food and soft drinks rose by 4.1%, the fastest rise for four years. however, there are some signs that inflationary pressure is easing with raw materials up more than 8% in september, but less than 5% in october. the reason why inflation rose is principally down to the drop in the value after the eu referendum and we do not expect the pound to fall dramatically further, not to the same extent and what that means is that what probably close to the peak inflation as a result of that fall in the value of the pound. that means there is less of the need
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to tighten the screw on inflation with another rise in interest rates any time soon. the next rise is now expected in the city until august next year. just to show your tweet of somebody having a good day. this is most arrow who a fewer hours ago was at buckingham palace to receive his knighthood and areas. —— there he is. that was most arrow who says he will only look to run a marathon at the 2020 limbic if he believes he will get onto the podium. you're watching afternoon live. motorists should be forced to have their eyes tested every ten years according to the association of optometrists. they say too many people who've been told their eyesight isn't good enough — are still driving. their campaign is being backed by the family of natalie wade, who was killed by a partially sighted driver. with mean the studios henry leonard.
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hanley times you see someone privately in your own head saying you should not be driving. we see a handful of patients every year. the association of optometrists are serving... all over the uk. association of optometrists are serving... all overthe uk. one association of optometrists are serving... all over the uk. one in three have seen a patient in the past month to huge continues to drive despite their vision being below the legal standard. iu under obligation to pass that on? we have to be very careful to balance our duty of confidentiality against our wider duty. we will only disclose information if we felt there was a serious risk to other ute road users. if somebody can't see probably, they are going to be that, a risk? they can be. but in most cases of thermometers can help, because they can correct position. and it is also a compound that
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health check. we do not want to discourage people from having their eyes tested,, because we can pick up eyes tested,, because we can pick up eye diseases before they can't become a prop problem. we recommend everybody has their eyes tested everybody has their eyes tested every two years. we are calling for a change in the law for drivers to have their eyes tested when they have their eyes tested when they have their eyes tested when they have their driving test originally but also at renewal period, every ten years. what is the requirement at the moment, when you take your test that there is a check, is in there? that is right, it is a very basic check. we have some of the most lax laws in checking vision for drivers. at the moment it is whether you can read the number plate at 20 metres. once you have done that, you are allowed to keep driving potentially for the rest of your life with no further checks. potentially for the rest of your life with no further checksm potentially for the rest of your life with no further checks. if you have somebody who you are examining who insist they are fit to drive when you know they are not, they do not have a treatable condition, if you do go to the dvla behind their
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backs, you then open to some sort of legal attack from them? the duty to inform the dvla rests with the patient and we think that is quite right. but there are are occasions... the is that is nobody is going to ring the dvla if they rely on their kind so that we shouldn't be driving. some people do contact the dvla and we would always give patients the chance to self—report, given their vision is below the standard. occasionally, you do have to notify the dvla if we think there is a danger to other road users. i presume different types of eye problems are going to cause you problems, because you will have to refocus a lot. that's right. particularly peripheral vision, we are worried about a condition called like homer. this comes on without you realising and this could damage up you realising and this could damage up to 40% of your vision. and that is the reason why everybody should get their eyes checked every two
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yea rs. get their eyes checked every two years. thank you for coming in. evidence from a ‘so—called' loyalist supergrass will be used against a man accused of murdering two catholic workmen in belfast 23 years ago. gary convie and eamon fox were shot dead as they sat eating lunch in a car at a building site. chris buckler reports. gary haggerty was a leader within the ulster volunteer force, a notorious loyalist paramilitary group, responsible for hundreds of murders during years when conflict and killings were only too common northern ireland. haggerty was responsible for some of them. earlier this year, he pleaded guilty to more than 200 crimes, among them shootings and kidnappings, conspiracy to murder and directing terrorism. he was given five life sentences for the five murders he admitted. but those jail terms will be significantly reduced because haggerty has agreed to give evidence against a former friend, james smith. the reported suspect will be prosecuted for the following offences.
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the murder of gary convie, the murder of eamon fox. gary convie and eamon fox were shot dead simply because of their religion. they were catholic workmen, murdered in 1994 by the uvf, as they had lunch in their car. the case will be what is known as a supergrass trial a case where the word of an offender is key to the prosecution. there were a series of them here in belfast in the 1980s. however, the system collapsed because of concerns about the credibility of the evidence given by the so—called supergrasses. the law was changed a decade ago to begin safeguards for these kind offenders. the evidence is not sufficient to prosecute killings by more than a dozen other people. killing is part of a history of
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violence here. belfast. we havejust read his tweet. the olympic champion went to buckingham palace and received his knighthood from the queen. sir mo farah came to the uk asa queen. sir mo farah came to the uk as a young boy and came on to become britain's most decorated athlete. the summer he called time on his track career. he described the knighted as a dream come true. he is britain's most successful track athlete. after a career that has brought for olympic golds and six world championship medals. mohammed farah, for services to athletics. today it was time to add yet another title with the queen on hand to confer sir mo farah‘s from knighted. it is recognition for a career that has scaled the heights. sir mo farah is only the
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second athlete in modern olympic history to win by the five and 10,000 metre titles at successive games. it is deftly way up there. close to my lipid medals, for sure. to come here, at the age of eight, not speaking english, to achieve what i have and to be knighted, there is no word to describe it. for a moment like this in a sports sta r‘s a moment like this in a sports star's cabrera normally indicates the end of their career. not so in this case. sir mo farah has plans for his future, albeit a slightly different focus. i've been asked if i want to be rid tired? i said no. this is far too long and i said yeah. you are going far too long or something like that. i said, yes. she said what would you like to do when you stop running? i said i would like to be able to help the next generation, younger kids get involved. a switch to the road and marathon is now awaits. with the prospect he may compete for britain
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at the tokyo olympics in 2020. and having recently split from his controversial coast leave coach who remains under investigation, sir mo farah is also returning to live in london. it is a city were that in 2012 sole witness to his ascent to the peak of world athletics and now celebrates a momentous career. congratulations to him. time for a look at the weather. we are very at the quiet at the moment, but we will get back to that scene. i will show you an area be covered yesterday, we have new pictures coming in, just after we ran off there yesterday, which is really starting to flood in. that is what it looks like. you see the extent here. an area from the balearics to greece. that is what it looks like. we will surely be fitted we have received recently, coming out of... initially this will be
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italy and then we will move on to equally dramatic pictures coming out of slovenia. this is fairly unusual for this early in the season. but a lot of. it is always the way, you think it is picturesque... if you have a skiing holiday booked... nice and early in the season. but we are talking about a metre or so of some of the high ground. but it has to be said, if you are trying to move around, doctor of business, it is really very tricky. —— conduct your business. this is quite an active system, mainly because of its location. cold airflooding down system, mainly because of its location. cold air flooding down on the western flank, there is a lot of warm aircoming out the western flank, there is a lot of warm air coming out of north africa. when you mix the two together... i've heard he said many times. can i
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just take you on into the scope of the effects. we have mentioned the snow also tends to make the headlines. out towards the western end to the mediterranean, gusts of wind coming out of rome... 70 miles an hour. bora winds, another local wind coming out of croatia and down into the adriatic. the gusts around 50 miles an hour. you see it happening from wednesday on into thursday. we have the possibility of some very heavy rain and once it pushes up to high ground, that is where we get the conversion into the snow. so there is worse to come? there could be. in the core of the system, it is becoming more showery, but some of those showers are really quite punchy. so we keep close cut eye on it. our colleagues will be coming back to it later. we will look forward to that. in the meantime, closer to the british isles, a bit quieter, more relaxed.
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it isa isles, a bit quieter, more relaxed. it is a bit goldilocks, not too hot, not too cold, sort of in the middle, we keep that prospect going overnight, not a cold night. if you haven't reach the central heating yet, then this won't be causing you to do so. but from what may cause you concern is that there will be some dense fog patches. so just because you step out of your door and you are not straight in it, doesn't mean it doesn't exist. if you are driving distance, you may yourself into it. part of east anglia, lincolnshire, southern and eastern wales could be at risk of dense fog spots. across northern ireland, here too we think there is a good chance, also a central and southern parts of scotland. a quiet start, but bear in mind the fog. a bit like tuesday, it will take time before we lift the low cloud and fog and break it. then it turns into a decent day. some spots of rain, but
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a lot of dry weather. not a cold day. above part for the time of year. that is because we are tapping into some warm, moist air coming from the south westerly breeze, we are sandwiched between those two weather fronts. while that persists, it will be mild. but lurking to the north west, and not many miles away, that cold air becomes a player for thursday. once we get this weather fronts down and across the british isles, that is when it turns to brighter skies, but the sunshine doesn't do much for the temperature. quite blustery. down to the south, 12, 13 degrees. for the north, single figure temperatures. that introduces us to friday, a dry and bright enough day, a few degrees. farther north, very blustery with a mixture of sunny spells and showers. taking us into the weekend. that's all. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. mps are to debate the finer
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details of the main brexit legislation this afternoon — which aims to bring all existing eu law into uk law. hundreds of amendments have already been put forward. thousands of people have spent a second night without shelter in iran after a powerful earthquake killed more than a50 people near the border with iraq. inflation remained unchanged — at 3% — in october. fuel prices have fallen, but the cost of food has risen to its highest level in 4 years. and four—time olympic champion mo farah has been knighted for his services to athletics. he's described the knighthood as a "dream come true". sport now on afternoon live. while there's national despair in italy — there have been huge celebrations for sweden — who quailified for their first world cup in 12 years.
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this is how the team celebrated at the final whistle — the papers calling it an apocalypse. fans leaving saying it was an embarrassment. you have to remember there are winners in this instance to. this is how the team celebrated at the final whistle — spotting the pitchside studio of a swedish broadcaster and invading their post—match analysis. and they mobbed them. i'm not sure the egan got back on air. there is not much left of that desk. sweden is going to the world cup at the expense of italy. the last of the european places is up for grabs. it's the republic of ireland's turn tonight — they play denmark later — the winner of that game will take one of the final three places in russia.
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it's honours even after saturday's goalless draw in copenhagen where chances were few and far between. ireland will be hoping to make the most of home advantage, but manager martin o'neill says the focus for them must be on scoring goals. you have to try and cover all eventualities. it only takes a second to score a goal. the minute the goal is scored, that eradicates a lot of things. it eradicates extra time, penalty kicks, things like that. we are going to try and score a goal. we may need a couple of goals to keep out in denmark for two games might be tough. there is more football tonight. england play brazil at wembley there is more mmanager gareth southgate says he "will not hesitate" to use his young stars in their friendly at wembley. three players have been drafted in from the under—21's — and that after five players earned their first caps against germany, including man—of—the—match reuben loftus—cheek. it's incredible that he has had so
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few 90 minute appearances in the league. that we are putting him into that sort of environment. we believe in him. he did really well. now... sometimes the first game is easier because nobody is it where a few. england cricket captainjoe root says he knows he'll be targeted by australia in the ashes series — and he's not at all bothered. england are in townsville for their final warm—up match, which starts tomorrow — and our sports correspondent andy swiss is there too: welcome to the stadium here in ten spell. you can see the cricket australia 11 having their practice session. earlier on, we had some heavy showers during england's training session. it didn't interrupt them. they had a pretty good work—out at the start of their four—day match which begins tomorrow. no jimmy anderson four—day match which begins tomorrow. nojimmy anderson at training this morning. that is because he is not filling 100%. we
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are assured it is nothing to worry about. jake ball had a light work—out on the outfield as he continues his recovery from an ankle injury. earlier on, we heard from the captain, joe root. in the usual pre—ashes war of words, joe root is the person they are targeting. reid says he is relishing it.|j the person they are targeting. reid says he is relishing it. i heard they were targeting me, but we will be targeting every single one of them. we're not going to single any guy out. you have to take 20 wickets and you have to score more runs than them. that is the exact approach we will have as a side. we have got planned for each player. bring it on. you want that competitive elephant. an important for days for england. still some questions over the line—up. craig overton, the fast bowler who impressed in adelaide.
