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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 16, 2017 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm. i'm still in charge — crisis talks with ousted president robert mugabe and military leaders who've seized control in zimbabwe. the final toll — the metropolitan police say that seventy—one people were killed in the grenfell tower fire. the old vic says it's received 20 personal testimonies of alleged inappropriate behaviour by kevin spacey during his 11—years as artistic director. coming up on afternoon live all the sport: the price of loving football? yes, good afternoon, the price of football study is out and highlighted the challenges facing footballing terms of bringing young people to the game. 61% of them say they are more likely to engage with they are more likely to engage with the sport by playing games on a console or pc than playing in a football team. we'll have more later in the hour. louise has all the weather. pick and mix with g 57 can-. pick and mix with g
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57 can” 525” for pick and mix with g 57 cal is. 52»... for pick and mix with g 57 cal is. 51” wet ror 7 rup. hello everyone — this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. what now for robert mugabe? zimbabwe's long—time president remains under house arrest — but is still supposed to be
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in charge after the military intervened two days ago. amid rumours of his imminent resignation — and talk of who'll replace him — the people of zimbabwe are holding their breath — and awaiting news which they hope will answer the question.. what next? this report from richard lister. they are headlines most in zimbabwe thought they would never see, the man who had held the nation in an iron grip the 37 years swept aside by the military and now in custody. it is a lot to take in. steps taken by the army, quite positive. we are a bit uncertain about what will happen. we are still... we have to respect our president, he is too old, we have to give him a safe retirement package and find somewhere to keep him safe. the military says it is keeping the president safe for now, armoured
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vehicles are still patrolling the streets of harare today, the army very much in charge, but also maintaining calm. president mugabe has been kept out of sight to maintain this pretence of it not being a coup, the army needs him to resign to allow a transition of power. talks are under way with south african envoys but some reports suggest he is demanding to serve his full term. president mugabe is still in power, the man in charge of zimbabwe, even though he's at home protected by the army. a lot has happened. but what has not happened is a coup. whatever you call it, waiting in the wings is emmerson mnangagwa, once robert mugabe's ‘s right—hand man, sacked as vice president last week, widely believed to have engineered the takeover. the whereabouts of his main rival, the president's wife, grace, are unknown and some of those in the governing party who supported her in the past and criticised the military yesterday are now falling into line.
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please accept my apologies on behalf of myself, we are young people, growing up, we learn from our mistakes. from this big mistake, we have learnt a lot. but will a reshuffle at the of zanu—pf be enough for these opposition activists with the movement for democratic change? they have battled robert mugabe for most two decades both. opposition parties may not see a path to power. it is urgent we go back to democracy, it is urgent we go back to legitimacy. but we need a transitional period and i think and i hope that the dialogue can be opened between army and zimbabweans. statehouse. mr mugabe's official residence
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filmed here eight years ago may still have the trappings of power but its occupant has lost his authority. where once he could grandstand to the world, now others are deciding his fate. the man who said only god could remove him, the victim of a more mundane power struggle. richard lister, bbc news. earlier our correspondent anne soy spoke to us from zimbabwe to bring us up to date with what's going on. well, a lot of intense negotiations going on behind the scenes. we understand that the regional board is here in southern africa as well as the continental body, heavily involved in trying to broker some sort of political solution to this. there is a constitutional quagmire because they are very keen to ensure that this does not appear like a cool that this does not appear like a cool, even though it really does. the way it has been conducted. for now, the military says president mugabe remains in charge, even though he is under house arrest. apart from that we have driven around the country and talking to
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people you really do not get the sense they believe this is a country in crisis, people going about their business. there is a registered presence of people in the towns, however, when you speak to them, there is optimism. they hope the change they've been waiting for for a long time has finally come, that their fortunes could change, especially economically. theyjust don't know how the next few days and weeks are going to be. joining us now from johannesburg is piers pigou, southern africa consultant at the international crisis group. thank you forjoining us. in the last few minutes the opposition leader morgan tsvangirai has said robert mugabe must now resign, is it inevitable? ? it would seem that way, doesn't look as though there is any other real option for robert mugabe. imean he other real option for robert mugabe. i mean he may be wanting to hang on there, but he will be little more than a there, but he will be little more thana lame there, but he will be little more than a lame duck president if you seem than a lame duck president if you seem to be hanging on in a context where he is clearly not wanted any more. the view for many people on the
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streets of harare as we want a date for elections, it seems to be what people want to aim for next. it's interesting that people on the streets of harare think an election is going to somehow provide some sort of panacea to the current situation. our sense of the international crisis group is that while an election needs to be held, it needs to be held in a context where the conditions are right for that election. we would argue the situation right now is not beholden toa situation right now is not beholden to a free and fair election, conditions on the ground. there should be an attempt to look for a national solution, going out beyond the confines of the ruling party and looking to a broader group of zimbabweans, beyond the political as well, into civil society, to look for a national solution to a really debilitating economic and social set of conditions which have been affecting zimbabweans and worsening over the last couple of months. that
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insta nt over the last couple of months. that instant reaction of a few days ago that this was the start of things getting better, could it mean things are about to get worse? of course, you know, there is a long history for the end of authoritarian regimes, in most instances the situation does get worse. there is no immediate economic miracle pill. we heard tendai biti earlier on the feed indicating we need some sort of respite. what we saw in the government of national unity period from 2005—13 was the beginnings of a period of stability. it will not necessarily bring automatic relief to most ordinary zimbabweans, who will only really see the benefits of a shift in economic policy and hopefully political conditions further down the line. there is talk of some sort of government of national unity. but really the pressure is on zanu—pf to work out
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what happens next. that is indeed the case. whether mr emmerson mnangagwa is to step into the position of president, whether he will be able to provide the solution for the engagement, reform and recovery, certainly he was seen as the lead agent inside zanu—pf as they attempted to re—engage with the international community. we saw very little evidence of him being able to pilot this, or to provide some kind of way forward. of course he could argue he was being inhibited by president mugabe and those around him. but what we now need to seek in terms of reconfigured power arrangement in zimbabwe, is a very clear policy line on which direction the new government will be taking and what it will seek to do to build that recovery into zimbabwe. thank you very much for your time. police investigating the grenfell tower fire say the remains of all those who were killed in the blaze have now been recovered.
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71 people are now known to have died when the blaze ripped through the tower block injune, including a stillborn baby delivered in hospital after his mother escaped. tom burridge reports. grim statistics do little to convey the scale of this tragedy. but afterfive months, the police now have a definitive figure. 70 people, they say, were killed in the fire, as well as a stillborn baby. it's not about a number, it's about the people, it's always been at the heart of what we do. the challenge of it has been immense. we've had our specialist teams work through about 15 and a half tonnes of debris, on each and every floor of grenfell tower, by hand, to find every single fragment that they can of all those that died. that's been extremely distressing to the families and indeed to those involved in the operation as well. the complexity of the police's work means a community waits. and scepticism and anger are prolonged. anita raphael knew people killed. she used to play in grenfell tower
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when she was a child. it's going to take a while for us to know the truth. you know, i don't think it's going to be like now or like the ending of the year, i think it's going to take about two years for everything to coming to light, you know, what's in the dark must come to light. that's how i see it. because we have no information, really, what's going on. you know? nothing at all. in the days and weeks following the fire, there was a lot of confusion about how many people had been killed. previously, the police had said around 80 people had died. the final death toll is lower, they say, because of a small number of cases of fraud and because some of the victims, who came from different countries, were reported missing several times. people living in this part of london have constantly demanded answers, but a vocal critic of the council in the wake of the fire says the debate about how many victims there were should now end. i think we have to accept that this
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is the final number. people are still angry about the chaos as it developed. i do pay tribute to the police and to the coroner's service. it's turned out to be far more complex than anybody thought it was going to be. officers are examining millions of documents relating to the refurbishment of the tower before the fire. they are interviewing thousands of people and examining the role of dozens of companies involved. any prosecutions are probably still a long way off. tom burridge, bbc news, in west london. theresa may has said she will take charge of the government's plans to build more new homes to fix what she's called a broken housing market. the communities secretary, sajid javid, has announced that he will intervene in the case of 15 local authorities in england which have failed to produce a local plan for housing in theirarea.
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our political correspondent leila nathoo reports. time to get britain building. the housing market is broken, the prime minister says, and she wants to take personal charge of the response. i want to make sure young generations can have that same opportunity to have their own home, the house or flat that will work for them. that is why it is so important the government and i am putting ourfocus on housing. new figures out this morning showed 217,000 new homes were added to england's stock last year, an increase of almost 30,000 on the previous year. the government wants to up the rate and today announced two new measures to help. housing associations borrowing will no longer be classified as part of public debt. the hope is that allows them to invest more to build. and ministers say they will intervene in 15 local authorities which have failed to produce housing plans. this morning, a promise from the secretary of state to make a giant leap forward. real action, day after day,
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week after week, to give this country a housing market that works for everyone. in next week's budget, you will see how seriously we take the challenge, just how hard we are willing to fight to get britain building. ministers‘ calculation is housing is such a pressing political issue they must act. the conservatives need to reach out to young people so drawn to labour at the election, but there is still a debate within government over just how far to go. borrow big to invest in house—building or encourage the private sector to do more. labour argues low interest rates is an incentive to take out loans. homelessness up 50%, rough sleeping doubling in our cities in recent years, overcrowding on a scale we have not seen since the second world war.
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we need an emergency budget to bring forward significant housing investment, nothing that has been said today recognises the scale of the problem or brings forward the resources we need. allocating scarce resources is the chancellor's challenge next week. housing is sure to be high on his list. 0ur chief political correspondent vicki young is in westminster for us now. we're being warmed up for the budget. yes, but the problem is there are many demands on the money, do very little money philip hammond has to deal with. we've had a lot of pressure on the public sector pay rises for example, pressure on doing something to change universal credit and the way that works. of course this issue of housing which, let's face it, politicians have been talking about not just face it, politicians have been talking about notjust this year but for many years. labour government
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and coalition government and the conservatives, too. sajiv javid today, his words suggested there is likely to be a big announcement in the budget, that it may well be the centrepiece of next week's statement by the chancellor. he talked about their needing to be a giant leap forward. he's assessing the issue, the problem, the generational divide. the staggering statistics he came up with, that a third of men in their 30s are still living at home. 0nce their 30s are still living at home. once again an assessment of the problem. the question still remains about exactly what they will do to deal with it. it's been interesting watching sajiv javid in deal with it. it's been interesting watching sajivjavid in the deal with it. it's been interesting watching sajiv javid in the last few weeks going out in television interviews openly calling for extra borrowing to pay for more house—building. today saying the government needs to intervene more. there isn't yet a suggestion the treasury is willing to go along with that. a call from the shadow chancellor for an emergency budget. they are repeating what they said in a general election in their
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ma nifesto, a general election in their manifesto, interest rates and borrowing rates are low, why not borrowing rates are low, why not borrow to invest? they say they have a strict rule, it only for investment for infrastructure, its not to do with day—to—day spending. they do want to have higher spending on public services but they say it is all being accosted, they can pay for that by cutting, reversing the change in corporation tax. taking it off richer people. they insist that is the way to deal with this. it is not how the treasury and philip hammond see it. the dynamic between number ten downing st, where today theresa may is saying clearly this will be her personal priority to make sure more housing is built. pressure coming from there. the treasury don't know yet exactly what they will do because they don't like to talk about budgets in advance. we've done an interview and you haven't mentioned the word brexit wa nts. haven't mentioned the word brexit wants. that won't last. we'll talk to you later, thank you very much. you're watching afternoon live,
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these are our headlines: the future of the long—term zimbabwe leader robert mugabe remains unclear after he was placed under house arrest by the military. metropolitan police say 71 people were killed in the grenfell tower fire. the actor kevin spacey faces 20 more allegations of inappropriate behaviour during his time as artistic director at the old vic theatre. in sport, does football have a problem integrating young people? bbc sport's price of football study shows 82% of them think the cost of tickets has stopped them going to more games. mark stoneman put himself in prime position for an opening spot with a century in england's final warm up match before the start of next week's first ashes test with australia. eddie jones week's first ashes test with australia. eddiejones has record 0wen farrell to his starting line—up to face australia on saturday. he proposes henry slade at inside centre. we're back with more no
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stories just after half past. searches continue for a missing 19—year—old indoor city disappeared nine days ago. the girl with severe epilepsy was last seen in swan h. police they are hopeful she is still alive. it's a beautiful scene here is lunchtime. the tranquillity of the sea, though, really belies the distress this community is feeling. everywhere you go you see these leaflets a nd everywhere you go you see these leaflets and posters. missing, please help. she's been missing for nine days and a little earlier i sat down with her father. we've had a very good response from the local community, you must be very pleased by that. absolutely overwhelmed by it, it's the most, it's beautiful to
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see. it's heart—warming and it gives us more see. it's heart—warming and it gives us more hope and keeps us going, it really keeps us going, you know, to feel that strength. with everybody helping. it's just the feel that strength. with everybody helping. it'sjust the best feel that strength. with everybody helping. it's just the best possible thing. to help us find her. every little bit of help is so gratefully received. she is worth every bit of it. do you feel confident she will be found? the family knows she'll be found. until we don't know that. so we have every hope, every minute that goes by, that, you know, we still have hope. hard question to
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ask you, but what is it like living through this at the moment?” ask you, but what is it like living through this at the moment? i can't describe that to you really. it's, you know... you can imagine. it's just about the toughest thing we can go through. as you'd expect in the age of social media there has been huge response to the family's appeal for help. a large group of volu nteers for help. a large group of volunteers have been carrying out house—to—house inquiries working on a grid system through the streets of swanage, coordinated a grid system through the streets of swa nage, coordinated by a grid system through the streets of swanage, coordinated by police. today that search moves away from here out into the countryside of the purbeck hills. a 500—year—old painting of christ believed to have been by leonardo da vinci has been sold in new york for a record £341 million. the painting is known
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as salvator mundi, the saviour of the world. it's the highest auction price for any work of art. leonardo da vinci died in 1519, and there are fewer than 20 of his paintings in existence. 0ur arts correspondent david sillito reports. and so, ladies and gentlemen, we moved to the leonardo da vinci, the salvator mundi. the salvator mundi, by leonardo da vinci. before this sale, the record price wasjust over $100 million for an old master. it took just 28 seconds for that record to fall. at 110 million, who will give me... two minutes later, this. 190,200 million is bid, at 200 million. at 200 million. it had broken all sale records and we were only just getting started. this painting is what you might call the ultimate trophy work. there's only one in the world. so if you buy it you are the only person who's got the last leonardo da vinci in private hands, and you have got
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the ultimate trophy. 290? 300. i thought so. 300 million. applause. and that was the record for any painting, smashed, and there was still a long way to go. the journey to this extraordinary moment is a story fit for a thriller. it was part of charles the first‘s collection. in the 18th century someone decided to add a beard to the face than four decades its whereabouts were unknown. then, in 1958, it was sold at auction for £16 about $60 and in 2005 it was decided by a group of experts that this really was the work of leonardo da vinci. the clue was that face, that hazy shimmer, his signature style. there are those who still have their doubts but a leading leonardo expert is convinced. there are no serious arguments about it not being by leonardo. the only serious argument is the extent to which it's been
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damaged and repaired, which is quite extensive. 19 minutes into the sale it had stalled at $370 million. and then this. 400. 400 million. add christies' commission and that's a total price of $450 million. game over. sold. the name of the buyer, even where they come from, remained secret. but wherever they are, they've just made history. david sillito, bbc news. with me in the studio is dr tim hunter, who is an expert in old master and 19th century art. we're about records being broken quite regularly but not like this. you're quite right. the last record set was the 129 million dollars. it's very rare you get this sort of
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massively, over dublin, doubling the previous price. we saw the reaction in the auction house, will it have been shared in fine art rooms around the world? was it a massive figure? a massive figure and a surprise, some of us thought it would make the world — record some of us thought it would make the world—record price, paintings by leonardo are incredibly rare as you just heard. nobody quite expected $450 million, no, that was a surprise. is it purely because we are talking about something 500 yea rs old are talking about something 500 years old painted by somebody fortune very few pictures actually exist now. it is an exceptionally rare piece as you've heard. less than 20 works can be attributed to leonardo, many of those unfinished. it is exceptionally rare, leonardo is one of the most important painters of all time. that in itself doesn't quite explain why it has made this price. what is it about this picture do you think?”
