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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 18, 2017 8:00am-9:01am GMT

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but i admit, brexit is not something where events happen in a fast and furious manner but it is a hugely dramatic moment in eu and uk history. thank you for coming on. before we go, no secret that some newspapers like to have a go at the bbc and this week the sun italy enjoy doing so. published photographs of night shift workers asleep at their desks, passed to them a fellow member of staff who complained... we won't embarrass our sleeping colleagues but we will mention the response of middle east correspondent quentin sommerville, perhaps recovering from his exclusive report on sunday. his report on is fighters. thank you for all of your comments this week. if you want to share your opinions or even appear on the programme you can call us on this number. you can find us on twitter and have a look at our website for previous discussions. that is all from us, we will be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week.
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goodbye. hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. examining the wreckage — the investigation continues to find out why two aircraft collided over buckinghamshire. police and air accident investigators have joined forces after the incident left four people dead. good morning it's saturday the 18th of november. also this morning: people are arriving on the streets of zimbabwe to take part in massive protests against the president, robert mugabe. 90 mps say patients in the health service in england are being "failed" by the system as they ask the prime ministerfor a cross—party solution. in sport, the man who took wales to the semi finals of the euros has stepped down — chris coleman has gone to manage the championship‘s bottom side, sunderland. and philip has the weather. a bit of everything in the weekend's
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forecasts. the bulk of the sunshine will be felt across northern parts on saturday, more cloud across southern areas, i will give you all of the details in a few minutes. we will see you then, thank you. good morning. first, our main story. air accident investigators are trying to work out what caused a plane and a helicopter to collide over buckinghamshire yesterday, killing four people. teams will continue scouring the area for wreckage — around the national trust's waddesdon estate, near aylesbury. ian palmer is there for us this morning. ian, what can you tell us about the crash and the ongoing investigation? it's getting light and i guess investigations and searches resume? it will very shortly. basically the search teams are arriving here on the edge of the waddesdon manor estate. they are having a briefing, a meeting at the moment. it isn't exactly clear when the investigation will resume after the suspension of it last night. of course it will
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start at some point this morning. when it does the families of the four dead people will be following developments very closely. beneath the canopy of autumn colour lies the wreckage of two light aircraft. this is the tale of the cessna plane. nearby lies its wing and a little further away in a clearing are the remains of what is believed to be the helicopter. two people were travelling in each aircraft and no one survived. we did a joint response with the fire service, ambulance and now the air accident branch who are working with us through a joint investigation while we establish the cause of the crash. the mid—air collision happened above the waddesdon estate, in buckinghamshire. both pilots took off from whickham airport 20 miles away. visibility at the time was clear and bright. an off—duty fire officer saw the collision and says there was a loud bang followed by falling debris. yesterday, police and air accident
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investigators worked late into the night. their task — to find out why the crash happened and who was involved. with the wreckage spread over a large area, the search for clues as to why two aircraft collided in good conditions is expected to continue at least until monday. as he will have seen from those aerial pictures, the wreckage spread over a large area. it's also inside very large wooded copse, which will make recovering the wreckage from those two aircraft particularly difficult. thames valley police say they expect to be here for some time, at least a couple of days. right now we are just waiting to hear when, of course, that
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investigation will resume this morning. and hopefully at some point later today we will find out the identities of the four dead people. thank you very much. jubilant scenes on the streets of zimbabwe where people are protesting against the president robert mugabe. state media have confirmed that eight out of 10 regional branches of the governing zanu pf already passed a vote of no—confidence in the president. ben brown is in zimbabwe for us. these rallies have begun. largely celebrating, from what we understand, but please let us know, the fact that a transition period seems inevitable. i think this is a really pivotal day in zimba bwe's history. i think this is a really pivotal day in zimbabwe's history. thousands of people coming out onto the streets in the capital. two a separate rallies, both demanding robert mugabe steps down. one organised by
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the war veterans, the veterans of the war veterans, the veterans of the war veterans, the veterans of the war of liberation, who fought alongside robert mugabe. that is backed by zanu pf, his party, and the army, and a number of civilians who want to take to the streets to demand he steps down. he's running out of time. he's running out of friends. and if he doesn't resign with some dignity of his own free volition it looks like he will be pushed out. zanu pf have a committee meeting. provinces of zanu pf have already had a vote of in him. if he doesn't step down and looked like he will be made to. the threat of violence is something people have been trying to avoid with this so—called coup, write? very little violence. some gunshots
