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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  November 17, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news — and these are the top stories developing at 11. theresa may is at an european summit in sweden — amid warnings the eu might not start trade talks in december. we want to move forward together, talking about the trade issues and trade partnership for the future. david davis calls for more movement on the european side of the talks. we have been offering some quite creative compromises — we haven't always got that back. zimbabwe's president, robert mugabe, makes his first public appearance since the country's military took control of the country. also coming up — police investigating the disappearance of a teenager in dorset are continuing to question a man arrested yesterday on suspicion of her murder. 19—year—old gaia pope was last seen in swanage ten days ago. an electric lorry is unveiled — which can travel 500
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miles on a single charge. and top dog — mali, the military dog that helped save the lives of british troops in afghanistan. good morning. it's friday 17th november. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. inafew in a few minutes, we will have the latest on the government push to get to the brexit trade talks next month, but next, we will begin with zimbabwe. we have the receiving pictures and allow short while of
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president robert mugabe, who has made his first public appearance in the capital since he was placed under house arrest, and the military took over the country earlier this week. he was attending a university graduation ceremony, but reports from the discussion that have been going on suggest that he is in no mood to resign or to step aside easily, at least. the generals still denying that this is a coup. they see it is the transition process, but designed very much, everyone there believes, to prevent robert mugabe's wife grace from succeeding him in power. we will be back in zimbabwe very shortly, but right now, let's move on to the latest on brexit. theresa may has said she hopes the eu will respond "positively" to her efforts to push forward
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the brexit talks as she meets other eu leaders in sweden this morning. the president of the european council is expected to tell her it's "not a given" that talks on a post—brexit trade deal will begin next month. meanwhile the brexit secretary, david davis, has told the bbc it's time for other european union countries to compromise on brexit. he's refused to comment on reports that the government could scrap its plan to write into law the date when britain will leave the eu. our correspondent leila nathoo has been following developments from westminster... there is a real sense of the clock ticking towards next month, when the government hopes the can begin, but given what the president of the european council is expected to expected to say to theresa may today, there is a sense that there's not much chance of the compromise the government is looking. theresa may's main priority is getting beyond the divorce issues of the irish border and citizens rights.
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getting beyond those issues and on to talk about the future trading relationship. that has already been delayed, we had expected the talks would move on in october, but it's up would move on in october, but it's up to eu leaders to agree on that. all hopes are pinned on the next eu summit in december. theresa may is today heading a government effort to try to convince the european side that it try to convince the european side thatitis try to convince the european side that it is now they're a move. she is in sweden for a european summit, a separate european summit, been trying to keep channels
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open between her and her ministers and individual european leaders, to have other talks alongside the formal rounds of negotiations that have been going on periodically in brussels with officials from both sides. today she is meeting the irish prime minister, she met the swedish prime minister and is meeting the president of the european council, to try and keep those channels open, to try and convince brussels that it is now their turn for the negotiations, th turn ose continue, and obviously we look forward to the december european council. and we're continuing to look through the issues. i was clear in my speech in florence that we will honour our commitments. but, of course, we want to move forward together. talking about the trade issues and trade partnership for the future, i've set out a vision for that economic partnership. i look forward to the european union responding positively to that so we can move forward together and ensure that we can get the best possible arrangements for the future
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that will be good for people in the united kingdom and across the remaining eu 27. thank you. to show some flexibility. here's what she had to say when she arrived in the government so far has been very reluctant to commit to a figure, but that is an expectation now that the government is preparing to there has been talk of a much higherfigure, to there has been talk of a much higher figure, ranging from to there has been talk of a much higherfigure, ranging from a0 billion to 60 billion. the government so far has been very relu cta nt to government so far has been very reluctant to commit to a figure, but there is an expectation now that the government is preparing and perhaps david davis has been unfairly and speaking to various leaders. he did not money. david davis has been u nfa i rly not money. david davis has been unfairly and speaking to various leaders. he did the talks had been at their block for some time. he appealed to european leaders not to appealed to european leaders not to a figure on the divorce bill, as it were, but again, betraying some frustration that the talks had been deadlocked for some time. he appealed to european leaders not
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you want the other side to compromise. i want them to compromise. surprise, surprise, nothing comes for nothing in this world. but so far, in this negotiation, we have made quite a lot of compromises on the citizens right front, we have made all the running. we have made the running in terms of things like the right to vote, weather the european union doesn't seem to be able to agree that everybody involved, the 3 million europeans in question, the 3 million brits abroad, should be able to afford. they can't do that. we have actually been offering some quite creative and promoters. we haven't always got that back. politics above prosperity and he again reiterated the same message, that it's now up to the european side to show some. we have heard
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from the irish foreign minister this morning that he didn't feel the european side was in a place to agree these to the negotiations to begin, andjohn agree these to the negotiations to begin, and john claud junker, president of the eu commission, who is also in sweden, was asked the the clock is ticking. asked the i hope that we will be able to come to an agreement as far as the divorce is concerned in the december council, but work has still to be done. he is expected to warn theresa may that there is no green light for the trade talks start in december. we have heard from the irish foreign minister this morning that he didn't feel the european side was in place to agree these to the negotiations to agree these to the negotiations to begin, and john claud junker, president of the eu commission, who is also in sweden, was asked the these are crucial weeks ahead before these are crucial weeks ahead before the december summit, i think the obiang caat on both sides of his not agreed that talks would on trade in december, because we could be looking at march before those do
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start. by bobby a full year after the process had begun and only a year left before it is due to be a lot of talks and discussions in these next few weeks, although both sides are digging in, there will be a lot of talks and discussions going try and persuade eu leaders that the talks should to try and agree some compromise. the government will be hoping they can do enough in these coming weeks to try and persuade eu leaders that the talks should move we have heard from theresa may, and the foreign secretary boris johnson from theresa may, and the foreign secretary borisjohnson is visiting theissue secretary borisjohnson is visiting the issue of the border between the republic of ireland and northern ireland is one of the key issues that the eu wants to see sufficient. he is visiting dublin today, sorry, and you will know of course that the issue of the border between the republic of ireland and northern ireland is one of the key issues that the eu wants to see before it moves on to those trade a
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ha rd before it moves on to those trade a hard border, nobody wants to see a ha rd hard border, nobody wants to see a hard border. we must work on it, and we must work on it together. what i would say to you is that in order to resolve those issues and get it right, for peoples, it is necessary i'iow right, for peoples, it is necessary now nobody wants to see a return to a hard border, nobody wants to see a ha rd a hard border, nobody wants to see a hard border. we must work on it, and we must work on it together. what i would say to you is that in order to resolve those issues and get it right, for peoples, it is to move on to the second stage of the negotiations, which entail so many of the questions that are with the border issue. am i think the message that, i think the message conversation we have today, i suspect will be quite government will be giving the conversation we have today, i suspect will be all wa nt have today, i suspect will be all want to move on to phase two of the brexit negotiations, but we are not ina brexit negotiations, but we are not in a place right now that allows us to do to the one between the prime ministers. the answer is yes, we all
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wa nt to ministers. the answer is yes, we all want to move on to phase two of the brexit negotiations, but we are not ina brexit negotiations, but we are not in a place right now that allows us zimbabwe's president robert mugabe has been seen in public for the first time since being placed under house arrest by the military. he's been attending a university graduation ceremony in harare. the 93—year—old is reportedly refusing to step down, despite growing calls for his resignation. negotiations are continuing, with zimbabwe's military saying it is engaging with mr mugabe. the us secretary of state says washington is hoping for a new era for the country, following the military takeover. ben brown sent this update from zimbabwe. the irish foreign minister alongside borisjohnson there. as your correspondent are we to make of this zimbabwe. what are we to make of are keen this is a strategy from the military, they are keen respect within the country. within the military itself, and yesterday we
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saw pictures after meeting with negotiators. he stood side stood side by side with the army generals who have taken control, smiling. this appears to be a message from the military that all is well. negotiations are that he is not being disrespected. he commands a lot of respect within the country. within the military itself, and yesterday we saw pictures after meeting with negotiators. he stood side by side with the army generals who have taken control, smiling. this appears to be a message from the military that all is well. negotiations but it appears that it is going to be a very difficult and delicate process of transition. we understand the negotiators would much rather have robert mugabe himself volunteer to step down at this point. however, there are indications that prefers to serve his full 2018 and he would much rather continue serving his term until the elections they were planning to have elections in 2018 and he would much rather continue serving his term until the if he refuses to step down, that will the generals‘ patience with but it‘s important to there are many factors
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to consider, but it‘s important that driving around zimbabwe, talking to people, you get the sense that to arrive here without being informed about what is going on, they cannot sense that from the streets, except the military presence outside key government installations. people are going about their business as were to arrive here without being informed about what is going on, they cannot sense that from the streets, except the military presence outside key government installations. people are going about their business they have been waiting for, they just about their business they have been waiting for, theyjust don‘t know what‘s going to happen so that is a chance this may be protracted. it may not be good for zimbabwe, a country that has suffered economically. as many people are hoping that this is the change they have been waiting for, theyjust don‘t know what‘s going to happen the successor is most likely to come from within the ruling party zanu-pf, which from within the ruling party zanu—pf, which has really been in power for 37 years and which people blame for running down the but if
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this discussion period is protracted, who will be in charge of the country? will it be zanu—pf the country? will it be zanu-pf or zanu-pf is still very much used to be vibrant ten yea rs still very much used to be vibrant ten years ago, but not any in the country, the opposition used to be vibrant ten years ago, but not any we have seen that morgan tsvangirai, one of the key opposition leaders asked the president to step down. there is top that he may be involved in some sort of transition, but it will really returned to the country and has been speaking out. he has asked the president to step down. there is top that he may be involved in some sort of transition, but it will really be zanu—pf. the military on the other hand does not want to be seen to be ticking over leadership. they don‘t want this to be seen as a cook, even though people say it is indeed a coup by the zanu-pf. the people say it is indeed a coup by the zanu—pf. the military on the other hand does not want to be seen to be taking over leadership. they don‘t want this to be seen as a cook, even though people say it is indeed a coup by the they are very keen to make it
