Skip to main content

tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  November 15, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

11:00 am
this is bbc news. and these are the top stories developing at 11am. zimbabwe's military says it has taken control of the country. it says robert mugabe, president since 1980, is safe, but his situation is unclear. their security is guaranteed. we are only targeting criminals around him who are committing crimes. the supreme court gives the go—ahead for scotland to set a minimum price for alcohol. the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe meets boris johnson. australians say yes to same—sex marriage with 61% voting in favour in an historic poll. also, concerns grow for a british explorer. tv star benedict allen's family say they're concerned he hasn't returned from a jungle expedition in papua new guinea. and we'll hear why grandparents‘
11:01 am
treats and we‘ll hear why grandparents‘ treats could be bad for their grandchildren‘s health. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the army in zimbabwe has seized control of the country but is denying it‘s staged a coup against robert mugabe, who‘s been president for the last 37 years. loud explosions and gunfire were heard during a night of tension in the capital, harare. armoured vehicles have now been deployed around parliament and government buildings. soldiers seized the headquarters of the country‘s national broadcaster and an army general appeared on television to say the military is targeting what he described as "criminals" around president mugabe.
11:02 am
the army say the president is being kept safe. the president of south africa, jacob zuma, has urged zimbabwe‘s government and its military to resolve what he called a political impasse amicably. the latest events were sparked by the sacking last week of one of the country‘s vice—presidents, emmerson mnangagwa, who mugabe accused of plotting against him and his wife, grace, who has positioned herself as his successor. jon donnison has this report. an increase in military vehicles and soldiers on the outskirts of the capital yesterday first raised alarm. overnight, soldiers took control of the country‘s state broadcaster, but in a televised address, the military denied a coup was taking place, insisting president mugabe was safe. we are only targeting criminals around him who are committing crimes that are causing social and economic suffering in the country in order to bring them to justice.
11:03 am
but it came just days after the head of the armed forces had threatened to take action over the sacking of a senior politician. we must demand those behind the current treacherous shenanigans that when it comes to matters of protecting our revolution, the military will not hesitate to step in. the general was referring to president mugabe‘s sacking of his number two, vice—president emmerson mnangagwa. once seen as a loyal deputy, his dismissal was seen as a move by president mugabe to hand power to his wife, grace. but, on the streets of harare, some welcomed the possible intervention by the military to block such a move. what is needed right now in zimbabwe is to remove this mugabe family in power. if there is this implosion, the implosion is good for the citizens of zimbabwe.
11:04 am
at 93, robert mugabe is the world‘s oldest head of state, in power since 1980. his political downfall has been predicted many times before and he‘s still standing. the question — for how long? we can get more on this from our correspondent milton nkosi in johannesburg. what more do we know about that phone call betweenjacob zuma and robert mugabe? we know that presidentjacob robert mugabe? we know that president jacob zuma has robert mugabe? we know that presidentjacob zuma has confirmed that president robert mugabe of zimbabwe is under house arrest. his office, jacob zuma‘s office, issued a statement and i can read you the paragraph about robert mugabe‘s whereabouts. he said he spoke to robert mugabe earlier today, who indicated he was confined to his
11:05 am
home but said he was fine. and he also spoke to the zimbabwe defence force. presidentjacob also spoke to the zimbabwe defence force. president jacob zuma also spoke to the zimbabwe defence force. presidentjacob zuma has also announced that he is sending envoys to zimbabwe to meet with president mugabe and his zimbabwean defence force. was there any mention in that phone call about robert mugabe‘s wife grace or any mention of her whereabouts? there is no clarity about where president mugabe‘s wife is always she has gone to or whether indeed she is still at home with her husband. it has not been clarified at all. remember, she was in a tight race with the vice president, emmerson mnangagwa before he was fired by president mugabe for the topjob to succeed fired by president mugabe for the top job to succeed president robert mugabe. so it is still entirely unclear where she is at this moment. of course, south africa is home to millions of zimbabweans. what would
11:06 am
stability lookalike to them as they watch what is unfolding in their country? would it be with emmerson mnangagwa or would it be with the mugabe family? if emmerson mnangagwa ta kes mugabe family? if emmerson mnangagwa takes over power in zimbabwe, as it is probably going to be the case, then the governing party stays in power by extension. therefore, in a way, you would have removed president mugabe but kept the current party in charge until you get to the next election. milton, thank you very much. the bbc‘s africa editor fergal keane he has been monitoring the situation from the democratic republic of the congo. we are supposed to be living in an age where military coup d‘etat ‘s are over in africa but that‘s
11:07 am
clearly not the case. whatever the army in south africa says, this looks like a coup, it talks like a coup, therefore it is a coup. the key question now is what happens to robert mugabe. we are told the first family is safe and sound. that means they are under something like house arrest somewhere. they are under something like house arrest somewhere. i think the army would be content enough to allow robert mugabe to continue in a figurehead role or at least to ease him house. the real problem is with his wife grace mugabe, who they saw repairing a power grab. there is a big conference coming up of the ruling party and they are expecting a move to be made to follow her husband and that is what they have acted to stop. considering his options, which are limited, the zimbabwe army are really powerful, there is no way on if any regional power is going to intervene militarily to reverse this coup. so the men with the guns are the people who have the initiative, who are setting the agenda at the moment. it
11:08 am
is possible they may suggest a child to grace mugabe but she is not the kind of person to go shyly or quietly. she is a very volatile individual. the problem is that she lacks the political base that her husband had. she is somebody who came into the position he has, the riches that she has, p willey through marriage to robert mugabe. that is a vulnerability and i don‘t think the army will have any great difficulty in resolving this. a couple of lines coming in from the eu about zimbabwe, saying recent political developments in the country, including in relation to the security forces, are a matter of concern. the eu is calling for dialogue and peaceful resolution in zimbabwe. we can speak now to doug coltart, a human rights lawyer and activist, who joins us from the capital harare. thank you very much for talking to us. thank you very much for talking to
11:09 am
us. described for us what the situation is like their around you. what it has been like over the last 24 what it has been like over the last 2a hours or so. what it has been like over the last 24 hours or so. sure. the atmosphere here is still fairly tense. people are concerned about how things will play out. i would say that there is not outright panic. many people can still go to work and go about their daily business. but there is a military presence in the city centre andi military presence in the city centre and i have had first—hand reports that they were gunshots, sustained gunshot over a period of about seven minutes last night in the northern suburbs, as has been reported elsewhere as well. so there is a level of concern and people are tense. but people are still waiting to see how things play out. we had
11:10 am
oui’ to see how things play out. we had our correspondent just say a few moments ago that grace mugabe doesn‘t have the sort of power base that her husband obviously has had. do you think they will be support for her awful robert mugabe from any sort of action that could try to undo what the army has done overnight? so, there is no doubt that within the party, robert mugabe still holds a huge amount of power. grace mugabe draws her power entirely from the president and so, to some extent, her negotiating power lies in how much robert mugabe will stand up for
11:11 am
her interests as things play out, and really the power he still commands. so in terms of grace was mac support base within the party, over the past few weeks, we have seen over the past few weeks, we have seen her indoors by the women‘s league and the youth league but with the developments over the past 24 hours, we have seen a major reversal of that. they came out very defiantly against the military yesterday, calling the actions unconstitutional. all of a sudden, today, they are speaking about the gallant military who are restoring democracy and are commended for using minimalforce. briefly, sorry to interrupt, what are your fears, your concerns for the days ahead? it is difficult for us to get to
11:12 am
some form of constitutional democracy but we need to get there as soon democracy but we need to get there as soon as democracy but we need to get there as soon as possible. sustained military power would be a very bad scenario for zimbabwe. so the military needs to manage this very carefully a nd military needs to manage this very carefully and ensure that we do have some form of civilian rule as soon as possible. thank you very much. british nationals living in zimbabwe are being warned to stay indoors following reports of unusual military activity in the country‘s capital harare. the foreign and commonwealth office issued the guidance in the early hours of this morning, saying: "due to the uncertain political situation in harare, including reports of unusual military activity, we recommend british nationals currently in harare to remain safely at home or in their accommodation until the situation becomes clearer." the foreign secretary boris johnson has been speaking in the last last hour. he urged those in zimbabwe to
11:13 am
refrain from violence. we are monitoring the situation very closely, as you can imagine. our ambassador has been in touch to say that if uk nationals are worried, they should get in touch with our embassy. at the moment it is very fluid and it is hard to say exactly how this will turn out. i think the most important point to make is that everybody wants to see a stable and successful zimbabwe and i think we are appealing for everybody to refrain from violence, that is the crucial thing. and you can follow all the latest developments from zimbabwe on our website. the uk‘s highest court will decide later whether scotland can finally enforce its policy of a minimum pricing for alcohol. legislation was approved by the scottish parliament five
11:14 am
years ago, but has been tied up in court challenges amid claims it breaches european law. but seven supreme courtjudges have said it is not breach european law. how quickly can we expect the scottish government to implement this? as quickly as possible. exactly what that means, we don‘t know yet. the scottish parliament will lay out a timetable. there is going to be a consultation period on exactly what level the minimum price will be. back in 2012 when the legislation was passed, it was set at 50p per unit of alcohol. inflation has happened in the previous five years. they may be a judgment that the level needs to be
11:15 am
set differently to achieve the aims this policy five years down the line. and the scottish government wa nts to line. and the scottish government wants to improve public health through this policy. but the scottish whisky association was arguing that they were better ways to achieve that aim. that is true, but clearly it is the judgment of the supreme court that this is a legitimate and proportionate way of achieving the goals of the scottish government and primarily that is to reduce harmful misuse of alcohol in deprived communities. that is where the scottish government feels that alcohol is doing a lot of damage. a large number of deaths associated with alcohol, in particular in 2016. there was 1265, eight & increase on the year before. so they have made the year before. so they have made thejudgment that the year before. so they have made the judgment that this is a way to reduce the harmful effect and the supreme court has agreed with that
11:16 am
judgment. thank you. we will be speaking to the scottish health secretary in around 30 minutes. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. zimbabwe‘s military says it has taken control of the country. president robert mugabe is believed to be under house arrest. the supreme court gives the go—ahead for the scottish government to set a minimum price for alcohol. the first country in the world to do so. the foreign secretary borisjohnson tells the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe that the government will leave no stone unturned in trying to secure her release from iran. and in sport, just eight days before the first ashes test in brisbane, chris woakes took six wickets as england were made to field all day. australia booked their place at the
11:17 am
world cup in russia after a 3—1win over honduras in the second leg of their play—off. and the republic of ireland manager martin o‘neill will speak to the country‘s football association about his future after failing to reach the world cup. they we re failing to reach the world cup. they were thrashed 5—1 by denmark in last night‘s play—off. i will be back with more on those stories at 11:30am. the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, the british woman being held in iran after visiting her family there, has met with the foreign secretary borisjohnson this morning to discuss her continued imprisonment. the meeting was held at the foreign office with richard ratcliffe and the couple‘s local mp tulip siddiq, focusing on the uk government‘s efforts to secure her release on humanitarian grounds. it comes after borisjohnson apologised for mistakenly claiming she had been training journalists when she was arrested in tehran in april last year.
