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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  November 15, 2017 5:00pm-6:00pm GMT

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today at 5 — the latest from zimbabwe where there's a military takeover and the president is under house arrest. gunfire is heard in the capital harare as armoured vehicles take to the streets. the military insist it has not staged a coup. we wish to make it abundantly clear that this is not a military takeover of government. 93—year—old robert mugabe — the country's leader since 1980 — is understood to be held in confinement at home. we'll have the latest on the situation in zimbabwe — and we'll be talking to a former adviser to zimba bwe‘s opposition leader. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. scotland is to become the first country in the world to set a minimum price for alcohol — following a ruling by the supreme court. the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe — the britonjailed in iran — has finally met the foreign secretary borisjohnson. and in australia — thousands celebrate as voters back plans for same—sex marriage.
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it's 5 o'clock. our main story is the military takeover in zimbabwe where president mugabe remains in confinement at home and armoured vehicles are patrolling the streets of the capital, harare. appearing on state television, an army general denied that a coup had taken place and said they were targeting what he called ‘criminals‘ associated with robert mugabe, who's 93 and has ruled zimbabwe since independence from britain in 1980. the atmosphere on the streets is said to be calm but tense. the british embassy in zimbabwe has advised british nationals to stay indoors until the situation becomes clearer, as our diplomatic correspondent
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james robbins reports. snatched video filmed furtively tells some of the story, troops on the streets of harare, as the generals take control after 37 years of president mugabe's increasingly dictatorial rule. heavy gunfire could be heard in parts of the capital early this morning, but the picture overall is of uncertain quiet. it looks as if the bulk of the army has been moving to secure its hold on zimbabwe. soldiers seized the headquarters of the state broadcaster zbc, so that a general could read out a statement. the situation in our country has moved to another level. firstly, we wish to assure the nation that his excellency the president of the republic of zimbabwe and commander—in—chief of the zimbabwe defence forces,
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comrade robert mugabe, and his family, are safe and sound and their security is guaranteed. we are only targeting criminals around him who are committing crimes that are causing social and economic suffering in the country in order to bring them to justice. as soon as we have accomplished our mission, we expect that the situation will return to normalcy. this was president robert mugabe last week, very frail, seriously ill, renaming the country's main airport for himself. hoping perhaps to cement still further a cult of personality and try to make the succession of his wife, grace, at his side, more certain.
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key military leaders now seem unwilling to let that happen, robert mugabe is under house arrest, in office but certainly not in power. grace, a0 years hisjunior, has helped split the entire ruling party, zanu—pf. ten days ago she was booed at a party rally and the army clearly blames her for splitting factions. grace mugabe is reported to be out of the country, apparently seeking protection in namibia. this is the man the army may favour, the vice president until he fired him last week, army commanders were desperate to stop the purge and emmerson mnangagwa saw himself as a frontrunner to succeed until his sacking and flight into exile. now, britain, the former colonial power, is urging calm. our ambassador has been in touch because uk nationals that
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are worried should get in touch with the embassy. it is fluid and hard to say exactly how this will turn out, the most important point to make is that everyone wants to see a stable and successful zimbabwe, and i think we appeal for everyone to refrain from violence, that is the important thing. harare does appear to be generally quiet, zimbabwe and its people will be nervous after enduring decades of violence and the catastrophic economic collapse of a once thriving economy. powerful neighbour south africa is also calling for calm and restraint. i'm hoping that the defence force will not move and do more damage, that they will be able to respect the constitution of zimbabwe, as well as the people of zimbabwe, so that this situation does not go beyond the situation where it is now. this morning's newspaper headlines
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on the streets of harare highlights tension between the army chief, general chiwenga, and president mugabe, but events have moved a long way since those words were printed. well it seems then that president mugabe has lost his grip on power after almost four decades. he has ruled zimbabwe since independence backin ruled zimbabwe since independence back in 1980. the former country of rhodesia becoming zimbabwe but the economy has descended into chaos and many thousands have been reduced to poverty. i, robert gabriel... robert gabriel mugabe was a revolutionary leader who fought in the liberation struggle against white minority rule. and bear true allegiance to zimbabwe... his tight grip on power earned him the title of being the oldest head of state in the world. the 93—year—old leader has been in power since zimba bwe‘s
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independence in 1980. he has continued his life as an international statesman, despite a diminishing reputation as zimbabwe's economy crumbled amid corruption and violence. mugabe's rise to power began in 1979 when the lancaster house agreement ended white minority rule. at first he protected minority rights. but in the 2000s he changed tack. he led a chaotic land reform programme including redistributing land from white farmers without compensation. the country's economy collapsed with runaway inflation figures. the central bank printed money on a massive scale. supermarket shelves were empty. a loaf of bread would cost you trillions to buy. mugabe's misrule prompted widespread protests,