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in the takeover, but not much. in fa ct in the takeover, but not much. in fact the whole mood in this country, as far as fact the whole mood in this country, as farasi fact the whole mood in this country, as far as i concede it is quite relaxed, it's quite calm. it's stupid and today. people since change is coming. how significant the change will be in the long run, we will have to see. the most likely next president was a strong man in robert mugabe's government. he's not exactly a champion of democracy, his critics would say. how much change it is unclear, but if there is a transitional government it looks like members of the opposition will be part of that transitional government. good to talk to you, thanks for keeping us up to date. we will be talking to ben throughout the programme. a 49—year—old man arrested on suspicion of the murder of missing teenager gaia pope has been released. carpenter paul elsey was held after clothing similar to what 19—year—old gaia was believed to be wearing the day she disappeared was found near a coastal path. in a statement posted on facebook her mother natasha said she was holding onto hope her daughter
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was still alive. gaia went missing from swanage 11 days ago. our correspondentjames ingham is in swanage. james, how significant are the clothes that were found? it seems like the police are very much focusing on her area where the clothes were found, but it goes beyond that, as well? that's right. the discovery of this clothing is clearly very significant. by pope's family have said it appears to be closing they believe she was wearing when she went missing. —— gaia pope's family. that means searches are taking place in that area and two other rural areas around swa nage in that area and two other rural areas around swanage today. the effo rts areas around swanage today. the efforts to find the efforts to find gaia have been huge. they have
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10,000 members for their facebook groups to find her. they are asking all of these people to come to swanage, at three different points, to come and help find her. there is an organiser at each of those points with maps. they will be doing a nine search with a couple of feet between each person to try and find her. natasha pope made an emotional plea yesterday saying i believe in this community and i believe miracles can happen. i'm holding on to hope. please come out, everyone of you can make a difference. there are still some hope, despite these arrest and subsequent releases, that gaia can still be found. thanks very much. donald trump has suspended the import of elephant hunting trophies, just a day after a ban was relaxed by his administration. the us president was set to reverse a 2014 obama—era ban, by allowing hunters to bring back mementoes from big—game kills in zambia and zimbabwe. but late last night he tweeted the change was on hold until he could "review all conservation facts". 90 mp5
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90 mps have signed a letter to the prime minister and chancellor to say that people are being failed by the nhs in this country. the politicians who signed the letter — including nearly 30 former ministers — are calling for parties to work together to find a solution. our health editor hugh pym reports. the pressure on nhs is growing. there are fears that hospitals will continue to struggle to find enough beds to admit new patients, partly because of difficulties discharging elderly patients, caused in turn by problems with social care. a group of mps now says that a long—term sustainable settlement is needed and that only a cross—party nhs and care convention can deliver that. in the letter written to the prime minister and the chancellor, the mps say: and: senior conservative labour
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and liberal democrat backbenchers are among those who signed the letter. i think the nhs and social care are huge issues for our generation and we've got to get it right and i think it's bigger than just one party. the mps also call for action in next week's budget to address the short—term pressures on the system. a government spokesperson said it was recognised there was broad agreement across parliament, that social care reform was a priority, and there would be consultation ahead of policy paper next year. it is the budget later this week. there have been a number of stories in today's papers and there will be more tomorrow, i'm sure, but what is in store. tom lees in the london newsroom. this is the weekend whether leaks
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start coming through and we get hints about what to expect, or not to expect, good morning. —— tom is in london. we know what will be in the budget is the first moves towards a possible tax on single use plastics. if you went out last night, bought a kebab on the way back from the pub, the polystyrene tray that came in, or if you are doing your christmas shopping, the bubble wrap it might arise in, the government is concerned about this. especially when it gets into the sea. 1 million birds, 100,000 sea mammals and turtles every year get tangled up in it or eat it, so the government wa nts to it or eat it, so the government wants to do something about it. they are announcing the start of a process. a call for evidence where they will look at how these plastics are made, used, and disposed of. they are specifically going to have