11:18 am
borisjohnson said the government would leave no stone unturned in trying to secure her release. would leave no stone unturned in trying to secure her releaselj would leave no stone unturned in trying to secure her release. i can tell you that people in the foreign office and across government have been working very hard over the last 19 months to secure the release of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe and indeed to solve some other very difficult cases in iran. we are going to continue to do that and we will leave absolutely no stone unturned in our efforts to do that. more on that meeting as we get it. unemployment fell by 59,000 between july and september to 1.42 million, official figures show. the jobless rate now stands at 4.3% but the number of people classed as economically inactive — those not in work and not seeking a job — rose by the most in nearly eight years. average earnings increased by 2.2% in the year to september.
11:19 am
there will be much more on this in the business news in half an hour‘s time. prominent tory critics of the government‘s eu legislation have accused the daily telegraph of bullying by describing them as brexit mutineers. the paper names at least 15 backbenchers who are threatening to vote against theresa may‘s plan to cement the date of brexit in law. our assistant political editor, norman smith, is in westminster for us now. as the eu withdrawal bill continues to make its way through parliament, that article has had the effect of uniting tories, hasn‘t it? that article has had the effect of uniting tories, hasn't it? far from car windows tory rebels, it seems to strengthen their resolve. a number of them tweeting fairly defiantly. one said that if fighting for the future of the country is mutiny,
11:20 am
then bring it on. others accusing then bring it on. others accusing the telegraph and brexiteers of bullying, of paranoia. that said, i think the telegraph front page, where the 15 likely rebels were named and shamed does point to the real tensions within the tory party over the brexit legislation, with many conservative mps unhappy because they think the real purpose of these rebels is not to amend or change the legislation but to derail, to thwart, to scupper brexit. there is also a fear that by potentially defeating theresa may, they would not only damage her authority, it could be so serious that the vote might also be seen as a vote of no—confidence and that could even pave the way for a general election, so there are real tensions rippling through the tory party now over this brexit legislation. and we have obviously
11:21 am
got prime minister‘s questions today. do we expected to feature in that? i guess so. ithink it today. do we expected to feature in that? i guess so. i think it almost certainly will but not from jeremy corbyn and theresa may because neither of them really wants to talk about brexit because both have difficult, to may because of her rebels, jeremy corbyn has a rather ambiguous position over brexit. we saw a veteran labour mp yesterday, a brexiteer, being heckled by other labour mps. but when you look at other mps, the backbenchers are going to be asking questions and a lot of them are quite outspoken on brexit. so, yes, brexit pretty short to feature big time at prime minister‘s questions. to feature big time at prime minister's questions. thank you very much. news just much. newsjust coming in much. news just coming in that the actor keith barron has died aged 83 after
11:22 am
a short illness. that statement coming through from his agent. he was the former duty—free star, a very well—known face on television. perhaps duty freak, one of the best series that he was best known for. —— duty free. the family of the british explorer say he‘s gone missing during an expedition to papua new guinea. benedict allen‘s wife says he missed his flight home and hasn‘t been heard from in three weeks. mr allen, who has made numerous documentaries for the bbc, had been trying to track down an indigenous tribe for a new programme. it‘s thought the father of three travels without gps or a phone so that he can "live like a local". let‘s find out more about him. adrian arbib worked with benedict as a documentary photographer and has travelled with him on numerous occasions. hejoins us now via skype. thank you for taking the time to
11:23 am
talk to at. benedict is obviously a very experienced explorer. he is clearly someone who goes into tricks like this well prepared with lots of planning. yes, he is one of the most experienced explorers i have ever worked with. we have worked in the skeleton coast in namibia, mongolia, he knows papua new guinea pretty well and he is a very resilient and experienced man. so what possible scenarios do you think might there be to explain why he didn‘t catch that fly? why key hasn‘t started his journey home as expected?m that fly? why key hasn‘t started his journey home as expected? it could be anything. it is a very remote area where he has gone so it could be as simple as a bridge being cut down, a river rising, it could even just be a bout of malaria that has laid him up. but three weeks is a long time so even in those terms, it isa long time so even in those terms, it is a concern. like i say, he is a
11:24 am
very experienced person. he had meetings to reach in england of the royal geographical society, he was going to give a talk there, and he has missed that so it is a major concern. can you tell is a little bit about efforts going on to try to get in touch with him or to track him down because, as we mentioned, he doesn‘t use mobile phones, he doesn‘t use gps and so on. he doesn‘t use mobile phones, he doesn't use gps and so on. in all honesty, i have only heard about it a couple of hours ago so i have yet to get in touch with people. i travelled with him in about 1998-2000, so that travelled with him in about 1998—2000, so that is some time ago. he is very much gone off on his own on this one. i need to make some calls and find out. and his wife says he has missed his flight home, he has not been heard from in three weeks. a very worrying time for them. but if anyone can cope in
11:25 am
these situations, you feel confident that benedict allen can? of all people, yes. he is used to living with tribes, he lives very much on the ground, he doesn‘t rely on any technology. if he‘s going to come back, who knows, he mightjust suddenly turn up. it is a concern though because three weeks is a long time. it is a worry. adrien, thank you very much for taking the time to talk to us. a friend of benedict allen. some news coming in. we are hearing that the use of a home pregnancy test in the 1960s and 1970s was not responsible for serious birth defects experienced by some families and some women who used the drug, the commission on human medicines has said. the commission, in this
11:26 am
judgment, and we just has said. the commission, in this judgment, and wejust have has said. the commission, in this judgment, and we just have literally a line of thatjudgment at the moment, says the use of the hormone test was not responsible for serious birth defects. the interim leader of the labour party in scotland, alex rowley, has stepped aside from the role amid claims about his conduct. mr rowley said he "totally refuted" allegations from a former partner published in the scottish sun newspaper who said their relationship "felt like emotional blackmail and abuse". the msp for mid scotland and fife has referred himself to the party‘s investigations unit. almost 400 individuals could be given the right to provide opening statements, highlight evidence or suggest lines of questioning in the
11:27 am
g re nfell tower suggest lines of questioning in the grenfell tower enquiry. at least 80 people were killed in the fire in the tower block injune. a young british tourists and her canadian friend have reportedly been found dead in a backpackers hostel in cambodia. they had apparently beenin in cambodia. they had apparently been in contact with family to say they had been feeling unwell. the foreign office says it is in contact with local authorities who are investigating the deaths. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first we leave you with a look at the weather. it has been a rather cloudy start to the day. we have had some mist, some four, which is still lingering across eastern parts of england at the moment. but for many of us, seems like this, lots of cloud in
11:28 am
the sky. the best of the brightness will be across scotland. eventually there will be some sunshine in northern england and across western areas of wales. a few showers perhaps but i think for central and eastern parts it is going to rain, quite cloudy and there will be some missed continuing into this afternoon. further north and west, some fabric slobbering into the north of —— further north and west, some mist and fog into the north of scotland. some very patchy rain moving further south but that rain will break up as it moves into the south—east corner. still holding on to the milder conditions in the south. but as the cloud and rain clears away to the south, across many northern areas of the uk, it is going to be clear, pretty chilly, snow over the highest ground, and
11:29 am
temperatures dropping down as the afternoon goes on. this is bbc news, our latest headlines. the army in zimbabwe has seized control of the country but denied it has staged a coup. president robert mugabe, the man who‘s ruled the country with an iron fist for decades, has been detained. the supreme court gives the go—ahead for scotland to set a minimum price for alcohol — the first country in the world to do so. ministers say an extra 50 pence per unit will tackle scotland‘s unhealthy relationship with drink. the foreign secretary borisjohnson meets the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe — the british woman being held in iran accused of spying. charges she denies. australians vote in favour of legalising same—sex marriage. in a non binding vote 61% chose to allow same—sex couples to wed , which could become law by christmas. british explorer benedict allen has gone missing during
11:30 am
an expedition to papua new guinea. his wife says he missed his flight home and hasn‘t been in touch for three weeks. in a moment... why indulgent grandparents may be bad for their grandchildren‘s health. time for the sports news. the countdown is on until the first ashes test, 8 days to go now, chris woakes took six wickets on the first day of england‘s final warm—up game. there were a couple as well for craig overton who‘s trying to get a starting place in the test team. play finished with cricket australia on 249—9. our sports correspondent andy swiss is in townsville. with the start of the ashes barely a week away, a decent work—out on day one of the final warm up match. but no doubting the start of the show, chris woakes, with six wickets,
11:31 am
including four in 22 balls either side of lunch, and with no ben stokes here, a lot of responsibility on his shoulders. he seems to be relishing that responsibility. two wickets also for craig overton, as he continues his push for a test debut in brisbane next week. but there is also a latest injury scare for england. just after lunch, jonny ba i rstow had to for england. just after lunch, jonny bairstow had to leave the field for treatment after hurting a finger on the field. he was off the pitch for 50 minutes. thankfully it turned out to be nothing other than a bruised finger, and during his absence ben foakes made his debut, the reserve wicketkeeper, he took a catch. also some encouraging signs from james anderson, he missed training yesterday because of a stomach upset. also, jake boll is continuing his recovery from an ankle injury.