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that was the birth of the opposition mdc, led by trade unionist morgan tsvangirai, who later entered into power—sharing agreements with mugabe following a disputed election. the economic climate was unbearable, something it is still struggling to recover from. millions of zimbabweans cross the border into neighbouring south africa looking for a better life. and now the end seems near. as he tried to pave the way for his wife grace mugabe to be his successor. the army found that unacceptable, saying that this is not a dynasty. alex magaisa is a former chief of staff for morgan tsvangirai — the leader of zimbabwe's opposition movement for democratic change. hejoins me via webcam from canterbury. what does your understanding of what
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is going on in zimbabwe? the situation as has been explained is that the military now is effectively in charge. mr mugabe is still in office, only in theory but practically he has lost power. and the situation is important for zimbabwe because mr mugabe has ruled for yea rs zimbabwe because mr mugabe has ruled for years and this is the end of an era. the end of an era as you say, ifi era. the end of an era as you say, if i asked you today on behalf of viewers is this a good move in terms of what has been there to replace president mugabe, or is it a bad move, what would you say? many zimbabweans have suffered under the rule of president mugabe. if you asked many today they would say they we re asked many today they would say they were looking for any change. of course there are challenges, people
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are not going to be celebrating military rule but for zimbabwe it is not about celebrating military rule but celebrating a change or welcoming a change from the rule of robert mugabe who some people felt was not going to end at all. at looking at this and seeing it is possible to go forward under a new leadership and perhaps the country could have a brighterfuture. leadership and perhaps the country could have a brighter future.“ leadership and perhaps the country could have a brighter future. if it is still a zanu pf administration working in collaboration with the military people might take the view that nothing much would have changed. absolutely. this is the big challenge faced by zimbabwe and that is why many have been warning that even amid the euphoria and excitement that robert mugabe is about to go, this is still the same system, the same people who backed
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robert mugabe when he was losing elections and will they be any different from what he was doing. will there be any change at all from the old system. these are the questions that zimbabweans are putting forward. so they are serious questions as we go forward as to whether or not this will bring any better change for the country. at the moment the ordinary person is saying were tired of rob murray gabby, letting go and we will see where we stand. and you have a close link with morgan tsvangirai, i wonder if you have managed to make contact with your contacts in zimbabwe and what they could be hoping for? i spoke to some of my collea g u es hoping for? i spoke to some of my colleagues in the opposition and obviously there is concern with regards to the fact that the constitutional order has been disturbed by this episode. but they're also concerned at fact that they're also concerned at fact that they were struggling to get any
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headway with robert gabby and some people feel perhaps with the new dispensation, a new attitude, perhaps these are people they can work with in order to create a new environment. but i must point out theissue environment. but i must point out the issue of human rights, any crisis like this is potential grounds for huge human rights violations. people have been arrested, they have been detained, people need to know how these people are being treated, or they are, and human rights organisations need to keep a careful watch on these issues to make sure there are no serious human rights violations in this crisis. are you confident that the international community and some agencies that you mentioned are on top of the situation and monitoring this in the way you think would be appropriate? to me it looks like a lot of people have been caught by surprise by what happened in the
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last two days. of course people in zimbabwe could see that things had been deteriorating. and the african union needed to keep a close watch on zimbabwe. my view is that people are now beginning to react to the situation in zimbabwe, people were tired of robert mugabe but they must get over that fact and begin to look at the actual issue is taking place in the country. 0therwise people will wake up after some time and realised that things happened that should not happen. it is important that they take a close look at what is going on at the moment in zimbabwe. a pleasure to talk to you, thank you. i'm nowjoined by the former foreign editor of the times, martin fletcher. he interviewed zimbabwe's former vice—president emmerson mnangagwa last year. good to have you with us. a broad
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reading first about what has happened? i think the gabby effectively committed political suicide ten days ago when he ousted emmerson mnangagwa in favour office why. emmerson mnangagwa had the support of the military and security and intelligence chiefs. it was only and intelligence chiefs. it was only a matter of time before he hit back and his wife has minimal support within zimbabwe. are you surprised by the fact that he called it wrongly and misjudged it in that way given the fact that over the years he has shown remarkable dexterity? he is old and increasingly frail and his wife is dripping poison into his ear. so i think it was a stupid move on his behalf. he has not made many of those in his 37 years but this was one. not to debate exactly what
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words mean but would you classify this as a coup or military takeover? it would not be, it is a military ta keover it would not be, it is a military takeover and not for the first time, in effect they did it after 2008 after that election when essentially they coerced mugabe into staying in power and read the result. the military is in charge, no doubt about that. that was the question that viewers will want to have answered, who is calling the shots 110w answered, who is calling the shots now and making decisions?m answered, who is calling the shots now and making decisions? it is hard to tell from this distance but i would guess it is emmerson mnangagwa in alliance with general chiwenga. their old allies. the war has been going on since 2013 between the emmerson mnangagwa faction and chris maghaberry, the old guard against the new text. —— grace mugabe.