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made this price. what is it about this picture do you think? i think it's an amazing work of art, a beautiful and astonishing and mysterious picture. i think we're living in a time when there are a large number of billionaire collectors out there who are vying with each other to purchase the biggest trophy piece they can find. and that does generate these enormous prices. i'm looking at twitter already this morning. a lot of people not angry but concerned this will just of people not angry but concerned this willjust be put away in a safe somewhere not to be seen. did you believe something like this should believe something like this should be put in a gallery for all to see? it would be a great shame if this work is put in a bank fault and not seen for 50 years. yet in its history, which is interesting, at one point it was lost altogether.m was lost altogether and repainted, when it emerged it was thought to be a copy, after a lost leonardo picture. it was a rediscovery.
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paintings do sometimes drop out of the limelight like that. it would be wonderful if it could go to a museum. very few museums if any could pay that sort of price. the only one that could pay that much is abu dhabi. they've had a leonardo on show. they have to hand that back to the louvre. this would be a fantastic picture. seeing the amount of publicity christie is generated, there were huge queues waiting to see this picture. any museum that bought this all could hang this on their wall would be assured of a lot of people coming to visit. it would be perfect for a museum. a lot of these billionaire collectors set up their own private museums. i wonder if that is why it is destined. their own private museums. i wonder if that is why it is destinedm has got scratches all over it, it's not a great piece. first of all,
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it's definitely by leonardo, a few voices have been raised in dissent but all the main scholars as you heard martin kemp say, all the major leonardo scholars are unified in saying they think it is the lost leonardo painting. yes, it's damage that has been restored, but it is quite common for 500—year—old panels, they get damaged over the yea rs. panels, they get damaged over the years. bits of the painting, i'd say, are very well preserved. the right hand of christ raised in benediction is beautifully painted, the celestial orb he holds in his left hand is an incredible piece of painting, the inclusions, the... you can see into it, it's a rock crystal. leonardo is so exact the way he paints he's included all the inclusions inside, that's amazing. the face is the area most damaged over the years. but i think it's been restored very well. leonardo painted in this very painstaking technique, using very, very thin
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glazes, and took years to produce these works. i mean literally years to painta these works. i mean literally years to paint a painting like that. so those glazes have been damaged through cleaning over the years, you can't get those back, its true. you are seeing a pared down example. there would have been much greater depth to it. nevertheless when you look at it in real life it's a very powerful, beautiful picture. and very, very expensive. thanks for coming in. my pleasure. let us know what you think. there are other ways to co nta ct what you think. there are other ways to contact us. away from works of art, louise lear is here with the weather. sorry... you've had all morning to come up with a throw and that is the best you can do? try and do betterfor an
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hour's time. that is worth a few quid. -4 on the top of cairngorm with the 19 mile per hour wind. i would prefer to be in bournemouth, glorious. 15 degrees with blue sky and sunshine. you'd be happy with this in august really. looks as though the cold weather in scotland is heading down towards us. hopefully i'll be able to show you more about it in a moment. we've got this weather front. it is in cloud and rain across the midlands and south wales as we speak. it'll drift steadily south. behind it, clearer conditions, but cold. and windy as well. gusts of wind, gale force or severe gales into the far north of the country. the rest of the afternoon we keep those showers into the far north. top temperatures disappointing especially factoring in the strength of the wind. the thermometer might say five or six but it doesn't feel like that.
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northern ireland and northern england lots of sunshine coming true for the rest of the afternoon and an improving picture across wales and the midlands. we will see that cloud because the front will continue to reducing rain close to the m4 corridor. south of that, miles, 15 degrees across the south. you keep the sunshine probably till the end of the day. the cloud arrives, the rain comes through, it drift steadily away. high pressure builds from the west. quietens brings down overnight. another talking point tomorrow when i'm standing here, simon andi tomorrow when i'm standing here, simon and i will be bantering about the feel of the weather first thing in the morning, it'll be a cold and frosty start for many across england and wales. —4 and minus five degrees first thing. hard frost likely, maybe patchy mist and fog. it'll lift away quite readily. we keep the light wind and sunshine. the wind strengthened to the north. these gales will drive in a cluster of showers, heavy with hale, thunder, even sleet and snow to the tops of
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the high ground. 7—9d generally. mightjust the high ground. 7—9d generally. might just scriptable figures in the high ground. 7—9d generally. mightjust scriptable figures in the south—east if lucky. going into the weekend a little bit of a battle between the feel of things yet again. mild air squeezing between the feel of things yet again. mild airsqueezing in between the feel of things yet again. mild air squeezing in from the south—west, introducing more in the south—west, introducing more in the way of cloud, dribs and drabs of rain. nothing amounting to much in the south—west. further north and east, little more shoulder, chile starts, frosty, but lots of dry sunny weather. not much change as we move into sunday. claudio bravo milder, drive into the south—west. the best of the sunshine for the weekend to the east. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the ousted president of zimbabwe robert mugabe is locked in talks with military leaders who seized control, as well as envoys from the south african government. negotiations are expected to determine the 93—year—old's future. 71 victims have now been formally identified
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by police investigating the grenfell tower fire. the death toll includes baby logan gomes who was stillborn in hospital the day the fire broke out. london's old vic theatre has said 20 people claim they were victims of "inappropriate behaviour" by the actor kevin spacey. the hollywood star was the artistic director of the venue between 2003 and 2015. the government says it's going to build more homes, more quickly, by encouraging housing associations to borrow money so they can invest in new properties. sport now on afternoon live with hugh woozencroft. bbc sport's annual price of football survey is out — what does it tell us? that's correct. it is out, it has thrown up surprising statistics,
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especially when it comes to the young. the study included a survey of 1,00018 to 24—year—olds. it turns out a huge 82% said that the cost was an obstacle for them going to more matches. 4% of season tickets in the premier league bought by young adults and 61% of young people said they were more likely to engage with the sport through a games console or a pc, far more than paying for a team, down at 37%. tampa to parents watching at home. the games console, is ruling the roost. is not the price coming down? for the third year in a row, the prices have frozen or fallen. in the premier league, we have seen many clu bs premier league, we have seen many clubs putting funds towards helping fa ns clubs putting funds towards helping fans pay for away tickets so. many dropping were £35 to an average of
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£20 for away tickets for the fans in the premier league. that contributed to the drop. now a change of sport and climate. seven days from the ashes, everyone has been watching who has been playing well. who is guaranteed a place? we know who is guaranteed a place, the likes of the captain, joe root. and alastair cook. but who with ill the partner be? the difficulty has been for the build—up on the england side for trevor bayliss but things are going more smoothly. a week before the crucial first ashes test. the batsmen looking comfortable. mark stoneman is the one who seems to have cemented an opening spot alongside alastair cook. scoring a century in the final warm up match. cook, himself and root, scoring half centuries. at the atp final, nothing riding on
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the game between roger federer and marin cilic. federer is assured of a place in the semi—finals, cilic is out. 3-3 out. 3—3 in the opening set. that is live on bbc two or the bbc sports website. later, americanjack sock is to play alexander zverev. kendall has stepped down were his post. investigated for allegedly using a mock caribbean accent when speaking to their striker. the fa decided that no further action was necessary but kendall has stepped down. 0wn far 7/11 to return to england's starting 15 for the test against australia at twickenham.
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he returns to replace henry slade. and no place in the starting team for maro 0ttogi there. when you get on the wrong side of someone, you need possible prepared for the backlash — the algeria head coach lost his temper with a journalist and decided to answer a question for leicester's mahrez. a pretty funny reaction. don't know
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if you have had a journalist scream at you but he says to let the next generation get on with it. similartoa generation get on with it. similar to a chat i had with my boss this morning! thank you very much. theresa may has been speaking about the government's pledge to ‘build more homes more quickly‘. she was visiting an affordable housing estate in barnet in north london. i've been pleased to come to barnet and see the regeneration of an estate, to sit down with rita and val and talk to them about the new flats, how much better they are than the old estate. i want to ensure that young generation, new generations can have the same opportunity to have their own home, to have the house or the flat that will work for them. that is why it is important that the government and iare is important that the government and i are putting focus on housing.
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pleased to say that the figures that we see today shows in the last year we see today shows in the last year we have seen 217,000 new homes built. that is the highest level of home building for almost a decade. but there is more we need to do. i announced a few weeks ago, we would put £2 billion into affordable housing, £10 billion into help to bye to get young people on the housing ladder. government is clear, we wa nt housing ladder. government is clear, we want people to have the security ofa we want people to have the security of a roof over their head, their own home for themselves and their family. the us secretary of state rex tillerson has called for an investigation into the plight of the rohingya muslims. 800,000 rohingya muslims have now crossed from myanmar into neighbouring bangladesh because of what's been described by the united nations as "textbook ethnic cleansing". 0ur correspondent justin rowlatt has been to cox's bazar in bangladesh to see what's rapidly becoming the world's biggest refugee camp.
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a bangladeshi army speedboat patrols the river that marks the border with myanmar. from the boat, you can see tents and hundreds of people trapped on the beaches. they're desperate to escape. so desperate they'll take incredible risks. some 60 people arrived on this raft made of plastic containers, they tell the same, now—familiar "they kept us on that beach for a month and a half," she says. "we had so little food. the army shot my husband, blinding him in one eye." like many of the new arrivals, they are in terrible shape. noor is two—and—half—years—old
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and is severely malnourished. if she doesn't receive nutritious foods soon, it could affect her development for life. one in four children are malnourished. we actually expect the situation to deteriorate before it improves. we have a nutrition crisis here, now. 12,000 people will be given food at this one feeding station today. it is basic nutrition — just rice, lentils, and a little oil, but it is enough to keep you alive. there are now more than 800,000 rohingya refugees here. no wonder they're calling this place the mega camp. just look at it — there are now more people living here than in leeds, glasgow or liverpool. and every day, it grows and grows. things are getting more orderly. the mega camp is getting
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roads and bridges. thousands of toilets have been dug in just the last few weeks. geophysicists use drones to help find aquifers deep underground. the blues, those are our clays and shales. and the reds are aquifers — clean water. so that's telling you where to drill. how important is clean water in a situation like this? clean water is fundamental to everything here. without that, we will have outbreaks of disease — cholera, typhus, within days or a few weeks at the most. but the truth is this is still basically a giant, open—air prison. soldiers guard the roads out of the camp. refugees aren't allowed to leave, and they can't go back to myanmar. despite all the evidence of atrocities, earlier this week, the myanmar government issued a report that exonerated its army from any blame. justin rowlatt, bbc news, kutupalong. we wa nt
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we want to bring news on the hunt for the missing teenager, giai hope, smasing from swanage. there has been the discovery of items of women's clothing in a field near swanage. this discovery was made before 10.30am. a discovery by a member of the public in openland north of the coastal path. the police say that the owner of the clothes have not identified them yet but they have informed missing gaia pope of this discovery. gaia was staying in swanage when she disappeared on the 7th of november. there is a quote from neil devoto from the dorset police, a saying
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that the full search will be taken of the field where the cloths have been discovered. they are supported by especially trained officers and their thoughts remain with the family at this very difficult time. so a possible development in that hunt for mying gaia pope. we will keep you updated with any news as we get it. the home affairs select committee has said that there must be contingency plans with addressing complaints from the eu with regards ports. gridlock on the way to the ports. this was the scene two years ago.