11:32 am
they need to keep fit as well as focused, with the first test starting in brisbane on november the 23rd. onto football, and austrailia have booked their place in the world cup after a 3—1 win in the 2nd leg of their play—off against honduras. the first leg finished goalless but there was a hatrick for the aston villa midfielder mile jedinak, all set pieces. his first a free kick from just ooutside the box, the other two came from the penalty spot. no celebrations for martin o‘neill who will speak to the irish football association about his future, after his side failed to reach the world cup. the republic were thrashed 5—1 by denmark in the 2nd leg of their play—off after the first finished goalless. it started well when shane duffy put them one up in the tie. but, some poor defending let the danes back in and tottenham midfielder christian eriksen ended up with a hat—trick as his team confirmed their place at russia 2018. england manager gareth southgate says "in terms of heart,
11:33 am
resilience and spirit" last night‘s goalless draw against brazil was up there with anything he‘s been involved in. a young england side played out a second consecutive 0—0 draw, with dominic solanke coming close to marking his debut with a goal near the end. chris coleman believes he‘s still the man to lead wales but admits he‘s unsure about his future as manager. a youthful welsh side impressed in their friendly with panama. tom lawrence put them ahead in cardiff. but in the 94th minute, the visitors, who unlike wales, are going to the world cup, equalised through armando cooper. coleman remains in talks about extending his contract. i think ithinki i think i am the man to lead and, yes, but i think that is an easier question, there is a bit more to it than that. but that will happen very shortly, i imagine. at the minute, it is all about the team, and it is tough against france. a lot has been
11:34 am
learned tonight. the uk anti—doping agency has closed its investigation into a package delivered to team sky during the 2011 criterium du dauphine. thejiffy bag contained a legal decongestant for sir bradley wiggins according to his team management. ukad say they cannot confirm or refute the claim but that they don‘t intend to issue any anti—doping charges in relation to the package. that is all for now. we will have more in the next hour. research has said that over indulgent grandparents may be bad for the grandchildren‘s indulgent grandparents may be bad for the grandchild ren‘s health. a university of glasgow study suggests grandparents often treat
11:35 am
and overfeed their grandchildren. it also says some smoke in front of them and don‘t give them enough exercise. and it suggests parents feel unable to interfere because they are reliant on grandparents for childcare. we know a quarter of working families rely on grandparents for childcare, so it is right we look at what they do everyday, and see them asa what they do everyday, and see them as a resource. if what they do everyday, and see them 3s a resource. if we what they do everyday, and see them as a resource. if we want to get positive messages about healthy eating and activity, we need to talk about the grandparents about what they are doing and what they might do in the future. grandparents often see it as the role to treat their grandchildren. but we‘re not talking about occasional treats, we‘re talking about grandparents who are significantly involved in helping to look after their grandchildren, lots of childcare, and therefore will be in contact with the grandchildren for a big amount of time every week. absolutely. we are talking about a group of grandparents caring for children a lot, so regular childcare, children could be younger, spit it that spending
11:36 am
significant amounts of times with grandparents, who might be giving them lunch or tea, and shaping what they do during the day. it is important we get some of those positive messages we are targeting pa rents positive messages we are targeting parents about healthy eating and activity to grandparents as well, because they can help set that firm foundation about positive choices about food and activity, not smoking, all the things the report highlights. it says in the research, grandparents were characterised i pa rents grandparents were characterised i parents as indulgent and misinformed, and accused of using food as an emotional tool. do you think there is a gap between the sort of messages parents are getting on how their children should be brought up, healthy eating and so one, and the sort grandparents themselves would have got when they we re themselves would have got when they were young parents to bring up their kids? certainly there is a lot of effort going into talking to pa rents, effort going into talking to parents, so if you are a parent and your children are at school, there area your children are at school, there are a lot of materials come home,
11:37 am
they do regular campaigns with children about how to eat healthy and the benefits of activity. it would be helpful to extend that messaging to grandparents. but presumably some grandparents will be very good at keeping up—to—date with the best foods for children, the amount of exercise etc. grandparents are not a homogenous group, they are very different in terms of age and activity and lifestyle, so many of them well, i am sure, be very active and into healthy eating. it is about making sure we use them as is —— as our resource for families. so let us get some really good information out to them, let us encourage grandparents to be really active as well. as a charity, can we do intergenerational activities that enable older and young people to do things together? so many things is about children on there on or about families, but that is not
11:38 am
constructive as a grandparent with a child. lots of opportunities to get better. you have not been in the office yet, you have been doing interviews, but when you get feedback about what grandparents are saying, how do you think they will be reacting, do you think they will be reacting, do you think they will bea be reacting, do you think they will be a little bit left? i think they wa nt be a little bit left? i think they want what is best for the grandchildren, so i would encourage them to talk about the parents of them to talk about the parents of the children, about anything that is concerning you. we need to focus on what is best for the children. thank you very much. more now on the situation in zimbabwe — its generals say they are not staging a coup. but they‘ve taken over the state broadcaster, zbc, and insisted that they‘re not attempting to overthrow the government but instead targeting criminals around president robert mugabe. jacob zuma has given a statement
11:39 am
calling for calm and restraint. robert mugabe said earlier he was under house arrest but fine. given the seriousness of the situation, i have taken the decision to send an envoy, to be able to conduct the leaders of the defence force who have undertaken these operations, but also to meet with president mugabe so that we have a more clear picture of what is happening in zimbabwe. i will also be sending an envoy to the president of angola, to become, as the chairperson of the committee on peace and security, so
11:40 am
there is action between us and the zimbabweans. iam hopeful that there is action between us and the zimbabweans. i am hopeful that the defence force will not move and do more damage, that they will be able... so that this situation does not go beyond the situation there it is now, particularly because we‘re now in contact with them as well as the president. we‘re hoping the situation is going to be controlled, so situation is going to be controlled, so that peace and stability comes back to zimbabwe. the south african president, jacob zuma, who spoke to robert mugabe by telephone earlier today. on the line we have a journalist working in the capital, harare. what is the situation like where you are? right now, the
11:41 am
mounting and vehicles. they are stopping many people from using the roads. soldiers are bringing the army vehicles, and moving closer to the robert mugabe offices. the army is describing this not as a coup, but a bloodless
11:42 am
transaction. at what point might it transition to civilian rule? what i can say here is that the army are not trying to take over government. they are trying to fish out some people, fellow comrades, . .. comrades,... we do not know really what the situation is with mugabe,
11:43 am
they are negotiating with him, but we do not know what these negotiations will be. thank you very much for your time. apologies, there we re much for your time. apologies, there were a few issues with the sound on that. australia has voted in favour of legalising same—sex marriages. the results of an eight—week postal survey show more than 61% of voters were in favour. it‘s non—binding but the government has pledged to introduce legislation before the end of the year. from sydney, hywel griffith reports: after months of divisive debate, finally australia has its answer. cheering the numbers confirmed what the opinion polls have said all along, that the majority of australians
11:44 am
do support same—sex marriage. but for veronica and louise, it means everything. it‘s huge. it‘s equality, it‘s everything, is just being recognised as being just like everyone else. it‘s freedom, it‘s acceptance, it‘s all of it. the eight—week vote was, according to the government, meant to prompt respectful discussion. it didn‘t always work out that way. go home, homophobes. both sides have been accused of demonising each other. faith groups say their right to religious freedom has been diminished. and they will carry on fighting to ensure people who oppose gay marriage have a legal right to do so. the language we have seen in the western world and other democracies, the coersive effect of changing the definition of marriage has been to restrict people's ability to hold
11:45 am
a different point of view. everyone knows this isn‘t the end of the line. it is not done and dusted until parliament passes legislation — that they hope will be done before christmas. that is concern for another day. today is about celebrating, getting the party started. not everyone was out dancing in the streets, butjon and arthur, the moment is just as sweet. after 50 years together as a couple, they can now plan their wedding. itjust gives our relationship exactly the status, exactly the same dignity as the relationships of our heterosexual friends, of whom we have many, and we just feel that we are first—class citizens, not second—class citizens. many who have campaigned for same—sex marriage did not want their relationships put to a public vote, but today‘s result means they should soon have the law on their side. ina
11:46 am
in a moment, the business news. but first, the headlines. zimbabwe‘s military has said it has taken control of the country. robert mugabe is believed to be under house arrest. the scottish government has given the go—ahead for the minimum price to be set from alcohol, the first country in the world to do so. borisjohnson first country in the world to do so. boris johnson tells first country in the world to do so. borisjohnson tells the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe that the government will leave no stone unturned in trying to secure her release. now, the businesses. the number of people in work in britain fell to 32 million in the three months to september. that is the biggest fall in more than two years. unemployment rate held at 4.3%, a
11:47 am
four decade low. are regional agencies is still failing to keep up with presentation. we will have more shortly. airbus has struck its biggest single deal with in order for 430 aircraft more —— worth more than £37 billion. the buyer is the us firm indigo partners, which owns several budget airlines. wings for the airbus aircraft are made in the uk, near bristol and in north wales. the deal was struck at the dubai airshow. it comes after the main rival boeing had already secured a large orderfrom the rival boeing had already secured a large order from the emirates for 40 of its seven 870 minus. hsbc has agreed to pay £266 million to french authorities to settle a long—running investigation into tax evasion by french clients. the french financial prosecutors office claimed hsbc‘s swiss private banking unit helped clients evade tax. they have