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maghaberry, the old guard against the new text. -- grace mugabe. are we likely to see any noticeable changes in the way the country is run and indeed the way is it engages with the rest of the world?|j run and indeed the way is it engages with the rest of the world? i think that we will, i think that is why he gave me an interview last year, i think it was in the middle of this battle and he wanted to get the message out that although zanu pf would ease its iron grip on power, it would change course economically. emmerson mnangagwa is less of an ideologue and much more of a pragmatist than mugabe. he knows that he needs to rebuild the shattered economy if only to pay the security forces on whom his survival will depend. the key quote he gave me was that capital goes where it is warm and comfortable and if it is cold and goes to a country with warmer weather. mugabe would never have said words like that. it is
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fascinating. what about his approach therefore to human rights and his approach to a possible path to open democracy, is that closed off?|j approach to a possible path to open democracy, is that closed off? i do not think it will be open democracy, this man has lost to parliamentary elections despite all the shenanigans that have gone on. what he might do, and a note last year he was reaching out to both morgan tsvangirai and the other opposition leader to get a veneer of respect and bring them into some kind of coalition arrangement. what with their attitude beat that? they hold him in suspicion? certainly morgan tsvangirai does. but he is affected by: cancer, he's a brave man but quite like the trappings of power. i think majora would be happy to go back into fold. he could declare and
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rule under a state of emergency in a coalition. the west would have a choice to make. what it wants above all and what south africa and china and the business community want is stability, they want the economy rebuilt. his calculation and their calculation may be it is better to have that than pure democracy. they may go along with that, and to get the bailout they will definitely need if he becomes president.“ the bailout they will definitely need if he becomes president. if you we re need if he becomes president. if you were sitting in the foreign office what would your perspective be? pragmatism before principle, a hard one. my guess they will. great to talk to you, thank you very much. you can follow all the latest developments from zimbabwe as it happens on our website. you can get live updates, analysis and much more
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just go to bbc.co.uk/news. all of the links are there including all the latest developments and analysis. this is bbc news at five — the headlines. the army in zimbabwe seizes control of the country — but insists it has not staged a coup against president mugabe, who's said to be under house arrest. scotland is to become the first country in the world to set a minimum price for alcohol — foillowing a ruling by the supreme court. the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe — the britonjailed in iran — has finally met the foreign secretary borisjohnson. the scottish fa makes an official approach to northern ireland for permission to speak to their manager michael 0'neil but could move to sunderland the cards? france will host the 2023 rugby world cup, named asa host the 2023 rugby world cup, named
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as a surprise winner of a secret ballot in london beating off competition from the preferred host south africa and ireland. and as uk anti—doping closes an investigation into a mystery medical package delivered to bradley wiggins in 2011 0lympic delivered to bradley wiggins in 2011 olympic champion says his life has been made a living hell. more on all those stories at half past five. scotland is to become the first country in the world to introduce minimum unit pricing for alcohol. it follows a 5—year legal battle with the scotch whisky association. the uk supreme court has ruled that the scottish government can proceed with its plan to set a minimum price for alcohol of 50 pence per unit. currently some alcohol can be bought for as little as 18p a unit. 0ur correspondent catriona renton has the story. the scottish government says the problem with drink in scotland is so significant that ground—breaking measures are required to save lives, the law to introduce a minimum price for alcohol was passed more
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than five years ago, but a lengthy battle in the courts with the scotch whisky association has stopped it from being implemented until now. the 2012 act does not breach eu law, minimum pricing is a proportionate means of achieving a legitimate aim. the idea of minimum pricing is simple, the more alcohol a drink contains, the stronger it is, and therefore, the more expensive it will be. the government wants to set it at 50p per unit, that means, four cans of 5% strength lager would cost at least £4.40. and a bottle of wine at 12%, £4.50. and a 70cl bottle of whiskey, could not be sold for less than £14. almost all alcoholic drinks bought in pubs sell for well above the minimum price, so they will not really be affected.