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look like you transition of power. but that is potentially the reason why they are engaging the president, they are meeting with him, sharing light moments with him, appearing in pictures with zimbabwe has been alienate it by the international community. they still have friends is there in africa and they would not —— and they would not want to alienate their friends they would not want to lose their military, if they appear to have carried out a military coup. police investigating the disappearance of a teenager in dorset are continuing to question a man arrested yesterday on suspicion of her murder. 19—year—old gaia pope was last seen in swanage ten days ago. the a9—year—old suspect is believed to be known to gaia. our reporter ian palmer has more. gaia pope went missing ten days ago. clothes similar to the ones the teenager was wearing when she disappeared were found yesterday in coastal fields. the area was sealed off by police. officers searched the scene in an attempt to discover what happened
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to the missing 19—year—old. we continue to investigate whether gaia has come to harm through an act of crime, or whether she is missing, and we will continue to do so. gaia lives in a village near swanage. she was last seen in morrison road by a family friend. shortly before she was captured on camera in a petrol station buying ice cream. two people were arrested and released pending further enquiries. yesterday, in a country park, some clothing was found by a member of the public. miss pope has severe epilepsy and needs regular medication. her family say she likes being at home and her absence is hard to bear. mum and younger sister maya are basically holed up in the house, trying to keep away from upsetting conversations, keep away from social media, keep away from the stuff which has been in the press, parts of the press, which has been extremely distressing for the family. they are just trying to look after each other. the man being questioned on suspicion of murder by police has
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been identified by his father as paul elsey, who is a9 and lives in the swanage area. he‘s the third person to be arrested. earlier this week police released cctv footage of gaia passing through a street in the town. police divers and investigating officers will continue the search for gaia this morning. ian palmer, bbc news. our correspondentjames ingham is in swanage and we can speak to him now. thank the latest police are saying about this investigation was the latest police are saying about this open to them, so that may include the possibility that gaia is alive and simply missing, but clearly they have good reason to suspect she may have good reason to suspect she may have come to harm and they have been killed. as they they say they are
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still investigating every avenue open to them, so that may include the possibility that gaia is alive and simply missing, but clearly they have good reason to suspect she may have good reason to suspect she may have come to harm and may have been killed. why they have this man under arrest. he was picked up yesterday and is continuing to here is clearly another worrying development, but this morning, around 30 police officers today. the discovery of clothes similar to those gaia was last seen wearing found coastal cliffs here is clearly another worrying development, but this morning, around 30 police specialist coastguard teams and searchers, can see this as a coastal community. many people who live here have joined in the searchers, searching through swanage and the higher hillsthe clifftop here. you can see this as a coastal community. many people who live here have joined this as a coastal community. many people who live here havejoined in the searchers, searching through swanage and the higher hills and coastal paths here. this getting people tojoin coastal paths here. this getting people to join searchers, to put up posters, to distribute flyers. they remain hopeful gaia can still be found alive. her father spoke to was yesterday, telling us we still believe gaia can be found here.
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james, thank you for that update. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. theresa may attends a european summit in sweden and despite rumours that the trade talks would start in december, she‘s looking forward to a positive response. david davis calls we re positive response. david davis calls were more movement from the european side of the talks. robert mugabe makes his first public appearance since the military took of zimbabwe. and in sport, australia have retained the women‘s ashes, thanks toa retained the women‘s ashes, thanks to a convincing win over england in the first day 20 international in sydney. just six days until the men‘s ashes start. england lead by 144, men‘s ashes start. england lead by 1aa, going into the final day. the former england women‘s goalkeeping
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coach lee kendall has admitted to using a fake caribbean accent towards a player before stepping down from his role yesterday. i will be back with more on those stories in around ten minutes‘ time. it‘s the final day of the united nations climate change conference in bonn. it‘s the first time the international community has gathered to discuss climate change since president trump pulled the united states out of the paris agreement. with the latest from the conference let‘s talk to our environment analyst roger harrabin. .. what can we expect from this final day? let's take it back to the start, you mentioned president trump. the worst case there was an absolute road crash, people saying the usa are out, why should we bother to carry on? a backlash from the chinese and the indians. they
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absolutely have not seen that. what we have seen instead is a week of steady cooperation moving through difficult issues and as to how they will get more ambitious towards the targets scientists have said. these villages of great difficulty and complexity and technicality. we are moving towards an agreement on that. there is one outstanding issue with this conference about is money. but the developing countries, who are most vulnerable to climate change, being extremely resentful that the rich nations, who principally caused by which change, not stumping up the money they promised to help them get clea n money they promised to help them get clean technology. one of the big m essa 9 es clean technology. one of the big messages from this week is that if every country when fulltilt at trying to reduce emissions, there are some changes to the climate that are some changes to the climate that are unavoidable now. but something can still be done. what sense you have that the delegates there are going away with clear plans and with the political will to bring about those changes? it is a real mixed
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picture, to be honest. you mentioned the amount of carbon dioxide that is being emitted and temperatures likely to rise now. if countries don‘t up their ambitions, we‘re looking at a temperature rise of more than three celsius, scientists estimate, which can be very bad news for a lot of nations. the delegates are where does that, they know they have to increase that ambition. the has been a remarkable transformation in the last couple of years and the attitudes of china and india, which are now investing massively in renewable energy. and renewable energy itself has plunged in price far faster than even its most ardent supporters believed. so after all these years of not being able to see how the world community could get to where
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it needs to go fully stable climate, at last there is a glimmer of hope that humanity might be able to pull off this most difficult feat of all. roger, thank you very much. the irish prime minister says the british government and supporters of brexit have not thought through. he said consideration had not been given to resolving his country‘s border with northern ireland. the foreign secretary is in dublin meeting his irish counterpart, while the prime minister was making those comments and will be meeting theresa may in sweden today. that stopped oui’ may in sweden today. that stopped our ireland correspondent, who is in dublin covering that meeting between the foreign secretaries. given the context of those comments from the irish prime minister, tell us how the meeting gone there. terrible timing. we thought that
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chris was going to be fine to talk to us and then just as he was about to us and then just as he was about to speak, problems of the line. we will try to get back to him very, very soon. i think he might be back, we‘ll try again. chris, can you hear me? yes, i can. i hope you heard my question. yes, i think at the news conference, the first thing between borisjohnson conference, the first thing between boris johnson and the conference, the first thing between borisjohnson and the irish foreign minister, you did see the differences between the british and irish governments on this question of the irish border. to summarise very briefly and generally the two positions, both sides want the border to remain in the state it is at the moment, which is invisible, soft, with no checkpoints. but that isa soft, with no checkpoints. but that is a difference of opinion as to how that might be achieved. the irish government think the best way to achieve that would be for northern ireland to continue to abide by the rules and regulations of the
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european customs union and single market. i'm so sorry, we would be able to continue with that line, it simply isn‘t good enough. that was oui’ simply isn‘t good enough. that was our ireland correspondent in dublin and we do hope to hear in more detail on a better line very soon. more than 1 million credit card users, who are struggling financially, have had their credit limits raised in the last year without being asked — according to the charity, citizens advice. it wants the chancellor to ban increases which haven‘t been requested in his budget next week. card companies say they‘ve agreed to abide by a voluntary code of conduct to protect customers. conservationists in the united states have strongly criticised a decision by president trump to end a ban on importing body parts from elephants hunted in zimbabwe and zambia. a federal government agency said imports could resume today for elephants that are legally hunted. the us fish and wildlife service said hunting fees could help communities put money into conservation but experts say that populations of african elephants are plummeting. a british military working dog
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who helped save the lives of troops in afghanistan is being awarded the prestigious pdsa dickin medal — the animal equivalent of the george cross. mali, a belgian malinois, will receive the honour for his heroic actions during an operation in afghanistan in 2012.. earlier tina daheeley met mali and his current handler corporal daniel hatley, who trained him as a puppy... amazing doctor train, he picks things up very quickly, he wants to work, he wants to learn. and his general character, he'sjust work, he wants to learn. and his general character, he's just a work, he wants to learn. and his general character, he'sjust a very funny dog. he can i was make you smile. was that training process like? it's quite intensive. you have to be constantly teaching the dog. dogs learn through repetition, so we have to do it a lot of times for
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them to pick it up. it's a very slow process, with good progression, but a very long process. we can see him in action now. how do they compare to other dogs who are serving in the military? he'sjust like any other dogs serving in the military, is just what he did on that day makes them stand out. he's having a lovely time there, very comfortable on a rock. what exactly happened on that day? what we saw was a building in kaboul and we were sent for words to retrieve coalition forces from the building. mali was a dork sent in to look for explosive devices and any potential enemy combatants. and he was hurt badly. yes, he received injuries from two grenades. he kept going. obviously, afterwards, he did
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receive injuries he needed to be treated for at the end of the operation. how long did it take mali to recover? he was initially treated in afghanistan and airbus flown back to the uk a few weeks after that. he was pretty fit and healthy generally when he got back, it was more the healing process, to stop infection and get him back to normal. it's quite rare for animals to win this award, mali is the only living animal to have won it in seven of eight years. how many dogs are used in combat? hundreds. if you go back to afghanistan in the height of the conflict, there could have been 130 or more dogs in afghanistan at the time. there are a massive need for the forces, the guys want them on the forces, the guys want them on the ground. training is one thing, but what is it like when they are actually in a live situation? that training has decayed kin, a lot of it must depend on the relationship mali has with his handler. yes, the
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bond between him and his handler was phenomenal. that's why they worked so phenomenal. that's why they worked so well together as a team and that's why he did what he did on the day. he kept going. now training could be better dog for what he went through a day. i had to keep going and keep working through everything that happened was phenomenal. and he saved lives on that day? absolutely saved lives on that day? absolutely saved lives. what is he up to the moment? he is based back at the defence animal training regiment and he helps me train new handlers when they come in and how to train dogs like mali. mali, winner of the pdsa dickin medal, congratulations to mali and his trainer. it‘s time to get the weather forecast.