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strikers by perric workers in france and a surge in attempts by migrants to get to britain, led to delays here. the government warned it could happen again when the uk leaves the eu. a home affairs committee report say new labours the customs operations stay as they are, border checks will increase, as eu goods will need screening. the report says capacity will be needed to store and search items and vehicles and it calls for more staff than the 300 extra border force officers promised by the government. the border staff what they do is the customs checks at the borders, if the checks increase, there is a risk that the staff will be pulled from security checks or illegal immigration checks and we can't have failings there to put our security at risk. this is the sec time in a week that a group of mps warned of
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possible chaos at britain's borders after brexit. it was said it could be catastrophic, if a new customs declaration system was not ready on time. but a spokesperson for the government said it would ensure that there was a system to run an effective customs and immigration system. now, the head loans on afternoon live. robert mugabe's future is unclear, after he was placed under house arrest by the country's militia. the metropolitan police say that their final assessment is that 71 people we re final assessment is that 71 people were killed in the grenfell tower fire. the actor, kevin spacey faces 20 allegations of inappropriate behaviour during his time as artistic director at the old vic theatre. here are the business head lines. british retail sales recorded a decline of 0.3% in october.
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it's the first fall since 2013, but that's the year—on—year figure. the month—on—month number, september to october, showed a similar rise in sales, which is why the office of national statistics says that the underlying pattern is "steady growth". mixed news in the post for royal mail this morning. strong growth at its european parcels business helped push revenue up 2% to £4.8bn. that's just for the first half of the year. however, its actual profits are not improving at all, and fell £2m to £250m. royal mail was privatised in 2013, and says competition is the problem, from dhl and federal express and so on — and costs are rising too. high street pawnbroker cash converters has warned customers about a data breach on its website. the company said customer usernames, passwords and addresses had potentially been accessed by a third party. the company told the bbc it was taking the breach "extremely seriously" and had reported it to the information commissioner. looking at asda's results, it is
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confusing as the number of trips made to the store fell but the results were quite positive. so fewer people spending more or what? so, 1.8% increase in sales but they are saying that the growth is not great. so asda still have a problem. we have 3% inflation as we talk about stagnant wage growths. so clearly it will affect the likes of asda. so online sales and fewer trips to the store but that could be balanced by online shopping. asda are also part of the bigger group, wal—mart? asda are also part of the bigger group, wal-mart? that's right. they are taking on amazon in the us. they are taking on amazon in the us. they area giant. are taking on amazon in the us. they are a giant. going for the e commerce. we have samira joining us now from new york. samira, the
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wal—mart result, how rethis now from new york. samira, the wal-mart result, how rethis wal-mart results were great. trading has started on the new york stock exchange 20 minutes ago. the share price is up 7%. there are a few reasons, one, we saw that the online sales were strong. and two, they gave forward guidance. so what they are expecting for the next three months. this is key for investors, that encompasses the holiday shopping season. they raised the guidance, so that they are expecting something better than reported before. in terms of who they are taking on. amazon appeared to be very much in their eyeline? absolutely. amazon is a big pet forthem. their eyeline? absolutely. amazon is a big pet for them. amazon is the abroute dominant player when it comes to online retailing. wal—mart has invested heavily in the online presence. so they are trying to use
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tools similar to amazon for example paying a flat fee for prime shipping for example. but wal—mart is also trying to get people into its brick and mortar stores, so what this have done, which i think is a bit creative and cheeky, they have two prices for some products. it will be a higher price online but a lower price in—store. so really trying to draw people into the stores because many believe that if you are in the store you end up shopping a little more. so drawing people off the couch and into the stores. let's see if it works. and the same with shopping. we in this country spend more at christmas than other countries, is that right? yes, 38% more. it is quite a lot. it seem as lot on presents but
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a p pa re ntly it seem as lot on presents but apparently chocolate is the number one gift for british consumers. i find that disappointing, that you get chocolate, as a present. i like the idea of money, that is quite good as a present! 0k, i like the idea of money, that is quite good as a present! ok, let's have a look at the markets shall we? the ftse is going to show up soon... that globe is turning nicely. so the ftse is in positive territory. the royal mail shares are down because the sales on there. sorry and their revenue is down, they are having troubles with union and pensions, there you go, the royal mail shares are looking flat. exactly where they were before! yes, a bit down. and gkn, a remarkable statement from
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them? they are deciding to axe their boss before he starts at the new job. apparently the division he was heading up was not doing so well. there was a motorand an air parts division, he was not performing well in the air. so he may not have a very good christmas. that's right. russia could be barred from competing in the winter olympics in february, after the world anti—doping agency said it hadn't done enough to address allegations of widespread cheating. the organisation says it's maintaining a suspension put in place two years ago, when a report accused russia of systematic state—sponsored doping. our sports correspondent richard conway reports. it was russia's moment to shine, but evidence of state—sponsored doping at the sochi winter olympics in 2014 continues to leave a stain on the country's sporting character. russia's hopes of clearing its name
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suffered a blow today. the world anti—doping agency thinks not enough has been done. it wants access to the moscow lab suspected of being the hub of its doping operation and is also demanding acceptance that senior sports ministry figures were complicit in a cover—up. the argument from our russian friends today was these top two are mainly political rather than normal procedure. i'm not sure that either of them are, but that's a different argument. but they haven't been fulfilled. independent reports last year by the canadian law professor richard mclaren implicated the majority of russian 0lympic sports in cheating, prompting a partial ban at the rio 2016 summer games. the russian minister of sport directed, controlled and oversaw the manipulation of athletes‘ analytical results, or sample swapping, with the active participation and assistance of the fsb. but russian authorities
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insist they are continuing their antidoping reforms. we are doing all our best to progress in antidoping activity among the whole of russia. i mean in prevention, in education, in result management, testing and in investigation. with just under three months to go until the winter games begin in south korea, russia‘s paralympians are currently ruled out of taking part. the final decision is due in mid—december. but the international olympic committee must also make its decision and rule if it‘s going to leave a sporting superpower out in the cold. richard conway, bbc news. helix has said that sea level rises
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of several centimetres will happen. this report is being presented to a climate change conference in bonn where the world leaders have begun to gather. whatever they can do to restrict carbon dioxide emission, the study says that fundamental climate change cannot be avoid the drats molecules have warmed the atmosphere for hundreds of years. so the sea water expands. so the researchers can say with confidence, that half a million people in low lying bangladesh will be affected by rising sea levels. with riding emissions that figure could reach 12 million by the end of the century. some tropical areas suffer levels of heat bringing a high risk of human harm, so—called heat stress. researchers say with two degrees of
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warming, most of the indian subcontinent and large areas of north africa will get these conditions. rainwater and river levels are more difficult to predict but scientists say that there will be increased flooding on major rivers, even if there are restrictions but there is no sign of it happening. the conference told that global emissions of carbon dioxide were forecast to rise for the first time since 2014. mainly because of the expanding use of coal and china‘s boehming economy. now louise lear has the latest weather forecast for us. these were the temperatures this morning, why am i showing you this? it is relatively mild in the south. but look at what is happening
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tomorrow morning — it will be pretty cold. in england and wales, a widespread frost, lows of minus four or five celsius. so widespread frost, lows of minus four orfive celsius. so bear widespread frost, lows of minus four or five celsius. so bear it in widespread frost, lows of minus four orfive celsius. so bear it in mind if you are out early. there is a weather front moving through. a cold front splitting the country in two. behind it is introducing a colder airand a rash behind it is introducing a colder air and a rash of showers with gale —force air and a rash of showers with gale—force winds into the far north of scotland. the weather front singing to the south and the east through the rest of the day. once it does so, we will see clearer skies but the temperatures are fallingway. by but the temperatures are fallingway. by the afternoon, it looks like it will be all change. high pressure building into the #50e6enning, and the winds a feature in the north. squally showers continuing through the night. not as cold with that wind but the temperatures just below freezing in rural spots. in england and wales, lose of minus four and minus five celsius. so a scraping
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off of the wind zmreens the morning. wrap up warm if you are up early. a little bit of patchy fog but that lifts. by 8.00am, the temperatures in towns and cities a few degrees above freezing. so cold. but lots of sunshine. in the north the winds strengthening. a scattering of light showers in the northern ireland but the further north and the west you 90, the further north and the west you go, there are frequent showers with hail mixed in and even a little bit of snow. cheerful above 100 but a pretty miserable day for many. the winds are gales or severe up to the northern isles, elsewhere, plain sailing. dry with lots of sunshine. chilly but the sunshine compensates, with highs of seven to 10 celsius. moving from friday into the weekend, we see the battle ground of will the mild air return? trying to squeeze
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in from the south—west but never winning out to the far north and to the east. a cool wind down the north sea coasts. here chilly and milder but double figures for the afternoon. sunday, and there is not that much in the way of change. the winds from the north—west along the north sea coasts making it feel cooler, more sunshine with a little cloud the further west you are. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. today at 3. i‘m still in charge — crisis talks between ousted president robert mugabe and military leaders who‘ve seized control in zimbabwe. the final toll — the metropolitan police say that 71 people were killed in the grenfell tower fire. the old vic says it‘s received 20 personal testimonies of alleged inappropriate behaviour by kevin spacey during his 11—years as artistic director.
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coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. hugh. looking at the price of football. indeed, our annual price of football study is out and has highlighted the challenges facing football when it comes to young people. more 18—24 —year—olds are betting on matches than play for a football team. it‘s clearly a worrying trend. more later in the hour. louise lear has the weather. mild and sunny along the south coast at the moment. all of that set to change with the arrival of cold front introducing cloud. as it introducing cold air. also coming up... $400 million is the bid. the piece is sold. the highest—ever amount paid for a work of art at auction. but the buyer of the da vinci painting remains anonymous.
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for now. hello everyone — this is afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. what now for robert mugabe? zimbabwe‘s long—time president remains under house arrest — but is still supposed to be in charge after the military intervened two days ago. amid rumours of his imminent resignation — and talk of who‘ll replace him — the people of zimbabwe are holding their breath — and awaiting news which they hope will answer the question.. what next? this report from richard lister. they are headlines most in zimbabwe thought they would never see, the man who had held the nation in an iron grip the 37 years swept aside by the military and now in custody. it is a lot to take in. steps taken by the army, quite positive. we are a bit uncertain about what's
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going to happen but we are still very much fine. we have to respect our president, he is too old, we have to give him a safe retirement package and find somewhere to keep him safe. the military says it is keeping the president safe for now, armoured vehicles are still patrolling the streets of harare today, the army very much in charge, but also maintaining calm. president mugabe has been kept out of sight to maintain this pretence of it not being a coup, the army needs him to resign to allow a transition of power. talks are under way with south african envoys but some reports suggest he is demanding to serve his full term. president mugabe is still in power, the man in charge of zimbabwe, even though he‘s at home protected by the army. a lot has happened. but what has not happened is a coup. whatever you call it, waiting in the wings
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is emmerson mnangagwa, once robert mugabe‘s right—hand man, sacked as vice president last week, widely believed to have engineered the takeover. the whereabouts of his main rival, the president‘s wife, grace, are unknown and some of those in the governing party who supported her in the past and criticised the military yesterday are now falling into line. please accept my apologies on behalf of myself, we are young people, growing up, we learn from our mistakes. from this big mistake, we have learnt a lot. but will a reshuffle at the of zanu—pf be enough for these opposition activists with the movement for democratic change? they have battled robert mugabe for most two decades both. 0pposition parties may not see a path to power. their leader, morgan tsvangirai,
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threatened to unseat robert mugabe once. their leader, morgan tsvangirai, threatened to unseat robert mugabe once. it is urgent we go back to democracy, it is urgent we go back to legitimacy. but we need a transitional period and i think and i hope that the dialogue can be opened between army and zimbabweans. statehouse. mr mugabe‘s official residence filmed here eight years ago may still have the trappings of power but its occupant has lost his authority. where once he could grandstand to the world, now others are deciding his fate. the man who said only god could remove him, the victim of a more mundane power struggle. richard lister, bbc news. 0ur correspondent milton nkosi is following events from johannesburg in neighbouring south africa. and just worried he supposedly still in charge. morgan tsvangirai says he has to go, these next few hours could be quite interesting there. yes indeed. what we understand, and i‘ve just been
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yes indeed. what we understand, and i‘vejust been in yes indeed. what we understand, and i‘ve just been in contact with the south african international relations department, they‘ve confirmed to mejust relations department, they‘ve confirmed to me just a few minutes ago that the envoys that president zuma sent to harare are currently at this moment locked in talks with president robert mugabe in harare. there is quite a lot going on, president zuma has been taking questions in the upper house in parliament in cape town and he said he‘ll be flying from there to botswa na he‘ll be flying from there to botswana where the regional body has a ministerial summit to try and resolve the zimbabwe crisis. the difficulty is whilst there is uncertainty, nerves get jarred, people get nervous, something has to give. yes, indeed. as you heard, morgan tsvangirai from the opposition, is asking president robert mugabe to resign, which i guess is exactly what the military has been trying to achieve. he is also calling for a transitional arrangement. there is quite a lot
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going on. but until we get official announcements, we‘re receiving news in dribs and drabs from sources, which are not confirmed. the difficulty if you live in zimbabwe is uncertainty, the wish, i‘m guessing many of them have, to have some sort of date for elections. indeed. and we must say zimbabwe remains quiet but tense. there hasn‘t been any news of rioting or violence. so everyone is relieved, at least for now, because of the prevailing climate there. many zimbabweans are worried. i know those here in south africa who fled their own country of birth in search of better economic opportunities are also keeping their ears on the ground trying to find out if their loved ones are safe. given we're
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talking about something that started two days ago, perhaps a simple question, do we know what has really happened? it is not entirely clear. the military has said this is not a coup. what they are trying to do is have a smooth transition bringing back emmerson mnangagwa who was sacked last week, to take charge without having a technical coup. that is why they say it is not a clue. they want to keep it within the constitutional mandate, that zanu—pf still enjoys from its last election. thank you very much for that of date. —— update. 0ur correspondent andrew harding is also in zimbabwe, he‘s been speaking to people who‘ve only known life under robert mugabe. we‘ve come to a very ordinary township to talk to people about what‘s going on here in zimbabwe. and two things are very striking.