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stop he will be hoping to stake his claim. alistair cooke who is yet to score a half—century on this tour will be hoping to get some runs under their belt ahead of that first test in brisbane on november the 23rd. number one rafael nadal has pulled out of the atp these are the live pictures. you can watch that one life right now on bbc two. that is what i am going to do for the next half hour before i am back with the headlines at three o'clock. more than a50 people are known to have died after the earthquake in iran. with me in the studio. programme manager at muslim
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aid. that figure suggests there is pressure for what? the need housing. they need warmth. it is winter, so you have a lot of people sleeping. inthe you have a lot of people sleeping. in the cold. 70,000 people have been displaced from their homes. a huge number of people who need shelter in the winter. the initial life saving of water and medical aid is still ongoing because some people are still trapped. earthquakes are not unknown in this region. either questions being asked about the stability of some of the buildings? schools have come down. stability of some of the buildings? schools have come downlj stability of some of the buildings? schools have come down. i think this isa schools have come down. i think this is a problem in many earthquake areas. if the safety regulations are not specific, buildings will come down. after the tsunami, a lot of
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schools where you would go for shelter were destroyed because they we re shelter were destroyed because they were not fulfilling earthquake requirements. especially homes did not need permission or planning requirements at that time. you would expect public buildings to. we are talking about subzero temperatures at night. there is the issue of warmth, water and the pressure is huge to get it in. we have been in touch with the iranians, they have said that they are dealing with the search and rescue which is the first thing you have to do, saving lives, providing water, but now we need tents and shelter, they have requested us to work on the recovery phase because very often you have an
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earthquake, the help rashes end, but then people have got to rebuild after that. is there no question of after that. is there no question of a rescue phase? yes still rescue but to plan for the recovery. out there still people who can got at? yes, you can survive three days without water so there will be some people, especially in remote villages that haven't been breached yet. the death tolls may rise, because rose had been closed and there is no access to re m ote been closed and there is no access to remote villages. there will be more deaths. that is a tragedy. there's been a big rise in the number of people who've had bailiffs knocking at their door in england and wales — according to a charity. the money advice trust says bailiffs were brought in by local authorities to collect debts more than 2 million times in a year.
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that's a rise of 1a % over two years — the charity says it's "deeply worrying". our personal finance correspondent, simon gompertz, reports. it is upsetting, sometimes frightening, bailiffs have the power to seize certain possessions, or if they find a way in. you are on my property. i'm not trespassing. in nottinghamshire, this man filmed their lives trying to enforce parking fines he thought was unfair. have a nice day, chaps. i thought, i'm not paying this, i have caused the hazard, not interrupted anybody‘s rights act access, i'm not interrupting the flow of cause... they usually make two visits, face—to—face visits, the bailiffs. and who are the top users of bailiffs? not banks or credit card companies, but councils. up 10%, getting them to full scan for tax debts, that is the biggest one. up 27%, giving bailiffs parking fines to deal with. they live retrieving
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overpaid housing benefit... that ‘s up 20%. you can receive a knock on the door. that is distressing. you hear about sleepless nights. it is adding to the cost of the debt, because the daily bailiffs fees are added on. we think the council should be applying more progressive ways of collecting debt, as other sectors are doing. it's easy option for the council to send bailiffs to your door. the fees are 72 per £75 initially. and £235 for the visit and £110 for selling your possessions. but councils say elderly care has to be paid for, also services for vulnerable children and things like collecting rubbish, they have a duty, they say, to raise the money they can. bbc news. a 71—year—old woman connected with
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the arrest of a missing teenager has been released on bail. this missing person who has severe epilepsy... the man who was arrested at the same time as the woman is helping police with enquiries. the television producer and writer, daisy goodwin — who created the itv drama, "victoria" — has claimed she was groped by a government official during a visit to number ten. she told the radio times the man put his hand on her breast after a meeting to discuss a proposed tv show when david cameron was prime minister. she said she wasn't traumatised, but was cross — adding she didn't report it at the time. downing street said they take all allegations very seriously and would look into any formal complaint, should one be made. rachel is here. with the business in just a moment. mps are scrutinising
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the eu withdrawal bill. death toll rises to at least a60 after iran's most deadliest earthquake. more than 7000 injured. the rate of inflation remains steady at 3%. high higher food prices offset by lower costs. the measure of inflation the measure of how quickly measure of prices are rising stayed prices are rising stayed steady at 3% last month, that's the highest level in five—and—a—half—yea rs. but it could signal a peak in inflation as last year's fall in the value of the pound drops out of the calculations. tesco has ‘welcomed' a decision by the competition and markets authority to provisionally clear its £3.7 billion takeover of the uk‘s largest food wholesaler, booker. the cma said the deal could even increase competition in the wholesale market and reduce prices for shoppers. house—price ‘north—south‘ divide has narrowed according to officialfigures...
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in northern ireland rose by 6% in the year to september, compared with a 5.7% rise in england, a 5.3% increase in wales, and a 3.1% rise in scotland. and inflation remains at 3%, what does it mean? inflation on average is the rise in prices of things we buy. when we look at the figures, we compare them to what they were a year ago. what that figure is telling us is the things you are bang in the shops today are costing you 3% more than a year ago. that is significant because of wage growth. we have got figures coming out tomorrow. the most recent figures show it is at 2.2%, if inflation is at 3%, that is the gap which is
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causing the squeeze in our incomes which means we have less disposable incomes. what is on the increase? food prices are up. furniture and fuel, the are costing less than last year. we get an average of 3%. the bank of england forecast that it would peak at 2%, their aim is to percent, there is quite a way to go there. what is key is that inflation is caused by demand, you have lots of money sloshing around, simon, you wa nt to of money sloshing around, simon, you want to buy lots of stuff, so inflation is called by of increasing our spending, demands rise, inflation is called by of increasing ourspending, demands rise, prices rise,. it inflation in the eu could —— inflation in the uk, the pound has fallen, we import so much, the wea k has fallen, we import so much, the weak pound has increased the price
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weak pound has increased the price we have to pay for items coming in. that happened over a year ago, and because inflation is measured year on year, that calculation is falling out now. we think that we have seen the peak and the peak is going to be 3%. you and i are old-fashioned. we work in an old—fashioned business. there is still life in television. work in an old—fashioned business. there is still life in televisionlj am there is still life in television.” am going to come to itv in a second. but first i asked lucy or carol earlier. we could have or it could come next month. if it comes next month, a little bit higher, the bank of england rights to the chancellor saying what he's going to do to get inflation down again. i don't think it will trouble mark carney too much. we are working in the cost of the first interest—rate rise in
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decades. the bank feels it is taking action. it is a historically low interest rate at the moment. it is probably not going to change people's behaviour. it is a signal, a reminder, perhaps some people approaching adulthood now have never known an interest rate rise. it's a reminder that interest rates can go up reminder that interest rates can go up as well as down. what can i ask you now? can i ask you about itv? we had figures out about their advertising revenues. on face value, it doesn't look good. they are down about a% for the third quarter. that is better than the 8% drop they saw in the previous quarter. they are forecasting growth by the end of the year. there are lots of factors.
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what can our correspondent tell us? itv has been coming under pressure in making money from tv advertising. revenues were in making money from tv advertising. revenues we re down in making money from tv advertising. revenues were down 7% in the nine months to the end of september. the problem is it is a competitive market, there is a lot of competition for advertising and companies have been cutting back on their advertising spending because of economic and political uncertainty. there are signs that some of the fast—moving consumer group companies are starting to come back into the market. that is a positive development. on the other side of the coin, itv producing original content, coronation street, it is doing very well indeed. its revenues we re it is doing very well indeed. its revenues were up more than it is doing very well indeed. its revenues were up more than £1 billion. that is offsetting the
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losses in the traditional business. the traditional advertising from television model is weakening, but on demand television, production, original content, that is where it is making its money at the moment. quick look at the markets. tesco is up. why is itv don't? -- down. revenues are still down a%. over the whole year they will be down 5% but the outgoing in right direction. we are going to the house of commons. the bill is under debate. this is a mammoth piece of legislation. it is seen as mammoth piece of legislation. it is seen as crucial to britain's
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departure from the eu. we are expecting a number of amendments. more than 100. let's join expecting a number of amendments. more than 100. let'sjoin our correspondent. the name ofjohn brogan should not have appeared as a supporter of... we will begin with... it will be convenient to ta ke with... it will be convenient to take amend and 79, together with other amendments with which some decisions will come at later dates in the committee as said in the selection paper. i rise to move the amendments in my name and all those other names that still remain on the order paper. i am limited to moving
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clause a9, this clause a9 is linked to clause 50, 51, 52, the reasons for that i might develop in a moment. i wish to begin by declaring my sentiments in moving this clause and the clauses which are umbilically attached to it. i am a relu cta nt umbilically attached to it. i am a reluctant brexiteer, i am too old to bring think that i was born to bring us bring think that i was born to bring us out of europe. life began again once we entered into the common market, my aim at my purpose and being and everything i breathe was to get us out of the organisation. that is not so, in my own constituency and the work i did nationally, i stressed that it was ona nationally, i stressed that it was on a balance that we had to make a
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decision about europe, and that we didn't need more facts about europe, we needed to draw on our very nature is, all that we had been taught in out is, all that we had been taught in our culture, is, all that we had been taught in ourculture, in our is, all that we had been taught in our culture, in our being, in where we feel we stand in this country, to make that decision of whether we wished to leave or not. point of order. in this amendment, we are debating a date of 30th of march 2019 but there are other amendments to be voted on at a later date which put the exit date 11pm on march the 29th 2019. there is a difference of an hour. the clocks only go forward on sunday the 31st of march. could you give some guidance to the movers
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of these amendments so that the clocks and houses are in order? lets not worry about time. it is a matter for the debate to decide no, not for me to decide. let's not take more time... my amendment decides on british time when to leave. there amendment is at the beckoning of europeans. we have a very clear choice. i would willingly take those interactions that are trying to trip me up. i thought the referendum campaign, being a reluctant brexiteer was on balance. i thought our country's free future would thrive outside rather than inside. i have always wanted to make a deal. i
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thought it very sensible in any negotiations to make sure the other side knows that you may be planning for no deal. the third factor which i will touch again in a moment when we see what the house of lords does toa we see what the house of lords does to a bill of this size, it has been very difficult for most of us to come to terms with what our role has been as mps in a representative democracy. and how we come to terms and digests the fact that a referendum has ta ken and digests the fact that a referendum has taken place, and the british people have spoken. how do we react in those circumstances which i believe are unique and in no way comparable with any other parliamentary procedure that we consider in this house. as i said at the beginning, this clause stands
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with three other new clauses, together they present the government with a clean slimline brexit bell, —— brexit bell, they will thank the lord it is in the bill. today we decide on the date by british time, not european time when we leave. that is our choice. it is about the freedom, the little freedom, the beginnings of freedom that we hope will fall, with difficulties of course, by setting off on the course of leaving the european union. the second thing is a simple clause that ensures that all the laws and
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regulations come onto our statute point at that point of time, british time, not european time. can i finish? the third clause is how parliament reviews those laws, the ones we wish to keep, those we wish to amend, those we wish to kick out. the clause says this house will decide how that process is done. before we finish our debate, the government will be agreeing with me on that. henry viii is an absurd way of going about this business. as we get down to the mega task of reviewing. we may beg the government for a touch of henry viii to get
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through the size of the task before us. through the size of the task before us. the last point, given we have real difficulties in completing negotiations, i have got views on that, i said negotiations, i have got views on that, isaid i negotiations, i have got views on that, i said i would give way as soon as that, i said i would give way as soon as i have finished explaining this and the three clauses, we need a safe haven. would he not concede that an arbitrary date for brexit could risk damaging the british economy as the evidence emerges that hurrying brexit me badly damaged our manufacturing and agriculture and financial sectors. i am supported by people whose constituents agree with me, and not their views. how they
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deal with that is not my problem. it isa deal with that is not my problem. it is a difficult problem but i do not have any particular solution to act. but labour voters, the larger the majority, the more clear they spoke about brexit. all talk at once i will be dealing with her point in a moment. it comes to who do we think we are dealing with? are we playing a game of cricket? i am saying that. some people suggest... iam saying that. some people suggest... i am saying that we will be fighting for our lives. while we want this clause, if i ever get onto explaining it, my friend wanted to
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intervene. i was confused that all labour voters were supporting his possession, the majority of them didn't and the majority of labour members do not support it. will he correct the record? i happily add to the records and it makes some people's circumstances more different. generally speaking, the larger the labour majority in a general election, the bigger the turnout. last and the one before that and the one before that. the more likely they were to boat leaving. —— more likely they were to boat leaving. — — vote. more likely they were to boat leaving. -- vote. order! we don't need everybody stood up at the same
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time. iam need everybody stood up at the same time. i am sure if the right honourable gentleman will give way, he will say so. please don't keep standing up at the same time. before i give way... that includes mr fa rrelly i give way... that includes mr farrelly as welcome he has already had a good start to the day. as i would say, in qualifying that general statement, the area i'd love to represent, not my own constituency but others, actually voted to remain and were against the trend of what was in the country about labour's support and the referendum. i will give weight to my friend, who has been in the house. —— give friend, who has been in the house. — — give way. friend, who has been in the house. -- give way. i am very grateful to my right honourable friend. i do not agree with his case but he had the usual approach. he needs to focus on
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the fact that, at the moment, most people have not changed their minds. the reason they voted to leave or remain as faras the reason they voted to leave or remain as far as they are concerned think it will be resolved by leaving. the question i will ask, supposing it emerges within the next 12 months at all of the reasons why they voted the way they did are going to be realised. on top of that, the economic consequences will be disastrous. what then? mr speaker, i only have four short sheets of paper. it has taken all this time. i do actually have an a nswer this time. i do actually have an answer for that. but any politician... no, indeed. it seems to me it is the labour side that needs educating, as i would say, to where labour voters are. and if my
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very honourable friend, right honourable friend, can contain himself, i hope i have will take account of that. i would emphasise that his wisdom in saying we don't know where these negotiations will end up, they are fraught, particularly if you have a group of people who do not really want you to succeed because they fear what would happen in that own countries, if you did succeed, is part of negotiations that we will actually have.” did succeed, is part of negotiations that we will actually have. i am grateful to my right honourable friend. did my right honourable friend. did my right honourable friend receive a pamphlet from the government during the referendum, paid for by the tax payers, which, on the back, said that the government would carry out the wishes of the people via the vote in the referendum ? wishes of the people via the vote in the referendum? doesn't he believes
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that having a fixed date, known by everybody, actually delivers what the people voted for?” everybody, actually delivers what the people voted for? i have to confess, in receiving the pamphlet but throwing it away. in the bin. immediately. i never believed the sort of campaign we fought, with forced truths on both sides enhanced the standing of us as a political class, or addressed the very serious issues which people had to sum up everything they knew about their own identity, the identity of their communities and their country and the position of their country in the world. we all know people take different views on that. the idea that the government pamphlet would help us, dear god! i will give weight to my honourable friend.”