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a look at possibly introducing a tax on that in the future. no detail at all at the moment on how that might work or what level it is likely to be in. other announcements, they have said they are going to allow housing associations to borrow much more money. philip hammond has a lot more money. philip hammond has a lot more money. philip hammond has a lot more money to spend than he thought he would come the question is, how is he going to spend it? we'll find out next week, i'm sure. thanks very much. last night children in need reached a record on the night total of more than £50 million. incredible. # who will buy this wonderful morning? # such a sky... #. highlights of the programme... since 1980 the appeal has raised
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more than £900 million. well done, everybody, fantastic stuff. we will have the weather in a little while and also the sport. more than half a million rohingya refugees are now thought to have fled myanmar into neighbouring bangladesh because of what's been described by the un as "textbook ethnic cleansing". later on in the programme we will talk to somebody about this and get an idea of what exactly is being done. the myanmar army investigated its own actions and cleared itself of any wrongdoing. but we were —— we will be talking more about it later. we have seen the pictures on the tv, but what is it like to be there? we will have an explanation shortly. i promised phil would give you a weather update in a few minutes, but
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he is here earlier than expected. never too late. never too early. don't say that, it depends what the forecast is. chuckles a beautiful image, not me, of course, it is this, the scene this morning from northumberland. glorious. it is a decent start across the northern half of britain. the skies are pretty clear. for that we have to thank the fact that we are away from this weather front in the north—east and south—west. they are providing this low pressure. wind and the rattle of showers across north—east scotland. elsewhere, decent sunny skies. the decent bit of brightness over northern ireland. a stream of
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showers running away from the north channel and across the north west at the moment. they will fade with time. what will not in this area of cloud close to that local weather front i was pointing out in the south—western quarter. that's already producing some weather. that will gradually eased to the east. it is fairly light and patchy. anywhere from the south of wales and into those southern counties and the south—west, you've got the greatest chance of seeing cloud and rain. further north, a sprinkling of showers, but a lot of dry weather. and despite the sunshine not very warm, and despite the sunshine not very warm , seven and despite the sunshine not very warm, seven to 9 degrees. chance of rain in cardiff and later this afternoon at twickenham. in scotland, clear skies and a chilly evening. hopefully that will help the scots to do something against new zealand. overnight, clearskies, safe for the south—western quarter. that'll keep the temperature is up
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here, but a wide spread frost elsewhere. at least it will be a bright start for many central and eastern parts of the british isles. cloudier over northern ireland into the early afternoon. we will find rain associated with that cloud pushing in to western scotland, northern ireland, and west and wales. despite the sunshine it won't bea wales. despite the sunshine it won't be a warm day in the east. late autumn, i would be a warm day in the east. late autumn, iwould have be a warm day in the east. late autumn, i would have said, be a warm day in the east. late autumn, iwould have said, rather than winter. thanks very much, you have made your point, it isn't winter. chuckles thank you, we will see you later. dr rosena allin—khan, a doctor and also the labour mp for tooting, joins us now from bangladesh. good morning. good morning. we've
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seen good morning. good morning. we've seen the pictures on the television over the last few weeks. they are haunting enough. can you give us a sense of what it is like to be there. what have you got from this already? it's incredibly sad. i'm hearing and seeing people who have lived through hell. one hour ago i spoke to an imam who had a village of 3000 people. what he described was seeing all of the women raped, the men killed, and he spoke of babies being thrown alive onto burning fires. it's unlike anything i've ever seen before. i've spent a long time been a humanitarian doctor and i've never seen anything like this. we are seeing some pictures now of the camps and the way people are going to try and get help. how are going to try and get help. how are they coping with the influx of people who have escaped? they are
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really overwhelmed. i spent this morning treating patients in a clinic set up by hope, a local charity. there were 3000 rohingya muslims here before. over 600,000 people have come over the last six months. there are projected to be another 200,000 by the end of the year. the scale is astronomical. they are struggling. everybody is doing what they can but theyjust need more. how can they get more? is this a case of donations and appeals, or is there an organisational element to this kind of rescue, as well? there needs to bea of rescue, as well? there needs to be a multifaceted approach. first of all, we need to find out exactly what has gone on. people have been skirting around what to call this. is it ethnic cleansing, genocide? from what i have heard and seen on this trip it sounds like genocide to me. we need, first of all, on a
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political level, to make sure we go into myanmar, find out what it is and call it what it is. on the ground we need to make sure we support the bangladeshi government who have opened their borders and hearts to welcome these refugees. but they cannot really afford it. they don't have the money to provide basic needs for these people. we need to make sure, yes, donations are made, engineers have what they need to provide services people require. we need to make sure our governments speak to each other. and make sure people put in all they can to help the effort. the army in myanmar has said it is not involved in this at all. it has exonerated itself in some sort of internal investigation and enquiry it has done. what do you make of that?” say that is out and out. i've met