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in shops like this, let's take this bottle of strong cider, at the moment, selling for £4.50, but it will go up to £11.25. what do people make of that? it is dear enough as it is now, and they make enough money from it. people will get together and they will buy cider, that is the most popular thing for them. that is £4 or £5. they will not be able to pay for it. it will be quite a good thing. i work as a psychiatric nurse, we get a lot of people addicted to alcohol and things like that. it will probably be a positive thing from my point of view. the scotch whisky association argued the policy goes against eu trade rules but the scottish government says it will change lives. the policy is by its very nature controversial because, again, this is an example of scotland leading the world. it will continue to have its critics. but it is the kind of bold and necessary policy that we need to tackle our public health challenges. campaigners in other parts of the uk will have been closely watching today's ruling, and this may well have an influence.
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west midlands police have this to say about an incident that happened around bonfire night, 29—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to murder. following the death of tony nicholls who was 56. that followed a firework arson attack at his home in birmingham. west midlands police telling us that 29—year—old man following the structural incident has been arrested on suspicion conspiracy to murder. if there's any more detail i will bring back away. the foreign secretary boris johnson has held his first meeting with richard ratcliffe, the husband of the british—iranian woman detained in iran. mrjohnson pledged to leave no stone unturned in trying to free nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. she was jailed for five years in april last year for spying — an allegation she has always denied.
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0ur correspondent tom burridge reports. he has been separated from his wife and young daughter for a year and a half. this morning, a meeting at the foreign office. richard ratcliffe was troubled when the foreign secretary suggested his wife might not have been purely on holiday in iran. first borisjohnson apologised, today richard ratcliffe was able to ask him whether he could join him on his trip to iran next month. we talked about his trip to iran. he has said it is not quite confirmed yet when. we spoke about whether i would be able to accompany him and he said he was keen to take me, but it is a question to resolve both within the advice of the foreign office and also in liaison with the iranians. this was nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe a week before her arrest. her daughter now only gets to see her during prison visits.
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she has dual british and iranian citizenship, and was arrested at the airport last year after visiting her parents. people here in the foreign office and across government have been working very hard over the last 19 months to secure the release of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe and indeed to solve some other very difficult cases in iran, and we are going to continue to do that. we will leave absolutely no stone unturned. richard ratcliffe says his wife is in poor health and on the verge of a nervous breakdown. their daughter cannot travel to britain to be reunited with her dad. this morning, he was able to press the foreign secretary on all of those issues and ask that his wife be granted diplomatic protection. diplomatic protection would eventually turn nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe's plight from an individual consular issue into an official dispute between britain and iran.
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what officials here at the foreign 0ffice have been trying to work out is whether that move would have a positive impact on nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe's case in iran. according to mr ratcliffe, the foreign secretary expressed reservations about granting nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe's diplomatic protection. he hopes his wife will be home in time for christmas. let's return to our main story. the united nations secretary has appealed for calm and restraint in zimbabwe after the military seized power. they have denied it is a cool but it looks to be a military ta keover of but it looks to be a military takeover of some kind. the un secretary—general is monitoring the situation there and appeals for calm, nonviolence and restraint. preservation of fundamental rights including freedom of speech and
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assembly is of vital importance says the us spokesman. —— un spokesman. and the military of course there and said it was holding president mugabe and his family safe while targeting what the core criminals in the entourage of the president after his 40 yea rs entourage of the president after his 40 years in power. that is the latest air from the united nations, there is an appeal for calm there. 0n the line from harare is the human rights activist ben freeth. you may remember in 2008 ben successfully sued mugabe's regime for violating the rule of law and human rights in zimbabwe which was chronicled in the award—winning 2009 documentary film mugabe and the white african. just give us your assessment of where zimbabwe is today? just give us your assessment of where zimbabwe is today7m just give us your assessment of where zimbabwe is today? it is an interesting situation, we are basically under military rule. there are soldiers everywhere. armoured
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personal carriers in the middle of the town. along the roads leading to the town. along the roads leading to the capital, police roadblocks have been replaced by military roadblocks. all heavily armed military personnel. we do not know exactly what is the situation with the president himself, we understand he is under house arrest. last night a friend of mine had about 30 shots at the residence of the president. that was early in the morning. and shortly after that the broadcaster was taken over and the military moved in very quickly. i drove from the second city here today and went to the airport in harare, we drove around town and basically there is a military takeover in the country, essentially a coup. if as we