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thank my right honourable friend for giving way. i note he did qualify his earlier statement. would he accept that at the last general election, over 85% of liverpool riverside constituents voted for the labour party candidates, and that 73% of liverpool riverside electives voted to remain? does he accept that people in liverpool riverside have great wisdom? if i did it with mean the voters of birkenhead did not have wisdom, which is the very opposite point she is making. i will not put my head in that news. i have given way once. we have a serious debate. i will if i can make progress willingly bring people in as we go along. i wished however to express disappointment with the government over how it is handling the strategy. i don't believe there is the sense of importance or drive
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or coherence but this —— that this issue merits. i have argued publicly and privately that anyone serious about comparing this historic... once he took over from chamberlain. he would have moved from the ramshackle way of existing institutions and he established a war cabinet. i believe that now, in a moment, i'm going to say this clause begins. i think we need a brexit cabinet, small with the opposition to be on it which mr attlee and mr greenwood accepted. we will leave that history lesson in
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the house of commons for the moment. this is an historic moment, the start of the withdrawal build debate would just explain what is happening at the moment. frank field is coming forward with his amendment, what he wa nts to forward with his amendment, what he wants to get written into this bill isa wants to get written into this bill is a precise x six date, a precise date for leaving the european union. e—mail member yesterday that david davis the brexit secretary said that is what he was going to do, to give the date of the end of march 2090 and get it written on the face of the bill. the problem is, that will please many on the leeds side, people like frank field who is a labourmp people like frank field who is a labour mp but people like frank field who is a labourmp but did people like frank field who is a labour mp but did campaign for leave. eurosceptics thing, let's get the date written in and then we cannot draw back from it. others think, this is crazy because it gives no room for manoeuvre, the government could be boxed in. crucially, for mps, it means if we
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are leaving anyway when they are presented with the option of the deal that theresa may brings back at the alternative is no deal at all, they feel they do not have enough room for manoeuvre. this debate will go on today. the government will bring in its own version of this at some point. crucially, and just to confuse things a little bit more, the actual vote on whether this should happen or not will not be taking place today. that is deferred, happen in the next few weeks. he appears to be having grief from his own benches rather than those opposite. the issue does not justify the conservative party. a lot of emphasis has been on the conservative party. they are very divided on the issue goes to the same is true of the labour party as well. there are people, maybe ten or does labour mps, who on the leave side of the argument in the referendum. what that means a white is important over the next few weeks, they will generally be voting
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with theresa may and the government on all of this. it boosts her very, very slim majority. she has the dup onside and a certain number of labour the lack really does help her. on the conservative side you can her. on the conservative side you ca n afford her. on the conservative side you can afford to have a few rebels. they need quite a few, 20 or 25 to defeat the government. pretty crucial error. the role that labour plays in all of this. they have already mentioned the henry viii clause, what is that about? these are the powers the government ministers feel they need in order to get through all the work that needs to be done for the uk to leave the european union. a0 odd years of rules and regulations have been brought overfrom rules and regulations have been brought over from the european rules and regulations have been brought overfrom the european union in order to change our law books and make sure everything is ready to go when we actually leave. the crucial date at the end of march 2019, they need to get through a lot of work. a
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lot of it is very technical. it is taking the word european union out of the law as it stands. they feel they can do it without primary legislation and in a much easier and quicker way but they are open to the arguments and basically other mps are saying that is not scrutiny. that means you have these overwhelming powers, a bit like henry viii. it makes us like a dictatorship and should be parliament the looks are all of this. that should beware any compromises may come in the next few weeks. i'm i'm a great admirer of frank field but how much longer will he go on? as long as he wants. we are waiting to hear from the europe minister, aren't we? he may not come to later. what happens is they all get up and chat and then the minister will come and say what he thinks. should we stay with this? i
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thinks. should we stay with this? i think we should. it is very important. we are staying with this. back to you later. i underline the fa ct back to you later. i underline the fact there is a rescue launch waiting in the four clauses i will be proposing during our... the four clauses that are linked to this burst clause which adds such pleasure in moving. with the right honourable gentleman accept that the house of lords is, of course, unelected? house of lords is, of course, unelected ? it house of lords is, of course, unelected? it has passed the referendum act itself by its own decision and it really has no justification whatsoever in attempting to obstruct, delay, or to undermine this bill. a very, very important lesson needs to go to some of those in the house of lords who think they can wreck this bill. and
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where i stand so that brexit never ta kes where i stand so that brexit never takes place. —— us down. there is a very important convention, the salisbury convention, and there is a very important difference between a referendum and a party's manifesto. the salt spray convention allows us to give and take —— salisbury convention allows us to give and ta ke convention allows us to give and take over certain parts of a ma nifesto take over certain parts of a manifesto that the government feels committed to and for which they wish to pursue in parliament and stand for re—election on saying we have done thejob we for re—election on saying we have done the job we promised to do. we are ina done the job we promised to do. we are in a different ball game. at the beginning, i tried to say, it is difficult for us all to get to terms with being the role that we have as mps and the role that we had in a post—referendum debate. i think their lordships should know that if they try and wreck this bill, then
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many of us would push the nuclear button. our side of the has wants to see the house of lords go. i'm surprised there was not a cheer at this point. —— be house. they will sound of their own death now. not one of them is elected. none of them have any standing whatsoever in preventing the government inviting the house of commons to implement the house of commons to implement the referendum decision, which we are doing today. i am very grateful to the right honourable gentleman for giving way. part of the lead argument was to take back control, and not just to argument was to take back control, and notjust to the house of commons. it was to take back control to the country in parliament as a
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whole foot is he trying to undermine that system? not at all. we'll be going late on these days if the honourable gentleman would like to see my website, i have outlined views on reforms which are different. about electing the great powers in this country and influences like the trade unions but not by the party whips deciding this. i dare not go down that path because i will not be touching on a new clause. my honourable friend has had an intervention by a point of order and i think that is it for him. this new clause, i think, should be the start of the new negotiating position. mr barnier has
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told us we have to put our money on the table and get serious within two weeks. i think we should jump at this opportunity. i think they should say in two weeks, the government should lay the outline of our agreement. i believe they should say over which decades they are prepared to meet our commitments and i believe they should say, at that point, at the end of the two weeks, we cease to pay any contributions to the european union. want to see the balance of power move swiftly from their boot to our boot. and that from that date, two weeks hence, at the invitation of mr barnier, we actually say, fine. here is the outline of agreement. here is the beginning of the money settlement, paid over a period of time with pensions contributions and so on.