11:48 am
acknowledged control weaknesses and said it had taken some steps to address them. the number of people in work has followed by £14,000, the biggest drop in over two years, according to latest figures this morning. 32 million work in a job between july two to september. unemployment was also down, with 1.4 million out of work. that is the lowest figure in over 12 years, giving a jobless rate of 4.3%. but there was a big jump in the number of people who are neither working nor are looking for work. those classed as economically inactive. there are now 8.8 million in that category. how much can we read into this. let us talk to alan clark, the chief uk economist at scotia bank. it seems wages are not keeping up with the rate at which prices are rising, which is a problem. yes, that is the biggest problem, prices are rising by about the same as a year ago, but wages are up by about the same as a year ago, but wages are up 2%. in three to six
11:49 am
months, we will probably cross as wage inflation picks up and prices in the shops are going up more slowly, so it is probably as bad as it is going to get and there is light at the end of the tunnel. with the drop in the number of people in work, the number of people who are unemployed also dropping, where have the rest disappeared too?m unemployed also dropping, where have the rest disappeared too? it is a bit of a mess, and the numbers never apply logic. unemployment has fallen, but so has employment. in an ideal world, they would relate to one another, but it never happens. the data is volatile, employment is up the data is volatile, employment is up at one point in the year, then it is down, then it obsoletes. i would not read too much into a single month, but employment is rising, so i would not read too much into this
11:50 am
drop in employment. thank you very much. there is also data out on productivity, you can read about that on the website. and some other business stories for you today. london‘s new bond street has overtaken the champs elysees in paris to rank in the top three most expensive streets in the world, according to new research. a survey by commercial retail estate company cushman & wakefield found that rents at the street have increased by 37.5% in sterling this year compared with 2016. telecoms group talktalk has fallen into the red during the six months to 30 september. it reported a pre—tax loss of £75 million compared to a £30 million profit last year. revenue also fell to £856 million, from £902 million in the first half of last year. however, talktalk says that it has seen double—digit growth in its retail and wholesale businesses. premier foods says the well known dessert angel delight is partly to credit for its latest set
11:51 am
of strong results. it reported a 30% jump in sales thanks to its new ready—to—eat pots. premier foods, which also includes brands such as batchelors and ambrosia custard has reported a 1.5% rise in the six months to the end of september. prime ministers questions is due at 12:30pm. our assistant political editor norman smith is in westminster. thank you, it would not be pmq is brexit did not rear its head. the front page of the telegraph says 15 tory critics, who were named and shamed, as mutineers. i‘m joined by one of them, stephen hammond. are you a mutiny? of course not. we are
11:52 am
trying to get the normal process through to make sure the bill is that a better shape at the end. the government has put down an amendment which we do not think is the right way to proceed, which is with the date on the face of the bill. we do not understand why it has done that, as it will impede their negotiating ability. what do you say to your collea g u es ability. what do you say to your colleagues who said, if you defeat mrs may on such an important piece of legislation, it might pave the way for a general election? that is nonsense. the conservative party is united on almost everything. i accept the will of democracy, i am not trying to prevent brexit or stop the bill, i‘m trying to get it into a good place we get a good dealfor britain. there were 15 of you named on the daily telegraph. are other more? yes. there are more, i do not know why the daily telegraph published those particular people.
11:53 am
but there are others, some who are more public and some behind—the—scenes putting pressure on the whips. how likely is that the government could be defeated potentially on the final exit date, given that last night we saw mrs may having a majority of around 20? if there are more than 15 of you, she is in trouble. it is three or four weeks before we have to vote on this. we not voting until then. that gives us a chance to speak to government ministers to try to convince them this is against their own advantage, and to give them a chance to negotiate for britain. thank you for your time. the brexit bill will be rumbling on in the commons this afternoon and this evening, and it will be for the next few weeks. now, more about the news that the highest court in the uk has
11:54 am
given the go—ahead for scotland to set a given the go—ahead for scotland to seta minimum price given the go—ahead for scotland to set a minimum price on alcohol, the first country in the uk to do so. it has taken five years to do this, will you introduce legislation on this quickly? yes, we will. i am delighted that the uk supreme court has been in ourfavour. this is a policy that will save lives and reduce harm, and we look forward to implementing the legislation that was past five years ago overwhelmingly by the scottish parliament. i will set out to parliament. i will set out to parliament shortly how we will take this forward at the earliest opportunity, and the next steps so we can get the policy in place to help reduce harm and change scotland‘s relationship with alcohol. will you set the minimum price for a unit of alcohol at 50p, which is what was suggested originally? we anticipate setting the minimum prize at 50p, we will
11:55 am
consult on the price, given it has been five years since the legislation was passed, and we are also required to consult on a revised business and regulatory impact assessment, so we will do that, and i will set out the time frame to parliament at the earliest opportunity, but please be assured we wa nt opportunity, but please be assured we want to get this legislation working, impacting on the ground, reducing harm, saving lives. we anticipate 400 fewer deaths over a five—year period, over 8000 fewer hospital admissions related to alcohol harm... i am proud scotland is leading the way. obviously healthy is your primary concern, but asa healthy is your primary concern, but as a government can you do more to reassure the scottish whisky association, which is a significant business in scotland, who said this was a disproportionate approach, and they are concerned about the disruption of free trade, and they say it distorts competition across
11:56 am
the single market. well, the whisky industry is hugely important to scotla nd industry is hugely important to scotland and will remain so, and we support our whisky industry. minimum unit pricing was never a policy that was going to impact on previous —— premium products, it does not impact on them. it impacts on the really high volume, cheap products that do the most harm in society. that is where it will have the impact. i am pleased the scotch whisky association has accepted the judgment. it is known about getting on and implementing legislation and starting to see the positive impact it will have in saving lives and reducing harm in scotland. thank you very much your time, shona robison, scottish health minister. now, the weather. we have some clouds across most of the uk, but there are some brightness coming through, here is
11:57 am
some high—level cloud in cumbria. scotland, through northern england will brighten up, but for many it will brighten up, but for many it will remain cloudy. further north and west, cloud will thicken across scotland, and with that, some rain will move in. there will be some fairly strong wind moving in as well, across scotland and northern ireland. as the rain moved south, it will remain cloudy through the evening tonight. but the cloud, and fog patches, will clearly quickly during thursday morning, and we can see this band of cloud and rain moving south and east. behind that, as the rain clears, there is sunshine, clear weather and colder weather. temperatures dropping by a few degrees. this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at midday. zimbabwe‘s military says it‘s taken control of the country. robert mugabe, president
11:58 am
since 1980, is believed to be under house arrest. their security is guaranteed. we are only targeting criminals around him who are committing crimes. scotland gets the go—ahead to become the first country in the world to set a minimum price for alcohol. the foreign secretary tells the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe that the government will "leave no stone unturned" in trying to secure her release in iran. good afternoon. welcome to bbc newsroom live. let‘s go over live to the house of commons now, where prime minister‘s questions is just getting underway. this morning i had meetings with
11:59 am
ministerial colleagues and others in addition to my duties in this house andi addition to my duties in this house and i shall have further meetings later today. my right honourable friend‘s stewardship of the economy and her predecessor‘s excellent work in making sure this economy grows has seen confidence in our country grow despite the troubles and the relations set before us. our debts are now, our deficit has now come down and our debts are oversubscribed. will she take this opportunity to invest in our economy even more than she has already and perhaps take a chance to build more homes? my honourable friend makes a very... homes? my honourable friend makes a my homes? my honourable friend makes a very... my honourable friend makes a very... my honourable friend makes a very important point about investing in infrastructure. he refers to housing particularly, but we are doing exactly that. that is why we have seen over a quarter of £1
12:00 pm
trillion in infrastructure spending since 2010. we are putting in another £22 billion from central government for economic infrastructure. we are seeing billion of pounds on rail projects, the biggest road building programme for a generation. that is this government building a country fit for the future. jeremy corbyn. thank you, mr speaker. i joined for the future. jeremy corbyn. thank you, mr speaker. ijoined the prime minister in wishing her majesty and prince philip a very happy platinum wedding anniversary. the thoughts of the whole house will be with the victims of the devastating earthquake that hit iran and iraq on monday, leaving hundreds dead and thousands without shelter. i hope the government is offering all necessary emergency help and support that can be used to save life. i also hope, and i‘m sure the house willjoin me, in sending our deepest sympathies to the families and friends of the late carl sargeant, the labour assembly member in wales
12:01 pm
who very tragically died last week. mr speaker, crime is up, violent crime is up and police numbers are down by 20,000. will the prime minister urged her chancellor, who i note is sitting absolutely next to her so it will be easy for her to make this demand on him, to provide the funding our police need to make our communities safe? well, first of all, can i say to the right honourable gentleman, on the earthquake that took place in iraq and iran, we are monitoring this closely. it‘s a devastating earthquake. our thoughts are with all those affected by it. we are looking at the situation and we do stand ready to provide assistance if requested so the government will do what is necessary. i also join with him in offering condolences to the family and friends of carl sargeant.