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understand it it is emmerson mnangagwa and the military collaborating together, does that represent any kind of improvement on the mugabe regime? well emmerson mnangagwa until recently was vice president and had served maghaberry asa president and had served maghaberry as a trusted blue tenant. he was minister of state security when 20,000 civilians were murdered on to the mugabe regime. so we're not overly enamoured with him as a choice. perhaps he will be a stepping stone to something else. but we are under military rule at the moment. in your view what is the role of the international community, we heard there from the un appealing for restraint but beyond that what can the international community do to try to reshape if you liked the
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politics of zimbabwe? clearly we have a constitutional crisis, we have a constitutional crisis, we have no constitutional leader. u nless have no constitutional leader. unless mugabe is going to agree to a puppet president under the regime. so essentially we need to bring things back to constitutionality with an election monitored by the international community. so the will of the people can the essentially looks at and understood. that essentially is what was fought for in 1980 essentially is what was fought for in1980 and essentially is what was fought for in 1980 and this is what we have not got at the moment. the african union in condemning this seizure of power by the army. this isa seizure of power by the army. this is a question about outside influences. we heard from barack
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0bama one earlier. what are your hopes for influence from the outside? —— we heard from president zuma earlier. we wanted to do things ina zuma earlier. we wanted to do things in a proper democratic way. we cannot have that militarily taking power and deciding they are going to hang onto it. by having power they can do all sorts of things that they could not do before they had power. the seizing of private property, com plete the seizing of private property, complete breakdown of the rule of law in zimbabwe, people have had enough of it. did you ever think, 37 yea rs enough of it. did you ever think, 37 years since robert mugabe became leader of zimbabwe, did you ever think you would see the day when he would be pushed to one side? think you would see the day when he
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would be pushed to one side7m think you would see the day when he would be pushed to one side? it has taken everyone would be pushed to one side? it has ta ken everyone by would be pushed to one side? it has taken everyone by surprise. we cannot believe that that militarily have actually seized power. 0bviously i'll robert mugabe is still alive and living in his residence and is still essentially the president, he has not been officially toppled yet, we don't believe that he has gone. we are in that between moment not knowing what to believe. the world is watching closely. thank you for talking to us. closely. thank you for talking to us. thank you. that was a human rights activist in zimbabwe, giving
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us rights activist in zimbabwe, giving us his view of what has happened. he has been involved in many years of campaigning for people's rights in zimbabwe. we will have more for you ina zimbabwe. we will have more for you in a moment and a quick recap. now the weather. turning cooler over the next few days. 0utbreaks the weather. turning cooler over the next few days. outbreaks of rain in scotland, northern ireland. strong winds for a time. elsewhere for much of england and wales cloudy with rain and drizzle. if you patches of mist and fog in the early hours. in the north it will be cooler with a clearer skies. tomorrow that weather front continues to sink its way south and east. a grey start in the south, brightening up before that weather front sinks south—east. behind it, brighter skies. weather front sinks south—east. behind it, brighterskies. wendy again and the far north of scotland.
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a contrast with temperatures. it will be a cool start to the day on friday. many as waking up to a touch of frost. for england and wales, dry plate weather. if you shower is pushing into scotland, northern ireland, northern england, as we move through the day. they could be quite heavy. fuelling pressure across the board. temperatures largely in single figures. this is bbc news — the headlines. zimba bwe's military seizes control of the country but insists it has not staged a coup. president robert mugabe, the country's leader since 1980, is understood to be under house arrest. scotland is to become the first country in the world to set a minimum price for alcohol following a ruling by the supreme court. the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, the british womanjailed in iran, has finally met the foreign secretary borisjohnson. we are going to catch up with the
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sport. northern ireland manager michael o'neill is a popular man. earlier the scottish fa made an official approach to speak to him. he guided them to the euros last year and they also just narrowly missed out on world cup qualification after losing to switzerland this week. he is now the preferred candidate to replace gordon strachan. the northern ireland fa has offered ten and improved contract. sir bradley wiggins says his life was a living hell during an investigation into wrongdoing. the uk anti—doping agency has closed its enquiry into a package delivered to him. during the 2011
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criterium du dauphine. the jiffy bag contained a legal decongestant for sir bradley according to his team management. ukad say they cannot confirm or refute the claim but that they don't intend to issue any anti—doping charges in relation to the package. but, they have said their investigation was hampered by poor medical record keeping at british cycling and team sky and have passed theirfindings on to the general medical council. wiggins has responded on social media — saying there are still questions to be answered about the way the investigation was handled. france are the surprise choice to host the rugby world cup in 2023. france has staged the competition twice before — in 1991 and 2007. south africa last hosted in 1995. france won in the second round of voting by council members — ireland were knocked out in the first round. very disappointed. a lot of work has gone into this. but when you come third out of three you had to take your medicine and congratulate france. they will do a greatjob. congratulations to them. we have to