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from this day, until you start seriously negotiating with us, which they have not, then there is no more money going will stop it is wrong to think all of the 17 billion a year would be coming back to us. there is already coming back to us the 5 billion that mrs thatcher negotiated from the unfair formula. watered down by whom, i will not say. but there is only so much one can say from these benches. watered down, nevertheless, it is 5 billion coming back, and a billion coming back to promote anti—poverty programmes in this country. i wish to tell the house i applied for money from these funds, to see people who are hungry, maybe starving. and what did mr
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barnier and his group do? nothing. so, we have, supposedly, huge sums of money coming back at their direction. what it should be spent on but actually does not feed people who are hungry. mr chairman... mr hoyle, i want to end now by saying i will push this amendment to a division. i do so for a number of reasons. one is it always seems to me to get an advantage when you can, rather than later. a bird in the hand is better than two in the bush. while the government is introducing its own timetable, set by the european bureaucrats readily are instructed, where we might take leave of them, i think we should actually make a decision today and leaves on our terms and our time. but it is, as i say, this is a
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clause which ought not to be read in isolation. it has the other three clauses which gives us an alternative way of exiting without all the cla ptrap the alternative way of exiting without all the claptrap the government has put in this bill. and i believe, before the end of the negotiations, something like this four clause bill will be adopted. the first and civilised than to mention i had about timing... maybe it's a fallacy to think that in £1 mac own terms one has terms for the nation. —— one's own terms. i have never bought a house without having in the contract the date when it is mine, when i can get in. i have never, apart from being elected to the house of commons, but knowing that i
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would actually have up to a five—year contract, i have never had a job that does not have a starting date in it. i will give way.” a job that does not have a starting date in it. iwill give way. iam very grateful to my rideable friend for giving way. his analogy that buying a house. at the first hurdle because nobody commits to a date for buying a house before they know what it is they are buying. the substantive point is this... is not the fatal weakness of what he proposes, and i respect the way he argues his cases as he always does, the secretary of state said to us when he came before the select committee that it is possible that negotiations may go to the 59th minute of the 11th hour. that is undoubtedly possible. in those circumstances, does it really makes sense to bind the hands of the country of those who are negotiating on behalf of the country to get the
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best possible deal we can get, which is also the weakness of the government's own amendment. does it make sense to do that? as my right honourable friend was kind to me about house analogy, i have always bought my houses and never inherited them. i bought mine, too! mr chairman... i have been corrected andi chairman... i have been corrected and i withdraw it, of course i do. that the idea that the biggest decisions in our lives, like buying a house can we take the most time over, is not borne out by any
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research whatsoever. can i now conclude, and i do apologise on that point? i do think... absolutely. i'm grateful to the right honourable gentle and who has been a political ally in previous cross—party arrangements but not on this occasion. —— gentleman. he has dodged answering the part of the serious point that his right honourable friend just put to him. as things stand, article 50 will ta ke as things stand, article 50 will take effect in march of 2019 and we will leave. anything in this bill is superfluous to that. the problem could arise only if 28 member states all agree they are near to a conclusion but they actually require a few more days, a few more weeks, to settle it. once we are going they won't want us to stay in much longer
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because they won't want to surround for the european parliament elections. actually, it would be utterly foolish, is 28 governments all agreed to extend the process and the british representative had to say that we put into british law a timing which says to the second when we are actually leaving. it seems to me that is a rather serious flaw to their remembering. my very right honourable friend berrahee was such a good lawyer, i wish he had read my amendment because it has a day, rather than a minute when we actually leave. despite all the encouragement from behind, i was so anxious to bridgewater said about my honourable friend, i forgot to raise
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the substantive point he addressed to me. i have been reminded by the learner gentleman. if we look over our whole history in europe, the idea that we finish any negotiations other than at the last minute is almost unheard of. by putting a time m, almost unheard of. by putting a time in, it will say that you have to begin your shenanigans a month before that, rather than the month after it. i am grateful to be able to move this amendment to remind people it is part of a short exit bill, which i think the government... very good, yes. i'm grateful to the honourable gentleman. you would just want to make this simple point. the argue about flexibly to force when you look at article 50 itself was a very specific for a simple reason. that is that in a timescale it is
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therefore determined on those negotiating to reach an agreement or agree not to reach an agreement. just changing that timescale does not allow you to reach an agreement. they have the time to do and i is the whole point about compression, to getan the whole point about compression, to get an agreement. that is either date is article 50. last point, mr hoyle. i thought my amendment was merely implementing the section 50, which we all voted for, to tell our constituents that we had... well, apart from one who voted against. well, voted against. voted against... triggering article 50? very, very good. apart from two or three... anymore on four? five, six, seven, eight, nine... mr hoyle, i thought i would take... it was so
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uncontentious what i was saying, i thought this would have been five minutes. i apologise to the house for the time i have taken. all the new clause does is to put on the statute book, the actual timing of section 50 that we've voted for in overwhelming numbers almost a year ago. i move the clause in my name and in those names who is still remain on the order paper. date of exit from the european union. so, the first part of this debate, the amendment put forward by frank field, but we will rejoin because very shortly they will start to debate the piece of legislation at the heart of this, be you withdraw bill. -- eu
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the heart of this, be you withdraw bill. —— eu withdrawal will. the heart of this, be you withdraw bill. -- eu withdrawalwill. mr hoyle, i rise to move that clause one stands as part of the bill and also several amendments. it may help the house and the public if i say these are for decision on days seven and eight. clause one reads the european community ‘s act of 1972 is repealed on exit day. it is a simple clause but it could scarcely be more significant. in appealing the european communities act of 1972, this is an historic step in delivering our exit from the european union in accordance with last yea r‘s european union in accordance with last year's referendum. i hope that all people on all sides of this issue can agree that the repeal of the eca is a necessary step as we leave the european union. would my
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right honourable friend recollect the official opposition voted against a second reading of this bill and therefore also voted against the repeal of the 1972 act? and yet they are still claiming that this bill is not fit for purpose and it usurps parliamentary sovereignty when in fact it does exactly the opposite. i am very grateful to my honourable friend for some look forward to seeing where the members opposite support the clause and stand by it. if we were not to repeal the european communities act, we would still exit european union at the end of the article 50 process from the perspective of eu law and there would be confusion. but there would be confusion and uncertainty about the law on our own statute book. it would be unclear whether uk and eu law took precedence and if there was a conflict between them. the status of new eu law would also
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be unclear once a uk has left the eu. i intend to set out for the has the effect of the european community ‘s act and the implications of its repeal. the eu, even when a treaty has been ratified, does not incorporate its laws unless it is incorporated into domestic law by legislation. it the european communities act gave eu law supremacy communities act gave eu law supremacy over communities act gave eu law supremacy over uk law. without it, eu law would not apply in the uk. the 1972 act has two main provisions. section two. one secures rights and observations are directly applicable in the uk legal system. they applied directly without the need for parliament to pass specific domestic implementing legislation and this bears repeating in the
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context of the clauses to follow. the eu regulations and certain eu treaty provisions have effect in the uk without further parliamentary intervention, thanks to the european communities act. section 2.2 provides a delegated powerfor communities act. section 2.2 provides a delegated power for eu obligations, such as those eu directives. over 12,000 eu regulations flow into our law over section 2.1 of the act. none of which could be refused by this house or the other place. it ranges from rules about the rights of passengers overseas and classification rules. does the minister agree this simple, crucial clause is the way in which our democracy is completely restored and that once it has gone through and that once it has gone through and implemented, any matter that worries the british people can properly be the subject of parliamentary debate and decision no laws and treaties with standing? he has perhaps anticipated my speech
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bya he has perhaps anticipated my speech by a few perhaps. uk ministers involved in the devolved administrationings on topics such as airfares, public administrationings on topics such as air fares, public contracts and preserved sardines. the house has not remained in absorbing all the legislation, we have benefited from the tireless work of the european scrutiny committee chaired by my honourable friend which has scrutinised a vast number of eu documents supporting this house in holding ministers to account when representing our interests in the eu. its work has been of paramount importance in holding ministers to account and maximising this house's voice on eu matters. on occasions, deliberations in this house have influenced the laws adopted by the eu, but this house was on every occasion obliged to implement our eu obligations. we could not... we
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could not refuse new eu law because our obligations to the eu. i give way. most of his legislation proposed by the commission considered by the council of ministers including a british minister, and now approved by the european parliament before it becomes law. can he name a significant european law or regulation which was opposed by the british government at the time, which the government is now proposing to repeal because most brexiteers can't think of one.” proposing to repeal because most brexiteers can't think of one. i am most grateful to my learned friend andi most grateful to my learned friend and i think the question at stake here is not whether there are legitimate processes in the eu. the one that i'm always glad to bring to people's attention is of course the ports regulation which we will have to stick with all the while that we are within the european union, but it's perhaps uniquely opposed by the owners of ports, the trade unions,
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it seems with all parties involved in our strategic interests and ports are opposed to that particular regulation. i look forward to the day that we can make our own decisions about our private flourishing infrastructure works. would he also agree with me that those who accuse the government of a power grab would be very happy for unelected eu officials to continue to exercise these powers rather than an elected government, accountable to this elected parliament? well, mr speaker, indeed. i've often that the seniorry of our constitution had remained in force, but not the practical effect which the electors of this country expected it to have. in response as it were to the right honourable member for rushcliffe, most of the decisions that are taken
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by the connell of ministers are effective made by consensus behind closed doors with no record as to who said what, how the decision was arrived at or indeed unlike this house, no record of any of the proceedings either?” house, no record of any of the proceedings either? i certainly thoroughly recommend his related report, the report of his committee on the related subject. what has been established in this sequence of interventions is that clause one of this bill could scarcely be of greater constitutional significance. it repeals the 1972 act on exit day, removing the mechanism allows eu law to flow into uk law and removing one of the widest ranging powers ever placed on the statute book of the united kingdom, the repeal makes it clear and unarguable that sovereignty lies here in this parliament. i will give way. sovereignty lies here in this parliament. iwill give way. i'm most grateful to the minister for
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dwifg way. if the 1972 act is repealed before the end of what ministers are calling implementation act which i prefer to think of as the transition period, what will be the transition period, what will be the legal basis for our relations with the european union and for the free trade agreements we have with the 57 third countries? i'm happy that we announced the withdrawal agreement and implementation bill which will follow in due course in order to establish that legal basis, but i wa nt to establish that legal basis, but i want to conclude this section of my remarks and move on to the amendments. how, and notjust now, how we exercise in future the restored power, i have to say i think i have given way quite a few times and! think i have given way quite a few times and i make progress and get on to the amendments. how in future we exercise that restored power is a choice for this place. the government are clear that we want a smooth and orderly exit achieved through continuity in the law at the
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point of exit as we shall discuss at later stages. for now, point of exit as we shall discuss at laterstages. for now, i hope, point of exit as we shall discuss at later stages. for now, i hope, all members can agree it is essential that this clause stand part of the bill. i now turn to today's amendments. it's very fitting that the first amendment to be debated in this committee was from the honourable gentleman for bird when head. he has got to the heart of the matter of when we leave the european. i listened carefully to his speech. i will come to that point, i listened carefully to his speech and i have a great deal of sympathy for the case he makes. i will pick up on two points. first on theissue will pick up on two points. first on the issue of using our time, he has not given a time of in his amendment and one of the things i learned in the course of my rile air force service is the ambiguity when somebody sesifies midnight. i do think his amendment is deficient and
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i hope he would choose not to move it to i hope he would choose not to move ittoa i hope he would choose not to move it to a division, but would accept the government's set of amendments which includes the consequenceals.” would love the government to move 23 hours, 59 minutes on the day that we should actually leave, but it is on ourtime, not on should actually leave, but it is on our time, not on their time or their terms. now, will the government actually move that amendment to my amendment later in the bill?” actually move that amendment to my amendment later in the bill? i am most grateful to him. he made his case well, of course, but we are going to move the amendment which we have tabled. i will give way once more and then i am going to make some progress. exactly this argument is creating division between us and our european neighbours which will make it very difficult to create a deep and special partnership. well, i don't accept that at all, no, because when the prime minister
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wrote to the president of the european council in march last year, she set in train the defined two year process of article 50 which u nless year process of article 50 which unless it is extended will come to a conclusion on 29th march 2019. that's why the prime minister said in her speech in florence that the united kingdom will seize to be a member of the european union on that day. that is the government's policy. asi policy. as i said, i would like to make some progress through my remarks. however, the government has listened carefully to the debate around the setting of exit day for the statutory purposes of the bill. there has been some uncertainty as to whether the exit day appointed by the bill would course spond to the day that the uk leaves the eu at the end of the article 50 process. the government sympathises with this uncertainty. this is also an issue on which the lords constitutional committee found in their report. they stated, "we are concerned that the power to define exit day, a matter that's pivotal of the operation of the bill is unduly
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broad in its scope and flexibility and it is not subject to any parliamentary scrutiny procedure." such concerns were further voiced by the honourable members for feltham and cardiff south and for wakefield, not least regarding the breadthth of the power to set numerous exit days. there has been a notable disconnect between the labour front and backbenches on this issue. the front bench seems to have refused to acknowledge the need to establish clarity. we would like it put this issue to rest. we recognise the importance of being crystal clear on the setting of exit day and if the government is keen to provide certainty. in the light of this, the government brought forward amendment 381 to clause 1a along with 382 and 383 which will set exit day as 11pm
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on 29th march 2019. of course, this is slightly different to the right honourable member's amendment in that it sets a date and time for exit. i'm sorry the minister is not feeling well, but does he understand how impossible it is for me to explain to my constituents that they can have certainty about nothing, about brexit as the government plans it. except, according to him, the date when it will happen? well, i have to say i forget for the moment whether the honourable voted to trigger article 50, but this house did vote to trigger article #50 and the process is clear. two yea rs later we leave #50 and the process is clear. two years later we leave the european union. i've given way. i'mjust wondering when he is going to admit
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to this house, setting a date for brexit is mere window—dressing. if there is to be a transitional deal which the prime minister says she wa nts, which the prime minister says she wants, she told this house it will be under article 50, that means we will be staying in the customs union and during the transition period so this exit day is a sop to the backbenches. when is he going to tell them truth? i will come on to the implementation period in a moment. one of the crucial points is we need to become a third country in order to conclude our future relationship agreement and so the prime minister set out in her florence speech the outline of that implementation period which would allow continuity under new arrangements which would allow us to bea arrangements which would allow us to be a third country concluding the future relationship agreement. i will give way just once future relationship agreement. i will give wayjust once more to an honourable friend behind me and once i have done so, i will move forward. i'm going to give way to the member
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for beckens feel. does he recognise there are two different issues on exit day? some of the amendments that were tabled were there to express concern that there might be multiple exit dates, but that's a different thing from fixing a day. obviously, it's the case under article 50 there is a date, but he knows that article 50 has provision in itfor knows that article 50 has provision in it for the possible extension of the period if that is what is actually needed to conclude an agreement and that's why i have to say i find this amendment by the government so very strange because it seems to me to fetter the government to add nothing to the strength of the government's negotiating position and in fact, potentially to create a very great problem that could be fwraut back to visit, to be visited on us at a later stage. i'm grateful to my learned friend and he makes his point with clarity.