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everyone is feeling this enormous sense of anticipation, they know, they believe that president robert mugabe, the only man they‘ve ever known in charge of this country, really is on the cusp of stepping down. so there is this anticipation, this feeling people want to celebrate, and yet, so many people here have learned the hard way politics is a very dangerous business. people get arrested, they disappear, there are beatings, there are killings. this has been something that has been a reality in zimbabwe for many, many years. so people are waiting, they‘re waiting for it to become official, waiting eitherfor president for it to become official, waiting either for president mugabe to go on television and announce his resignation, perhaps for emmerson mnangagwa his former deputy who was ousted, and who has now come back on the back of this military coup, to go on television himself and say it‘s over. then i think we‘ll see people breathing out, people relaxing, taking to the streets perhaps to mark this extraordinary
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moment. but until then, perhaps to mark this extraordinary moment. but untilthen, people perhaps to mark this extraordinary moment. but until then, people are waiting. they are quietly overwhelmed, i think, waiting. they are quietly overwhelmed, ithink, and waiting. they are quietly overwhelmed, i think, and overjoyed, by and large, by what is happening. they are also aware this is not some popular uprising, but the opposition taking over. this is still zanu—pf, still the party that has run things and will carry on to run things. people are not sure exactly what will change in their lives. when and if president mugabe is finally out of the picture. there have been more claims against kevin spacey while he was at the old vic. lizo mzimba has news. yes, since these allegations first arose a few weeks ago, the old vic where he was artistic director for many yea rs, he was artistic director for many years, launched an investigation carried out by an outside law firm. they said they spoke to 56 people,
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who contacted their confidential information line. of those 20, of those 56, 20 people said they had been victims of inappropriate behaviour from kevin spacey. been victims of inappropriate behaviourfrom kevin spacey. all of them younger men at the time of the allegations. of those 20, the investigators here for the theatre in14 of investigators here for the theatre in 14 of them to go to the police. saying the behaviour they alleged could constitute a criminal offence. the bulk of them took place between the years 2004—2009. predominately alleged to have happened here at the old vic theatre itself. they met with staff, the investigators and the trustees of the old vic, earlier this afternoon, to explain the situation to them. and to their artistic executive director, who has apologised on behalf of the old vic as to what happened during kevin spa cey‘s as to what happened during kevin spacey‘s time here. as to what happened during kevin spacey's time here. the old vic apologises wholeheartedly to the people have told us they have been
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affected. we've learnt it is not enough to have the right process in place, everyone needs to feel they can speak out, no matter who they are. much has changed at the old vic in recent years. we will continue to work to model and safeguard the open culture we want the old vic to be known for. they said one of the problems may have been kevin spa cey‘s problems may have been kevin spacey‘s star persona he was artistic director here as well as being a double 0scar artistic director here as well as being a double oscar winner. they said they‘ve put in new procedures to ensure something like this never happens again. kevin spacey was approached to take part in the investigation. they didn‘t receive a response from him and at this point we‘ve not received any response to these allegations made from the old vic here earlier today. thank you very much, lizo mzimba. police investigating the grenfell tower fire say the remains of all those who were killed in the blaze have now been recovered. tom burridge is there. it's five
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months since the fire at grenfell tower in mid—june. the metropolitan police say they‘ve been working tirelessly through the last four or five months to try and work through all the evidence and search through tonnes of debris on each of their 24 floors of the tower block behind me. it's floors of the tower block behind me. it‘s been a very difficult, painstaking, at times emotional, process for those officers involved. finally they have reached this figure of 71 victims of that fire. grim statistics do little to convey the scale of this tragedy. but afterfive months, the police now have a definitive figure. 70 people, they say, were killed in the fire, as well as a stillborn baby. it‘s not about a number, it‘s about the people, it‘s always been at the heart of what we do. the challenge of it has been immense. we‘ve had our specialist teams work through about 15 and a half tonnes of debris, on each and every floor of grenfell tower, by hand, to find every single fragment that they can of all
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those that died. that‘s been extremely distressing to the families and indeed to those involved in the operation as well. the complexity of the police‘s work means a community waits. and scepticism and anger are prolonged. anita raphael knew people killed. she used to play in grenfell tower when she was a child. it‘s going to take a while for us to know the truth. you know, i don‘t think it‘s going to be like now or like the ending of the year, i think it‘s going to take about two years for everything to coming to light, you know, what‘s in the dark must come to light. that‘s how i see it. because we have no information, really, what‘s going on. you know? nothing at all. in the days and weeks following the fire, there was a lot of confusion about how many people had been killed. previously, the police had said around 80 people had died. the final death toll is lower, they say, because of a small number
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of cases of fraud and because some of the victims, who came from different countries, were reported missing several times. people living in this part of london have constantly demanded answers, but a vocal critic of the council in the wake of the fire says the debate about how many victims there were should now end. i think we have to accept that this is the final number. people are still angry about the chaos as it developed. i do pay tribute to the police and to the coroner‘s service. it‘s turned out to be far more complex than anybody thought it was going to be. officers are examining millions of documents relating to the refurbishment of the tower before the fire. they are interviewing thousands of people and examining the role of dozens of companies involved. any prosecutions are probably still a long way off. tom burridge, bbc news, in west london.
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still a lot of scepticism in the local community about anything the authorities tell them?” local community about anything the authorities tell them? i think there‘s a lot of confusion as well. thinking back to five months ago in those days when we were here, there we re those days when we were here, there were mixed messages, a lot of rumours. in the days and weeks after, the police were unable to come up with the definitive figure, which fed into the scent of scepticism within the community. chatting to people today we spoken to one man who lost his uncle in the fire. he really reflects a view within the community which is, yes, there is scepticism, yes, we think there is scepticism, yes, we think the figure could have been higher. we now feel we need to accept it, and move on from that debate and really focus on getting justice for the victims and the criminal investigation which very much continues by the metropolitan police. tom burridge. police investigating the disappearance of a 19—year—old
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in dorset say they‘ve discovered "items of women‘s clothing" in a field near swanage. gaia pope, who has severe epilepsy, was last seen in the coastal town, nine days ago. a cordon is now in place at the field and officers have updated the teenager‘s family. it‘s not yet known who they belong to. earlier, our correspondent, chrissy sturt, spoke to gaia‘s father, who says he‘s been overwhelmed by public support. it's it‘s the most... it‘s beautiful to see, beautiful to see it. and it‘s heart—warming, it gives us more hope, and it keeps us going. it helps, it really keeps us going, you know, to feel that strength of everybody helping is... just the best thing, the best possible thing, to help us find every little bit of help. it‘s so gratefully received. and she‘s worth every bit of it. she‘s worth every bit of it. and she‘s worth every bit of it.
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she's worth every bit of it. do you feel confident that she will be found? i... the family, know she'll be found. until we don‘t know that. so we have every hope, every minute that goes by, we still have hope. richard, hard question to ask you, what is it like living through this at the moment? i can't describe that to you, really. it‘s... you know, you can imagine. it‘sjust about the toughest thing we can go through. any development in that story, we‘ll
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bring them straight to you. the future of robert mugabe remains unclear the future of robert mugabe remains u nclear after the future of robert mugabe remains unclear after he was placed under house arrest by the country‘s military. his long—time rival morgan tsvangirai has urged him to resign immediately. the metropolitan police have said theirfinal immediately. the metropolitan police have said their final assessment is that 71 people were killed in the g re nfell tower that 71 people were killed in the grenfell tower fire. actor kevin spacey ‘s faces 20 allegations of inappropriate behaviour during his time as artistic director at the old vic theatre. in a moment, the highest price paid for work of art, a painting by leonardo da vinci fetches more than £340 million. in sport, where we‘ll football find the season ticket holders of tomorrow? 0ur season ticket holders of tomorrow? our price of football study shows 82% of young people think the cost of tickets has stopped going to more games. mark stoneman put himself in prime position for an spot with a century in england‘s final warm up
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match before the start of next week‘s first ashes test with australia. eddie jones week‘s first ashes test with australia. eddiejones has recalled 0wen farrell to his starting line—up to face australia at twickenham on saturday, replacing henry slade at inside centre. more on those stories just after half past. theresa may says she will take charge of the government‘s plans to build more new homes, to fix what she called the broken housing market. the communities secretary, sajid javid, has announced that he will intervene in the case of fifteen local authorities in england which have failed to produce a local plan for housing in theirarea. 0ur political correspondent leila nathoo reports. time to get britain building. the housing market is broken, the prime minister says, and she wants to take personal charge of the response. i want to make sure young generations can have that same opportunity to have their own home, the house or flat that will work for them. that is why it is so important the government and i am putting ourfocus on housing. new figures out this morning showed
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217,000 new homes were added to england‘s stock last year, an increase of almost 30,000 on the previous year. the government wants to up the rate and today announced two new measures to help. housing associations borrowing will no longer be classified as part of public debt. the hope is that allows them to invest more to build. and ministers say they will intervene in 15 local authorities which have failed to produce housing plans. this morning, a promise from the secretary of state to make a giant leap forward. real action, day after day, week after week, to give this country a housing market that works for everyone. in next week‘s budget, you will see how seriously we take the challenge, just how hard we are willing to fight to get britain building. ministers‘ calculation is housing
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is such a pressing political issue they must act. the conservatives need to reach out to young people so drawn to labour at the election, but there is still a debate within government over just how far to go. borrow big to invest in house—building or encourage the private sector to do more. labour argues low interest rates is an incentive to take out loans. homelessness up 50%, rough sleeping doubling in our cities in recent years, overcrowding on a scale we have not seen since the second world war. we need an emergency budget to bring forward significant housing investment, nothing that has been said today recognises the scale of the problem or brings forward the resources we need. allocating scarce resources is the chancellor‘s challenge next week. housing is sure to be
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high on his list. a 500—year—old painting of christ believed to have been by leonardo da vinci has been sold in new york for a record £341 million. the painting is known as salvator mundi, the saviour of the world. the price is the highest achieved at auction for any work of art. leonardo da vinci died in 1519, and there are fewer than 20 of his paintings in existence. 0ur arts correspondent david sillito reports. and so, ladies and gentlemen, we move to the leonardo da vinci, the salvator mundi. the salvator mundi, by leonardo da vinci. before this sale, the record price wasjust over $100 million for an old master. it took just 28 seconds for that record to fall. at 110 million, who will give me... two minutes later, this. 190,200 million is bid, at 200 million. at 200 million. it had broken all sale records and we were only
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just getting started. this painting is what you might call the ultimate trophy work. there's only one in the world. so if you buy it you are the only person who's got the last leonardo da vinci in private hands, and you have got the ultimate trophy. 290? 300. i thought so. 300 million. applause. and that was the record for any painting, smashed, and there was still a long way to go. the journey to this extraordinary moment is a story fit for a thriller. it was part of charles the first‘s collection. in the 18th century someone decided to add a beard to the face than four decades its whereabouts were unknown. then, in 1958, it was sold at auction for £45 about $60 and in 2005 it was decided by a group of experts that this really was the work of leonardo da vinci. the clue was that face, that hazy
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shimmer, his signature style. there are those who still have their doubts but a leading leonardo expert is convinced. there are no serious arguments about it not being by leonardo. the only serious argument is the extent to which it‘s been damaged and repaired, which is quite extensive. 19 minutes into the sale it had stalled at $370 million. and then this. 400. 400 million. add christies‘ commission and that‘s a total price of $450 million. game over. sold. the name of the buyer, even where they come from, remained secret. but wherever they are, they‘ve just made history. david sillito, bbc news. joining me from our studios in edinburgh is dr bendor grosvenor, art historian and presenter of bbc‘s britain‘s lost masterpieces. fake or fortune first of all? it's
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definitely the real deal, i think, andi definitely the real deal, i think, and i think it fetched an appropriate price. two people in the world wanted to pay that much and one came away the lucky owner. $400 million. in what world is that seen as appropriate? well in the world of these people who are, let‘s face it, ultrahigh net worth individuals, thatis ultrahigh net worth individuals, that is what they are prepared to pgy- that is what they are prepared to pay. i thought a glimpse into the psyche of the person who bought it was the final extraordinary and probably ridiculous bit where they just chucked in an extra $30 million to ta ke just chucked in an extra $30 million to take it from 370 to 400 million. it was like a scene out of only fools and horses, if del boy was bidding, that‘s what he would do. we assume they will love the picture, let‘s hope they put it on public display. whoever has it is a multi—multimillionaire. do you think it isa multi—multimillionaire. do you think it is a private buyer? what are the
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chances it is a gallery, so more people can see it in future? there it is correction occur there is zero chanceit it is correction occur there is zero chance it is a museum bidding. i suspect the museum might have started the bidding. it‘ll probably be heading off to the far east i suspect, from various intelligence reports from the sale room last night. but the people buying these sorts of things are quite active in putting them on public display and lending them to institutions so i‘m sure we‘ll see it in public. lending them to institutions so i‘m sure we'll see it in public. you don‘t think they‘ll put it in a vault, put it on their yacht? it‘ll bea vault, put it on their yacht? it‘ll be a trophy asset. this is an art world cliche, people buy these things to stick in the vaults. when dealing with old masters at this level, it‘s rarely the case. dealing with old masters at this level, it's rarely the case. whoever it is will sit in a very comfortable room and be able to look at it any time they want to. they might reflect upon what many people say... this is a scratchy old thing. it‘s been cleaned to within an inch of
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its life. any restoration, there is more new paint on it than old, do you think they might regret it at some point? i don't think so, i mean, they might regret it when they see the insurance bill. it has widely been reported this picture is sort of a wreck, it has been over restored. compared to other early 16th century panel paintings, the condition is not that bad. if you saw the extent of the over painting, you‘d see pictures in a far worse state than this, which we still rightly lauded as masterpieces. what do you say to the doubters who say this is not a work of leonardo da vinci? the evidence is pretty irrefutable that it is. the only question is the extent to which he may have had workshop collaboration involved in areas like the drapery or the background, but it is fairly standard for pictures by artist at
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this level. all the evidence points to an original. the change in hand where you can see christ‘s fingers have been moved by the artist, it proves it isn‘t a copy, it‘s the real thing. mike macro did you ever seeit? real thing. mike macro did you ever see it? i did, yes, in london many times, when on display in the national gallery. it is as magical as that? it is actually. a lot of our interpretation of what is subjective and it‘s easy to get carried away with belief in all these things especially when looking ata these things especially when looking at a picture of christ but it is a beautifully painted work. it has had its day. you didn't buy it did you? know i didn‘t. its day. you didn't buy it did you? know i didn't. i would its day. you didn't buy it did you? knowl didn't. i would kick myself ifi knowl didn't. i would kick myself if i found later you had. thank you for joining if i found later you had. thank you forjoining us. if i found later you had. thank you for joining us. 0k, if i found later you had. thank you forjoining us. ok, let‘s catch up with the weather. here is louise lear. a variety of weather out there today. sunshine and rain around. this weather front sinking south and
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east. the dividing line between mild out the south, cold and showery conditions into the far also windy with it. gales or severe gales into the far north. through the night across england and wales, skies were clear, winds light, temperature is likely to follow weight full stop in rural spots —4 or minus five degrees. cold and frosty start for england and wales, light frost of the north, because too much wind... we are still likely to see gales, severe gales, driving in squally showers with hail and snow. elsewhere, keeping sunshine. a cool feel for all to finish off our working week. top temperatures of 7-10d. working week. top temperatures of 7—10d. into the weekend, milder into the south—west. in eastern areas stays cold. with a greater chance of seeing more sun. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the ousted president of zimbabwe robert mugabe is locked in talks with military leaders who seized control, as well as envoys from the south african government. negotiations are expected to
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determine the 93—year—old‘s future. 71 victims have now been formally identified by police investigating the grenfell tower fire. the death toll includes baby logan gomes who was stillborn in hospital the day the fire broke out. london‘s old vic theatre has said 20 people claim they were victims of "inappropriate behaviour" by the actor kevin spacey. then venue say it is apologises wholeheartedly to the people affected. the actor has not responded to the allegations. police in dorset who are investigating the disappearance of gaia pope say they‘ve found "items of women‘s clothing" in a field near swanage. the 19—year—old hasn‘t been seen for more than a week. building more homes more quickly, the message from theresa may as she sets out plans how to respond to the housing crisis. saying that the
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government will look at borrowing money to invest in new properties. sport now on afternoon live with hugh woozencroft. they have an opener in for the ashes? well a few weeks ago, called england‘s worst ever — ashes build up, so many off field problems . a series with a lacklustre west indies — didn‘t teach us much — but now the players are there they‘ve relaxed saw them cuddling koalas a few days ago and they‘ve been comfortable at the crease — in their final warm—up game.