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there is mali and his trainer. it‘s time to get the weather forecast. there is some mali and his trainer. it‘s time to get the weather forecast. there is some workloads mali and his trainer. it‘s time to get the weather forecast. there is some workloads across mali and his trainer. it‘s time to get the weather forecast. there is some workloads across southern mali and his trainer. it‘s time to get the weather forecast. there is some workloads across southern england. mali and his trainer. it‘s time to get the weather forecast. there is some workloads across southern england. there mali and his trainer. it‘s time to get the weather forecast. there is some workloads across southern england. there is mali and his trainer. it‘s time to get the weather forecast. there is some workloads across southern england. there is sunshine and showers affecting scotland, perhaps the odd shower into cumbria. temperatures around 10 celsius but it is colder compared to yesterday, particularly across southern areas. tonight we will see more showers and cloud moving in with rain into wales and parts of england and wales. not as cold as last night but some cold smells will allow pockets of frost develop. saturday morning starting off on develop. saturday morning starting offona develop. saturday morning starting off on a chilly note, some frost around, more cloud around tomorrow than today. some brighter skies and sunshine developing in northern and eastern areas with some showers in the far north of scotland and temperatures tomorrow around 6—9dc, but less cool down towards the south—west. goodbye.
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this is bbc news. our latest headlines: robert mugabe has made his first public appearance since the military seized control of the zimbabwean government. mr mugabe — who is still officially the president — addressed a university graduation ceremony in harare. theresa may attends a european summit — despite warnings the eu might not start trade talks in december she says she is looking forward to a positive response. meanwhile, brexit secretary david davis calls for more compromise from the eu. it is always the negotiations. i wa nt it is always the negotiations. i want them to compromise. nothing comes to nothing in this world. so far in this negotiation we have made quite a lot of compromises. police investigating the disappearance of 19—year—old gaia pope are questioning a a9—year—old man on suspicion of murder.
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the actor, sylvester stallone has denied sexually assaulting a 16—year—old girl in a hotel room in las vegas in 1986. he was responding to reports giving details of a police account of the teenager‘s claims. time for sport and let‘s get the latest. good morning. australia have retained the women‘s ashes thanks to a comfortable six wicket win over england. in the first of three t20 matches, in sydney. coming into the match, england knew defeat in any of those games could end their hopes. the captain was out with the second ball of the innings. i have century from danny white helped steady things before she was run out. they need 133 for effectively. best mini helping the
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hosts achieve their target with four overs to spare. the court said his players and home were left gutted. well, australia‘s men seem as confident of victory as their women‘s side — opting to name their squad for the opening two matches early. it included a couple of surprises — none bigger than the return of wicketkeeper tim paine. it‘s been seven years since his last test appearance and he admits he thought his test career was over. it is exciting. for australia, it is the biggest series in cricket and to be here is even better. i played my last test seven years ago, but i feel like it is exciting. i am absolutely made up. well, england‘s batsmen are in control of their final warm up match ahead of thursday‘s brisbane test. moeen ali struck twice late on day three to leave england leading an australian cricket eleven by 1aa runs ahead of tomorrow‘s final day. but assistant coach paul farbrace wasn‘t satisfied with the performance.
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mixed day really. what we reckon we have had two good days and perhaps today we just took our eye off the ball a fraction with the bat. we are disappointed with this morning‘s session but pleased that we have 100 and then at the end. in terms of context in this particular game, you know we are in a good position. but in terms of preparation going into next week, we feel we are below where we have been in the last few days. bbc sport understands former england women‘s goalkeeping coach lee kendall admitted to using a fake caribbean accent towards eni aluko, as part of an fa investigation. kendall was cleared of "unacceptable behaviour" by the fa before stepping down from his role yesterday, his admission was not included in the fa statement, who said ‘no further action was necessary.‘ sir bradley wiggins is set to make his competitive rowing debut
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at next month‘s british indoor championships. the 2012 tour de france winner will compete in the 2,000 metre race at london‘s olympic velodrome on the 9th of december. wiggins retired from cycling in december 2016 and admits he may be a ‘bit delusional‘. the sale director of rugby steve diamond has been given a six—week stadium ban for comments made about the referee after his side‘s match with exeter last month. half of this ban is suspended, but diamond will also serve the remainder of a suspended touchline ban for previous offences. sale have also been threatened with a points deduction if diamond‘s behaviour continues. tyrrell hatton shot a fantastic 2nd round of 63 to take the clubhouse lead at golf‘s end of season event in dubai. hatton hit an eagle and eight birdies, but bogied the last to miss out on a share of the course record. meanwhile tommy fleetwood also landed eight birdies in a sublime second round of 65 to keep himself in with a shout of the prize. it marked a huge turnaround from
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fleetwood, who shot a disappointing round of 1—over par yesterday. he now lies just three shots off hatton‘s lead. i fired ifired a shot i fired a shot at level par when i was leading wine under today. then everything is out of my hands. i have to play my best and see what eve ryo ne have to play my best and see what everyone else does. but at least with that score i have kept myself in with their chance at the turn it, i had to make sure i was still around today. anything like that today was much needed, so there was pressure on that side of it. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. as we‘ve been hearing, the president of the european council, donald tusk, is expected to tell theresa may that there is no guarantee that talks on a future trade deal between britain and the eu will begin next month as the government hopes.
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interviewed by bbc news this morning, the brexit secretary, david davis, urged other eu countries to do more to help the divorce negotiations move ahead. mr davis has been speaking to our political editor, laura kuenssberg. you always want them to compromise. but so far in this investigation —— negotiation, we have made progress on citizens rights. we have made all the running in terms of the things like the right to vote, where the european union doesn‘t seem to be able to agree that everybody involved, this 3 million europeans in britain and 3 million brits abroad, cannot fought. we have been offering some creative compromises. we haven‘t always got that back. you are admitting you have had to give ground. the reason we agreed the european approach was so that the citizens rights issue which we‘ve
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flew as morally the most important was to be dealt right up front. you have come to the powerhouse of the european union with an offer on what pretty much everyone on the other side agrees is the biggest problem. eu politician after eu politician has been crystal clear they are not going to move on in the way you want to until the uk is willing to make a promise, not to give herfigure, but to give a promise that europe required to write a bigger check. to give a promise that europe required to write a bigger checkm course they are saying that. this is the only european country i have been to in the last week or so alone. what is also clear that is that many of them want to move on. they see it is important to them, countries like denmark and holland and italy and spain, poland, can see the big benefits in the future deal that we are talking about. this strong, deep in special relationship the prime minister refers to, a
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strong trade and security relationship. they have a lot to gain from that. this is not something for nothing, this is something for nothing, this is something that benefits everyone. something for nothing, this is something that benefits everyonem who his holding things up? to be clear, germany and france, they are the most powerful players on the european continent, of course they are. so what the believe is very influential. sometimes similarly so. it is the whole of the european decision, the whole of the 27 countries decision. let‘s look at some other developing stories today. benedict allen has been found. he
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was spotted alive and well yesterday near a remote airstrip. the former head of the sicilian mafia has died in prison the day after his 87th birthday. the boss of bosses had been behind bars for the past 2a yea rs been behind bars for the past 2a years and was serving 26 life sentences. for a full summary of the news you can go to our website where you will get more details on all of the deep‘s studies. —— dave‘s stories.
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the electric car maker, tesla, has unveiled the prototype of a new articulated lorry. the vehicle, also known as a semi—trailor, can travel for 500 miles on a single charge. the company has also publicised what it says will be the fastest production car ever made. our technology reporter dave lee reports. this is the new tesla semi. it will travel 500 miles on a single charge and elon musk thinks it will make electric the new king of the road. the thing that looks like it‘s not moving... is a diesel truck. but he has been under a lot of pressure lately. his company isn‘t yet making cars quickly enough to meet demand and so this new truck could be another distraction for the man who also dabbles in space travel. tesla‘s definitely taking some serious issues on the manufacturing side. model 3 delivery is measured in hundreds when they‘re supposed to be producing thousands every week. that is a huge issue.