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yes, of course, i accept that the article 50 process has the provisions that it does, but a number of learned voices in private have voiced the concern to us that there was a degree of elasticity in there was a degree of elasticity in the bill and they were concerned for that reason that we should fix the exit day and i would also say to him further that in relation to this matter, while he makes his point with his usual clarity, other members of this house expressed the view that we should put beyond doubt the time and date that we leave the european union. and that is what this, that is what the government has done with this amendment. i said i would give way once more, but i will give way to my honourable friend and then i will make more progress. the minister made a good speech, but what is not clear and there is media speculation is amend 381 is passed with the exit date confirmed as it is, is it, is it the bill allow that date to be changed
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subsequently by regulation or not? no, the answer is, no, this has been raised in relation to the powers of clause 17 which are in relation to consequenceals and i very much look forward to a full debate on the powers of clause 17 when we reach it in committee, but the short answer to his question is no. but i will just get on. well, no, i did say to my right honourable friend in the house that i was going to get on with it. so i will, really, i have had to say to my learned friend i am not going make the progress i need to. so, we said at second reading that we would listen to the concerns of the house and this amendment delivers on that promise. the government wants this bill to provide as much certainty as possible, and we are happy to consider amendments which share this goal. i hope in light of this, the right honourable member will be willing to withdraw his new clause
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and that honourable members with related amendments worthwhile draw theirs too. i would like to briefly before i sit downturn to amendments 386 and 387 in the name of the memberfor 386 and 387 in the name of the member for castleford. 386 and 387 in the name of the memberfor castleford. i 386 and 387 in the name of the member for castleford. i have 386 and 387 in the name of the memberfor castleford. i have to say, we think that these amendments are ill conceived and could result in chaos. following a majority vote in this house, the prime minister wrote to the president of the european council to trigger article 50 and that set in train the article 50 and that set in train the article 50 process. the treaty article says the treaty shall seize to apply to the treaty shall seize to apply to the state in question from the date of entry into force of the withdrawal agreement or failing that two years after the notification u nless two years after the notification unless the european council in agreement with the member state concerned decides to extend this period. that's why the prime minister said in her speech in florence that the united kingdom will seize to be a member of the european union on 29th march 2019.
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the government has always been dlaer the purpose of the eu withdrawal bill is to ensure that the uk exits the eu with certainty, continuity and control. this is an essential bill in the national interest which will ensure that whatever the outcome of the negotiations, the statutory book can continue to function. the right honourable lady's amendments would have the consequence of destroying this bill's capacity to function. and let me be clear as a consequence of the amendments the bill's crucial provisions could not come into effect until a second act was passed. the consequence would be legal chaos in the event that the second act was not passed before 29th march 2019. furthermore, no one should fall into the trap of thinking that these amendments would keep us in the european union, if no withdrawal agreement were concluded. we would leave under article 50, the treaties would no longer apply, but what would happen is that our
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domestic law would be in an unfit state and we could have legal chaos. asa state and we could have legal chaos. as a responsible government, we must be ready to exit without a deal, even though we expect to conclude a deep and special partnership and i give way to the honourable gentleman. if he is right in what he has said, what his government set of amendments does is pave the way for no deal and if i am wrong about that, why did his predecessor lord brinks say he didn't believe it would be possible to sort out the divorce bill and sort out the implementation period and the final deal on our withdrawal within the time frame envisaged. what he is planning and should be frank with the british people is no deal and he has no mandate from the british people to do that. well, this is a
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subject on which i responded to a debate only recently and i would refer the honourable gentleman to everything which i said on that occasion, but he is wrong. we are planning to secure a deep and special partnership with the european union. we intend to do that with the implementation period which at the prime minister's described and set out in her florence speech and set out in her florence speech and we very much look forward to carrying through the necessary legislation to do it. i'm going to give way twice more and then i'm going to go through and conclude my remarks. is he aware that the chief financial officer of aston martin has said that it would be semi catastrophe if the uk went for no deal? can i ask him why he would not allow the option of article 50 to be extended to ensure there was a deal if we we re very to ensure there was a deal if we were very close to reaching one at the date that he has set? well, i am grateful to him for that intervention. what i would say to
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him is we are going to go through the process of making sure as a responsible government that our country is ready to leave the european union without a deal if that proves necessary. we will take the steps to be prepared as a responsible government should. but what this bill cannot do is premt the negotiations by putting things into statute before they have been agreed. the government intends the united kingdom to leave the eu on 29th march 2019 and that is why we intend to put that on the face of this bill. however, we have always been clear, we will bring forward whatever legislation is necessary to implement the agreement we strike with the eu and that is why yesterday my right honourable friend the secretary of state announced the withdrawal agreement and implementation bill which we will introduce once parliament had a chance to vote on the final deal. this government takes its responsibilities seriously and is committed to ensuring that uk exit the eu with certainty, continuity and control. it makes no sense to
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legislate for one piece of legislation on the face of another piece and i therefore, ask the right honourable lady to withdraw her amenments and with that i ask that clause one remain part of the bill. thank you very much indeed, madam deputy speaker. i am pleased to move amendments 3a, aa and a5 which give parliament control over the length and basic terms of transitional arrangements and allow parliament to set the clock on sunset clauses. these are the first of many amendments tabled by the opposition which we will be considering over the next few weeks. all of which have one purpose which is to improve this bill and it's frankly, it's frankly not helpful when ministers andindeed frankly not helpful when ministers and indeed the prime minister over the weekend sought to characterise scrutiny and accountability by this
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house as an attempt to thwart brexit. it is not. we accept the british people voted to leave the european union. it may have been a close vote, but it was a clear vote. and that's why we voted to trigger article 50. whether we leave the european union is not a matterfor debate. but how we do so is crucial for the future of our country. the british people voted to pull out. they did not vote to lose out. and they looked at this parliament to secure the, i will in a moment, they looked at this parliament to secure the best deal, and that includes not stumbling over a cliff edgein includes not stumbling over a cliff edge in march 2019. could he define the labour party's idea of leaving the european union? i'm surprised at such an ardent
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breakseer, the right honourable doesn't understand what leaving the european union involves! now, until last thursday the debate on clause1 now, until last thursday the debate on clause 1 looked fairly straightforward. the article 50 notification made our exit from the european union in march 2019 a legal certainty. and so exit, no, i will ina certainty. and so exit, no, i will in a moment, but not now. and so, exit day for the purposes of the bill could be left in the hands of parliament. but then the government did something needless. they tabled amendments 381 and 382, putting a specified exit date and indeed a specified exit date and indeed a specified exit date and indeed a specified exit time of 1pm or midnight brussels time on the face of the bill. their consequential
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amendment 383 seem to contradict their other amendments in some regard and that, i think, underlines the chaos and the chaotic way with which they have approached this bill, but taken together, the intention of the three amendments is clear. the mysterious explanation that the honourable gentleman gave to my right honourable friend here needs some explanation. would he explain whether leaving the european union does mean also repealing the european communities act 1972 and then explain why they voted against it on second reading?” then explain why they voted against it on second reading? i would have thought it would have been as clear to him as it is to me that leaving the european union does involve revoking the european communities act and i will go on to explain why we have concerns over the government's amendments and the
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different decisions that are involved within them. iam involved within them. i am grateful for the involved within them. i am gratefulfor the honourable member giving way. did the honourable member understand as i did, when the vote for article 50 took place that the provisions outlined in article 50 would apply including the ability of 28 nations to agree to extend the negotiating process ? idid, indeed process ? i did, indeed and i will come to that point later in my remarks. isaid that point later in my remarks. i said that the intention of the three amendments, despite the confusion caused by 383 is clear, it's clear but it is needless because article 50 triggered on 29th march 2017 provides for a two year exit teunl. there is therefore no question over whether, not at this
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moment, no, iwill question over whether, not at this moment, no, i will make some progress. there is therefore, no question over whether the uk will leave the eu at the end of that period in accordance with that notification. so, madam deputy speaker, what's the purpose of the government's three amendments? is it to appease extreme elements within their party, not thinking of the consequences for the country? or, is ita consequences for the country? or, is it a deliberate decision to unpick the florence speech, demonstrating that the flee lancers within the prime minister's cabinet are in charge of policy? studio: i want to bring charge of policy? studio: iwant to bring in charge of policy? studio: i want to bring in vicki young. we have been watching this for more than an hour. i don't know anything with the procedure or anything, but i have been watching that, and all that goes through my mind, how are we going to make progress if this is the sort of debate that we are going to have day
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in and day in? this is the kind of debate that goes on all the time, but normally it is behind closed doors, the committee stage which is the line by line scrutiny happens in the line by line scrutiny happens in the cord course around here, when it isa the cord course around here, when it is a momentous bit of legislation like this one, it is done in the chamber of the house of commons so that everyone can have their say. that's what is going on now. it's carefully timetabled. it seems like it is going on for a long time, but they go through each issue. each issueis they go through each issue. each issue is given a certain number of hours to be debated and they will progress through this and there will be eight days. don't worry, simon we will get to the end of this. today is about the decision about the decision by the government to try and put a fixed brexit date into law, into this bill and it is proving controversy as you heard there. there are many on the conservative side who said you are tying the hands of the government, the negotiators. we need to have flexibility, you don't have to have the date written in there and there
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are some voicing it by saying, look, we might need to extend the negotiations if the eu let us do that, if they agree to do that, the negotiations could go on beyond march 2019. no one is saying that's going to happen, but they don't understand why the government would wa nt to understand why the government would want to restrict its movement if you like. so you have heard from people like. so you have heard from people like claerng clarke and dominic grieve and others on the tory front benches who may decide to defy their own government over this. vicki young, iam own government over this. vicki young, i am going to let you pull away. now the weather. if you work on the base that it is a cloudy day, you won't go far wrong. some of you have seen blue skies as witnessed against by our weather watchers here. it helps if you are nowhere near the weather front.