12:02 pm
iam sure family and friends of carl sargeant. i am sure that goes for everybody across this whole house. he raised theissue across this whole house. he raised the issue of crime and policing. crime is traditionally measured by the independent crime survey and it is down by well over a third since 2010. we have been protecting police budgets, and we are putting more money into counter terrorism policing. but what matters is what the police do and how they deliver and asi the police do and how they deliver and as i say, the crime survey shows that crime is down by nearly a third since 2010. mr speaker, i have been following some of the tweets from some of herfriends following some of the tweets from some of her friends along the front bench over their and one of them says, very disappointed and mystified at the closure of uxbridge police station. just for the want of any doubt, mr
12:03 pm
speaker, that came from the foreign secretary, who is also... let her about the uxbridge police station. jeremy corbyn. the foreign secretary is so excited he won‘t even hear the answer. the real reason is that it is closing because of a £2.3 billion cut from police budgets in the last parliament and it gets worse, they are going to be cut by another £700 million by 2020. under this government, . .. million by 2020. under this government,... there are 11,000 fewer firefighters in england government,... there are 11,000 fewerfirefighters in england since 2010. last year, deaths in fires increased by 20%. in the wake of the
12:04 pm
terrible grenfell tower fire, the prime minister was very clear, she said this could not be allowed to happen again and money would be no object to fire safety. will she therefore now back the campaign to provide £1 billion to local councils to retrofit sprinklers in all high—rise blocks? to retrofit sprinklers in all high-rise blocks? prime minister. first of all, on the first question that the right honourable gentleman raised, he might not have noticed that the police and crime commissioners in london is the maher —— mayor. the last time i looked, sadiq khan was a labour mayor of london. although perhaps the leader
12:05 pm
of the labour party thinks he‘s not labour enough for him. but let‘s be very clear about funding for the metropolitan police, there is more money and more officers for each londoner than anywhere else in the country. that is the reality about funding for the metropolitan police. he asks... he has asked about the issue of fire and we absolutely take what happened, the appalling tragedy of what happened at grenfell tower seriously and that is why i said that the public enquiry. it is why my right honourable friend the communities secretary has set up already work taking place on the fire regulations and building regulations to ensure that we do have those right. it‘s why we continue to support kensington and chelsea council in ensuring that we deliver for those who have been victims for this awful tragedy. but
12:06 pm
he asked about sprinklers and we do wa nt to he asked about sprinklers and we do want to make sure that homes are fit for those who live in them. there is a responsibility on building owners in relation to that. and some owners to retrofit sprinklers but there are other safety measures that can take place. perhaps he also needs to look at what labour councils have said about this. haringey council rejected calls to fit sprinklers saying what happens —— matters is introducing the right safety measures. lewisham council say they need to weigh up the issues because fitting sprinters can go through fire compartmentalisation, which was another victim safety measure. lambeth council said there were issues retrofitting sprinklers and questions how effective they were. even islington council say they need to look at how effective sprinklers would be. mr speaker, the coroner after one fire thought that fitting sprinters would be the right thing
12:07 pm
to do, the chief fire officer thinks it is the right thing to do, those local authorities that have asked central government... those local authorities that have asked central government for support to retrofit sprinklers have all been refused by her government. surely we need to think about the safety of the people living in socially rented high—rise blocks. yesterday, i was passed a letter from a lettings agency in lincolnshire. universal credit is about to be rolled out. the agency, andi about to be rolled out. the agency, and i have the letter here, the agency is issuing all of its tenants with a pre—emptive notice of eviction because universal credit has driven up in arrears where it has driven up in arrears where it has been ruled out. and the letter, andi has been ruled out. and the letter, and i quote, says, gaap property
12:08 pm
cannot sustain arrears at the potential levels universal credit could create. will the prime minister pause universal credit so it can be fixed or does she think it is right to put thousands of families through christmas in the trauma of knowing that they are about to be evicted because they are in rent arrears because of universal credit? prime minister. can i say to the right honourable gentleman that there have been concerns raised, there have been concerns raised, there have been concerns raised in this has previously over the issue of people managing their budgets to pay rent but what we actually see is that after four months, the number of people on universal credit in arrears has fallen by a third. it is important that we do look at the issues on this particular case. the
12:09 pm
right honourable gentleman might like to send a letter through. in an earlier prime minister‘s questions he raised a specific constituent, a specific case of an individual who had written to him about her experience on universal credit, i think it was georgina, and so far he has still not said that letter to me. jeremy corbyn. mr speaker, i am very happy to give the prime minister a copy of this letter. i suspect it is not the only letting agency that is sending out that kind of letter. she might be aware that food bank usage has increased by 30% in areas where universal credit has been ruled out. 3 million families are losing an average of £2500 a year through universal credit. the child poverty action group estimates
12:10 pm
more than a million will be in poverty due to cuts imposed by universal credit. if those aren‘t reasons enough to pause the roll out, i don‘t know what our. and, mr speaker, last week, the chief executive... order! mr morris, calm yourself. behave with restraint. you are seated in a prominent position. quiet. it will be good for your well—being. quiet. it will be good for your well— being. jeremy corbyn. quiet. it will be good for your well-being. jeremy corbyn. last week the chief executive of nhs england, simon stephens, wrote, the budget for the nhs next year is well short of what is currently needed. a&e waiting time targets have not been met for two years, the 62 date cancer waiting time targets has not been met since 2015, so can the prime minister spent the next week ensuring that the budget does give
12:11 pm
sufficient funding to our nhs to meet our people‘s needs? sufficient funding to our nhs to meet our people's needs? on the first issue that the right honourable gentleman raised, can i remind him yet again, universal credit is ensuring that we are seeing more people in work and able to keep what they earn. he talks about what simon stephens says about the national health service. let‘s look at what he says about the national health service. the quality of nhs care is demonstrably improving, outcomes of care are dramatically better than three or five or ten years ago. he said what has been achieved in england over the past three years, more convenient access to primary care services, first steps to expand the primary care workforce, hires cancer survival rates ever. big expansion in cancer checkup, public satisfaction with hospital
12:12 pm
inpatients at its highest for more than two decades. that is the good news of our national health service. jeremy corbyn! it is very strange, mr speaker, that the chief executive of nhs providers says we are in the middle of the longest and deepest financial squeeze in history. i have got a pretty good idea they know what they are talking about. let me give the prime minister another statistic, the number of people waiting more than four hours in a&e has gone significantly since 2010. the opposition were very noisy when i mentioned... you are the government, we are the opposition. you are the opposition to us, it is not obligated. -- it is
12:13 pm
—— it is not complicated. two weeks ago, i raise the question of cuts in school budgets. teachers and parents telling mps what the reality of it was about. the prime minister was in denial, every tory mp was in denial. this week, 5000 headteachers from 25 counties wrote to the chancellor saying, we are simply asking for the money that is being taken out of the system to be returned. will the prime minister listen to headteachers and give a commitment that the budget next week will return the money to school budgets so return the money to school budgets so that our schools are properly funded? prime minister. can i say to the right honourable gentleman, actually, i think this is a major moment. he has got something right today. we are the government and he is the opposition. on the nhs, there are 1800 more
12:14 pm
patients seen within the four our a&e standard every single day compared to 2010. he talks about school funding, we are putting more money into our school budget, we are seeing record levels of funding going into our schools and this government is the first government in decades that has actually gripped theissue in decades that has actually gripped the issue of a fairer national funding formula. we are putting that into practice. but you can only put record levels of money into your nhs and schools with a strong economy and schools with a strong economy and what do we see as a result of policies that this conservative government has put into place? income inequality, down under the conservatives, up under labour.