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people today who have witnessed thousands of people... i met an imam from a village, he had about 3000 residents there, and he left with the shirt on his back. they were hiding ina the shirt on his back. they were hiding in a forest looking at babies and children being thrown alive onto burning fires. women being dragged by their hair, being raped, the men taken away by their hair, being raped, the men ta ken away and by their hair, being raped, the men taken away and killed. it is the burmese military if they are trying to say they have nothing to do with this, it is a lie. some of the details you are providing our horrific. some of the story is almost impossible to this morning. very hard. are we being too slow? are we failing to respond to this? in all honesty, yes, i feel we are. humanity should have no borders. i know all across the world, i have seen know all across the world, i have seen it as a doctor, as a politician, i know there is great need. there are lots of atrocities going on. this one stands out to me
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because it is entirely avoidable. people are being ethnically cleansed purely because of who they are. the race in which they belong to. it is futile. there is no need for it. we need to step it up. we have to go and speak to the government of myanmar and say, as the world, we cannot accept this. the government globally should not be accepting this. you are a politician. if you had that meeting with the government. if you are face—to—face with aung san suu kyi who has been fated as a hero of democracy over many years, what would you say to her? i would love to be on a delegation to go and meet with her, sit down to her, talk to her, and i would tell her to her face that her in action, her lack of calling this outcome is an act of cowardice. she should stand up. she should not allow this to happen. —— calling
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this out, is an act of cowardice. thank you for your descriptions. it was quite hard to hear what she was describing, wasn't it? yes. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. writer and broadcaster tim walker is here to tell us what's caught his eye. good morning. we're still getting over some of those horrific descriptions of what is happening in myanmar. but some positive stories to ta ke myanmar. but some positive stories to take a look at in the papers. i think this is positive, in the advancement of medicine, but it is already being cold frankenstein transplant. it warns its readers not to try this at home. —— being called. we are already talking about face transplants. full face
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transplants. there have been about 17 of these. so why not go for the whole thing, and go for a head transplant? this italian surgeon claims his team has already undertaken one. that is connecting the spinal cord, and so one, of aa, obviously a dead person, attaching it to the head, weatherhead would have been, of the —— where the head would have been of the living person. you are explaining it a lot more simply thani you are explaining it a lot more simply than i imagined it is. indeed. you talk about the spinal—cord. if you sever it, you pa ralyse spinal—cord. if you sever it, you paralyse somebody, so it is a very serious thing. they called me frankenstein, he said, but a guy from oxford university says, i'm sorry, decapitating somebody isn't really acceptable if it is a long
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shot and i think i am with him. really acceptable if it is a long shot and i think i am with himm is one of these stories you might see on the internet and wonder if it is true. which takes us on to this story, talking all the time about fa ke story, talking all the time about fake news, donald trump talking about it all the time. and a p pa re ntly about it all the time. and a ppa re ntly fa ke news about it all the time. and apparently fake news isn't new, it isn't something which has come with donald trump. interesting story. ben bradshaw has been asking questions for a long time about russian involvement in our politics. theresa may has now accepted that this is a serious issue. she is concerned about it. ben macintyre says russia has long been in the presence of manufacturing fake news, back to the days of thatcher. in ronald reagan and thatcher's day the internet wasn't such a huge thing in our lives as it is now. there were clearly thousands of these russian box, these automated accounts which could publish. if you hearfacts
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over and over again it easy to start to believe in it. i have talked to a few people and i start to feel like a character in a john few people and i start to feel like a character in ajohn buchan novel. there are certain things you shouldn't say. one guy has been asking on twitter about the lagarde institute. but i think that's like asking about the 39 steps. if we all start asking about it, we will be on a train up to scotland in fear of our lives. chuckles somebody needs to bring some order to the commons. it has taken the palace of westminster a while to get around gender inequality. but we are about to see in the house of lords the first ever lady black rod in the shape of sarah clark. it is a wide—ranging job. shape of sarah clark. it is a wide—rangingjob. basically shape of sarah clark. it is a wide—ranging job. basically she has to keep the elderly peers amused. some of them are not easy customers. i think her background in english