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go home and like arrogance. more on those stories on the website. including all the latest on the atp finals in melbourne. more for you in the next hour. let's return to our main story. the zimbabwean army has seized power in the country with military vehicles patrolling the capital, harare. but it's denied staging a coup. president robert mugabe is said to be still in office, but is under house arrest. i can now speak to fadzayi mahere — a constitutional lawyer aspiring to become an mp in next year's election. thank you forjoining us. describe
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what you think has happened. their house to be an acceptance that we are in the process of some power tra nsfer we are in the process of some power transfer taking place. there also has to be an acceptance that there has to be an acceptance that there has been infractions and violations of the constitution as this goes on. it is becoming increasingly clear that some of these processes might be difficult to reverse. in what sense make the big difficult? the reality seems to be that some of the arrests have taken place, that military has taken over the state broadcaster. they did so at four o'clock this morning. we have not heard a word from the president or any of the civilian authorities or political authorities in the country, which suggests in a very
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strong way that at least for the until the military is in control of some of the vital aspects that control power within this country. that military has placated various areas within the central business district, including the road that goes towards the courthouses, that goes towards the courthouses, that goes towards the president's formal office, also there are reports the military has stopped various people coming to the airport, and stop people from going out. it has also detained previous government ministers. reversing this at the moment, given that the military does have the option to use force, is becoming increasingly difficult. we have also seen something of a stand—off between the military and police. the note they seem to be firmly in charge, at least in a de fa cto firmly in charge, at least in a de facto position, even thought the dispute that any coup in the strict sense has taken place. what do you
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think is the of mr mnangagwa in all of this, given what you have said about military power? how would you assess his influence? from an objective perspective it seems that he had the backing of that militarily. what is perhaps surprising, perhaps disappointing, given that he was minister of justice, the constitution has not been completely upheld. it is the debate currently within zimbabwe, does the ends justify the means? a lot of people are on the edge of their seats. there is stability, as far as their seats. there is stability, as faras ordinary their seats. there is stability, as far as ordinary people are concerned, people went about their business, a lot of people went to work. most things seem to be business as usual, there is stability in that sense. but there is no running away from the fact
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that on a de facto perspective the constitution seems to have been suspended and there is a little bit of boat as to whether it is supreme at this moment or whether there are some other forces at play. thank you for talking to us. 0ur senior africa correspondent anne soy is in the zimbabwean capital harare now. your assessment of where the power is great now? it is up to the military what happens next. that is the big question that many people are asking. many of them are happy that this is a moment in history that this is a moment in history that they have been waiting for. they are saying change in their country but they are apprehensive about what happens next. when we look at what might happen next, where do you think the influence will come in terms of shaping policy and the kind of country that
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zimbabwe wants to present itself as to the rest of the world. the influence looks like its will in the short term to be shipped by the military. it depends on who then they decide will lead this country after robert mugabe. the cd is still president even though he is under house arrest. there is uncertainty for now but the mood on the ground is that people are happy that change is that people are happy that change is coming but theyjust do not know what is going to happen next. do you sense that president mugabe will be held there as a figurehead, or do you think there will be a move to replace him with mr mnangagwa? all indications are that he may well be
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replaced. but they would want it more dignified excellent. it is humiliating that he is under house arrest. that he still commands a lot of respect. respect from his country. they would want something more dignified for him. but indications are that this is really the end for the leadership of president mugabe. people under the age of 37 have known no other leader. many people have suffered economic lead. people have been queueing at the banks and have often gone home without withdrawing their money because of this huge problems in this country. this change is something that people have been waiting for. thank you forjoining us. thousands of people have been celebrating in towns and cities across australia
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after the country voted to legalise same—sex marriage. more than 60% of voters backed the proposal in what was a non—binding postal referendum. the prime minister called it a vote for love, and says he plans to introduce legislation before the end of the year. from sydney, our correspondent hywel griffith reports. so now to the final count... after months of divisive debate, finally australia has its answer. cheering. numbers confirmed what the opinion polls have said all along. that the majority of australians do support same—sex marriage. but for veronica and louise, it means everything. it is huge. it is equality, it is everything. it is just being recognised as being just like everyone else. it is freedom, it is acceptance. all of that. the eight—week vote was according to the government meant to prompt respectful discussion.