12:15 pm
unemployment, down under the conservatives, up under labour. workless households, down under the conservatives, up under labour. deficits, down under the conservatives, up under labour. he is planning a run on the pound, we are building a britain fit for the future. mr speaker, iwould are building a britain fit for the future. mr speaker, i would have thought that 5000 headteachers would have a pretty good idea about the funding problems of their schools. and a pretty good idea of the effect of government cuts on school budgets on this staff and on their students. indeed, the iff says that school funding will have fallen by five percentage in real terms by 2019 as a result of government policies. public services in crisis from police to the fire service, from nhs
12:16 pm
to children‘s schools, while a super—rich feud dodge their taxes. ah, yes, the government sits on its hands as billions are lost to vital public services, the conservatives cut taxes for the few and vital services for the many. it is not just that there is one rule for the super—rich... just that there is one rule for the super-rich. .. order. i just that there is one rule for the super-rich... order. i apologise for interrupting the right honourable gentleman. both sides of this house will be heard and the idea that when somebody is asking a question they should be a concerted attempt to shout that person down is totally undemocratic and completely u na cce pta ble undemocratic and completely unacceptable from which ever caught it comes. i would just ask colleagues to give some thought to how our behaviour is regarded by the people who put us here. jeremy corbyn. quite simply, it isn't the
12:17 pm
truth that this is a government that protects the super—rich while the rest of us pick up the bill through cuts, austerity, poverty, homelessness, low wages and slashing of local services all over the country? that is the reality of a tory government. prime minister. we have taken £160 billion extra in as a result of the action we have taken on tax avoidance and evasion. the tax gap is now at its lowest level ever. if the tax gap had stayed at the level it was under the labour party, we would be losing the equivalent of the entire police budget for england. we in the conservatives are building a britain fit for the future. the best brexit deal, more high—paid jobs, fit for the future. the best brexit deal, more high—paidjobs, better schools, the home is our country
12:18 pm
needs. labour have backtracked on brexit, they have gone back on their promise on student debt, and they would cause and lose control of public finances. i say to the right honourable gentleman, he may have given momentum to its party but he brings stagnation to the country. in april 2015, the residents saw their only in april 2015, the residents saw theironly gb in april 2015, the residents saw their only gb surgery close in an area of rigby that once had significant challenges but thanks to the great work of local councillors has been regenerated. my constituents reluctantly accepted short—term pain for the long—term gain ofa short—term pain for the long—term gain of a new surgery that would open the following summer. regrettably, the project still hasn't yet started so i wonder whether the prime minister might
12:19 pm
meet with me and the action group to consider the slippage in this much—needed facility? consider the slippage in this much-needed facility? my honourable friend is right to raise this important issue for his constituents andi important issue for his constituents and i have been assured in this particular case that all the local health organisations do remain fully committed to this project. they are confident it will bring benefits to the local population in the long—term but i fully understand the frustration that my right honourable friend has at the delays that have taken place. i understand he is going to be meeting representatives of nhs england and nhs property services later this month. it is those two organisations that are in the best position to ensure this project is progress as quickly as possible and i hope they will be some positive news coming out of that meeting. but as my honourable friend has raised the issue of access to local health services, i would like to take this opportunity as well to say how important it is... this is an important issue.
12:20 pm
for people around this house and outside this house. i want to make sure that everybody who is entitled toa sure that everybody who is entitled to a flu jab this year gets one. i have had one as a type one diabetic andi have had one as a type one diabetic and i hope everyone in this house is encouraging everyone in their constituents who is entitled to a flu jab to get one. ian blackford. cani flu jab to get one. ian blackford. can ijoin with the prime minister and the leader of the labour party in congratulating the queen and prince philip for their impending platinum anniversary. can i also welcome the presiding officer of the scottish parliament. she is in the gallery today. does the prime minister agree with me that we should be incredibly proud of our emergency services, that they do a heroic job, emergency services, that they do a heroicjob, often emergency services, that they do a heroic job, often putting emergency services, that they do a heroicjob, often putting themselves in dangerto keep heroicjob, often putting themselves in danger to keep us all safe. first
12:21 pm
of all, can ijoin the right honourable gentleman in welcoming the prime minister —— presiding officer of the scottish parliament to see our proceedings today. as i have said previously in this chamber, iam happy have said previously in this chamber, i am happy to confirm that our emergency services do do an amazing job. i was very pleased at the pride of britain awards to be awarding posthumously and award in the name of pc keith palmer, who worked to keep this place safe, but other police officers, the leader of the opposition and the leader of the liberal democrats gave awards to other police officers who had also done what they do and what other emergency services do, they run towards danger when most of us would run away from it. i associate myself with the remarks of the prime minister. scottish fire and police are the only forces in the uk to be charged vat. that deprives front—line services of £140 million since 2013. the snp has now raised
12:22 pm
this issue 30 times in this chamber. the uk government needs to scrap the vat. this has been a long—standing snp campaign and we will not give up. as the chief secretary has made clear, they will look at this issue and report on it in due course. i am pleased to say that very constructive representations have been made by my scottish colleagues on this particular issue. but let‘s be clear, because the right honourable gentleman knows this, that before the scottish government made the decision to make scotland‘s police and fire services national rather than regional bodies, they we re rather than regional bodies, they were told that this would mean that they would become ineligible for vat refunds and they pressed ahead despite knowing that. oliver dowden.
12:23 pm
grandparents have a vital role to play in the upbringing of their grandchildren. at a time of rising life expectancy. does the prime minister therefore agree with me that we should send a strong signal from this has not only that they should be a presumption in their favour when it comes to adoption but they should also be intimately involved in those decisions, something i have seen has been sadly lacking in my own constituency. can i say to my honourable friend that like him, i have seen grandparents in my constituency, through my constituency surgery, who have been concerned about decisions that have been taken in relation to their grandchildren when they themselves we re grandchildren when they themselves were willing to provide that support for them. so he has raised a very important issue. there is already a duty on local authorities in legislation to ensure that wherever possible children are raised within
12:24 pm
theirfamily possible children are raised within their family and the statutory guidance does make particular reference to grandparents. but adoption agencies must also consider the needs of the child first and foremost. each case will be different but i think the message he is giving of grandchildren being able to brought up in their family isa able to brought up in their family is a good one. drew hendry. as the by minister accepted my invitation to the universal credit conference in my constituency, she would have her destiny —— testimony about not only patients dying but they are now forced to self declared that they are dying even if they didn't want their doctor to tell them their fate. will she stop this weight and end this cruel condition?” fate. will she stop this weight and end this cruel condition? i have made the point earlier about the importance of universal credit. we have made changes in the implementation of it and we are listening to the concerns being
12:25 pm
raised. we are making more advanced payments available but the honourable gentleman might also like to recognise that thanks to the unprecedented devolution of powers to scotland that we have given, including over welfare... the scottish government have the ability to ta ke scottish government have the ability to take a different path if they wish to, so action in holyrood might be required. michaeltomlinson. mr speaker, we are leaving the european union and as the eu withdrawal bill goes through the house of commons, the prime minister agree with me that it the prime minister agree with me thatitis the prime minister agree with me that it is part of ourjob as members of parliament, some might say our duty, to scrutinise that to debate, consider amendments, which seek to improve the bill and which are constructive and which seek to ensure a smooth transition of our laws from the eu to the uk. and that we come together and deliver brexit for our country and for the british
12:26 pm
people. my honourable friend is right. we will be leaving the european union on the 29th of march 2019 and there is a lively debate going on in this place and that is right and proper and that is important. there are strong views held on different sides of this argument about the european union, on both sides of this house. what we are doing as a government is listening to the cultivation is being made, we are listening carefully to those who wish to improve the bill and i hope that we can all come together to deliver on the decision that the country took that we should leave the european union. carolyn harris. it has been almost a year since i stood in this chamber, told my personal story and asked for a children's funeral fun to be established. the leader of the house recently... —— children's funeral fund will stop i have risen
12:27 pm
to the chancellor —— children's funeral fund. the to the chancellor —— children's funeralfund. the honourable lady has been a passionate campaigner on this issue and shared her experience with this house. we recognise what an incredible painful experience it is to lose a child. i know that the whole house are in sympathy with those who do experience such a tragedy each year. sadly, thousands of families do. now, what has happened is that we have put in place a piece of cross government we re place a piece of cross government were to look at this whole question of how we can improve support for bereaved parents in a whole variety of ways. that piece of work is being led by the parliamentary secretary of state. we are already supporting the private members bill on parental bereavement that my honourable friend has introduced. we are making