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mark stoneman took his chance — looks set to be an opening batsman — first test in a week‘s time.... as i was saying, surrey batsman mark stoneman looks set to partner alastair cook as part of england‘s opening pair when the first ashes test against australia. and has there been talk about the survey on football and tickets? 80% of survey on football and tickets? 8096 of young people in the polls said that they felt priced out going to fewer games as a result of the cost of the tickets. i spoke to a spokesperson with regards the importance of the young fa ns to regards the importance of the young fans to the game. i would imagine that they miss out the initiatives, set out for the younger fans. it is
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an area that needs to be looked at to encourage or to make sure that they don't miss out on initiatives that other age groups have the benefit of. he went on to say that perhaps youngerfans he went on to say that perhaps younger fans needed more he went on to say that perhaps youngerfans needed more help to get to live football game, perhaps talking about the likes of 0llie and memet who have come here to join talking about the likes of 0llie and memet who have come here tojoin me on this chilly afternoon. 0llie, a derby county fan, how do you find the match day experience and the cost? the overall experience is good but the price against what you get, if it isa but the price against what you get, if it is a bad game you don't enjoy it and you put pressure on the players as you are expecting from the game. so it's a good day out but the game. so it's a good day out but the situation is that the prices are getting hirer. do you still go? occasionally but
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after 18, the adult prices are too much. and you support tottenham, imagine that the prices are higher, how do you cope? i will go to watch the match on telly. but there, the prices are ridiculous. it turns into a massive day out. if i do see a ticket that i can afford, i'm not going to think about just the ticket, i think about the whole day's experience and what i'm buying when out there enjoying the match, enjoying the game. but it is all about the experience of the whole day. and you are at university up here, so there are the restrictions of a university budget. what do you think that football must do to eengage with fans for your age group? with university students and people starting work? putting down the prices. freezing them. making transport easier, getting groups of people together. getting their
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early. if you get cheap tickets, there will be so many more university students getting there. that‘s what you have to do. the average match day at stoke costs about £30 to £35 but it‘s still too much say the young fans at stoke. frozen tickets are the only thing for you guys at stoke. mark stoneman, looking set to pair with alastair cook at the first ashes test in a week‘s time. england‘s first century on the tour added to half centuries from cook and leaving them with 87 going into the third day on the tour. in terms of how i played, in the
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opposition i have faced i am fairly happy. everything is going well in practice. it feels like the game is in good order. it will be tested more come next week for sure, no doubts about that. everyone is aware of it. as far as things are going, i‘m happy. at the atp world tour finals, there is not anything riding on the game between roger federer and marin cilic. a repeat of the wimbledon final in which roger federer won. there the croat took the first set aen a tie—break. these are live pictures from the 02 aen a tie—break. these are live pictures from the o2 arena in london live on bbc two and the bbc sport website. laterjack sock is playing alexander zverev. the winner of that match gets a place in the last four. that‘s all the sport. back in the next hour. i‘ll see you then. i‘m not sure you will?
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next hour. i‘ll see you then. i'm not sure you will? i think i will... no i won‘t. it‘s not me, it is mike bushell. aye poll guise. thank you very much! the home affairs select committee says that ministers must draw up contingency plans to prevent delays at ports if custom controls changes when britain leaves the eu. gridlock on the way to the ports. this was the scene two years ago on the motorway near dover. strikes by ferry workers in france, and a surge in attempts by migrants to get to britain, led to queues and delays over here. now the government‘s being warned it could happen again, when the uk leaves the eu. a home affairs committee report says u nless a home affairs committee report says unless customs operations stay as they are after brexit, border checks
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will increase, as eu goods will need screening. the report says that extra capacity is needed to store and search items and vehicles and it calls for significantly more staff than the 300 extra border force officers promised by the government. when the border staff, what they do, the customs checks at the borders, if they are to increase, there is a risk that border force staff will be pulled off security checks or illegal immigration checks and we can‘t have failings in brexit implementation putting our security at risk. this is the second time in a week that a group of mps have warned of possible chaos at britain‘s borders after brexit. saying it would be catastrophic if a new customs declaration system was not ready on time. but a spokesperson for the government said it would ensure that the resources were available to run an effective customs and immigration system. police investigating
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the grenfell tower fire say the remains of all those who were killed in the blaze have now been recovered. 71 people are now known to have died, including a stillborn baby delivered in hospital after his mother escaped. meanwhile, families, firefighters and those affected by grenfell are being offered free holidays thanks to a unique project in cornwall, as frankie mccamley reports. a birthday boy without a care in the world. but the reality is his life was uprooted by the fire at grenfell tower. now, thanks to a unique project, his family are on holiday in cornwall. how has your day been? good. yeah? your birthday? and how has it been in cornwall? good? i thought it was super. he lost his best friend in the fire. so young, he struggled to understand. i told him that she is in
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the sky, she can see you. he can say hello to her. she never forget you. every day he would say "did you see me?" "i miss you." it is hard for me, missing my child. the family lived in a block next to grenfell tower and cannot go back. they have now been staying in a hotel for more than five months. this was their only chance for a break thanks to cornish businesses offering free holidays to those struggling to cope. what can we do? we can do this. what have we got? beautiful surroundings. we don‘t have much money, but we give what we have got. and everyone has come together. the group have now helped nearly 200 people get away.
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as well as sightseeing and beach trips, they have had grief counselling as well. it is a chance for the families to make their own new memories, and for many of the children here, this is the first time they have surfed, the first time they have ever been in the sea, and their parents tell me the first time some of them have smiled in a very long time. this is just amazing. people that don't even know us, theyjust come and tell us come here and surf. the holiday ends with a celebration. but like many here, his sister does not want to go back. it is slightly scary. you just feel like the building will fall on you. if someone talks about it
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i just start remembering stuff, what happened. make a wish! hejust wishes he had his friend back. frank mccamley, bbc news, in cornwall. theresa may has been speaking about the government‘s pledge to ‘build more homes more quickly‘. she was visiting an affordable housing estate in barnet in north london. i‘ve been pleased to come to barnet and see the regeneration of an estate, to sit down with rita and val and talk to them about the new flats, how much better they are than the old estate. i want to ensure that young generation, new young generations, new generations can have the same opportunity to have their own home, to have the house or the flat that will work for them. that is why it is important that the government and i are putting focus on housing. pleased to say that the figures that we see today shows in the last year we have seen 217,000 new homes built. that is the highest level of home
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building for almost a decade. but there is more we need to do. i announced a few weeks ago, we would put £2 billion into affordable housing, £10 billion into help to buy to get young people on the housing ladder. government is clear, we want people to have the security of a roof over their head, their own home for themselves and their family. nick bowles is a forming planning minister. hejoins me from south london. we have heard this before? yes it is very welcome that the prime minister has made this her personal mission for her time as the prime minister. it is the biggest challenge that the country faces. we are making progress. but the progress is too slow. i think that the prime minister recognises that. i‘m expecting to see some bold new measures in the budget next week.
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where is the log jam? is it with central government or local councils? there are a whole number of things. problems with the land market. it‘s very, very hard to buy land, to build on at an affordable price and still have money for the infrastructure. sites don‘t have planning as quickly as they should. there is a sense that they sit on the land and build when they can keep the prices as high as possible. there are restrictions in the planning system and it takes too long. so lots of different problems. we have to tackle all of them to really get houses being built at the rate that we need. there is more than a sense of people hanging on to land on the basis it gains in money without having to do anything it is happening all over the country.
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should there be a limit on the length of time that people can hang on to land like that? well i think there are two things. there is the land that house builders own, that they have planning permission on. there, they will have agreed to build out a certain number of houses. what i believe is that if they don‘t build out the houses on they don‘t build out the houses on the schedule agreed, then they should be required to offer the empty should be required to offer the e m pty plots should be required to offer the empty plots to any other builder who is willing to build houses on that sight, so that they can‘t gain the market and keep the land backjust until the prices are as high as possible. then there‘s land not owned by house builders, without planning permission but the sort of land you may want to build on in the future. that is where we have to reform the compulsory purchase laws to restore a situation that used to be the case before 1960, where you can buy the land, the local councils
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can buy the land, the local councils can buy the land, the local councils can buy the land at a reasonable price so, that they have the money to put in place also the roads, the drains, schools and the infrastructure needed to support the housing. a change in law takes time, what do you say to the chancellor, who has a week left before the budget, what can you see him do that might make a real difference? one of the main proposals i have been pushing is for him to launch a new grenfell housing commission and bond in memory of the people that lost their lives in that terrible disaster. to build 50,000 affordable homes every year across the country, mostly on land that governments and councils already own. i believe that the central government has to intervene in a way it has not done for a very long time, more than 50 years. this is now a crisis. small measures are got going to sort it out.