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but the truck wasn‘t to be the only new vehicle on show here tonight. so the tesla fans that came here certainly expected to see a lorry, what they weren‘t expecting to see was a new roadster and that got this energetic crowd excited. so it turns out there was some cargo in the truck... for fans an exciting one more thing, but for tesla‘s investors it is just one more thing. a family renting their home in london has been threatened with eviction after complaints that their baby‘s crying was too noisy. attila and ildiko wurth received a warning from their management company, after they said neighbours had complained "on a daily basis". the parents say it is "horrible discrimination" against families renting with children. it is terrible. we have just moved
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in. the move was stressful enough. and then we have been told we have to move again. and we moved here for a reason. we do not want to move anywhere else because renting because we priced the accommodation to be near to the school. if we move now our son will not get in, so we just cannot. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live: theresa may attends a european summit in sweden — and despite warnings the eu might not start trade talks in december she says she is looking forward to a positive response. meanwhile brexit secretary david davis calls for more movement on the european side of the talks. zimbabwe‘s president, robert mugabe, makes his first public appearance since the military took control of the country. hello there. an update of the
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business news now this hour. carillion shares have sunk 30% after the construction firm issued another profit warning and said it expected to breach financial covenants. the firm, which is in a consortium building part of the £56bn h2 high—speed rail link, said it was in talks on a potential recapitalisation. nissan executives have confirmed
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that they are currently in talks with suppliers and dealers to discuss compensation over the recall of 1.2 million cars due to a quality control scandal. another executive confirmed that conversations are ongoing with suppliers as well, and compensation is being discussed case—by—case. building society, nationwide has posted its latest results and profits are down for the second period in a row. earlier we spoke to our business correspondent theo leggett. they don‘t look great. under lighting... you do have to bear a couple of things in mind, one is that the figures for the same period a year ago were rather flattened by
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a year ago were rather flattened by a £100 million bonus from selling offa a £100 million bonus from selling off a stake in visa europe. strip that out and the company made a profit. nationwide, let‘s not forget asa building profit. nationwide, let‘s not forget as a building society, is started paying extra money into his employers pension fund earlier this year and that is had no effect. it has to set aside more money for bad loa ns. has to set aside more money for bad loans. overall it is not that bad, these are healthy figures. there have been more takeover approaches for media giant twenty—first century fox. according to reports comcast, owner of nbc universal and the biggest cable tv operator in the us — has expressed interest in buying assets — as has verizon communications. last week it emerged that walt disney had held talks with fox. media companies are looking at mergers as more people ditch cable in favour of streaming services like netflix. gap shares jumped nearly 8 percent after—hours. the us clothing retailer raised its outlook for 2017 profit and reported same—store sales ahead
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of analysts‘ expectations. the company has been investing to upgrade its offering for customers — and it‘s paying off. german industrial group siemens has announced plans to cut around 6,900 jobs worldwide — mostly in its fossil fuels division. we will actually move on to another study now. we will go to westminster. a new report has been lodged by the chairman of the construction commission looking into how best to shore up the continued success of one of the most economic way important parts of the country. as we see these new houses being built. good top to talk to you. this new arc of town spanning oxford, milton keynes and cambridge, contributing some £90 billion to the
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national economy this year, but you think that amount could be significantly increase? the big problem in this arc which is the most economically successful parts of the country, we do not have enough houses. house prices in oxford and cambridge are higher than some parts of london. that is saying something because that is the highest in the country. that is a real issue. how can we get house—building increased, also preparing to build new towns. milton keynes is one of the most successful places in the country. there is an opportunity to do more of that. the a nswer opportunity to do more of that. the answer is we have to fit infrastructure investment in ahead of expecting local authorities to agree to new housing. there is a deal to be done here between the government and local authorities. the government agrees to upgrade the infrastructure, i new railway line,
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there was 150 years ago but it was closed after the beeching cuts. if thatis closed after the beeching cuts. if that is put in place, that will transform connections between towns and cities in this arc, oxford, cambridge, all hugely important residential centres. if that is put in place with the road infrastructure, it would be possible for local 30s to agree more housing and it is a win—win. for local 30s to agree more housing and it is a win-win. it comes at a time when brexit negotiations are under the spotlight. how do you feel that that is affecting these new infrastructure projects that you are calling for a greater economic progress on? brexit are no brexit, we need bold plans like this. we will need to trade more as a country after brexit. we will need to have homes for people to live in. we cannot spend all time debating brexit without debating the bread and butter issues that matter to
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people. having to live and work and getting the best out of successful centres of innovation, and there are no two better centres of innovation than cambridge and oxford, getting that right is very important for us asa that right is very important for us as a country. what we are seeing todayis as a country. what we are seeing today is that there should be a deal, their government should fit in the place their infrastructure, new ra i lwa ys the place their infrastructure, new railways and roads, and on that basis local authorities should double the rate of home building. it isa double the rate of home building. it is a big and bold and ambitious plan. lord adonis, thank you for joining us live from westminster. that is all the business for this hour. more later on. for a generation of children used to tablets, emojis and instant messaging, hand written letters might seem like something consigned to the history books. but teachers at one primary school think pupils are missing out by not putting pen to paper, the way their grandparents did. so the school in kidderminster has teamed up with two local care homes
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to launch an inter—generational pen pal scheme between children and residents. our reporter emma jane kirby has been to find out more. we have got some exciting post today. what do you think it might be? the letters! the pen pal letters! the postman has been at this school in kidderminster and they‘re eager to find out what their pen pals have to say. dear jasmine. thank you so much for your very lovely and well—written letter... most of the children have never received a letter before, let alone a written one. but thanks to a scheme linking them to a local care home, they‘re now old hands at it. we believe the art of letter writing is lost, so we‘re encouraging children to write for a real purpose, beyond a simple snapchat or text message. above that we want to engage with the community because we believe as a school that‘s something we‘re passionate about. and the considerable age gap between the correspondents doesn‘t seem to be a problem.
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you get to listen to what places they've been to and what they've been doing and the cheeky stuff that they've done. you get to ask all the questions you really want and most of the time they answer them. this project is about so much more than just teaching a generation of children raised on e—mails how to write properly set out letters. the pupils are now finding out about their pen pals, where they lived, what they did as children. it‘s about forging friendships across the generations. i‘ve got a letter from the school from one of your pen pals, called tilly. shall i read it to you? they are lovely, those kids. at the care home, the children‘s letters are equally well received. many of the residents have dementia and staff help them to read their mail and draft replies. reece asks, what was
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your favourite trip? weston—super—mare. one lady couldn't believe that children wanted to know about her and her life. she started crying, but she was crying happy tears at the thought that someone wanted to know about her. has everyone got a place that their pen pal is visiting? for now, the children are finding out as much as they can about their pen pals, and just before christmas the letter writers will meet face—to—face. car is driven by females injames bond films have gone on display. let‘s have a look.
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it is the largest visual collection ofjames it is the largest visual collection of james bond vehicles it is the largest visual collection ofjames bond vehicles coming from the production archive. this is the land rover defender which was driven by moneypenny. this is in the opening sequence. there would have been a few of these particular cars because they get quake damaged along the way. there is a mercury cougar com plete the way. there is a mercury cougar complete the skis. this car was driven by diana rake on her majesty ‘s secret service. it is great to have such a wide variety of cars that date back over 50 years of the james bond films. the bond in motion exhibition. in one of the celebrity weddings of the decade, the tennis star, serena williams, has married alexis ohanian, the co—founder of the reddit website in new orleans.