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it didn't always work out that way. go home, homophobes! both sides have been accused of demonising each other. faith groups say their right to religious freedom has been diminished. and they will carry on fighting to ensure people who oppose gay marriage have a legal right to do so. the way in which we have seen the western world and other democracies, the coercive effect of changing the definition of marriage has been to restrict people's ability to hold a different point of view. everyone knows this is not the end of the line. it is not done and dusted until parliament passes legislation. that, they hope, will be done before christmas. but that is a concern for another day. today is about celebrating, getting the party started. there's very few photographs... not everyone was out dancing in the streets. but forjohn and arthur, the moment is just as sweet. after 50 years together as a couple, they can now plan their wedding. itjust gives our relationship
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exactly the same status, exactly the same dignity as the relationships of our heterosexual friends, of whom we've got many. and we willjust feel we are first class citizens and not second—class citizens. many who have campaigned for same—sex marriage did not want their relationships put to a public vote. but today's result means they should soon have the law on their side. hywel griffith, bbc news, sydney. this is bbc news at five — the headlines: the army in zimbabwe has seized control of the country with president mugabe thought to be under house arrest. scotla nd house arrest. scotland is set to be the first country in the world to set a minimum price level for alcohol
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following a supreme court ruling. the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe has finally met the foreign secretary borisjohnson today. dame vera lynn, always known as the forces‘ sweetheart, celebrated her 100th birthday earlier this year, with tributes being paid to her outstanding work entertaining during the second world war. and that work included some dangerous missions to egypt, india and burma to entertain the troops. dame vera has written an account of her wartime adventures in collaboration with her daughter virginia. i'll be speaking to virginia in a moment, but first let's hear from dame vera, who in a bbc interview recorded in 1967 tells rosemary hart of her time in burma. well, i went out to burma and india, but mostly it was burma that i went to entertain.
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and it was rather wearing but very, very worthwhile. ijust had a sort of station wagon, a driver, a pianist, a piano, a microphone, and off we would go. and of course, our little impromptu concerts were just put up anywhere, maybe in a casualty clearing station, orjust on a spot of grass that happened to be empty at the time. a few aeroplane engine cases, that would be a stage, or the back of a lorry. and the amount would vary from two to 6,000. good gracious. how many songs did you sing at one concert? we didn't limit ourselves. we just sort of staggered on until we thought we couldn't do any more. and of course there was a lot of visiting hospitals too. this came into it not
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just as much as singing. theyjust liked to see you and liked to know that you came out all that way just to see them. was it your own idea that you went abroad? well, ensa used to ask for people to go, so i said, i'd like to go somewhere where there isn't very much entertainment going on because a lot of people were going to cairo and france, italy, and places like that. so they said, not many people go to burma, would you go there? i said, yes. so that's where i went. let me show viewers the book. it isa
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let me show viewers the book. it is a lovely volume. how did it come about? i thought from quite a cute years ago that i should do something about her burma trip because it was quite an amazing thing to have done. she was 27 and had never been abroad but felt she had never been abroad but felt she had to do something for her country apart from just going around the country and singing at various concerts. some where nobody else had been, that is why she went to burma. i felt that it should be recognised ina larger i felt that it should be recognised in a larger scale than it has been, thatis in a larger scale than it has been, that is why i wanted to write the book. did the story tell itself? how much of a challenge was that? the challenge was actually doing the research, with the letters and photographs. four years ago i put an advertisement in the newspaper, anybody in burma, their uncle,
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grandfather, father, if you have any letters that my mother has met your relative, please send them to me. we we re relative, please send them to me. we were getting them in any way, slowly, people would write about their experiences. but because i wa nted their experiences. but because i wanted to do the book, that is why i put an advertisement in the papers. what was the response? it was enormous. what kind of things? phenomenal. we heard someone, they we re phenomenal. we heard someone, they were in the middle of thejungle, the howard vera lynn singing, they followed the voice, my mother said they appeared as if by magic. amazing. photographs? loads of photographs. that is gold dust. the problem was deciding not what to put m, problem was deciding not what to put in, but what to read out. everybody‘s story was so fantastic.