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—— are not going to sort it out. thank you very much for your time. the future of zimbabwe‘s long—time leader, robert mugabe, remains unclear after he was placed under house arrest by the country‘s military. his long—time rival, morgan tsvangirai, has urged him to resign immediately. the metropolitan police have said their final assessment is that is that71 people were killed in the grenfell tower fire. the actor kevin spacey faces 20 more allegations of inappropriate behaviour during his time as artistic director at the old vic theatre. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. a drop in british retail sales recorded a decline of 0.3% in october. it‘s the first fall since 2013, but that‘s the year—on—year figure. the month—on—month number, september to october, showed a similar rise in sales, which is why the office of national statistics says that the underlying pattern
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is "steady growth". the number of unlicensed cars on the road has tripled since the paper tax disc was abolished. it shows that there is more than £100 million from about 750,000 unlicensed vehicles last year. the rac said to get rid of the paper task disc three years ago has proved costly. high street pawnbroker cash converters has warned customers about a data breach on its website. the company said customer usernames, passwords and addresses had potentially been accessed by a third party. the company told the bbc it was taking the breach "extremely seriously" and had reported it to the information commissioner. its that time of year when people are preparing forms to try and get into university or applying to become apprentices — but more applying for the latter rather than the former because of the cost? absolutely. it is said that half the
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people that graduate don‘t get to graduate level jobs, so people that graduate don‘t get to graduate leveljobs, so three years studying the degree but unable to follow it to the job that you want to get into. and also, there are people that want to earn money in stead of being in debt in three yea rs‘ stead of being in debt in three years‘ time. that is a main motivator, and therefore 48% of young are looking into apprenticeships. young are looking into apprenticeships. debt from degrees taking years to pay off. answers and cues in guest. let‘s talk to steve nash, chief executive at the institute of the motor industry. tell us more about the apprenticeships? the number of new apprenticeships? the number of new apprenticeships is coming online. we will end up more than we have ever had since the levy was introduced earlier this year. we are seeing degree level
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apprenticeships offered at a rate we have not seen before. it is not that there is a problem with the supply of apprenticeships, 20 years ago, tony blair‘s government set an objective to get 50% of people going to university. we have achieved that. in subsequent years we have seen it is probably not entirely what we want to achieve. we need a more holistic approach. as you have said earlier, a lot of graduates don‘t get graduate leveljobs as they may not have done the right type of degrees. with the age of automation, for example is there a danger that an apprenticeship could be a short term fix? that the machines that are replacing parts of the force of the industry made up 30,40 replacing parts of the force of the industry made up 30, 40 years replacing parts of the force of the industry made up 30,40 years ago, thatis industry made up 30,40 years ago, that is changing? it is changing but then we need more highly skilled people. so the jobs are different. without a question, thejobs people. so the jobs are different. without a question, the jobs that some of the young people coming
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cloying the education system today may want in five or ten years‘ time don‘t exist today but we will need people to take the roles on. to get employability skills, with an apprenticeship and a vocational education, that all of that can give you. the people at home looking to apply to universities or apprenticeships, when we are talking about skills, what are they? the reforms to apprenticeships, going through the system recently were about having people who were work—ready. so people who don‘tjust know in theory how to do the job but have the practical skills to do it. i think that is the key thing. steve, thank you very much for joining us. and manchester united, they are second. not doing so badly but doing well with the revenues? scoring with the revenues. back of the net for broadcasting, match day ticketing
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doing well. those are the two i rehearsed! so a p pa re ntly those are the two i rehearsed! so apparently they had three new signings over the summer but have managed to do well. broadcasting and match day is helping. broadcasting because they were in the uefa, the champions league as well as the premier league. match day still doing well for them but they are suffering in terms of the commercial side of thing, mensch andising and clothing on their business, that is not doing so well. is that as they are not changing the kit every two months? perhaps. or perhaps a broader picture of the retail sales show slowing but they are doing well. and the markets. so the ftse is in positive territory. bucking a trend from the rest of the week. the royal mail shares are slightly up by 1%. they had reported a drop in revenue. they
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are having troubles with staff over wage... so the share price goes up? i never understand that. well, it is slightly flat. 1% is ok. it was a little down a couple of hours ago. but they have been warned over the christmas period that there could be issues with delivering. thank you very much. russia could be barred from competing in the winter olympics in february, after the world anti—doping agency said it hadn‘t done enough to address allegations of widespread cheating. the organisation says it‘s maintaining a suspension put in place two years ago, when a report accused russia of systematic state—sponsored doping. our sports correspondent richard conway reports. it was russia‘s moment to shine, but evidence of state—sponsored doping at the sochi winter olympics in 2014 continues to leave a stain on the country‘s sporting character. russia‘s hopes of clearing its name suffered a blow today. the world anti—doping agency thinks not enough has been done. it wants access to the moscow lab suspected of being the hub of its doping operation and is also demanding acceptance that senior
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sports ministry figures were complicit in a cover—up. the argument from our russian friends today was these top two are mainly political rather than normal procedure. i‘m not sure that either of them are, but that‘s a different argument. but they haven‘t been fulfilled. independent reports last year by the canadian law professor richard mclaren implicated the majority of russian 0lympic sports in cheating, prompting a partial ban at the rio 2016 summer games. the russian minister of sport directed, controlled and oversaw the manipulation of athletes‘ analytical results, or sample swapping, with the active participation and assistance of the fsb. but russian authorities insist they are continuing their antidoping reforms. we are doing all our best to progress in antidoping activity
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among the whole of russia. i mean in prevention, in education, in result management, testing and in investigation. with just under three months to go until the winter games begin in south korea, russia‘s paralympians are currently ruled out of taking part. the final decision is due in mid—december. but the international olympic committee must also make its decision and rule if it‘s going to leave a sporting superpower out in the cold. richard conway, bbc news. right, receipts catch up with the weather. louise lear is upstairs, over there, oh, i‘m just weather. louise lear is upstairs, overthere, oh, i‘mjust seeing weather. louise lear is upstairs, over there, oh, i‘m just seeing you now. i‘m here. i have managed to break the bbc computer, i look forward to the
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insults to come in half an hour‘s time! these are the temperatures tomorrow. it will be a cold start over england and wales. lows down to—4 and 5 celsius. so a hard frost is likely. scraping the wind screens no doubt. the reason for the change isa no doubt. the reason for the change is a cold front moving from the north as we speak. behind it is giving cooler air and windy conditions into the far north of scotland. here not as cold. we are likely to see gales into the northern isles and a rash of showers. elsewhere, clearskies and lighter winds. a touch of fog forming in places. it will be the talking point, the cold, that will be the feel of things tomorrow morning. so cold. a frosty start—4 and—5 celsius. in england and wales, lots 6 sunshine to look forward to. a beautiful day if you like it on
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the chilly side. but at 8.00am, a temperatures are a couple of degrees above freezing in the early morning rush house. so if you are heading out walking the dog, you will need an extra layer. bright and subby conditions in the north. a risk of showers. widespread in the far north with squally winds and gales into the far north. also wintriness into the far north. also wintriness into the higher ground too. but they should be refined to the north of scotland. elsewhere, it is a settled day, dry and sunny. hopefully some lovely weather shots for you tomorrow. 10 to 7 celsius, so not feeling warm. and into the weekend, we keep the breeze and the lower temperatures, there could be
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light patchy rain, cheerful down towards south wales and southern england on saturday. dry, sunny spells elsewhere. a similar story into sunday. always the strongest of the winds through the north sea. here cooler but we should keep some sunshine. all the time, down to the south—west, a little more in the way of cloud. double figures likely here but cold on the exposed north sea coasts. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. today at 4. still in charge — crisis talks between ousted president robert mugabe and military leaders who‘ve seized control in zimbabwe. the final toll —
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the metropolitan police say that seventy—one people were killed in the grenfell tower fire. the old vic says it‘s received 20 personal testimonies of alleged inappropriate behaviour by kevin spacey during his 11—years as artistic director. a bbc study highlights the big challenge ahead in terms of getting more young people into the game. it shows more 18—24 —year—old is betting on matches and play in a team. twice as many prefer to play ona team. twice as many prefer to play on a computer game. i would be happy with this beach in august but believe it or not this was this afternoon across the south coast with 15 degrees the high. a different story across cairngorm. minus four degrees a couple of hours ago with 91 mile—per—hour wins. also coming up... the highest—ever amount paid
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for a work of art at auction. but the buyer of the da vinci painting remains anonymous. for now. hello everyone — this is afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. what now for robert mugabe? zimbabwe‘s long—time president remains under house arrest — but is still supposed to be in charge after the military intervened two days ago. amid rumours of his imminent resignation — and talk of who‘ll replace him — the people of zimbabwe are holding their breath — and awaiting news which they hope will answer the question.. what next? my colleague ben brown is following events from zimbabwe. they are headlines most in zimbabwe thought they would never see, the man who had held the nation in an iron grip the 37 years swept aside by the military
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and now in custody. it is a lot to take in. steps taken by the army, quite positive. we are a bit uncertain about what's going to happen but we are still very much fine. we are a bit uncertain about what will happen. we are still... we have to respect our president, he is too old, we have to give him a safe retirement package and find somewhere to keep him safe. the military says it is keeping the president safe for now, armoured vehicles are still patrolling the streets of harare today, the army very much in charge, but also maintaining calm. president mugabe has been kept out of sight to maintain this pretence of it not being a coup, the army needs him to resign to allow a transition of power. talks are under way with south african envoys but some reports suggest he is demanding to serve his full term. president mugabe is still in power, the man in charge of zimbabwe, even though he‘s at home
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protected by the army. a lot has happened. but what has not happened is a coup. whatever you call it, waiting in the wings is emmerson mnangagwa, once robert mugabe‘s right—hand man, sacked as vice president last week, widely believed to have engineered the takeover. the whereabouts of his main rival, the president‘s wife, grace, are unknown and some of those in the governing party who supported her in the past and criticised the military yesterday are now falling into line. please accept my apologies on behalf of myself, we are still young people, growing up, we learn from our mistakes. from this big mistake, we have learnt a lot. but will a reshuffle at the of zanu—pf be enough for these opposition activists with the movement for democratic change? they have battled robert mugabe for almost two decades. 0pposition parties may not see a path to power.
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their leader, morgan tsvangirai, threatened to unseat robert mugabe once. in the interest of the people of zimbabwe mr robert mugabe must resign. step down immediately in line with the national sentiment and expectation. taking full regard of his legacy and contribution to zimbabwe. the delay is making the african union uneasy, the longer zimbabwe‘s military appear to be in charge, the harder it is to accept what is happening in harare. translation: we demand respect for the constitution and will never accept the military coup d‘etat. we know their internal problems, they need to be resolved politically by zanu—pf. statehouse.
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mr mugabe‘s official residence filmed here eight years ago may still have the trappings of power but its occupant has lost his authority. where once he could grandstand to the world, now others are deciding his fate. the man who said only god could remove him, the victim of a more mundane power struggle. richard lister, bbc news. andrew harding is in zimbabwe and has been speaking to people who only known life under robert mugabe. we‘ve come to a very ordinary township to talk to people about what‘s going on here in zimbabwe. and two things are very striking. everyone is feeling this enormous sense of anticipation, they know, they believe that president robert mugabe, the only man they‘ve ever known in charge of this country, really is on the cusp of stepping down. so there is this anticipation, this feeling people want to celebrate, and yet, so many people here have learned the hard way politics is a very dangerous business. people get arrested, they disappear, there are beatings, there are killings.
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this has been something that has been a reality in zimbabwe for many, many years. so people are waiting, they‘re waiting for it to become official, waiting either for president mugabe to go on television and announce his resignation, perhaps for emmerson mnangagwa his former deputy who was ousted, and who has now come back on the back of this military coup, to go on television himself and say it‘s over. then i think we‘ll see people breathing out, people relaxing, taking to the streets perhaps to mark this extraordinary moment. but until then, people are waiting. they are quietly overwhelmed, i think, and overjoyed, by and large, by what is happening. they are also aware this is not some popular uprising, but the opposition taking over. this is still zanu—pf, still the party that has run things and will carry on to run things. people are not sure exactly what will change in their lives. when and if president
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mugabe is finally out of the picture. the opposition leader called for robert mugabe‘s departure. in the interest of the people of zimbabwe, mr robert mugabe must resign. step down immediately in line with the national sentiment and expectation. taking full regard of his legacy and the contribution to zimbabwe, pre—and post—zimba bwe. that the contribution to zimbabwe, pre—and post—zimbabwe. that they be negotiated, all—inclusive, transitional mechanisms. i emphasised transitional mechanism. and that the purpose, the essence, nature and character of that mechanism be agreed upon by all national stakeholders. that there be
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rinsing reforms for a free, fair and credible election to be held upon the fort implementation of those reports. —— full implementation. the fort implementation of those reports. -- full implementation. for more information, go to our website. police investigating the disappearance of a 19—year—old in dorset say they‘ve discovered "items of women‘s clothing" in a field near swanage. gaia pope, who has severe epilepsy, was last seen in the coastal town, nine days ago. a cordon is now in place at the field and officers have updated the teenager‘s family. it‘s not yet known who they belong to. wejoin we join matthew amroliwala for a special interview with un secretary general antonio guterres will be talking about zimbabwe as well yemen, the rohingya refugee crisis
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and the situation in north korea and elsewhere. we‘re going to develop the next part of the programme to the un secretary general who is with us on bbc news. in 1945 the body‘s first secretary general said it was the most impossiblejob in general said it was the most impossible job in the world and it is probably as true now as it was then. when you look at what antonio guterres is actually grappling with, whether the humanitarian crisis in yemen, the nuclear crisis, uk cheque and, climate change. if i went to the other challengers in the there would be no time left for the interview. welcome to the programme. pleasure to be here. when you got it said we are a world in pieces. we‘ve had the comedy macro crisis, north korea, the most unpredictable us president in living memory, the world is in more pieces, what is the toughest bit about being secretary general? i think the fact we are facing a number of crises for which u nfortu nately facing a number of crises for which unfortunately the un is not the
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instrument to bring them to solution. if you compare with the beginning of the un, now we have a new threat, the nuclear threat, a threat that probably we never imagined would come back after the cold war. we thought it was a problem of the past. it is there. the north korean situation, the different positions between the united states and iran on the treaty relation to the nuclear... potential. in iran. the nuclear strategy is back. we might have, and i hope it won‘t happen, but we might have a serious confrontation on the north korean situation. i interviewed the american general in charge of the forces on the korean peninsula. he said that threat is what kept him awake at night. what keeps you awake at night? that also keeps you awake at night? that also keeps me awake at night. i think it‘s absolutely essential the