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watchers here. it helps if you are nowhere near the weatherfront. here is where we are seeing the thickest of the cloud. that's likely to be the case through the night. there is the case through the night. there is the odd bit and piece of rain to be had, but at the same time there will be breaks in the cloud and that's giving us a little bit of a cause for concern. not so much for the fa ct for concern. not so much for the fact that it is going to be a frosty night. that won't be on the cards because it is mild air mass, but it is moist and where the skies clear then dense fog patches may well form and it's patchy. that's part of the issue. so almost anywhere across the british isles, where you have had the breaks overnight, you could be looking at the odd dense fog patch. the signal is for parts of east anglia and lincolnshire and maybe into the south wales and there are parts of northern ireland and parts of scotla nd parts of northern ireland and parts of scotland too that could see the dents pass. as we start the day, again, it's really rather cloudy where it has broken for any length of time across the north of scotland. it will be cooler and i think on the whole, it will be the northern half of the british isles that gets to see again some of the
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brightest weather, but even further south, after that rather dank, foggy start for some, there will be brightness coming through. not a cold day by any means. double figures for northern ireland, england and wales, just that wee bit fresher across the north until even here we start to import somewhat milderairas here we start to import somewhat milder air as this warm frontjust allowing that pulse of warm air to get up into scotland. there is cold air, nota million get up into scotland. there is cold air, not a million miles away and we have to keep it in our minds because asi have to keep it in our minds because as i take you into wednesday and push you into thursday, we will begin to see the first signs of that cooler air behind this cold front, gradually tumbling in across the northern parts of the british isles. what will be a brighter day, yes, for the north, but breezy and really quite showery. the last of the mild air locked there. to the south of the weather front, things turns fresher and that introduces a breezy day on friday with a copious supply
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of showers. hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at a. the battle of brexit: mps debate the small print of the government's legislation for leaving the eu. we decide on the date by british time, not european time, when it actually leave. that is our choice. it is about freedom which we hope will flow. we will be utterly foolish if 28 governments all agreed to extend the process and the british representative had to say that we put into british law timing
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which says to the second when we are actually leaving. first the quake. now the freeze. iranians living outdoors in sub—zero temperatures make desperate pleas for help. and steady as she goes. the uk inflation rate defies many analysts forecasts and remains at 3%. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. a big night for ireland. yes. ireland have 90 minutes did kill their players at the world cup. they are playing denmark in dublin in the second leg of their qualifier. it is goalless after the first leg full that will hear from the ireland camp. very windy conditions in the western mediterranean and across the adriatic. damaged in between very disruptive snowball indeed. i will ta ke disruptive snowball indeed. i will take you in half an hour back to the quake zone to check on the weather
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conditions. also coming up... the knight runner. sir mo farah receives his knightood from the queen at buckingham palace. where does this rank in terms of your achievements? it's definitely way up there, close to my olympic medals for sure. mps have began the first of eight days of debate to go line by line through the centrepiece of government legislation which will pave the way for brexit. more than aoo pave the way for brexit. more than a00 amendments have been tabled to the eu withdraw bill by labour and conservative rebels. —— withdrawal bill. they are off. there is a
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question about how long this will take. we know this section will take eight days. this is the detailed scrutiny of this bill. it normally happens behind closed doors but when it isa happens behind closed doors but when it is a chunky bits of legislation like this where everyone wants to speak, they do it in the house of commons. they will go through it line by line with many mps wanted to make changes to this bill. one change which is being discussed is about bringing in and putting into law the brexit date. so, that is the end of march 2019. should that be written into the bill itself? the government thinks it should. it thinks that gives people certainty. they think that is the right thing to do that many think all it is doing is tying the hands of the government. it gives no flexibility and they fear it means they, the mps, might not get the chance to look at the final bill that is
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brought back and they might end up with a choice of, take this deal all week have no deal whatsoever. this is what one labour mp said about the idea. does he understand how impossible it is for me to explain to my constituents they can have certainty about nothing, about wrecks it, as the government plans it? except, according to him, the date it will happen. -- brexit. although a vote on this will not ta ke although a vote on this will not take place today, it will happen in the next few weeks. we understand the next few weeks. we understand the labour party will oppose the idea of having this written onto the face of the bill. the crucial thing for the government is how many of its own side, how many conservatives, will decide to vote the same way. it could mean that the government could be defeated on all of this. the minister today set out the government's thinking on this. the government intends the united kingdom to leave the eu on 29th of
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march, 2019. that is why we intend to put that on the face of this bill. we have always been clear we will bring forward whatever legislation is necessary to implement the agreement we strike with the eu. that is why yesterday, my right honourable friend the secretary of state, announced the withdrawal agreement and implementation bill we shall introduce once parliament has had a chance to vote on the final deal. the main purpose of the eu withdrawal bill is to repeal the european communities act of 1972. that was the law that took us into the european community, which then became the european union. the government insists this is absolutely necessary. some on the labour benches feel the government is trying to use it to bring in other things. earlier i spoke to the labourmp, other things. earlier i spoke to the labour mp, chuck other things. earlier i spoke to the labourmp, chuckjamuna. other things. earlier i spoke to the labour mp, chuck jamuna.” other things. earlier i spoke to the labour mp, chuckjamuna. i don't think it is a question of making this bill into something else. the problem is, the government has made
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more than cindy transposing eu law into uk law. they are proposing to make laws by decree, as if we are some kind of dictatorship, which we are not. there are a number of things in this bill to prevent us from have a proper implementation phase as the prime minister puts it, to bridge from being in the european union to outside the european union. the big issue is britain voted to leave the european union to take back control to parliament, which represents the people. therefore, parliament should be the one with the final say over our withdrawal arrangements are being a deal, a meaningful vote. at the moment we do not have one. that will be the real bone of contention in coming weeks. how meaningful will the vote be? david davies yesterday said it would mean something and would give mps are real choice but many of them do
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not think that. i know nothing about all of this. what strikes me, listening to david davis, i is expect people have sympathy with him when he has tough ago she ages with all of this going on at home. it must be easy for europeans to look at them and say, you cannot decide what is going on back in london. at them and say, you cannot decide what is going on back in londonm shows how compensated the process is. the referendum was a straightforward question. actually doing it with the process of doing it is incredibly complicated for the obvious reason we have been closely played to clean and economically aligned with the european union. decades. getting out of that has not been an easy process. a lot of what we will hear in the coming hours and weeks sounds legalistic because it is. ministers will say they need particular powers to get through the amount of work they will do to
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change the laws and make sure we can function legally once we leave. i think the argument of who decides whether to accept the final deal or not is something i think resonates with people, no matter how they voted in a referendum. once we have seen voted in a referendum. once we have seen the deal, should mps be able to look at that and say, do you know, thatis look at that and say, do you know, that is not good enough, go back and try again? at the moment they may not be getting up option. we will pull away from that. i have a screen on my desk which just shows you thought of anything goes on, waved at me and we will come straight back to you. if you want to keep watching the progress in parliament, bbc parliament is covering the debate as well. more than a50 people are now known to have died after sunday's powerful earthquake in iran. nearly 8000 people have been injured. officials have called off the rescue operation, saying it's unlikely that more survivors will be found. the iranian president hassan rouhani has visited the affected area. richard lister reports.
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the earthquake shook much of the middle east. this is where it did most damage. tens of thousands lost their homes. many of these buildings we re their homes. many of these buildings were built by the government as cheap housing after the war with iraq in the 1980s. the question some here are asking is why did so many collapsed in an area along prone to add grapes? visiting the town today, the iranian president pledged that anyone who failed to adhere to proper building standards would be held accountable but, for now, here's focusing on the survivors. we will provide tents for those who need them and give loans and grants to all those whose houses were damaged and are unsafe will struggle give money to anyone who needs temporary accommodation. and
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estimated 70,000 people need emergency shelter. helicopters are bringing them supplies, while many roads are blocked by landslides. the challenge is to keep the survivors healthy as winter temperatures continue to fall. this is another challenge for the authorities. the town's knee hospital was so badly damaged it is unusable. —— only hospital. war than a thousand of the injured are being treated at hospitals around the region and many will not have houses to return to. across—the—board in will not have houses to return to. across—the—boa rd in iraq, will not have houses to return to. across—the—board in iraq, hundreds we re across—the—board in iraq, hundreds were injured. aid agencies say they are ready to assist iran if needed. in case of any need for an iranian person or others, we will definitely provide across—the—board the support they ask for. this town had to be
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built after the war with iraq and now it will have to be rebuilt all over again. some cracks have appeared at a dam in iraq following the earthquake. some villagers have been evacuated. we have this report from bbc arabic. this is the down with the reservoir capacity of 3 billion cubic metres. after the earthquake there were fears it would collapse, causing catastrophic flooding and a tragedy far greater in scale than the earthquake itself. the authorities swiftly ordered the evacuation of several villages downstream and specialist teams have been studying the damage that was caused to the dam. they are hoping this is only superficial damage and not the deep structural damage that would cause a collapse. to be on the safe side they aim to keep the water in the reservoir well below capacity and they have not yet told residents it
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is safer them to return home. theresa may has made her strongest attack yet on russia, accusing it of using technology to undermine the international order. speaking at the lord mayor's banquet in london last night, the prime minister said state—run russian organisations were planting stories, meddling in elections and using fake news to undermine societies. it is seeking to weaponised information. deploying its state—run media organisations to plant baked stories and photos shot images in an attempt to sow discord in the west and undermine institutions. i have a very simple message for russia. we know what you are doing and you will not succeed. our correspondent, steve rosenberg, told us what the reaction had been in moscow. well, they heard what she was saying but they didn't like it. one russian senator says these are groundless allegation. another senator said may has made a fool of herself. and the message from moscow is clear — "we do not care what you think we are doing."
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and part of us think the moscow government do not care about being criticised, because they see theresa may as a weak leader. this is the country that invented the phrase iron lady to describe margaret thatcher. but president putin does not see theresa may as an iron lady, but rather as a weak prime minister. it is that weakness that dilutes the strong message was trying to get across in that speech. there is another reason why the russians do not seem to care about being criticised. about being criticised. as bizarre as it sounds — the kremlin may benefit in being criticised by countries such as britain. because soon there will be an election in russia and already there is the idea that the kremlin is... being seen as the besieged fortress. mps have begun debating the eu
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withdrawal bill, a key piece of legislation paving the way with brexit. a50 people have died following an earthquake in iran. the rate of inflation remained steady at 3%. higherfuel rate of inflation remained steady at 3%. higher fuel prices were offset by lower fuel costs in october. martin o'neill defends his side's offensive approach ahead of their crucial world cup qualifier. they played denmark in dublin in the second leg tonight. england's does look set to play against the world's most expensive player, neymarfor that there could be a number of debutants for england as they face brazil in tonight's and leave. joe root says bring it on as he is singled out by australia ahead of the first ashes test. more on those stories just after half past.
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inflation remained unchanged last month at 3% — a five year high — despite a rise in food prices. earlier this month, the bank of england raised interest rates for the first time in a decade to try and deal with the threat of higher inflation. our economics correspondent, andy verity, reports. upward pressure on prices. this bristol manufacturer in bristol ma kes hig h— pressure safety valves used in everything from refrigeration to transport. the raw materials it uses that once passed through bristol's nearby docks have to be brought in foreign currencies from the euro to the dollar. because of the weaker pound, you need more pounds to buy the same amount of copper to make a valve. we have seen a 30% increase of raw material prices since january last year. that is a really substantial issue for us. it is about two thirds of that is weakness of the pound, one third of that is caused by commodity price changes increases. the company can't risk passing on those higher
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costs to its customers, so its profits are being squeezed, meanwhile the workers face higher prices on the supermarket shelves. cost of living goes up, cost of things in shops, food, etc. wages seem to stay at a certain level. you're not buying as much as you were with the same money before. you are spending more. you're paying with the same money than in the past. spending more. 3% inflation might not seem too high, but then you see what is driving it — food and clothing. and low income households spend more of their money on those items, so they are hit harder in this new bout of inflation. the overall rate of inflation was 3.0%, slightly less than expected, but food and soft drinks rose by a.1%, the fastest rise for four years. however, there are some signs that inflationary pressure is easing with raw materials up more than 8% in september, but less than 5% in october. the reason why inflation rose is principally down to the drop
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in the value after the eu referendum and we do not expect the pound to fall dramatically further, not to the same extent and what that means is that what probably close to the peak inflation as a result of that fall in the value of the pound. that means there is less of the need to tighten the screw on inflation with another rise in interest rates any time soon. the next rise is now expected in the city until august next year. the welsh assembly has been paying tribute to the former labour minister, carl sargeant. the a9—year—old was found dead at his home four days after he was sacked by first minister carwynjones, pending an investigation into claims of inappropriate behaviour. today in the welsh assembly, a minute's silence was observed, then mrjones led the tributes to his friend and colleague.
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i first ifirst met carl i first met carl in 2001. i had gone to speak to the local labour party when tom middle hirst was the assembly member. when he was elected him in 2003 we became friends. his particular talents came to the fore when he was chief whip. when i saw with my own eyes he was capable of gentle rating where necessary. —— we re gentle rating where necessary. —— were rating. he took a reluctant am out to feed the ducks to persuade him to vote the right way. a man of many talents. in all the years i knew him we never had a crossword we spent a lot of time talking together about the challenges of being a dad and the pressures upon politics. —— of politics. he was was full of advice. gaer pope has severe epilepsy
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filtered she was last seen on 7th of november. dorset police say a 19—year—old man is still helping police with their inquiries. officers say they were both known. our correspondent has the latest from plymouth. the 19-year-old is from plymouth. the 19-year-old is from the village of langton in west dorset. when she went missing she was staying in the nearby town of swanage pulled was staying in the nearby town of swa nage pulled out was staying in the nearby town of swanage pulled out that was a week ago this afternoon. her family say thatis ago this afternoon. her family say that is completely out of character. she has severe epilepsy. when she went missing she went missing. she did not take her medication with her. she has not been seen off or heard of since. investigators have been scouring cctv footage in and around the town but nothing. this afternoon the searches for her continued, including help from coastguards and a local search and rescue team. so far nothing. they
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have not found any trace of her at all. events have moved very quickly in the last 2a hours. two local people known to her were arrested on suspicion of murder last night. a 71—year—old woman was released this morning under investigation. a 19—year—old man is still helping police with their inquiries. detectives say they are hopeful they will find her alive. they are asking for anyone with any information to come forward. they asked us to repeat what she was wearing to give an idea of that. she is believed to be wearing a red checked shirt, grey and white woven leggings and white trainers. this is a very difficult time for the family of gaia pope. they are distraught and appeal for her to get in touch. they are also being supported by specially trained officers. it is arise sir mode. this afternoon
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the olympic champion went to buckingham palace and received his knighthood from the queen. he went on to become britain's's is decorated athlete. this summer he called time on his track career to concentrate on running marathons. richard conway reports. he is britain's's successful track athlete. after a career that has brought four olympic golds and six world championship medals, today it was time to add yet another title with the queen on hand to confirm the night heard of sir mo. in his recognition for a career that has scaled the heights. to sir mo is only the second athlete in modern olympic history to win the 5000 and 10,000 metre titles that successive games. it is way up there, close to
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my olympics medals, for sure. to come here at the age of eight cannot speak any dish and achieve what i have over the years and then to be knighted, there is no word to describe it. by the moment like this with a visit to the palace and a shiny medal normally indicates the end of their career. not so in this case. sir mo has plans for his future, albeit with a different focus. i said i'm going onto the roads. it is far too long. she said you have been going far too long as well. i was like, yes. you have been going far too long as well. iwas like, yes. she you have been going far too long as well. i was like, yes. she said, you have been going far too long as well. iwas like, yes. she said, or two like to do when you stop running? i said i would like to help the next generation and younger kids. switch to the road, having recently split from his controversial coach, alberto
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salazar, he remains under investigation by us authorities. sir mo is also returning to live in london. it was a city that in 2012 bore witness to his assent to the peak of world athletics. that celebrates a momentous career. an interesting tweet. this is about dismissing the accusations by theresa may that russia has been meddling in elections and carrying out cyber espionage. some politicians in russia have turned the tables on her. the russian foreign ministry has just tweeted, which i will show you. it says, we know what you have been doing. it shows a picture of her with a glass of red wine in her hand. that is not, that is our political correspondent who has been tweeting about what has been going on in the house of commons. an interesting bit of trolling against the prime
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minister. one more go in trying to show it to you. it is worth waiting for. it is from the ministry of foreign affairs and it says, and i am sure this is going to work now... it says... it says... no, we have a huge problem with our technology. our show it to you later on. it shows there is a sense of humour and that she tries some crimean wine rather than the glass she has on her hands at that particular moment. you are watching afternoon live. paul edmonds from gloucestershire had denied conspiracy to supply firearms and ammunition at birmingham crown court. police discovered 100,000 rounds of
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ammunition is here. bullets were found scattered around his bedroom and attic. today, following a six—week trial, edwards was found guilty of supplying guns and home—made ammunition to gangs across the country. the 66—year—old make bullets for firearms that were classified as antiques and then sold them for a hefty profit. these weapons and ammunition have appeared over 100 crime scenes in the uk between 2009 in 2015. it involved murders and other serious crimes will stop he abused his position and they abused his knowledge of ammunition and firearms. undoubtedly this operation which began in 201a, has saved many lives were as we have been able to stop what was a major supply route of these firearms and
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intelligence service, firing one of the antique revolvers with the bullets made by edmonds. cases found at shootings over the last few years we re at shootings over the last few years were handcrafted by the pensioner. i'd just want to shave this tweet from the ministry of foreign affairs in russia for that we can just show you on the internet. beckett is. we have a picture of theresa may with a glass of wine. —— there it is. she had said, we know what you are doing and they said, we had said, we know what you are doing and theysaid. we-_. had said, we know what you are doing and they said, we dayg had said, we know what you are doing and they said, we day you doing as well. we hope one day you fig}: doing as well. we hope one day you 21:2! try doing as well. we hope one day you '! try red wine. f'72"”'£ it g?