12:28 pm
it easierfor parents friend has introduced. we are making it easier for parents to apply for financial support and we are also ensuring that support from across government is brought together so it is easily accessible for bereaved pa rents is easily accessible for bereaved parents and what we know is a very difficult time. will the prime minister join difficult time. will the prime ministerjoin me in praising the work of community transport projects across the country and can she intervene to sort out the threat to the permit the use? and in the meantime, can she issue guidance that confirms there is no need for local councils to take enforcement action until the consultation is complete? we do strongly believe community transport operators to provide vital services connecting people and amenities and reducing isolation. i was very pleased to visit a number of weeks ago one of the community buses provided within the community buses provided within the borough that serves as part of my constituency. but obama. transport does remain committed to supporting community transport
12:29 pm
operators. it has no intention of ending the permit system and we have written to all local authorities in great britain to expend how they can comply with the relegate —— regulations without negatively impact on passengers. the prime minister i aware that the energy sector might enter administration. this would put lots ofjobs in administration. this would put lots of jobs in scotland administration. this would put lots ofjobs in scotland under threat. cani ofjobs in scotland under threat. can i ask what specific actions she can take? i am happy to give the honourable gentleman that assurance. i was able to discuss this matter very briefly with the first minister of scotla nd very briefly with the first minister of scotland yesterday when i met her. iam pleased of scotland yesterday when i met her. i am pleased to say that my honourable friend, the member who devises and as a minister spoke to the relevant minister in the
12:30 pm
scottish government about this issue. we stand ready to work with the scottish government and other to try to ensure that the best results can be achieved. thank you mr speaker. our nhs is a national treasure, and we must be bold to protected. by constituents struggled to getan protected. by constituents struggled to get an appointment at their doctors. our fantastic doctors are struggling to recruit. to safeguard our nhs, will be prime minister look at making medical students sign a contract committing them to working in the nhs for the first five years. stopping the rain drain of our great doctors overseas? this as an important issue. on these specific point that she raises, about
12:31 pm
committing people have been trained, to work in the nhs, this is the department... the department of health has been looking at ways in which they can maximise health and education, and they will report back early next year. the foreign secretary told us how is that they had seen no evidence in russian interference on uk elections in the referendum. yet, on monday, the premise of warned russia not to meddle in western democracies, and today the times reports that they crush on twitter accounts chugged out thousands of messages in an attempt to influence the eu referendum result. at the foreign secretary not been kept in the dark on intelligence, have you not read it, or is he wilfully blind? was she now stop dragging her feet and set up now stop dragging her feet and set up these intelligence and security committee to look at me into these attacks undermine our democracy? the
12:32 pm
honourable lady is right, i spoke on on honourable lady is right, i spoke on that in a number of countries seen that in a number of countries in europe. it is all very well, labour members pointing to the foreign secretary. if you looks at the speech i gave on monday, he will look at the examples that i gave we re look at the examples that i gave were not in the united kingdom. but she raises the issue about the intelligence and security committee thatis intelligence and security committee that is being established today. the harmful aspects of the internet are now causing a series of social policy emergencies amongst young people. could be prime minister tell us people. could be prime minister tell us when we can expect to legislation with real teeth that recognises that our children only have one child at childhood —— one chance.
12:33 pm
our children only have one child at childhood —— one chancel our children only have one child at childhood -- one chance. i know you chiléhsgé f—r—gee chanse= shiléhssé f—r—sas saaass= a issue interest in this if;*¢3f;; j: month, $5354: month, we on this issue. last month, we published our internet safety strategy. we are consulting on a number of letters, like a social media code of practice. we do need to ta ke media code of practice. we do need to take action to protect internet users and especially young people, including a sanction regime, to ensure compliance. over the past month, two people have been fatally stabbed in prescott, my constituency. this is a right of violent crime of 20% in the last year. we have lost over 1700
12:34 pm
front—line police staff. that is more than one in five police officers. 82 million have been cut down to a further 18 to 20... how will you, prime minister, use the budget to address the right for expectation of more police on the streets, merseyside have not been protected. let me please exercise as a busy with those who have been injured at stabbed in the way that the honourable lady has referred to. we are concerned about criminal acts of this sort, that take place. the question, as i said earlier in other a nswe rs , we question, as i said earlier in other answers, we are protecting police budgets, we aren‘t rejecting police budgets, we aren‘t rejecting police budgets, and we do see a higher percentage of police officers on the front line. in july 2016 a 20 rod
12:35 pm
man arrived in by head from romania, three weeks later in board daylights here held last to a 14—year—old schoolgirl, and rates her. last week he was sentenced to nine years in prison. can the prime minister explain what the government is doing to stop dangerous individuals like him from entering our country. can you assure that it will not weaken —— brexit will not weaken our relations, i can —— brexit will not weaken our relations, ican assure —— brexit will not weaken our relations, i can assure him that in the specific case, the home office will be pursuing deportation action against the individual. he makes a wider point, though, about
12:36 pm
the continued work we will have and partnership and cooperation we will have with the eu to the 27 once we have with the eu to the 27 once we have left the european union. i am very clear, as i was in my forehead speech, that you want to maintain that cooperation on all security and criminal justice. that that cooperation on all security and criminaljustice. that is important to us all. the child poverty action group recently published some figures about the cuts to universal credit. single parents with children stand to lose on average 2380 pounds per annum from the family. i would ask the prime minister, if she was sitting there with her government ministers, planning whether she today feels a sense of shame? thank you mr speaker. i have said in
12:37 pm
a nswer to you mr speaker. i have said in answer to a number of questions of universal credit. i believe that it is very important in helping people get into work, and also ensuring that people can earn more of what they pay. of course we know... we have made a number of changes in the way that is being implemented. universal credit, itself, is the right thing to do, because it is enabling more people to get into the workplace and having them when they are in it. with recent events in zimbabwe, and total electoral chaos now in kenyan, or will the prime minister join now in kenyan, or will the prime ministerjoin me in celebrating the hugely successful elections in somalia. that was due to help from our government. the winning candidate has announced that one of
12:38 pm
his first acts will be to legislate against fgm as they direct consequence of work by a british campaigner. my honourable friend raises an important issue. this government is pleased at the work that we have done to support the government in somalia, to ensure that we can see those election taking place in a way that my honourable friend has said, and we continue to do that. i was pleased myself to chair the somalia conference that took place here earlier this year. i am very pleased to hear of the intention to deal with the issues of female genital mutilation. this is an important issue. we want to see it dealt with not just issue. we want to see it dealt with notjust in somalia, but here in the united kingdom as well. thank you mr speaker. a couple in my constituency have their application for universal credit delayed because the man does not have voter id. she can‘t afford
12:39 pm
a passport, and she does not drive. they now have to wait for her dentist and her doctor, to provide identification. will the prime minister stepped in and shows and common—sense, and transfer legacy identification from legacy benefits over to universal credit, so that these are necessary delays don‘t give my position is more pain and suffering? can i save to the honourable lady to that she may appreciate that we wanted to that it is those were entitled to the benefits that are receiving them. we do look and continue to look at how we are implementing universal credit, and i am sure that if she ca res credit, and i am sure that if she cares to write with the point that she is making to the secretary of state and work and pensions we will look at it. businesses at the dover front line are now preparing to
12:40 pm
leave the european union. will the government consider in marking at least £1 billion in the upcoming budget to make sure that we are ready on day one, deal or no deal, and prepared for every single eventuality? bisley, in his constituency, the issue of —— obviously, in his constituency, the issueis obviously, in his constituency, the issue is very tightly felt. we have already made funds available for the preparations and work that is necessary a cross preparations and work that is necessary across government, in preparations for brexit, and of course, we will be looking at what further work is necessary to insure that we are ready. we hope we are good to get that good deal. we are working to get that good deal. but either way, there will need to be some traders from the government point of view. we are working towards that. there was a pledge that freedom of movement would be
12:41 pm
preserved from bankers and other members of the financial service industry. why can‘t the same pledge be given to other key economic sectors like manufacturing and agriculture? we are very clear about the need to ensure that we take into account the needs of our economy, and that is as i see why the home secretary has asked the independent... given the recent events in zimbabwe, what support can help man her man —— her majesty‘s government provide to zimbabwe... we have all seen what is happening
12:42 pm
in zimbabwe. we would urge restraint on all sides. our primary concern is the city of british nationals in zimbabwe, and that we are obviously in an uncertain political situation. we do see report of unusual military activity, so we would recommend that british nationals to remain safely at home, until this has become clearer. on the point that you have specifically raised, we are currently providing support in zimbabwe to support economic reform and development. next week will mark six months of the tragic attacks in the majesty arena. will the tri— minister —— prime ministerjoin me in tribute to those affected. the prime and it‘ll also be aware that... yet, as of today, these