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security council remains united. and that the north koreans accept the need to denuclearise the korean peninsula. but i believe there should be a military solution. for that i strongly believe the unity of the security council needs to pave the security council needs to pave the way for a political solution for a dialogue that the north koreans need to accept in order to allow for denuclearisation to take place in the context of a diplomatic initiative. i want to talk about the rohingya. we see pictures filmed by one of your bodies, staggering lines of refugees. where you worked many yea rs. of refugees. where you worked many years. i've been in these parts, in the north of ratifying the state, three times. this must shock you. those people who escaped to bangladesh. they want to play some
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first—hand accounts from people if escaped myanmar talking to the bbc earlier. at the un has said textbook ethnic cleansing but you met aung san suu kyi, what did you say to her? well, first of all, this is a situation i know from many years ago. i was in unhcr, i visited know from many years ago. i was in unhcr, ivisited rakhine know from many years ago. i was in unhcr, i visited rakhine state twice. the rohingya population is probably the most is, native population i‘ve ever seen in the world. they are stateless, they have
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no rights, they can‘t move without permission of the authorities even from their villages, access to education and health is minimum. they can‘t marry without government permission. you can‘t imagine how discriminated this population was. during the confrontation is that occurred a few years ago, there were clear double standards. the buddhist population that was displaced was authorised to go back to their villages. the crackdown of the last few months, i mean, so much pressure on aung san suu kyi. when you met her a couple of days ago, what did you say to her? the same i've been saying in public, it‘s absolutely essential to stop all the violence, it‘s absolutely essential to allow humanitarian access to all of the affected areas. most important of all because we have 600,000 in bangladesh, it is essential to guarantee that they can come home in
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safety, dignity, voluntarily, and to their places of origin. this is a massive effort of reconciliation. the agency formed between the two macro communities and the consequences of this brutal violence that took place amongst the rohingya is something that has created panic, fear. you've been calling for that for many months now, at what point would you consider sanctions? this is an area in which only the security council can decide. i don‘t think the council is in a position to decide sanctions, i think it‘s crucial to keep the pressure over myanmar. to make sure these conditions i mentioned our implement it. i wonder if the crisis is emblematic. the un has never been needed more. it‘s never been weaker. notjust in needed more. it‘s never been weaker. not just in myanmar with needed more. it‘s never been weaker. notjust in myanmar with the rohingya. look at syria, you were
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forced to watch the help of aleppo, impotent. you had assad using chemical weapons. is the worry not that there is such a mismatch of events that there is such a mismatch of eve nts o n that there is such a mismatch of events on the ground and the responses of your body? it's very clear why. i lived when i was a student... it was not a world with global governance, much less democratic. two superpowers who control things. then when i was in government, a period of american supremacy in the 90s. the rules were clear. now we live in a world that is not your nipple. it‘s not multipolar, it‘s just is not your nipple. it‘s not multipolar, it‘sjust chaotic. —— —— it our capacity to bring parties
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together, and to make them create conditions for peace is very limited. the result of that is this terrible humanitarian impact. quite an admission. we have not been able to stop of an admission. we have not been able to stop - of these crises. we to stop most of these crises. we have a big effort in libya. we have been active in several of the african crises. we‘ve been trying to have process in syria. we‘ve not been able to deliver peace there. one thing the un has been able to deliver is massive humanitarian assistance. i‘m proud to be a colleague of so many people around the world in the most dangerous circumstances making sure rohingya, syrians and others get the assistance they need. trying to do that in yemen. before i ask about the catastrophe that is in yemen and has been getting worse and worse, three of your agencies, another report out today. i want to show you this from some of the bbc reporting
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of the last couple of days from that country, have a look at this. panic at the school in the yemeni capital. a saudi coalition air strike targeting a nearby building has blown out this the school‘s windows. in this conflict, death can come from the air at any time. for kids as well as soldiers. how do you stop yemen becoming the next syria? it's stop yemen becoming the next syria? it‘s not easy, we‘re making a lot of efforts. first of all trying to make sure the doors are open for humanitarian assistance, at the present moment we have enormous difficulties of access for a population in extreme danger. the saudi foreign minister refused again only today after three un reports talking about the potential for thousands to die. we will be insisting, it‘s essential to allow for massive humanitarian assistance,
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they need food and medicine. airport bostock also be open for un flights for the needs, the more immediate needs. we believe that we will be able to reach that, and go on insisting. beyond that we need peace. we need to engage the parties and make the parties understand this isa and make the parties understand this is a stupid war, nobody is winning, it is paying a terrible price for those fighting. your supporters say amazing things about you, your ability to make deals, your intellect, your drive, but criticism i read his style is to make general state m e nts i read his style is to make general statements on issues, but not directly challenge governments on their actions. how do you directly challenge the saudi arabians on this? have you directly challenge them? as you know, we've published a report in which there was a very strong criticism of saudi arabia. in
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relation to the children that died in the conflict. we have no problem challenging any government. but our objective is to create conditions for peace. for that we need to convince the parties to come together to understand as i said this is a war nobody is winning. it's this is a war nobody is winning. it‘s causing tremendous negative impact for both sides. let me ask you more about yourself. what is it that drives you? i had a fantastic job, to be able to give my life to support people in stress, the most vulnerable of the vulnerable. we saw in the pictures that you have presented. it has created enormous frustration. it was fantastic to feel we could help them but terrible to recognise we couldn‘t stop the causes forcing them to flee. i felt
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i should try to do something in that. that was the reason i became a candidate for secretary general of the united nations. i‘ll do everything i can in order to be able to reduce, if possible stop, some of these terrible conflict spreading in these terrible conflict spreading in the world and causing so much trouble. you talked about the most vulnerable, when he stood down as by minister of portugal, you secretly educated some of the poorest children in maths, i read in terms of things you like, you love history, books, chocolate, you hate cheese! who hates cheese chris jamar daesh i do. and you are on the cocktail circuit. i'm allergic. what you said is true, i mean... one needs to be able to do everything possible to solve the problems of the world. but you‘ll never be able to solve the problems of the world if you are not also able to dedicate your commitment to the people you know, to those that live side by side with you, that you can help and
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you cannot refuse that. you talked about the difficulties. we have a question from a viewer from kenya, a dedicated you to reform of those basic reforms? we've launched to raise reform un. we want to be much more nimble, much more effective, much more cost—effective. much more decentralised, with power distributed to the periphery instead of concentrated in new york. at the same time more able to deliver humanitarian assistance in a coordinated way, more able to support governments in implementing the agenda for sustainable development and creating conditions for climate change to be ten. to make the organisation much more effective, much less bureaucratic, and much more committed to support the people. because it is the people that matter. yukonite donald trump, have you told him, when he says
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climate change is a hoax, you are wrong? of course, we all consider climate change to be the most releva nt threat climate change to be the most relevant threat to the planet today. he doesn‘t. relevant threat to the planet today. he doesn't. yes, but there we profoundly disagree. and more, i think it‘s important... profoundly disagree. and more, i think it's important... how do you do diplomacy with the most undiplomatic presidents. it's clear there is a different perspective, not the conviction it is the case. i would say what is reassuring, what the un has managed, is that all other countries in the world are staying the course. and we see in american society, the cities, some states, the businesses, totally committed to make americans able to fulfil the pledges made by the american government, even if the american government, even if the american government, even if the american government is not doing it back. let me get through a few more question. what are we seeing, to the world looks like a coup in zimbabwe, how do you it ends? i never like to
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see military involved in politics, but i have to recognise it‘s a confusing situation. i hope first of all there is no blood, that this is done peacefully. and i hope that it will be able to lead to a political democratic solution, and that the next elections that are scheduled, that they are free and fair for the people of zimbabwe to choose their own future. you are grappling with so much, you have russians interfering with other countries elections, and annexing territory, the nuclear threat you are talking about, donald trump talking about wiping that nation off the face of the planet. you said an interesting thing about advice from your late wife. in terms of how people see individuals. two people become six, thatis individuals. two people become six, that is how you try to deal with countries as well, you need to explain to the viewers what she meant by that and what you do. my first wife, that passed away long ago, was a psychoanalyst. she taught
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one thing that has been essential. when you have two people that are six, what each person is, what they think they are, and what each person thinks the other is. the six can be very different, that is why you have so many misunderstandings in relations and lack of trust. it works with countries as well. what is true for people is true for countries, that is why you have preventive strikes. we think the other country is going to attack us, we‘ll attack first. what we need, this is essential in politics and diplomacy, to bring together the six to two to make people love each other, recognise what each other is, and respect each other. you are only one year in but when you get to the end of this term as secretary—general, in your head what real success look like and what will failure look like? success for me is to be able to contribute for peace
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to be able to contribute for peace to be able to contribute for peace to be established at least in some of these crises, failure is if it is not possible, even if it is not my fault. but i also have to assume my responsibilities. in terms of the almost 12 months you‘ve completed, what have the highs and lows been?‘ positive thing has been when everybody expected the relationship of the new american administration would be impossible we manage to have a constructive relationship. a lot of merit goes to the us department representative in new york, nikki haley. it does allow us to work. the most negative thing is this frustration to see all these conflicts going on and on and on. not being able to stop them. we've run out of time but thank you so much for your time, joining us here on the programme, thank you so much. ijust want i just want to bring an ijust want to bring an update on a story we‘ve been covering through the day. detectives who had been looking for the teenager gaia pope
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say they‘ve discovered women‘s clothing near a coastal path in dorset, found by a member of the public, in the last few minutes we hear a 49—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. he‘s from swanage. that‘s all we‘re hearing at the moment. gaia went missing nine days ago, last seen by afamily missing nine days ago, last seen by a family friend in swanage. their father has been saying the search for his daughter had been the toughest thing to go through. as you can see there is now a forensic search of that field and the area around the point where clothes were discovered by a member of the public just before 10:30am this morning that discovery was made. a police cordon was set up. breaking news in the last few moments a 49—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. any more on that, of course, we‘ll bring it to you. sally taylor from south today will bring all of that when we talk to her in
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our nationwide segment in the next few minutes. you‘re watching afternoon live, let‘s catch up with the weather. louise lear is in the studio with a rather nice picture, is that tonight? beautiful sunset, in leicestershire. it means clear skies in november... very cold. how low do you think we‘ll get? minus four. you've been paying attention. i watched the last bulletin, i don‘t know what you expect. quite right, well done. -3, minus four degrees in some places, clear skies, light wind. minus four degrees in some places, clearskies, light wind. more minus four degrees in some places, clear skies, light wind. more of a breeze for the north so not as cold in scotland. unfortunately it‘s going to be windy as well with a scattering of showers. you can see that clearly. this area of high—pressure drifting in from the west is going allow temperatures to fall away through the night to night. italy start. you‘ll be scraping the frost of the windscreen is no doubt first thing tomorrow.
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little bit patchy mist and fog around as well. temperatures at 8am will only sit around two or three degrees above freezing. cold start but lots of sunshine first thing. a light breeze. despite wearing a few extra layers should be a promising morning. scattered showers into northern ireland, when strengthening, showers more frequent into scotland. here it‘ll feel quite one particularly in the far north. gales or severe gales likely, driving in squally showers and hail, even sleet and snow to higher ground. elsewhere, a beautiful afternoon for many, lovely mid november afternoon. sunshine will stay for most of the day. temperatures will be down on what we seen today, with highs of 15 degrees on the south coast. highest values around 6—9. cold air desperately trying to hang in. this mild air wa nts to trying to hang in. this mild air wants to spoil the party. it‘s going to bring more cloud, like drizzly rain across wales, south—west
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england, to saturday, not amounting to too much. double figures likely. 1112 degrees, clear skies and cold weather continuing along the north sea coast. at that is where the breeze is likely to stay into sunday. similar story. cold, hopefully some decent spells of sun. thicker cloud and drizzly outbreaks of rainfor thicker cloud and drizzly outbreaks of rain for the south and west. highest values on sunday 6 degrees into the north—east, 12 degrees, almost double, into the south—west. it will be mild air win out? you have to keep watching. i‘ll be back later on. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. zimbabwe‘s long—time president robert mugabe is holding talks with south african negotiators over his future. the 93—year—old was put under house arrest yesterday after the army
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moved to take control. police in dorset investigating the disappearance of gaia pope say they‘ve found "items of women‘s clothing" in a field near swanage. the 19 year old hasn‘t been seen for more than a week. after months of investigation, the metropolitan police say seventy 71 people were killed in the grenfell tower fire. the final death toll includes a baby who was stillborn on the day the fire broke out. london‘s old vic theatre says 20 people claim they were victims of "inappropriate behaviour" by the actor kevin spacey. the venue says it "apologises wholeheartedly" to the people who told them they‘d been affected. the actor has not responded to the allegations. sport now on afternoon live with mike bushell. mike have england finally got an opener for the ashes? yes it‘s notjust the koala bears the england players have been looking comfortable with, as they seem to be finding their feet on their ashes tour. mark stoneman looks set to open in that first test next week, after getting england‘s first century on this tour. in a moment — we‘ll show you how mark stoneman took his chance — to take 111 in england‘s final warm
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up match against a cricket australia eleven. and the bbc‘s price of football survey is out. it shows that football may have an issue creating a future generation of season ticket holders. our reporter katherine downes is at the home of premier league side stoke city. some of the most interesting parts of this involves young people, who it seems could be getting priced out of the game. yes. that is despite the fact that the majority of premier league football clu bs the majority of premier league football clubs across the country have frozen prices for the last three years or even dropped prices. stoke the average match day experience, once you have bought a ticket, a pie or a cup of tea at
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half—time it is costing you about £35. less than average. the most popular season ticket is £344. almost £200 less than the average in the premier league. so you might think enough to keep people coming back. but not so. 80% of 18 to 24—year—olds, the bbc asked in the poll, said that they felt priced out of football. 56% said that the cost of football. 56% said that the cost of the ticket is enough to mean that they don‘t go to watch live football. i put the question to mark hughes, the stoke city manager in his press conference this afternoon before the match against brighton. i askedif before the match against brighton. i asked if he was worried that football was losing touch with young people. i would imagine that the 18 to 24 group is different. they miss out on the initiatives set up for the younger fans and away pieces.