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what were the best stories? there we re what were the best stories? there were so many. 0ne what were the best stories? there were so many. one of the funniest was, they had gone down this bumpy road in the middle of the jungle and they landed somewhere. she was going to do the concert, the piano was put on stage, the site fell off, because it had been on this terrible, rough bumpy road. two of the troops had to hold the side of the piano on, still playing. they had to hold the side of the piano while she was singing. the thing about burma, it is worth underlining, the fact that she was the thing about burma, it is worth underlining, take fact that she was the thing about burma, it is worth underlining, take a ct that she was the thing about burma, it is worth undi she ng, take a ct that she was the thing about burma, it is worth undi she ng,i prepared lat she was the thing about burma, it is worth undi she ng,i prepared to she was the thing about burma, it is worth undi she ng,i prepared tojoin was the thing about burma, it is worth undi she ng,i prepared to join troops that she was prepared to join troops in what were terribly challenging circumstances. how did she explained the way - she came to that the way that she came to that decision? she wanted to go somewhere nobody else had been. people said,
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the only place nobody else has actually been as in burma, beyond the line, if you like, she said, thatis the line, if you like, she said, that is where i want to go. she a lwa ys that is where i want to go. she always said she was not scared because she had 6000 men protecting her. ensa said they could only go so far, and that is when the army took over. everybody loves the singing and the boys. the entertainment element was strong. —— the singing and the voice. but spending time, that is not entertaining, that is a different side. she said it was important to
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talk as well as perform because it was a contact with home, a contact with their loved ones. she was piggy in the middle, if you like, to have that contact was important. 0ne in the middle, if you like, to have that contact was important. one of the letters said, he had lost his sight, it was only years later, he got his site back, he said it was the first time he had met her in the flesh, but he had met her before. what kind of experience has it been like for her to reminisce? this is quite detailed. there is lots of detail in the book. how difficult or easy was that for her? she has a lwa ys easy was that for her? she has always spoken about it so therefore it is genetically engineered in my system. i always knew a lot about it, the journey and what happens,
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andi it, the journey and what happens, and i had tremendous help from a young researcher who helps me with the military side which was very important. he did a fantasticjob. it was very important for her as well. she had this diary that she took with her that she was not supposed to take. the person with whom i was working at the time, she andi whom i was working at the time, she and i had to get a magnifying glass out to lead what was written because it was so small. she said, even if the japanese had got it they would not understand it. but we have gleaned a lot from the diary.|j not understand it. but we have gleaned a lot from the diary. i will show that cover once again. it is lovely to talk to you. thank you. it is a lovely book. very inspiring. thank you.
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i will be back at ten o'clock. bbc news at six in a moment. here is the weather. a grey start. but there has been some brightness, particularly further north. tonight we will see eight weeks of rain pushing into scotland. quite heavy for a time. pushing into scotland. quite heavy fora time. —— pushing into scotland. quite heavy for a time. —— outbreaks of rain pushing into scotland. where we see brea ks pushing into scotland. where we see breaks in the cloud there will be patches of mist and fog. tomorrow morning some showers across scotland, they could fall as snow. scattered showers. more brightness behind that weather front. further
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south, more in the way of cloud. a feud patches of mist and fog. as we move through tomorrow that weather front will sink south and east. increased amounts of cloud, apache outbreaks of rain, finally clearing into the evening. —— patchy outbreaks of rain. cooler temperatures as we move towards friday. tomorrow, that weatherfront is sitting across northern england and wales. it will edge south—east. brightening up quite quickly before that weather front six south. behind it, brighter skies. plenty that weather front six south. behind it, brighterskies. plenty of sunshine. if you showers in the north, falling as snow over the hills. that weather front finally
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clearing towards the south and east. high—pressure overnight into friday. in the north, still quite windy, a chilly start to friday. many of us waking up to a touch of frost. it will be largely dry for much of england and wales. good spells of sunshine. more in the way of cloud for northern ireland, scotland, northern england, windy in the north, across the board temperatures starting to feel cooler. as we move into the big end, lots of dry weather around. cold and bright on saturday, and sunday as well. some rain moving in from the west later in the day. tonight at six — zimbabwe's president, robert mugabe, is under house arrest after the military intervenes. armoured personnel carriers on the streets of the capital — the generals claim it's not a coup —
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but a clean—up in the ruling party. we wish to make it abundantly clear that this is not a military takeover of government. from liberation hero to despot — is this the end of the road for the world's oldest leader? british citizens in the country have been told to stay indoors. also tonight. scotland will become the first country in the world to have a national minimum price for alcohol after a supreme court ruling. the husband of nazanin zaghhari—ratcliffe — the british citizenjailed in iran — meets borisjohnson.
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