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75: f; ' from sinificantarea m if "f" ,, 75: f; ' from si-iflnificantareaof if "f" ,, 75: f; ' from sinificant area of low if .. f .. w 75: f; ' from a significant area of low pressure. by a significant area of low pressure. by the east, you have brought a lot of coverage from the earthquake area. daytime temperatures not a problem. night—time out towards the west of the quake area about 10 degrees. in the east, this is where
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we get into the mountainous regions and the temperatures dip away very markedly indeed. you have been talking about sub zero temperatures and this is where we will see the night—time minimum temperatures and you have said there are 70,000 people needing shelter at the moment. the other part of the forecast i have put in is that there is not too much in the way of daytime weather. i do not expect to see rain or snow in the region until probably the start of next week. there are a few days where we can continue with the recce is —— rescue situation before we have to go into the recovery situation. that will be the recovery situation. that will be the real issue, i would have thought. we must keep a close eye on that. that is the average and other places will be below that. we are not facing what they are facing in other parts of europe, are we?
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tha nkfully other parts of europe, are we? thankfully not. very dramatic stuff. widely we have had strong winds from the west of the mediterranean to the adriatic. nothing like that on the cards. a quiet spell of weather here which has been that way for a number of days. quite a bit of cloud around. the bruise is westerly or south—westerly and that is helping to keep the temperatures are. —— the breeze. you will know the real issue overnight is where the cloud parts we end up with the possibility of some dense fog patches. the clue is in the patches. you may not see it first up when you step out of your door but if you are travelling any distance you may run into one of those patches. the possible at is there will stop it depends on whether you keep the cloud or lose it. northern ireland has shown up on a couple of occasions as has scotla nd a couple of occasions as has scotland for areas that could be
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quite prone to that. it could be grey when you first get up but as we get on through the morning fog will lift into low cloud and hopefully it will begin to pop away. still the possibility of one or two bits and pieces of rain from the big cat area of cloud. not particularly cold across the british isles. we are a run of relatively mild westerlies and south—westerly is coming from the atlantic and we are stuck between the two weather fronts. away to the north—west, we have cold air waiting in the wings. it becomes a player, not so much on wednesday but by thursday we are bringing a weather front into the northern corner of the british isles which gradually works its way ever further southwards. introducing brighter skies. it will brighten up. ahead of it is the last of the mild air hanging on. in the north here come the brighter skies but it will turn
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fresher. on friday the mixture of sunny spells and showers, blustery in the north of britain but further south it is dry but feeling much fresher. more detail on all of the above right there at the bbc weather website. see you soon. the issue of brexit is top of the agenda. we'll be talking to iain watson, our correspondent, who is covering that for us. nicola sturgeon arriving, and obviously it's what she says when she leaves thatis it's what she says when she leaves that is important, and we will take you to downing street for that. this is bbc news.
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our latest headlines: mps begin to scrutinise the main brexit legislation, which aims to bring all existing eu law into uk law. hundreds of amendments have already been put forward. labour is to demand that the prime minister withdraws the brexit legislation amendment which would set the day of eu departure in law. thousands of people are without shelter in iran after a powerful earthquake killed more than a50 people near the border with iraq. inflation remained unchanged at 3% in october. fuel prices have fallen, but the cost of food has risen to its highest level in four years. and four—time olympic champion mo farah has been knighted by the queen at buckingham palace. he described the honour as a "dream come true". sport now on afternoon live. we will talk football in a moment, but other things are going on, and the australians are targeting joe
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root. they are, and you often find this as you get closer to the start of the ashes series, the war of words begins. australia has singled out england captain joe words begins. australia has singled out england captainjoe root, and yet another top tennis player has ended their season early because of injury. rafa nadal will play no further part in the atp world tour finals. i can tell you why in just a second. and we've got some big games and some not so big games, but important for those taking part, tonight. yes, probably the not so big game is england against brazil at wembley in a friendly, but for ireland, what a crucial match for them. they are hoping to book their place in next year's world cup tonight. they play denmark later. it's even after saturday's goalless draw in copenhagen, where chances were few and far between. ireland will be hoping to make the most of home advantage, but manager martin o'neill says the focus for them must be on scoring goals.
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it only takes a second to score a goal so, the moment a goal is scored in the game, that eradicates a lot of things. it eradicates extra time, it eradicates penalty kicks and things like that. we are trying to score a goal. england play brazil at wembley tonight. there could be a number of debutants. manager gareth southgate says he "will not hesitate" to use his young stars in their friendly at wembley. three players have been drafted in from the under—21s, including liverpool striker dominic solanke. i know they have got world—class players. to play against them would be amazing, really. you always watch them and think how good they are, so it would be amazing. i think everybody‘s just got to stay grounded, keep working their way up to the top, and go as far as they can, really.
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england women's interim manager, mo marley, has given manchester city's keira walsh and arsenal's leah williamson their first senior call—ups. the two midfielders are joined by goalkeeper karen bardsley in a 26—player squad for the world cup qualifiers against bosnia and herzegovina and kazakhstan at the end of the month. bardsley returns for the first time since breaking her leg at this summer's european championship. lock george kruis, prop ellis genge and back alex lozowski have been left out of the england squad for saturday's match with australia. all three featured in saturday's 21—8 win over argentina. propjoe marler has been included in the 25—man squad after returning from suspension, and he will feature against the wallabies. maro itoje and owen farrell, who were both rested against the pumas, also remain in camp. england head coach eddiejones will confirm his matchday 23 on thursday morning. england cricket captainjoe root says he knows he'll be targeted by australia in the ashes series, and he's not at all bothered. england are in townsville for their final warm—up match,
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which starts tomorrow, and australia spinner nathan lyon has promised that all the home bowlers will be focusing their attention on root. but root says it's a regular feature of an ashes tour. i've heard a lot of chat about targeting me in particular, but i know from our point of view will be targeting every single one of them. we won't be singling any guys out. to wina we won't be singling any guys out. to win a test match, you've got take 20 wickets and score more runs than them, and that's the approach we'll have as a side. of course, will have plans in place for each individual player. bring it on. it's what it's about. you want that competitive element to it, and those little in—house rivalries, if you like. it should be a great series, and they've got some great players in their squad, some good characters as well, which i am sure will make for a great year. with world number one
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rafael nadal pulling out of the atp world tour finals with a knee injury, roger federer takes over as the top seed and the main attraction. he takes on dominic thiem in the evening session. in action now, as you can see from these live pictures from the o2, jack sock of the usa is taking on this year's beaten wimbledon finalist, marin cilic. it's gone into a deciding set. it's going to take cilic to break jack sock‘s serve to win that deciding set. currently, he leads 6-5. you can watch that one live on bbc two right now. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. thanks for that encouraging people to go elsewhere at this point! now on afternoon live, let's go nationwide and see what's happening around the country, in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. carol malia is in newcastle with the story of a six—week—old baby who needs a new heart, and natalie graham is in tunbridge wells, where there are plans for a new statue to honour those who served in the first world war. carol, this brings out every
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emotion. the youngest child, charlie douthwaite, needing a new heart. yes, we think charlie is the youngest child in britain to be waiting for a new heart, and he was only six weeks old yesterday, just a tiny baby, currently in the children's heart unit at the freeman. it's a great heart unit and we are proud of it in the region. they can operate on babies' heart the size of walnuts, such is their skill. the surgeons are very experienced. charlie was born with half a heart and he went into cardiac arrest shortly after birth and was brought round, but his mum has been at his bedside in the unit ever since, and the hunt is now on to find a heart for charlie to have transplanted into him. his mum, tracey right, has made an emotional europe—wide appealfor a tracey right, has made an emotional europe—wide appeal for a donor. charlie is my world and i know that
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there is a parent out there who could be in a position to help him. that baby is their world and they will feel the same way i do about charlie. it breaks your heart. it's not a nice place to be. gosh. what are the family going to do now? it's a waiting game. what can they do? they are acutely aware that it means that another family will be suffering a tragedy somewhere, if their baby boy is to receive a heart, as with all transplants, so it is tinged with a bitter edge of sadness, but they are desperate to find a donor, and the surgeon has said he is very fearful if a heart isn't found in the next weeks or months for baby charlie, so we are all behind them tonight, keeping our fingers crossed that something good happens for them in the near future. keep us in touch with that, want you. let's go to tunbridge wells,
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and plans to honour a local war hero. notjust any local hero. not just any local water real, hero. notjust any local water real, —— local war hero, henry allingham, who was the last volunteer survivor of the first world war and, for one month only, at the end of his life, the oldest man in the world he died eight years ago at the age of 113 and, because he lived that long, he saw extraordinary events. he was born in the reign of queen victoria, he saw soldiers from the boer war returning as a child, he saw wg grace batting at the oval and he was 16 when the titanic sank. but it was his wartime experiences for which he became known across the world. he was a moving site every year at the cenotaph in his wheelchair, as you can see. he made very many public crowd pleasing appearances in the final years of his life. he served with the fledgling raf during the first world war and he saw warfare
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in the trenches. he very rarely spoke about those experiences. in fa ct, spoke about those experiences. in fact, he could get very emotional when he spoke about the things he'd seen, the friends he'd lost in the first world war. the first time he spoke about it publicly was 2005, but he became very well known across the world, particularly here, in eastbourne, where he lived for a0 yea rs, eastbourne, where he lived for a0 years, and he spent his last years ina home years, and he spent his last years in a home near brighton. the sculpture behind this project said that henry was a people's champion. i wanted to commemorate the fact that he was 113 when he died, and he was about 113 when there were the images from this which are used to make this piece of work. he's wearing a suit, not a uniform, which i felt was important, wearing a suit, not a uniform, which ifelt was important, and he is holding a poppy wreath, which is perched on his knee, and it is his way of remembering, placing his own
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remembrance outlet. when will be seeing the statue? they hope to get it in place at the national arboretum in staffordshire for the time of the century really the end of the first world war, next october, but they need to raise £130,000 to make it a reality. i'm not sure what henry would have made of it. apparently he wasn't somebody who wanted things like statues but since his death a tree has been planted in his honour, there was a road named after him in hackney where he was born, but he was famous for his sense of mischief, with him until the end. when asked the secret of living to 113, he said, cigarettes, whiskey and wild, wild women. thank you, natalie. pete carroll mali for that story, keep in touch. you're watching afternoon live. if you'd like to catch up with more of those news nationwide stories, go to the bbc iplayer. some breaking news from the
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metropolitan police. officers from the counterterrorism command arrested a 1a—year—old girl today. she was arrested at an address in south london on suspicion of assisting a person to carry out an act of terrorism. she was detained and taken to a south london police station where she remains in police custody and, according to scotland yard, those enquiries are continuing. a 1a—year—old girl arrested on suspicion of assisting a person to carry out an act of terrorism. more on that later. nicola sturgeon is in downing street to meet the prime minister, the first such meeting between the two in more than six months. she went in ten minutes or so ago. what's she going to be talking about? let's talk to iain watson. there is a lot on the agenda, mostly brexit, of course. that's right, simon. a lot to cram into the next half hour or so. we expect her to the merge about 5:15pm and how they