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an entire block of the american city was closed off for the 200 guests who included the singer, beyonce, the reality tv star, kim kardashian, and the editor—in—chief of vogue magazine, anna wintour. the reception reportedly had a beauty and the beast theme. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment we will leave the bbc two viewers. but before that, we get the weather forecast. will leave the bbc two viewers. but before that, we get the weather forecast. we will leave the bbc two viewers. but before that, we get the weather forecast. we had will leave the bbc two viewers. but before that, we get the weather forecast. we had quite will leave the bbc two viewers. but before that, we get the weather forecast. we had quite a will leave the bbc two viewers. but before that, we get the weather forecast. we had quite a widespread frost, temperatures got down to —3 or minus four celsius. pockets of frost in the shade, like this in staffordshire. for the rest of us sparkling sunshine and a lovely afternoon to come from many. it will not be for all of us. there is more cloud the further north you go, shower receding in here on a brisk north—westerly wind. elsewhere this
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afternoon, there is very little change with some sunshine. the showers will continue across northern scotland. a strong wind making it feel chilly, temperatures around five or 6 degrees but it will feel colder than that. maybe some showers into cumbria and lancashire. for most of england and wales, despite there being more cloud this afternoon, there will be lots of sunshine around and it will feel cold across northern saviours compared to yesterday. temperatures down by a few degrees to nine or 10 celsius. this evening and tonight we will continue the showers across scotla nd will continue the showers across scotland and then increasingly cloudy across england and wales with outbreaks of rain moving in europe. some places will not be as low as they were yesterday, but with some clear swells in southern and central areas, there will be a frost developing here. we start off the
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weekend with a bit more cloud around compared to today. outbreaks of rain across wales and midlands and into central and southern areas of england. into the afternoon there will be brighter skies, sunshine in north—east of england. not quite as cold towards the size and the west, temperatures around 11 or 12 celsius. we have male deer are trying to nudge and across the uk, but as we go into sunday, we will keep this colder air across many parts. that milder air is associated with this weather system here which is trying to nudge in into the saviour of high pressure. that will keep things settle during sunday. as the system moves then, we will see increasing amounts of clouds across northern ireland and wales and the south—west of england and later on there will be sure is moving in here as well. temperatures in double figures, but for most of us it will bea figures, but for most of us it will be a chilly day, and the best of the
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sunshine will be across central and eastern parts of the united kingdom. there will be more details on the website. i will leave you with my collea g u es website. i will leave you with my colleagues for the rest of the afternoon. i hope you will have a good afternoon —— weekend whatever you do. goodbye. this is bbc news — and these are the top stories developing at midday. zimbabwe‘s president, robert mugabe, makes his first public appearance since the military took control of the country. mr mugabe — who is still officially the president — addressed a university graduation ceremony in harare. theresa may attends a european summit in sweden — and despite warnings the eu might not start trade talks trade talks in december, she says she is looking forward to a positive response. meanwhile, brexit secretary david davis calls for more movement on the european side of the talks. police investigating the disappearance of 19—year—old
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gaia pope are questioning a man arrested on suspicion of her murder. also the next hour, the top dog gets a reward. mali, a military dog that helped save the lives of british troops in afghanistan, gets a bravery award. and shortly we‘ll speak to david france, who won this year‘s baillie gifford prize for nonfiction for his book describing the response to the aids epidemic. good afternoon. welcome to bbc newsroom live. zimbabwe‘s president robert mugabe has been seen in public for the first time since being placed under house arrest by the military. this was mr mugabe arriving
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for a university graduation ceremony in harare a short while ago. the 93—year—old is reportedly refusing to step down but negotiations are continuing with zimbabwe‘s military and regional envoys. the us secretary of state says washington is hoping for a new era for the country, following the military takeover — a sentiment that was reflected on the front pages in harare this morning. our correspondent anne soy gave me this update from zimbabwe. i asked what we should treat into the images of mr mugabe at the graduation ceremony. this is a strategy from the military to show that the head of state is not being
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disrespected. he commands a lot of respect within the country and within the military itself. yesterday, we sell pictures of him standing side by side with their generals and they were smiling. this would appear to be a message from the military that all is well, they go scenes are under way, but it appears that it‘s going to be a very difficult and delicate process of transition. we understand the negotiators would much rather have mr mugabe himself volunteer to step down at this point in time, but there are indications that mr mugabe prefers to serve his full term. they we re prefers to serve his full term. they were planning to have elections in 2018 and he would much rather continue serving his term until the elections. if he refuses to step down, how long will the generals‘ patience with that extend? there are
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many factors to consider. it is important to note that, driving around zimbabwe, talking to people, you don‘t get the sense that there isa you don‘t get the sense that there is a crisis at the moment in the country. if somebody were to arrive here without being informed about what is going on, they cannot sense that from the streets, except the military presence outside key government installations, for example, parliament. people are going about their business as usual, so there is a chance this may be protracted. it may not be good for zimbabwe, a country that has suffered economic way. many people are hoping this is the change they have been waiting for. theyjust don‘t know what‘s going to happen next. right now, the successor is most likely to come from within the ruling party, zanu—pf, which has really been in powerfor 37 ruling party, zanu—pf, which has really been in power for 37 years, and which people blamed the running down the country. if this discussion
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period is protracted, who will really be in charge of the country? will it be zanu—pf really be in charge of the country? will it be zanu-pf or really be in charge of the country? will it be zanu—pf or will it effectively be the military? zanu-pf is still very much the big party in the country. the opposition used to be vibrant ten years ago, but not any more. we‘ve seen that morgan tsvangirai, one of the key opposition leaders, has recently returned to the country and has been speaking out. he has asked the president to step down. but there is talk that he may be involved in some sort of transition, but it will really be led by the ruling party, zanu-pf. the really be led by the ruling party, zanu—pf. the military on the other hand doesn‘t want to be seen to be taking over leadership. they don‘t wa nt taking over leadership. they don‘t want this to be seen as a cool, even though there are people who see it is indeed a coup by the military. they are very keen to make it like a transition of power. but that is
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potentially the reason why they are meeting with the president, sharing light moments with them, appealing in pictures. zimbabwe has been alienating by much of the international community. they still have friends here in africa they would not want to alienate those friends. in the past, we have seen the african union suspends countries that carry out military coups, so they wouldn‘t want to lose their friends. our senior africa correspondent in zimbabwe. theresa may has said she hopes the eu will respond "positively" to her efforts to push forward the brexit talks as she meets other eu leaders in sweden this morning. but the president of the european council is expected to tell her it‘s "not a given" that talks on a post—brexit trade deal will begin next month. meanwhile the brexit secretary, david davis, has told the bbc it‘s time for other european union countries to compromise over brexit. our political correspondent ben wright has been following
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developments from westminster... on this issue of compromise from the other eu countries, is that being said more in hope than expectation? it's said more in hope than expectation? it‘s a month ago until this crunch council meeting with all the eu leaders in brussels on december the 1ath and 15th, which is the moment we believe when eu leaders will decide whether or not the second phase of detox can start. talking about trade, the transition agreement, something the u:k.‘s desperate to get onto. but it is clear there is still in wide gulf between them on many issues, particularly the question of money. how much cash britain is prepared to cough up as part of this divorce deal. its financial obligations that
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it has committed to paying the eu on. there is a large disagreement between them. a source close to donald tusk said it is by no means given that the green light will be given that the green light will be given for talks to move to the second stage. theresa may sounded more upbeat when she arrived at the summit in gothenberg. this is what the prime minister said as she arrived in sweden. for the negotiations, those continue, and obviously we look forward to the december european council. and we're continuing to look through the issues. i was clear in my speech in florence that we will honour our commitments. but, of course, we want to move forward together. talking about the trade issues and trade partnership for the future, i've set out a vision for that economic partnership. i look forward to the european union responding positively to that so we can move forward together and ensure that we can get the best possible arrangements for the future that will be good for people in the united kingdom and across the remaining eu 27. thank you. while she is therein sweden, her
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brexit secretary david davis has beenin brexit secretary david davis has been in burlington, talking to business leaders and politicians. germany one of the key players in the brexit story, they will be crucial in deciding whether or not progress has been made or not next month. he gave an interview to the bbc, in which he sounded pretty belligerent, pretty punchy, not sounding very conciliatory at all and saying, during the course of his interview, that britain has moved quite a lot on some of the issues the eu really cared about. he highlighted the question of guaranteeing rights of eu citizens in the uk after brexit day. he said the uk had compromised on that, but he said it was the eu who weren‘t giving ground. he sounded pretty irritated, i thought, giving ground. he sounded pretty irritated, ithought, and giving ground. he sounded pretty irritated, i thought, and try to make a distinction between this band ‘s been taken by france and germany and countries which are smaller,
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like spain and holland. here he is speaking in berlin. you want the other side to compromise. i want them to compromise. surprise, surprise, nothing comes for nothing in this world. but so far, in this negotiation, we have made quite a lot of compromises on the citizens rights front, we have made all the running. we have made the running in terms of things like the right to vote, weather the european union doesn‘t seem to be able to agree that everybody involved, the 3 million europeans in britain, the 3 million brits abroad, should be able to vote. they can‘t do that. we have actually been offering some quite creative and promoters. we haven‘t always got that back. eu leaders don‘t see britain is making compromises, they don‘t feel the uk has produced enough clarity on how they will stop there being a ha rd on how they will stop there being a hard border between northern ireland and the republic. that is an absolutely critical issue, and the