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so, it's probably an area that needs to be looked at to try to encourage or ensure that they don't miss out on initiatives that other groups and other age groups have the benefit of. .itis of. . it is generally agreed that the 18 to 24—year—old category is a transient demographic as people leave universities, getting first jobs away from home it is difficult to keep a tab on the demographic. but there are concerns that football could be losing touch with an entire generation, in fact. thank you, kat. for more, go to the bbc website and read in detail the findings. for more, go to the bbc website and read in detail the findings. as i was saying, surrey batsman mark stoneman looks set to partner alastair cook as part of england‘s opening pair when the first ashes test against australia begins in a week‘s time... his 111 helped england to 337 for 3 on day two
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against a cricket australia xi in townsville. england‘s first century on tour was added to by half centuries from cook, dawid malan and captainjoe root. england lead by 87 going into the third day of four. i‘m in decent touch. obviously it‘s been well document but in terms of how i have played and against the opposition, i‘m happy. everything is going well. i feel like opposition, i‘m happy. everything is going well. ifeel like my game is in good order. it will be tested a hell of a lot more come next week. there is no doubt of that, everyone is aware of it but as far as things 90. is aware of it but as far as things go, i‘m happy. but as far as things go, i‘m happy. roger federer has made it three wins out of three at the atp tour finals, beating marin cilic in london. it was a repeat of the wimbledon final which federer also won. the swiss came from a set down to win comfortably again. later, jack sock plays alexander zverev in the final game in that group. the winner willjoin
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federer in the last four. justin rose has put himself into a great position, at the world tour championships in dubai. the englishman is one off the lead after the first round. this eagle from the bunker helping him to six under par. patrick reed of the usa leads. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. now on afternoon live — let‘s go nationwide — and see what‘s happening around the country — in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. sally taylor is in southampton with the latest on the search for missing teenager gaia pope and peter levy is in hull where the queen has been visiting the city of culture. sally first of all. take us back, she‘s been missing for nine days now? she has, simon it is over a week since 19—year—old gaia pope went missing from swanage. to set the scene, swanage is a small but a
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popular seaside town in dorset. her disappearance sparked a massive search with the whole community of swanage getting search with the whole community of swa nage getting involved. search with the whole community of swanage getting involved. there is a huge sense of unit down in swanage. and certainly keeping this story very much in the headlines. gaia, we are told, we spoke to her cousin, she is devoted to herfamily, very, very close to them. they say this is not typical behaviour for her to disappear and not let them know. on monday evening, a 19—year—old man and 71—year—old woman, both known to gaia were arrested and released. in fa ct, gaia were arrested and released. in fact, south today, we had spoken to the 71—year—old woman hours before. she said that gaia had come to her flat knocking on her doorfor she said that gaia had come to her flat knocking on her door for help. it is important to say that gaia has epilepsy and it‘s believed she does not have her medication with her. there have been appeals from the family over the days and from today we spoke to her father, a very upset
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richard sutherland. the family know she will be found... until we know that, we have every hope, every minute that goes by, that every little bit of help is so greatfully received and she's worth every bit of it. worth every bit of it...a every bit of it. worth every bit of it... a dreadful time for the family. what developments today, sally? it's interesting, in the last hour, a number of things have happened. firstly, ishould hour, a number of things have happened. firstly, i should tell you that some women‘s clothing has been found ina that some women‘s clothing has been found in a field near swanage towards the coastal footpath, not farfrom towards the coastal footpath, not far from the town centre itself. in the past hour there‘s been a news conference from the dorset police, they revealed that they have arrested a 49—year—old man from swanage, known to gaia on suspicion of murder. that police search is continuing to
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find gaia. we‘ll have the very latest on south today at 6.30pm. thank you very much, sally taylor. let‘s go to hull, a change of mood here. peter levy is there for us. a rather important visit to the city of culture today? absolutely. .it culture today? absolutely. . it has been the city of culture yearfor hull. the highlight today, a visit by the queen. she was met by the city‘s volunteers. and was given a bouquet of flowers from isla lister, she chose them herself. and many, not usually shy hull people, said that they were star—struck. the queen went to a newly opened turbine, wind turbine factory, opened a year ago. hull is now the home of renewable
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energy. after, the queen went to the new university campus, to open a medical school building, a new building. it‘s been a great day for hull. many people were surprised to meet the queen. it‘s been a great day for hull in this year. and specialfor day for hull in this year. and special for the day for hull in this year. and specialfor the queen day for hull in this year. and special for the queen to come today? yes, and l and special for the queen to come today? yes, and [showing the queen with a sense of humour, at the medical centre, she was given an experiment, a glass of water, she said she hoped it was not drugged! lots of humour. and we notice there has not been a royal visit by simon mccoy but you still have 45 days if you come to hull. you better have some money! you may have upset a few people with that
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comment! well, i tell you what, have upset a few people with that comment! well, itell you what, i know you have been up to something for children in need, so we may have to talk about that. 0h, to talk about that. oh, dear. let‘s not go there. thank you very much. you are watching afternoon live, to catch up on any of those stories, go to the bbc news iplayer. go to the bbc news iplayer. police investigating the grenfell tower fire say the remains of all those who were killed in the blaze have now been recovered. 71 people are now known to have died — including a stillborn baby delivered in hospital after his mother escaped.tom tom burridge reports. grim statistics do little to convey the scale of this tragedy. but afterfive months, the police now have a definitive figure. 70 people, they say, were killed in the fire, as well as a stillborn baby. it‘s not about the number, it‘s about the people,
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it‘s always been at the heart of what we do. the challenge of it has been immense. we‘ve had our specialist teams work through about 15 and a half tonnes of debris, on each and every floor of grenfell tower, by hand, to find every single fragment that they can of all those that died. that‘s been extremely distressing to the families and indeed to those involved in the operation as well. the complexity of the police‘s work means a community waits. and scepticism and anger are prolonged. anita raphael knew people killed. she used to play in grenfell tower when she was a child. it‘s going to take a while for us to know the truth. you know, i don‘t think it‘s going to be like now or like the ending of the year, i think it‘s going to take about two years for everything to coming to light, you know, what‘s in the dark must come to light. that‘s how i see it. because we have no information, really, what‘s going on. you know? nothing at all. in the days and weeks following the fire, there was a lot of confusion about how many people had been killed. previously, the police had said around 80 people had died.
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the final death toll is lower, they say, because of a small number of cases of fraud and because some of the victims, who came from different countries, were reported missing several times. people living in this part of london have constantly demanded answers, but a vocal critic of the council in the wake of the fire says the debate about how many victims there were should now end. i think we have to accept that this is the final number. people are still angry about the chaos as it developed. i do pay tribute to the police and to the coroner‘s service. it‘s turned out to be far more complex than anybody thought it was going to be. officers are examining millions of documents relating to the refurbishment of the tower before the fire. they are interviewing thousands of people and examining the role of dozens of companies involved. any prosecutions are probably still a long way off. tom burridge, bbc
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news, in west london. 20 people have claimed they were victims of ‘inappropriate behaviour‘ by the actor kevin spacey, following an investigation by the old vic theatre in london. mr spacey was artistic director there between 2004 and 2015. he has not responded to these latest allegations. lizo mzimba has the latest from the old vic theatre in central london in central london. since the allegations arose, the old vic where he was the artistic directorfor many vic where he was the artistic director for many years, launched an investigation, they said that they spoke to 56 people who contacted their confident shall information line. of those, 20, of those 56, 20 people said that they had been the victims of inappropriate behaviour from kevin spacey. all were younger
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men at the time of the allegations. now of those 20, the investigators here for the theatre encouraged 14 of them to go to the police, saying that the behaviour that they alleged could constitute a criminal offence. the buck of them took place between the years #20 2004 to 2009, alleged to have happened here at the old vic itself. they met with staff. the investigators and the trust years the old vic earlier to explain the situation to them. and their artistic executive director apologised on behalf of the old vic as to what happened during kevin spa cey‘s as to what happened during kevin spacey‘s time here. the old vic apologise, wholeheartedly, to the people who have told us they‘ve been affected. we‘ve learned it is not enough to have the right process in place, eve ryo ne have the right process in place, everyone needs to feel that they can speak out, no matter who they are. much has change at the old vic in
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recent yea rs, much has change at the old vic in recent years, we will continue to work, to model and safeguard, the open culture that we want the old vic to be known for. they said a problem may have been kevin spacey‘s star persona, he was the artistic director here, as well asa the artistic director here, as well as a double oscar winner. they have said that they will put in procedures to try to ensure something like this does not happen again. kevin spacey has not given a response to this nor the allegations made from the old vic earlier today. the allegations made from the old vic earlier today. lizo mzimba is at the old vic theatre in central london for us. in the last few moments, pictures of robert mugabe emerged from the newspaper, the herald, he is there sitting up in an armchair with his
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wife, grace and general chiwenga at state house this afternoon. a number of images have been released. this is suggesting that robert mugabe is comfortable and very much looking as though he feels he is still in charge of what is going on. he has been talking to south african envoys about the future of zimbabwe, following the takeover of the military and the commander, general chiwenga is also there in the room with him so. those pictures are emerging. we are getting more from zimbabwe, my colleague ben brown will be with us later on. the government says it wants to build more homes, more quickly, to fix what it‘s called the "broken housing market". the communities secretary, sajid javid, says he will intervene directly in the case of fifteen councils in england, which haven‘t drawn up plans for more homes.
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labour say any increase was welcome but that house—building had still not returned to the level it reached before the global financial crisis. in a moment the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the future of robert mugabe is unclear, after he was placed under house arrest. morgan tsvangirai has urged him to resign immediately. the police investigating the disappearance of gaia pope have arrested a 49—year—old. gaia pope went missing nine days ago. gaia pope went missing nine days ago. the metropolitan police have said their final assessment is that seventy one people were killed in the grenfell tower fire. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. a drop in british retail sales recorded a decline
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of 0.3% in october. it‘s the first fall since 2013, but that‘s the year—on—year figure. the month—on—month number, september to october, showed a similar rise in sales, which is why the office of national statistics says that the underlying pattern is "steady growth". the number of unlicensed cars on the road has tripled since the paper tax disc was abolished. it shows that there is more than £100 million from about 750,000 unlicensed vehicles last year. the rac said to get rid of the paper task disc three years ago has proved costly. high street pawnbroker cash converters has warned customers about a data breach on its website. the company said customer usernames, passwords and addresses had potentially been accessed by a third party. the company told the bbc it was taking the breach "extremely seriously" and had reported it to the information commissioner. now, gkn, the share price announced
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today. a remarkable announcement made by them this morning? they had a new boss about to start on the #1s of january but has been axed before day one. he was head of the aerospace division and he had to write that off. write it off? what happened? he had to write it down because of auditing problems, and he is vague about that. we can make what we want from that. but lawyers are watching so we better not. yes. so, royal mail, the share price is all over the place? we have seen it fluctuate a bit today it started off well, even though the profits were down about 30%. that was better than expected. so it started 40% higher, then dropped, now it is hovering at 196. then dropped, now it is hovering at 1%. not too bad. but they warned that the christmas period could be tough. me are in dispute with
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workers over pension and pay. so it is not looking so great. but share price is not as bad as it could be. christmas tough for the royal mail, who knew?! how, house, the government announcing that they want more housing more quickly, a good news for the housing associations? that is true and for the house builders. persimmon and taylor‘s, they are all up. not necessarily because of this news but good news for them. the housing market is fragmented. it is hard to know where the prices are going, as the regions perform differently it is hard to know where the prices are going, perform differently . let‘s talk to richard dunbar, investment director at aberdeen standard. let‘s talk about the housing story. how much of a difference will this make today, boosting supplies will help but how much? we have been waiting for news on a boost to housing supply for some time. government has been talking about it
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but it has never been delivered. so the question is moving from talking about increased supply to delivering it. the house builders have the potential to do it but it comes down to the individual constituencies and individual regions and whether or not individuals and organisations are willing to let the housing be built. will the chancellor have room to manoeuvre in the budget next week? there is a real head of steam amongst the politicians and the government to make this happen. to get the level of house—building up to the levels we had seen before the financial crisis. the house builders themselves are in good financial shape. they are capable of doing that. there seems political will to expand the ability of councils and regions to allow houses to be built, so there is a combination coming together that should allow the chancellor to give us good news on that front. on the demand side, we are seeing evidence of demand at the
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top end of the london market coming down, which is helping the pricing of houses but, albeit at the top end. richard, let's move on to royal mail. royal mail often has troubles over the christmas period. how much ofa over the christmas period. how much of a significance is this? the profits are falling but the share price not so affected? the profits and revenues were better than investors expected. it is obviously that the company has gone up the down escale aitor, if you like. we are using letters and posting much less but the election helped the letters business in terms of posting but the royal mail is doing well with the parcel business with shopping online. revenues have been up, so letters doing poorly but not as badly as the
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investors feared and the parcels doing well, so that is balancing that, pleasing the invest orrors today. and the markets? i wanted to show you babcock, it was on there... they have won an raf contract for £106 million. you will have to take my word on that. that‘s good. but i wanted to show you funny pictures but i don‘t have those either. we are disappointing eve ryo ne those either. we are disappointing everyone today! we are disappointing everyone today! a 500—year—old painting of christ believed to have been by leonardo da vinci has been sold in new york for a record £341 million. the painting is known as salvator mundi, the saviour of the world. the price is the highest achieved at auction for any work of art. leonardo da vinci died in 1519, and there are fewer than 20 of his paintings in existence. our arts correspondent david sillito reports. and so, ladies and gentlemen, we moved to the leonardo da vinci,
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the salvator mundi. the salvator mundi, by leonardo da vinci. for this sale, the record price wasjust over $100 million for an old master. it just 28 seconds for that record to fall. at 110 million, who will give me... two minutes later, this. 190,200 million is bid, at 200 million. at 200 million. it had broken all sale records and we were only just getting started. this painting is what you might call the ultimate trophy work. there's only one in the world. so if you buy it you are the only person who's got the last leonardo da vinci in private hands, and you have got the ultimate trophy. 290? 300. i thought so. £300 million. applause
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and that was the record for any painting, smashed, and there was still a long way to go. the journey to this extraordinary moment is a story fit for a thriller. it was part of charles i collection. in the 18th century someone decided to adam beard to the face than four decades its whereabouts were unknown. then, in 1958, it was sold at auction for £45 about $60 and in 2005 it was decided by a group of experts that this really was the work of leonardo da vinci. the clue was that face, that hazy shimmer, his signature style. there are those who still have their doubts but a leading leonardo expert is convinced. there are no serious arguments about it not being by leonardo. the only serious argument is the extent to which it‘s been damaged and repaired, which is quite extensive. 19 minutes into the sale it had stalled at $370 million. and then this. 400. 400 million. adding christies‘ commission
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and that‘s a total price of $450 million. game over. sold. the name of the buyer, even where they come from, remained secret. but wherever they are, they‘ve just made history. david sillito, bbc news. it's it‘s when i tell them i was kidding, ididn‘t it‘s when i tell them i was kidding, i didn‘t have the money, that‘s when things really liven up! that‘s it from your afternoon live team for today, next the bbc news at five with jane hill. time for a look at the weather... here‘s louise lear. this is the story today, a weather front moving steadily south and east, introducing colder air and clearer skies. through the night, the temperatures to fall away sharply as the weather
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front drifts into the south—east. then with the high pressure building from the west, the clearer skies, the lighter winds and a colder air source and the temperatures fall away. the exception to scotland, here a bit too much of a breeze. but in rural parts of england and wales, seeing minus three or four celsius in the morning. so a cold and a frosty start but a sparkling start for many of us. the day to stay like that as well. so a lovely day with lots of sunshine coming through. the exception is the far north. gales continuing here. a scattering of showers. some of these heavy. squally winds and sleet and snow to the tops of higher ground. into the weekend, things turn milder, with the odd spit and spot of rain on saturday. on sunday it looks likely to stay fine, dry and sunny. bjorn
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today at 5, i‘m ben brown live in zimbabwe where president mugabe‘s future hangs in the balance. the ousted leader is in crisis talks with the military, which seized control of the country. reports say he‘s refusing to resign but his long—time rival, opposition leader morgan tsvangiria, calls on him to go now. in the interest of the people of zimbabwe, mr robert mugabe must resign, step down immediately in line with the national sentiment and expectation. i‘m jane hill. the other main stories on bbc news at 5: police investigating the disappearance of 19—year—old gaia pope in dorset arrest a 49—year—old man on suspicion of murder.
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