12:43 pm
monies have yet to be reimbursed. would she, today, give a clear and categoric commitments that these monies will be reimbursed that the early as opportunity. can i say to the honourable lady that our thoughts continue to be with all of those that were affected by this terrible attack that took place in manchester. i myself, as well as meeting some of the victims immediately after the attack, i also met some of the victims and those who were involved in matter of weeks ago, and taught them about the long lasting impact that this has of them. she has raised an important issue. i can say to her, in relation to this funding issue, we will be responding next week, but i accept that responds to say that the majority of funds will be made available. the prime minister represent a constituency in the green belt. we have been very clear
12:44 pm
about our position in relation to the green belt. indeed, we have confirmed that in the house of white paper that we set out that we were very clear about that too. we do wa nt to very clear about that too. we do want to see more homes being built in this country. it is important that we seem all homes being built in london, but they‘re wrong many opportunities to do that which don‘t affect the green belt. mr speaker, earlier in the year, the prime minister told the country, that she was the only person who could offer a strong and stable leadership in the national interest. with her cabinets crumbling before her eyes, can she tell us how it‘s going? cabinets crumbling before her eyes, can she tell us how it's going? let me say to the right honourable lady, what we see this government delivering. i spoke about some of the things earlier. deficit down, unemployment is down, we have seen more record sums going to our health service and our schools, and a
12:45 pm
government is determined with a clear plan as set out in my florence speech, to deliver the best brexit dealfor this speech, to deliver the best brexit deal for this country. she speech, to deliver the best brexit dealfor this country. she is speech, to deliver the best brexit deal for this country. she is a member of a party that can‘t even decide what it wants from brexit, let alone set a plan. no serious negotiation would normally allow one side to try to dictate financial times before the wider times were known. in preparing to embrace the world when it comes to trade through wto rules, we‘ll see please ignore the defeatist voices who got project via one wrong, and our need tojoin the euro wrong? can i say to the honourable friend, what we want to do is the ghost takes a good, closer partnership, a special partnership with your meaning eu 27, so that we can continue to see good trade, as far as possible... between countries
12:46 pm
here and the eu 27. we also want to have trade arrangement around the world to make sure that we articulate advantage of the opportunities that those kick trade deals go. being good neighbours, the prime minister and are from maidenhead and slough, i would like to impress my gratitude on the prime minister to help increase our majority from seven to 17,000. i couldn‘t have done it without you. mr speaker, constituents, businesses and unions are very aggrieved that various governments led initiatives have seemed to lead to no progress. the train line, order. i am trying to be accommodating to colleagues, and want to see the honourable gentleman, but the rest of the
12:47 pm
question must be just that, one sentence, and a question mark at the end of it? code the prime minister reassure my constituents that the western rail links to heathrow will be treated as a priority but that it is dealt with immediately? pan thank you. i am pleased to say that we are putting significant sums of money into transport and infrastructure. we are electrifying the great western mainline, which will be of benefit to slough and to maidenhead. will be prime ministerjoin me in welcoming the decision by the people of australia to vote in favour of same—sex marriage, and stylesheet am i hope that the government of australia will quickly legislate to introduce and —— does she share my
12:48 pm
hope that become adults trailer will legislate to introduce same—sex marriage. i hope the australian government will indeed take that vote and act on its very soon. side order. -- order. in the listening to that, our political editor, norman smith. what was quite striking at the beginning of pmqs, was howjeremy corbyn tried to land a series of blows on the pm, talking about police budgets, school budgets, universal credit, feedback, and the list went on. it did, and thought it became a bit convoluted. sometimes, when you go for these
12:49 pm
sort of smorgasbord lessons taking on all sorts of different issues, it is easy for the prime minister, in fa ct, is easy for the prime minister, in fact, i thought he might have kept pressing on universal credit, because mrs may used to suggest that she was listening, they were addressing concerns, and this of course, because we know in the run—up to the budget, there is massive pressure on the chancellor to rethink, to tweak universal credit, and then end this six—week wait before people get the cash. some of the argy—bargy that there has been in the tory party, mrs may saying, it is right and proper that there is a lively debate, and that she is quite ok with constructive citizen, but, surely, the most remarkable thing, it‘s how long it was. that was 15 minutes, i don‘t think i can for a pmqs that has gone on is so long. - we‘ll think i can for a pmqs that has gone
12:50 pm
on is so long. -i it‘ll e to say to speaker, 3 to say to give us an hour. there the speaker, give us an hour. there isa the speaker, give us an hour. there is a lots to joke about. thank you so is a lots to joke about. thank you so much. you probably saw an image of borisjohnson that so much. you probably saw an image of boris johnson that at so much. you probably saw an image of borisjohnson that at prime minister‘s questions, just before pmqs he was involved in a meeting with richard ratcliffe, the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. she is jailed in iran, and they are trying to secure her release. let me tell you what the foreign office are saying about that meeting. they are saying about that meeting. they are saying that a decision about richard ratcliffe‘s these application for a run, and access for mr ratcliffe to see his wife if a visit does go ahead, will work is discussed, and mrjohnson was able to tell mr ratliff, that all of these boys had
12:51 pm
been raised again, in a conversation between the british ambassador in orion, the iranian officials this morning. —— in iran. they also touched on a couple of important points about whether now is actress—mac would be to get —— naz actress—mac would be to get —— naz actress—mac would be to get —— naz actress—mac would be to get. at a news co nfe re nce actress—mac would be to get. at a news conference in the last two minutes, richard ratcliffe gave his version of the meeting, saying that it was positive and constructive. so, i wanted to stress the urgency of my wife‘s situation. it feels to me that while i said, home as soon as possible, when to go to iran as soon as as possible, when to go to iran as soon as possible, for her to go home as christmas, is because of that urgency. busy, that is not in his gift and highly, but he did undertake to take her case very seriously, and to leave no stone
12:52 pm
unturned. we talked about his trip to run, as of in the meeting, he said it is not quite concerned yet, when. he talked about whether i would be able to accompany him, and he said that he is keen to take me, but it is a question to be resolved with the advice of the foreign office, but also in liaison with the iranians. that is something we will keep wishing for, and keep taking forward. it is clear to everybody in this room that for me, it is very important to be going on that trip, and to be standing alongside the foreign secretary. i understand that thatis foreign secretary. i understand that that is a big ask. reasonably unprecedented, but i think it is important in our circumstances. we talked about the work he had done, trying to get her released, talked about raising the health concerns with the leader. and, he also said
12:53 pm
that he felt that the campaign has moved the nation, and that many people cared very deeply about her. i wanted to say is thank you to all of you for your part in this, and thank you for the care that we receive, and that she receives, that she is aware of. i believe in public campaigning asa she is aware of. i believe in public campaigning as a way of bringing her home, so thank you for all of the attention here. that was mr ratcliffe speaking about his meeting with borisjohnson, talking about the situation involving his wife, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. here is the red weather forecast with lucy martin. as we move through the next 24 hours
12:54 pm
this cold front will bring about change. it will introduce some wet and windy weather for a time, but also we are going to see colder at moving in from the north—west, thinking it‘s way slowly south east. into friday, we will see the temperatures dipping. here is that whether french is creeping into the far north—west of scotland. that is bring some heavy bursts of rain. some heavy bursts in there, and some strong winds. we could see gales at times, for the finals of scotland. temperatures just falling away, while they get the clearer skies behind that front, but staying in the double figures in the south. tomorrow morning, that front continues to edits way south eastwards. a view patches of mist
12:55 pm
and fog, temperatures largely in the double figures. that friend and fitting —— that rain band sitting across the south. a few scattered showers in the north and as well as some snow. that weather front will sink its way south and east, bring some bursts of rain for a time. behind it, starting to see some brighter and clearer conditions. again, if you showers in the north, and some strong winds the further north you are. we can see the contrast in the temperatures, though, staying in the double figures in the south, but in the clea ra nce figures in the south, but in the clearance behind it, it will start to feel cooler. as it moves through tomorrow night, clearing the south coast, the high—pressure building in. we see some tightly pike darbinyan pact is about in the north. it will be a chilly start to friday. some people waking up to a
12:56 pm
touch of frost, a bit of a shock to the system in the south where it has been mauled. —— in these out ——. the army in zimbabwe seizes control of the country but insists it‘s not staging a coup. gunfire is heard in the capital harare, as armoured vehicles take to the streets. it began last night as the state broadcaster was taken over their security is guaranteed. we are only targetting criminals around him who are committing crimes. ninety—three—year—old robert mugabe, president since 1980, is understood to be under house arrest. we‘ll be live in zimbabwe for the latest. also this lunchtime.
12:57 pm
scotla nd latest. also this lunchtime. scotland will become the first country in the world to set a minimum unit price for alcohol in a bid to tackle a worsening health problem. the foreign secretary tells the husband of
12:58 pm
12:59 pm
1:00 pm
1:01 pm

19 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on