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question of money. in her florence speech, theresa may indicated that while yuki was prepared to pay around 20 billion euros, fulfilling obligations it has made to the european budget is two years after we leave, the eu wants much more detail on how the uk plans to account for many more billions in pension spending, other obligations the clock is ticking. i hope that we will be able to come to an agreement as far as the divorce is concerned in the december council, but work has still to be done. and on the question of whether the
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government is going to set a date for leaving the eu, there‘s been a bit of doubt about that. and also, just in the last few minutes, that that had been expressed in a report from the exiting the eu committee. could you take us through those developments? yes, back on westminster stage, one of the key arguments is whether or not the exact time or date of departure should be written into law. the government has decided it should be in bed and amendment down in the last few days to the withdrawal bill, saying that on a certain date, britain will be leaving. there is considerable concern, cross—party concern, about whether or not that isa concern, about whether or not that is a smart strategy or not. today, the prime minister‘s spokesperson confirmed that was indeed the government intervention and urged mps across a host of back it when it
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comes to a vote next month. in the last few minutes, a cross—party committee of mps have issued a small report the key into some of this, and their conclusion is that nailing that date into law would create significant difficulties, if eu negotiations go down to the wire. an interesting intervention from a cross— party interesting intervention from a cross—party group of mps. at the moment, the government intention clearly still is to try and press on and get support in parliament, including from 20 or so rebel tory mps, to plan to get that date nailed into uk law. well, meanwhile, the foreign secretary borisjohnson, has been holding discussions with his irish well, meanwhile, the foreign secretary borisjohnson, has been holding discussions with his irish counterpart this morning. mrjohnson said it was important trade talks started as quickly as possible, so progress could be made on issues surrounding the irish border. and nobody wants to see a return to a hard bordeer, nobody wants to see a hard border. we must work on it, and we've got
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to work on it together. and i think what i would say to you is that in order to resolve those issues and get it right for our peoples, it is necessary now to move on to the second stage of the negotiations, which really entail so many of the questions that are bound up with the border issue. i think the message that the irish government will be giving and the conversation we will have today, i suspect will be quite similar to the conversation that the taoiseach is having with the prime minister today. and that is that, yes, we all want to move on to phase two of the brexit negotiations, but we are not in a place right now that allows us to do that. the irish foreign minister therewith borisjohnson. police investigating the disappearance of a teenager in dorset are continuing to question
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a man arrested yesterday on suspicion of her murder. 19—year—old gaia pope was last seen in swanage. more police searches have been taking place this morning in connection with the teenager‘s disappearance. our correspondentjon donnison is in swanage and we can speak to him now. it is ten days since gaia was last seen, and while police are keeping an open mind and maintaining hope that she could still be alive, there is obviously becoming increasingly concerned. those searchers have focused on a clifftop area just to the south of here. and that is where these items of clothing were found yesterday, items of clothing which police say resemble what gaia was wearing on the day she disappeared. following that find, even a8—year—old man was arrested, his
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name has been confirmed to us by his family as paul elsey. his 71—year—old mother and 19—year—old nephew were arrested earlier in the week, but have now been released. what more are the police saying about how the public can help them? i think one thing the police and the family have been particularly pleased with is the community here, isa pleased with is the community here, is a pretty small seaside town here, they have really got involved. in a lot of the shops, on the backs of cars, you will see posters appealing for people to come forward. and also, the local community have been very much involved in the search. the mother and father have both appeared in the media, appealing that information. one of the things we heard the father saying this morning was, gaia did sufferfrom pretty serious epilepsy. they believe she was without medication
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and for them, they are hoping this could have been some sort of medical incident rather than anything more sinister. but i think the police are increasingly concerned. thanks for that update. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. zimbabwe‘s president makes his first public appearance since the military took hold of the country. robert mugabe, who is still officially president, addressed a university graduation ceremony. theresa may attends a european summit in sweden and despite warnings that the eu might not start trade talks in december, she says she‘s looking forward to a positive response. let‘s get some more sports news. australia have retained the women‘s
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ashes. coming into the game, england‘s new defeat in any of the matches would end their hopes, and it began terribly when captain heather knight was out with just a second ball of the innings. soon afterwards, england were 16—a. a half—ce ntu ry afterwards, england were 16—a. a half—century held steady things. a fantastic effort. the england head coach mark robinson said he and his players were gutted. australia‘s men seem as players were gutted. australia‘s men seem as confident of victory as their women‘s side. they included a couple of surprises, and none bigger than the return of wicketkeeper tim payne, seven years since his last test appearance. he admitted he thought his test career was already over. it's exciting, forestry earlier, is the biggest thing. i
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made my test appearance seven years ago, so it‘s a truly exciting. england‘s men are in control. england reading, but assistant coach was not exactly satisfied with their performance. a mixed day, really. we reckon we've had two good days and then today, we took eye off the ball of that fraction with the bat. in terms of context of this particular game, we are in a good position, but in terms of our preparation going into next week, we feel worth probably did below will have been the last two days. bbc sport the
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former women‘s goalkeeping coach lee kendall did admit using a fake caribbean accent towards a striker. he was cleared of unacceptable behaviour before stepping down from his role yesterday. his admission was not included in a fa statement, who said, no further action was necessary. that is all this board for now, i‘ll be back with a full round—up at half past one. let‘s look at some of today‘s other developing stories: more than 1 million credit card users, who are struggling financially, have had their credit limits raised in the last year without being asked — according to the charity, citizens advice. it wants the chancellor to ban increases which haven‘t been requested in his budget next week.
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card companies say they‘ve agreed to abide by a voluntary code of conduct to protect customers. it‘s emerged donald trump‘s son in law jared kushner failed to disclose emails he received about wikileaks and "a russian back door overture" in 2016. two senators sent mr kushner who‘s a senior white house aide to the president, a letter demanding additional documents as part of an ongoing investigation into russia‘s alleged election meddling. the lawmakers said they became aware of the documents through other witnesses. a lawyerfor mr kushner, donald trump‘s son—in—law, said he was "open to responding to any additional requests". the actor, sylvester stallone, has denied sexually assaulting a 16—year—old girl in a hotel room in las vegas in 1986. he was responding to reports giving details of a police account of the teenager‘s claims. no action was taken against the actor at the time. sylvester stallone‘s spokeswoman said it was a "categorically false story". the british explorer benedict allen is expected to be flown out of the jungle in papua new guinea later today. he had been trying to make contact with a reclusive tribe he last visited 30 years ago.
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the 57—year—old had taken no means of communication with him, prompting his family to mount a search on monday. he was spotted alive and well on thursday near a remote airstrip. the former head of the sicilian mafia, toto riina, has died in prison, the day after his 87th birthday. the "capo di tutti capi", or boss of bosses, had been behind bars for the past 2a years and was serving 26 life sentences. for a full summary of the news you can go to our website where you‘ll be able to get more details on... it‘s the final day of the united nations climate change conference in bonn. it‘s the first time the international community has gathered to discuss climate change since president trump pulled the united states out of the paris agreement. with the latest from the conference let‘s talk to our environment
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analyst roger harrabin. .. let‘s take it back to the start, you mentioned president trump. the worst case here was an absolute road crash, people saying the usa are out, why should we bother to carry on? a backlash from the chinese and the indians. we absolutely have not seen that. what we have seen instead is a week of steady cooperation moving through difficult moving through difficult issues as to how they will get more ambitious towards the targets scientists have set. these are issues of great difficulty and complexity and technicality. we are moving towards an agreement on that. there is one outstanding issue with this conference and that is money. but the developing countries, who are most vulnerable to climate change, being extremely resentful that the rich nations, who principally caused climate change, are not stumping up the
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money they promised to help them get clean technology. one of the big messages from this week is that if every country when fulltilt at trying to reduce emissions, there are some changes to the climate that are unavoidable now. but something can still be done. what sense do you have that the delegates there are going away with clear plans and with the political will to bring about those changes? it is a real mixed picture, to be honest. you mentioned the amount of carbon dioxide that is being emitted and the amount temperatures are likely to rise now. if countries don‘t up their ambitions, we‘re looking at a temperature rise of more than three celsius, scientists estimate, which would be very bad news for a lot of nations. the delegates are aware of that, they know they have to increase that ambition. the has been a remarkable transformation in the last couple of years and the attitudes of china and india, which are now investing massively in renewable energy. and renewable energy itself
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has plunged in price far faster than even its most ardent supporters believed. so after all these years of not being able to see how the world community could get to where it needs to go for a stable climate, at last there is a glimmer of hope that humanity might be able to pull off this most difficult feat of all. for a generation of children used ta blets, for a generation of children used tablets, handwritten letters mean seam something from history. but teachers believe children are missing out, so we school in kidderminster has teamed up with to ca re kidderminster has teamed up with to care homes to launch a pen pal scheme between children and residents. a reporter has been to find out more. we have got some
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exciting post today. what do you think it might be? the letters! the pen pal letters! the postman has been at this school in kidderminster and they‘re eager to find out what their pen pals have to say. dear jasmine. thank you so much for your very lovely and well—written letter... most of the children have never received a letter before, let alone a written one. but thanks to a scheme linking them to a local care home, they‘re now old hands at it. we believe the art of letter writing is lost, so we‘re encouraging children to write for a real purpose, beyond a simple snapchat or text message. above that we want to engage with the community because we believe as a school that‘s something we‘re passionate about. and the considerable age gap between the correspondents doesn‘t seem to be a problem. you get to listen to what places they've been to and what they've been doing and the cheeky stuff that they've done. you get to ask all the questions you really want and most of the time they answer them.