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get home remains to be seen, because nicola sturgeon said how difficult it was to get a personal connection with the prime minister and she said she found that frustrating but but brexit is at the top of the agenda, but the forthcoming budget will be discussed, the roll—out of universal credit, and it's likely they will talk about the sexual harassment scandal at edinburgh and westminster and what the parties are doing together to try and put more robust measures in place to tackle that. on brexit, the main thing is a big sticking point, not something to derail brexit but something which could potentially delay it, and that is that nicola sturgeon has been holding back on putting forward what's called legislative consent in the scottish parliament for the eu withdrawal bill because she is worried that westminster‘s involved in what she is calling a power grab. in other words, when some powers come back from brussels, especially from agriculture and fisheries, she is worried they will be delayed at westminster and not moved back to
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the scottish parliament and, unless she gets assurances on i think she is prepared to be difficult. the government in westminster is going to use brexit as a power grab, that was nicola sturgeon's phrase, i think? that's right, that is her main concern, in effect that she believes that power currently held in brussels should not be held at westminster but the devolved parliaments and assemblies should get some of those powers, power perhaps that otherwise they would be in charge of. interestingly, there is an amendment going forward today by com if like, a sister party, the welsh nationalists plaid cymru, and they are saying, in effect, that u nless they are saying, in effect, that unless the devolved parliament and assemblies agree to brexit, in effect they should have a veto that the eu withdrawal bill wouldn't go ahead. iam the eu withdrawal bill wouldn't go ahead. i am not expecting that amendment to be cast, but what i am expecting is that we are going to
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see from the nationalist parties many roadblocks as they can have to stand in the way brexit, unless they get some agreement that some of the powers they want to see passed straight to edinburgh and cardiff will actually take place and not remain at westminster. personal relationships very important throughout this process. do we know how these two women actually get on? nicola sturgeon has said in an interview with the new statesman that, compared to the rap or she had, even though she politically disagreed with him, with theresa may's predecessor, david cameron, she simply doesn't have the same rapport with theresa may. the two women governing scotland and the whole of the relationships between westminster and holyrood, hugely important that they get on, but so far they haven't done so, so i don't think there is necessarily a lot of love lost between them when it comes to trying to build up any kind of give and take personal relationship, and that may be a difficult
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relationship. it may be that when nicola sturgeon appears it may be time to be relatively polite and make sure that there is some way to go which will be grateful for the progress she is making, and there may be some areas where they can more positive spin, perhaps their agreement to have more robust action tackling sexual harassment, four example. but i think, when it comes to the brexit process and some of nicola sturgeon's to the brexit process and some of nicola stu rgeon's demands to the brexit process and some of nicola sturgeon's demands in the budget on welfare changes in particular, i don't think we will be seeing any kind of agreement here. we will be back when nicola sturgeon leaves. rachel is here. iforgot your name! i'm having one of those days. i was looking at you going, i know who you are. rachel will bring us the business news in a moment. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live. mps begin debating the detail of the eu withdrawal bill, the key piece of legislation that will pave the way for brexit. the death toll rises to at least a60 after iran's deadliest earthquake in more than a decade. more than 12,000 homes have been destroyed.
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theresa may makes her strongest attack to date on russia, accusing it of using technology and fake news to sow discord in the west. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. the measure of how quickly prices are rising stayed steady at 3% last month, the highest level in five—and—a—half—yea rs. but it could signal a peak in inflation, as last year's fall in the value of the pound drops out of the calculations. tesco has welcomed a decision by the competition and markets authority to provisionally clear its £3.7 billion takeover of the uk's largest food wholesaler, booker. the cma said the deal could even increase competition in the wholesale market and reduce prices for shoppers. the house price north—south divide has narrowed, according to officialfigures. in northern ireland, they rose by 6% in the year to september, compared with a 5.7% rise
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in england, a 5.3% increase in wales, and a 3.1% rise in scotland. the smallest rise of 2.5% was in london. michael bloomberg, the businessman and former new york mayor, has said london will remain a global financial capital after brexit. departure from the eu would probably slow the capital's growth, but would not see it eclipsed by a european rival, he said. i was once running through the streets of berlin, covering the queen on a state visit, and time was against us and i had to send back a report to london, and i did it in one take, and i got the end where you put your name and i forgot what my name was. what did you say? it came out as simon mckoo. we should have a clip of that! let's move on.
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inflation. the analysts were suggesting that it might go up to 3.1% but it stayed level. is that seen as 3.1% but it stayed level. is that seen as good? it is 396 now, holding steady from last month, the highest level fraud— a half years, and we haven't seen much reaction on the ftse, which has slightly up and down. not a huge reaction on the markets. the issue with this type of inflation, often inflation is caused by increased spending, so lots of people with lots of money... but that isn't happening because all of the retail figures that isn't happening because all of the retailfigures are that isn't happening because all of the retail figures are suggesting... yes, that's not the sort of we are experiencing. our sort has been forced by a drop in the value of sterling. that was caused by the brexit vote. inflation is working year—on—year, so brexit vote. inflation is working year—on—year, so we brexit vote. inflation is working year—on—year, so we have prices now 396 year—on—year, so we have prices now 3% higher than 12 months ago, and that value drop in sterling and in the summer, so now that weakness is
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falling out of the calculation, which is why some people are saying we may have seen which is why some people are saying we may have seen a which is why some people are saying we may have seen a pig in inflation. and we have to compare that with pay details, people not getting pay rises. —— a peak in inflation. details, people not getting pay rises. -- a peak in inflation. 2.296 rises. -- a peak in inflation. 2.296 rise in wages, and a 3% rise in inflation, so you can see that our wages are going up more slowly than prices are rising. yesterday we talked about a big proposed merger, nisa and co—op, and now we are talking about tesco and booker, even bigger. this has been in discussion for a while. a £3.7 billion takeover deal, but there was concern over whether or not the competition and markets authority, the regulator, whether they would step in and say if there was an issue with it, but they have compelled and said that they have compelled and said that they think it may increase competition in the wholesale market and could even reduce prices for people. it's interesting, because tesco obviously is the biggest
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dealer in the supermarket market. they have about 28% share of that market. it used to be that they were up market. it used to be that they were up in the 30s, so their value has been nibbled away at by the discounters, and individuals being more interested inconvenience, there are more out—of—town stores, so they are more out—of—town stores, so they are looking for somewhere else to get their value, and it could come from the book deal. we are also looking today at itv. the broadcaster came out with figures on their advertising revenues, and they have seen, this is interesting... revenues are continuing to fall, but the fall is falling. does that make sense? it's a lesser fall? yes, it was down 8%, in the last chord it is down a%, so it isn't falling as much, and by the end of the year they think it will be up about 1%. it be down about 5% for the year, but it's going in the right direction. let's see what the markets can tell us for the reaction. we should be able to see tesco, which we have been talking
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about, and we should also be able to see... oh, there we go. we've got the european markets, even better. i'll give you a global overview. you can see that they are all down. markets across the world are at record highs, most of them. we have had a real bull market, which is when the markets are going up. a bear market is when the markets are falling. there is strong growth in some european countries, so overall you would think, why are the markets down? because somebody has taken some money. that's right, people have said, we have had great growth, but people think the markets are overextended, that stocks are overvalued, and people are paring back and selling some stocks and banks profits. the pound is getting weaker. yes, against the euro. some commentators say this is more to do with the strength of the euro than the weakness of the pound. the pound will have slipped a bit today on
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inflation figures, because inflation steady at 3% would suggest the bank of england might not need to act again soon by raising interest rates. they raised interest rates to try and bring down inflation but, if inflation is steady, that might be impetus to spark another interest rate if interest rates were rising, that would make sterling stronger. because it looks like interest rates will not move, people say possibly until late august, that makes it look like sterling isn't as strong as it could be. but lots of people are saying that is more to do with the fact that the euro is strong in sterling being week was a are we done or do have another board?” sterling being week was a are we done or do have another board? i am done, i think. done or do have another board? i am done, ithink. tomorrow, unemployment figures are out. they are at their lowest since 1975, so we are looking to see if there is any change, and those wage figures, we have the latest set tomorrow, so we have the latest set tomorrow, so we will look to see what happens. but they get closer to inflation and increase that squeeze? rachel hore,
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my unforgettable friend. simon mckoo, it's been an unforgettable experience. i want to bring you an update on a missing girl in swanage. the teenager, who suffers from severe epilepsy, went missing without her education. —— medication. she hasn't been seen or heard from since. investigators don't think she has left the area and they are continuing to search around the seaside town. a 71—year—old woman has been released. she was under investigation. a 19—year—old man is being questioned by police. we have had a statement from the family of gaia, who have released a statement through dorset police saying, we will find you, darling girl, the thought of seeing the sunshine of your smile again soon the sunshine of your smile again soon keeps all going and hoping. that statement issued by dorset
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police from the family of gaia pope, who disappeared in swanage a week ago. we will keep you updated with developers on that case. you are watching afternoon live. some of the world's rarest gemstones are up for sale in geneva this week. to buy them, you'll need a few spare million, but looking is free, so we sent imogen foulkes for a sneak peak. there is more than a little sparkle in geneva this dull november. every year the jewellery houses compete to show that one special stone, the rarest, the purist, the most vivid. but this year there is one extraordinary show stopper. at 163 carats, this is the largest diamond ever to be put up for auction. now, to show it at its best, or maybe to make sure potential buyers don't mistake it for an ice cube, it has been set into a string of emeralds, 59a9 of them. we are expecting in the region
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of $30 million for it, and it is the largest deflawless diamond ever to come to the market and it is the finest colour, finest clarity and extraordinary proportions. and there is always a temptation with a diamond crystal to cut the largest possible and end up with a stone that maybe is a little lopsided or lumpy or thick just to keep the weight. not here. this is perfection in every way. pink, yellow, necklace, ring or brooch, jewellery lovers are spoilt for choice. but while many will look, with these multi—million—dollar price tags, only a few will be able to buy. imogen foulkes, bbc news, geneva. that's it from your afternoon live team for today. next, the bbc news at 5. huw edwards is talking to the
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american ambassador. it looks like quite weather will continue through the night. a lot of cloud around. where it is at its thickest, still the odd bit and peace of rain but, where the cloud breaks, i'm not concerned about the temperatures overnight but frost, if any, will not be a widespread problem, but would could be a problem, but would could be a problem where the is clear for any length of time is some quite dense fog patches. they could be quite widespread, so it isn't wall—to—wall, it is patchy in nature, but there could well be some patches in the south of wales, east anglia and lincolnshire, northern ireland, parts of scotland. after a dull start, things gradually improved for many. a pleasantly mild sort of day, ten to 13. a bit fresher in the north and things certainly pressure on thursday because, behind this cold front, the last of the mild air is shovelled
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towards the south, and behind it things turning noticeably cooler. today at 5. the debate is under way on the key piece of legislation designed to take britain out of the european union. nearly 500 amendments have been tabled to the european union withdrawal bill, as mps seek to strengthen parliament's voice. ministers say the bill is sound. this is an essential bill in the national interests, which will ensure that whatever the outcome of the negotiations, the statute book can continue to function. what he is planning for, and he should be absolutely frank with the british people, is no deal. he has no mandate from
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the british people to do that. we'll be speaking to one conservative mp, who's proposing six amendments to the bill. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. a firearms dealer is found guilty of supplying illegal handguns and bullets — linked to more than 100 crimes, including three murders.
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