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this project is about so much more than just teaching a generation of children raised on e—mails how to write properly set out letters. the pupils are now finding out about their pen pals, where they lived, what they did as children. it‘s about forging friendships across the generations. i‘ve got a letter from the school from one of your pen pals, called tilly. shall i read it to you? they are lovely, those kids. at the care home, the children‘s letters are equally well received. many of the residents have dementia and staff help them to read their mail and draft replies. reece asks, what was your favourite trip? weston—super—mare. one lady couldn‘t believe that children wanted to know about her and her life. she started crying, but she was crying happy tears at the thought that someone wanted to know about her. has everyone got a place that their pen pal is visiting? for now, the children are finding
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out as much as they can about their pen pals, and just before christmas the letter writers will meet face—to—face. definitely getting to that time of year when it‘s good to send a letter ora card. time year when it‘s good to send a letter or a card. time to check out the weather forecast. decent spells of sunshine in england, it‘s a different story further north. chiefly affecting northern ireland as well. pour the rest of the day, we keep the showers, they‘ll continue through the night. high pressure gets its way south west overnight tonight, allowing the door to open for cloud and drizzly rain into the south—west. what is cold a start tomorrow morning, but in one to roll
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spots, clear skies will see temperatures dipping just below freezing. the tricky and messy start to our weekend. cloud and drizzly rain, particularly across south—west wales and south—west england. the best of any brightness through northern england and scotland, despite the showers continuing to the extreme north. the milder air looks set to continue into the west we re looks set to continue into the west were sunday. the best of any brightness, but a little bit colder the further east you are. this is bbc newsroom live — our latest headlines: robert mugabe has made his first public appearance since the military seized control of the zimbabwean government. mr mugabe — who is still officially the president — addressed a university graduation ceremony in harare. theresa may attends a european summit — despite warnings the eu might not start trade talks in december she says she is looking forward to a positive response. meanwhile, brexit secretary david
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davis calls for more give and take from the eu. it is always the negotiations. i want them to compromise. surprise, surprise, nothing comes to nothing in this world. so far in this negotiation we have made quite a lot of compromises. police investigating the disappearance of 19—year—old gaia pope are questioning a a9—year—old man on suspicion of murder. the british explorer benedict allen — who was missing in a remote area of papua new guinea until yesterday — has been flown out of the jungle by helicopter. he is expected back in the uk on sunday. more now on our top story this lunchtime — and the president of zimbabwe, robert mugabe, has made his first public appearance since being placed under house—arrest by the military earlier this week. he addressed a university graduation ceremony in the capital, harare. this morning, military leaders said they were in talks with the president, and had made
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progress in dealing with what they call criminals around him. let‘s hear the thoughts of some zimbabweans in the capital. they must sort out their differences. what we need is peace. in the environment and the economy, so in the environment and the economy, so it is right. that is what we expect. what they should do is sort out their problems. the country has meant going backwards. we cannot re i nve nt meant going backwards. we cannot reinvent the wheel, it has already been invented. this country is going down and down and down. we have got to pick it up. i am behind them 100%. robert mugabe has to go. he should step down. he is supposed to step down. with me now is dr michael amoah, an expert in african politics from the university of london. thank you for coming on to talk to
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us. thank you for coming on to talk to us. robert maghaberry appearing in front of the cameras in that graduation ceremony earlier today. is that part of the choreography the military want to show to the rest of the word —— world? military want to show to the rest of the word -- world? absolutely. after this engagement he will be going back into house arrest and then they will carry on with the negotiations, hoping that he will take the easier route to article 96, that is by resignation. any written statement to the speaker that i am resigning and it could be by text message. that is the easier route. otherwise they will have to keep talking more or then think about the next plan of action, which would be to remain in confinement until the party conference in december. the vice
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president is still in possession. how long did this all take, obviously it depends on whether robert maghaberry will play ball, if you like, with what the general rule is wanting to do. —— robert maghaberry. he has not got a strong role to play at all. if not by article 96 where he resigns, perhaps he may want to stick around. then he might want to play the waiting game until the party conference. ifeel that while he is still hanging around, the military are behind the vice president. it will be difficult for robert mugabe to carry on. it could well be that he me through in
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the towel later than —— sooner than later. will they simply say to him, you have got to do this because the other options are not going to be palatable for you ? other options are not going to be palatable for you? yes, i think they will make it clear to him that the other options will not be palatable to him and to not be in anyone else‘s interests either. either way, if he goes back into the waiting game for the party conference, that will be too much time in solitary confinement. and also then it is going to be made clear that going into article 90 seven, that will not be very good either. he has been in power for decades, be very good either. he has been in powerfor decades, you have to be very good either. he has been in power for decades, you have to look at the mindset of this 93—year—old who has been leading zimbabwe for so
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long. taking that into account, do you think he will decide it is best for him and those closest to him, if he spends his remaining years in a way that has been worked out with the military to allow him to spend those years as comfortably as he can? yes, that will have been made ta ke can? yes, that will have been made take —— clear to him. he will be to live in zimbabwe as a retired president. south africa may be hospitable to him and me offer and to live there for a while. it will be made clear to him that this is the endgame and that the sooner that he throws in the towel the better. thank you very much. a british military working dog
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who helped save the lives of troops in afghanistan is being awarded the prestigious pdsa dickin medal — the animal equivalent of the george cross. mali, a belgian malinois, will receive the honour for his heroic actions during an operation in afghanistan in 2012. earlier tina daheeley met mali and his current handler corporal daniel hatley, who trained him as a puppy... amazing dog to train, he picks things up very quickly, he wants to work, he wants to learn. and his general character, he's just a very funny dog. he can always make you smile. what‘s that training process like? it's quite intensive. you have to be constantly teaching the dog. dogs learn through repetition, so we have to do it a lot of times for them to pick it up. it's a very slow process, with good progression, but a very long process. we can see him in action now. how does he compare to other dogs who are serving in the military? he's just like any other dogs serving in the military, it'sjust what he did on that day
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makes him stand out. he‘s having a lovely time there, very comfortable on our rug. what exactly happened on that day? what we saw was a building in kabul and we were sent forwards to retrieve coalition forces from the building. mali was the dog sent in to look for explosive devices and any potential enemy combatants. and he was hurt badly. yes, he received injuries from two grenades. he kept going. obviously, afterwards, he did receive injuries he needed to be treated for at the end of the operation. how long did it take mali to recover? he was initially treated in afghanistan and then flown back to the uk a few weeks after that. he was pretty fit and healthy generally when he got back, it was more the healing process, to stop infection and get him back to normal. it‘s quite rare for animals to win this award, mali is the only living animal to have won it in seven
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or eight years. how many dogs are used in combat? hundreds. if you go back to afghanistan in the height of the conflict, there could have been 130 or more dogs in afghanistan at the time. they are a massive need for the forces, the guys want them on the ground. training is one thing, but what is it like when they are actually in a live situation? that training has to kick in — a lot of it must depend on the relationship mali has with his handler. yes, the bond between him and his handler was phenomenal. that's why they worked so well together as a team and that's why he did what he did on the day. he kept going. no training could be prepare a dog for what he went through that day. he had to keep going and keep working through everything that happened, he was phenomenal. and he saved lives on that day? absolutely saved lives.
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what is he up to at the moment? he is based back at the defence animal training regiment and he helps me train new handlers when they come in and helps me to train dogs like mali. some breaking news, sailor has been appointed as the new black rod. sailor clark is the championships leader at... she has been appointed as the new black rod. she will take on the duties early next year. it has only taken 650 years to appoint a woman to the rule. not long at all. the clock is ticking towards next month when the government hopes talks will begin, over britain‘s vision of a future trade relationship with the eu, post brexit.
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however the president of the european council, donald tusk, is expected to tell theresa may at a european summit in sweden, that there is no guarantee that those talks will get underway in december. it comes as the eu says negotiations cannot move on to trade until questions about the uk divorce bill, citizens‘ rights and northern ireland are resolved. our reality check correspondent, chris morris is here. chris, back to basics with these three fundamental things that the european union wants to see progress on before it moves on to those trade talks. let‘s talk about the divorce bill and the size of that. first we should remind everybody, we are in the middle of a negotiation and in negotiations people say something in public what does not reflect what is happening behind the scenes. although it may seem hopeless, sometimes a resolution is found.
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theresa may has said in florence reached the uk will honour financial commitments it has made during its membership of the eu. the eu wants what that means in practice, it wa nts to what that means in practice, it wants to go in detail as part of the negotiation. we know that the eu is looking for tens of billions of euros as a settlement for the uk weaving, part of that is commitments it says the uk has made while it was a memberfor it says the uk has made while it was a member for bills that have not been paid out. the uk is trying to reduce the amount as much as possible. so far it has offered to be about £18 billion, that is for two years after it leaves the eu in 2019 and 2020. to make sure that other car —— countries are not out of pocket. it coincides nicely with the time that the uk wants to transition. there has been some progress, but on the big detail there is still some more to do. and
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on citizens rights? citizens rights is our big one. both sides say yes there has been progress. david davis talks about substantial progress, but on both sides they want things sorted out. on the eu say, what happens to the rights of family members tojoin happens to the rights of family members to join eu happens to the rights of family members tojoin eu citizens here. the uk says what about voting rights we re the uk says what about voting rights were citizens. we have allowed people the vote. the eu seems cautious about that. the big thing from the beginning is the role of the european court ofjustice. that comes down to who guarantees the right was brexit has happened. who interprets that withdrawal agreement and who is the ultimate legal authority. you can argue the eu is being legalistic about this saying there has to be a role for the european court of justice. there has to be a role for the european court ofjustice. the uk thatis european court ofjustice. the uk that is unacceptable, that is a technical sticking point they have not ironed out yet. then the irish
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border question. in the headlines today because borisjohnson is in dublin. mrjohnson suggesting that if the eu would move onto the trade talks, it would help unravel some of the questions that need to be sorted out on the border question. there is an element of chicken and. there hasn‘t —— has been an element of a wake—up call hasn‘t —— has been an element of a wa ke—up call today. i hasn‘t —— has been an element of a wake—up call today. i think they have not been read the riot act, but there it is this impression that we are all on the same page, nobody wa nts a are all on the same page, nobody wants a hard border, let‘s move on. pa rt wants a hard border, let‘s move on. part of the argument is we cannot sort out the border until we know what the future relationship looks like. the irish position, there is a lot of expansion region —— exasperation there, the want more detail. if you are saying you do not wa nt detail. if you are saying you do not want a hardboard, that is fine in theory but what does that mean in
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practice? do you accept there can be no diverges of regulations on both sides of the border after brexit, like safety of food and animal standards. the irish want more detail in december than the eu summit there are, then they are preferred to give before they give the green light. on all three of theseissues the green light. on all three of these issues there is still quite a lot to do. it is still a negotiation and sometimes more is going on behind the scenes than meets the eye. that is certainly an understatement. thank you very much, chris. chris morris from a reality check team. let‘s get more now on those brexit negotiations. go into some detail on those
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difficulties you anticipated enshrining the data law that it could cause. the government has proposed an amendment to the bill as the date we leave the european union. what we have said in a report todayis union. what we have said in a report today is that if the negotiations go down to the wire, indeed when we took evidence from david davis, he said that it could go to the 59th minute of the 11th hour, if you have put an absolutely rigid date in the bill, then you could deny yourself the flexibility that you want if the negotiations have not quite been concluded. because you are stuck, you are held by this fixed date that has been suggested. and that is why the committee has said that we think
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it could create significant difficulties if the negotiations go down to the wire, because you might wa nt to down to the wire, because you might want to prolong them for a bit to tie up the last minute that you‘re trying to agree. there is history in the udp and union of negotiations going to the last minute, even though michel barnier has said he would like to wrap them all up by october at the latest, november of next year, to give time for the british parliament to take a view, for the european parliament to decide and for the other member states to be sure that they are happy with any agreement that is reached. it is about keeping your options open. let's look at another point you make in this report, that the government would like —— provide more clarity and information to the public. in practice and looking at that context of what is happening today, theresa may is sweden and borisjohnson in today, theresa may is sweden and
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boris johnson in dublin, today, theresa may is sweden and borisjohnson in dublin, david davis calling for more give and take from the eu, well, let‘s look at where the eu, well, let‘s look at where the balance of that needs to live. do you think the uk needs to give more detail to other uk —— eu countries at this stage to make progress in stocks? there are two separate issues. in moving european law into british law as the bill proposes to do, it creates a new category of law. we have got evidence as a committee in which people said, it is not entirely clear what status this is going to have, how will it be interpreted, will it be treated as primary or secondary legislation, that is why we have made the plea for a greater clarity. the judges have we have made the plea for a greater clarity. thejudges have asked we have made the plea for a greater clarity. the judges have asked for further guidance on how they are made —— meant to make that work. we need this process is moving the law across. when it negotiations, we are atan across. when it negotiations, we are at an absolutely crucial stage because everybody wants to make progress to move
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because everybody wants to make progress to move to we can talk about our future longer term relationship with the european union after we leave. at the moment that has not happened because of the outstanding questions on citizens rights, northern ireland and the question of the money. i hope that in december that the 27 member states will say yes we can move on to that discussion because time is running out. and the negotiations are due to be completed next october, november, but they might have to run on further depending on the progress. hilary benn, sorry for interrupting you. we appreciate your time. chairing the committee on exiting the european union. david france has one the baillie gifford prize for nonfiction. how to survive a plague is an eyewitness account of the years between 1981 and 1996 when ordinary citizens became activists and work to campaign for and find
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treatments for hiv. i am pleased that david jones me know. you are very welcome. when i saw the title of the book, play, it suggests medieval times, people suffering and being shunned by their healthy. is that the sort of imagery you are trying to portray? is this what it was like in america in an early 19805. was like in america in an early 1980s. absolutely. i use the word plague to describe a word for something which there is no cure. and what scares up all sorts of hostility about those who are ill and very little committee —— compassion for them. and that is what happened for the first 15 years of the epidemic in the united states and the world. it to that long for a effective treatments to be developed to make an hiv infection is something that could be survived. this is the book version of your oscar—nominated documentary. you we re
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oscar—nominated documentary. you were in new york in the early 1980s. when you then some years later started to think about how you would tell the story, looking back, was there a particular moment that sparked that thought? what i realised was that no one had chronicled the enormous and epic campaign that it too to bring about those medications. and in fact most of the writing is about aids were written and published and staged as plays honours films in the middle of the plague years. once 1996, the watershed of 96 came in the drugs came, there was very little desire to look back at that time because it was such a terrible period, really, in human history. and ifelt, after ten yea rs in human history. and ifelt, after ten years of this treatment either, it was to go back and see how we got
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there and who were individuals who brought us to this watershed event. do you think it almost took the development is to move to the point where there are very effective treatments to be able to have the space to look back at the time that you were writing about? exactly. what i discovered is it really would not have happened without the very direct involvement of people with aids themselves as activists, as self trained citizen scientists. who knew nothing about the pharmaceutical industry and developing arts. they were involved in russian literature and theatre and they came together in its science in a desperate campaign to save their own lives. had they not joined with the scientists and the politicians who were responsible for releasing monies and the pharmaceutical industry were all of this work was being done, i am confident that we would not have
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found these drugs and brought us to this treatment area, certainly not by 96. maybe it would have taken many more years. but the story of how it happened is a story of collaboration, forced collaboration, between grassroots activists, very harsh in their campaigns, and the scientists that they needed to save their lives. david, congratulations on winning the baillie gifford prize on winning the baillie gifford prize on nonfiction. and thank you for talking with us. a unique family memento has gone on display as part of a campaign to get more of us interested in researching our own history. the treasured item is actually a picture in a frame carved from a first world war british army biscuit. it was sent home to sweeten the heartache of a mother missing her son. robert hall explains. for many of us this is the archive — the loft, cupboard, or a set of shelves where we tend to put
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family stuff away and then forget about it. but what if amongst all these objects there was something which told a bigger story about a family member who perhaps took off on a journey to something extraordinary? this isjeremy collingwood. an object he found at home is now a star exhibit in redding museum. it looks like an ordinary framed photo of his grandfather, but the frame is a biscuit. redding used to be home to one of the most famous names in biscuit making. during the first world war, the maker provided what looked like solid snacks for the troops. so solid that some soldiers carved them and sent them home as gifts. in the drawer at home was this i suppose keepsake that mum really liked. it was of her father and he sent it back to his mother to say how much he loved her. look at that picture. the scaredness in his eyes, the worry and concern, but he wanted to show his mother he was all right.
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it connects in a really human way. if you‘re following a trail, you might well end up here. the national archives store — 11 million paper records going back 1,000 years. if you‘re interested in your own personal history, in community history or the history of your place, there are records there for you and they can make a real difference to people‘s lives. importa ntly archives have to be used usefully. every day hundreds of documents are brought from 2.5 kilometres of shelving, or read as digital copies. what we have here is a spy story from the first world war. the file contains the case and the evidence that is collected against him, including a number of letters. you will see across the top what he's written, what he wanted you to see. below that is what was hidden by the secret or invisible ink. if you scan through the file,
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you will even find the lemon he used to write those letters. this is an example of the file relating suffrage women's rights and this is the case of a woman called hilda and she was one of the first women to be forcibly fed in prison. she talks about how she's willing to give her life if needed. it's a really great example of one of the personal stories that we have at the archives. from tomorrow, archives nationwide will be asking us to get involved and explore thse amazing places. who knows? the next great discovery could be yours. ina in a moment we will have the news at one with jane hill. right now we will have the forecast. good afternoon. it was cold and frosty
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for most of us and we started off with scenes like this. for most of us we are with scenes like this. for most of us we are keeping the blue sky and sunshine. temperatures are struggling but i am sure the sunshine helps with that. there is some sunshine helps with that. there is some cloud the further north you go, particularly into northern ireland and scotland. and some gusty winds. the showers are being driven by gill force gusts of winds, severe gales and the northern isles. one or two going into north—west england for the rest of the afternoon. elsewhere we keep that sunshine and temperatures of around 8—10dc and feeling colder when you factor in the wind further north. do the night to it looks as though we will keep the showers going for a time, but clear skies to the size. it is the meteor shower this evening and it peaks tonight meteor shower this evening and it pea ks tonight between meteor shower this evening and it peaks tonight between midnight and on. we have a new moon which means there will be darker skies and a
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good opportunity to see it if we keep the clear skies. central and eastern areas seen keep the clear skies. central and eastern areas seen the best chance. cloud develops from the western outbreaks of rain moving into wales by the end of the night. temperatures will stay around 5—6d. but we might in rule spot sea temperatures below freezing. so chilly start here first thing in the morning. it is a slightly different story as we go into the start of the weekend. outbreaks of show the rain will continue, not amounting to too much but it will move towards the london area. the best chance of the sunshine tomorrow will be further north. we will keep the extreme fees and a few showers into the north, here 5—6d the hive. down to double figures in the south west. and we go into saturday night and wednesday, we keep the threat of cloud, that. temperatures falling to law. the mild air is desperately trying to
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squeeze in. the second half of the weekend, the further north and east you are, you will have the clearest skies and the best of the dry sunshine around. on sunday it looks as if it will be cloudy and damp in time in the south—west, cooler and dry sand the further north and east you are. —— dry sand. since the country‘s army took over. he attended a graduation ceremony in the capital, harare, after being put under house arrest on wednesday. the 93—year—old is reportedly refusing to step down but negotiations are continuing with zimbabwe‘s military and regional envoys. we will be live in zimbabwe with the latest. also this lunchtime... theresa may, at an eu summit, says she hopes for positivity in the brexit talks, but eu leaders warn that the clock is ticking.
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the missing dorset teenager gaia pope — police are still questioning a man on suspicion of murder. a belgian court is considering whether to extradite the former catalan leader for sedition, after he declared independence for catalonia.
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