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lawn tennis club, where she had to deal with people like john lawn tennis club, where she had to deal with people likejohn mcenroe, should mean she should be able to keep them in order. what will she be doing, when you say she must keep them amused? it isa she must keep them amused? it is a formal role. when the guys did it they walked around in breaches. you see them at the state openings of parliament. herjob is to keep them entertained. she will organise events, social events for them, and generally keep them busy. i never knew that was a thing, i never “— i never knew that was a thing, i never —— i never i never knew that was a thing, i never —— i never knew i never knew that was a thing, i never —— i never knew they were organising entertainment. that is the dayjob, keeping them entertained. we thought it wasjust one a year, they take her out, not one a year, they take her out, not on the door, go back, see you again next year. it interesting. after all of the headlines about harassment at westminster and the position of women at westminster, i guess it is
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a symbolic moment that a key role in westminster is taken by a woman and maybe that is shifting culture. as we know, women keep order, and people are more civilised when they are around. that is controversial in itself. i'm not sure i agree but i like the sentiment. we will see where that goes. chuckles you have picked a piece about christmas dinner. philip has told us that it christmas dinner. philip has told us thatitis christmas dinner. philip has told us that it is not winter. i've already seen that it is not winter. i've already seen trees. it is quite depressing. carol opened the lighting of the christmas tree last week. my mother used to always say, we'll get through it. but it'll be more expensive this year. we all know the cost of the weekly food shop is going up and up. 5%, the guardian says, which i think is an underestimate. but they are claiming, andi underestimate. but they are claiming, and i wouldn't like to go round to a guardian journalist for
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christmas dinner... would they invite you? they are claiming they can it with just £22.56. you invite you? they are claiming they can it withjust £22.56. you can a p pa re ntly can it withjust £22.56. you can apparently get a really good press echo for just £12 apparently get a really good press echo forjust £12 —— a really good bottle of prosecco forjust £12 at spar. does that leave much money left for everything else. they are claiming that it is for six people. i cannot see that is going to be a huge feast. but apparently we spend, on average, £821 a year on food. we spend most of the money on food. in the final months of the year, the final 12 weeks, we are expected to spend £20.7 billion on stuffing our faces. it is a roast dinner, that is all it is. pretentious chicken. you
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are not holding back. chuckles the headlines in a moment. this is bbc breakfast. we'll get through it. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. coming up before nine, phil will have the weather for you. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. air accident investigators are trying to work out what caused a plane and a helicopter to collide over buckinghamshire yesterday, killing four people. teams will continue scouring the area around the national trust's waddesdon estate, near aylesbury, for wreckage. both aircraft had set off from wycombe air park, around 20 miles from the scene of the crash. 90 mps, about a third of them conservative, have signed a letter to the prime minister and chancellor calling for a cross—party approach on the future of the nhs and social care in england. a government spokesperson said it was committed to making
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the sector sustainable. the politicians who've signed the letter, including nearly 30 former ministers, say partisan politics has failed to come up with a solution. an air and sea search is taking place to find an argentine submarine, which disappeared in the south atlantic on wednesday. the sanjuan has 44 crew on board — including the argentine navy‘s first woman submarine officer. the boat's last known position was about 260 miles off the coast of patagonia. jubilant scenes on the zimbabwean capital today. in the last hour, crowds of people have started to descent on harare. state media confirmed eight out of ten regional branches of the governing zanu—pf have passed a vote of no confidence in the is 93—year—old head of state. a 49—year—old man, who was arrested
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on suspicion of murder following the disappearance of teenager gaia pope, has been released while inquiries continue. paul elsey, confirmed as the suspect to the bbc by his father, is from swanage in dorset. murder detectives are focussing their forensic investigations on homes, cars and an area near a coastal path where women's clothing was found. miss pope's family confirmed the clothing matched what she was believed to be wearing on the day she went missing. the sinn fein president, gerry adams, has said he will set out a plan for a leadership change in his party at its conference in dublin today. mr adams, who is one of the most significant and divisive figures in irish politics, has led sinn fein since 1983. he's indicated he won't stand down immediately, but will talk about future plans. the new leader of the scottish labour party will be announced later this morning. the contest is between the former deputy leader anas sarwar and richard leonard, who became an msp last year. the winner will replace kezia dugdale, who stepped down
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in august and is reportedly flying to australia this weekend to take part in the itv reality show "i'm a celebrity....get me out of here." it's just bizarre. the government is considering a tax on single—use plastics that are used in packaging and polystyrene takeaway boxes. the chancellor, philip hammond, is expected to use next week's budget to announce a consultation on the measure to cut waste and pollution. an estimated 12 million tonnes of plastic enters the oceans each year, and residues are routinely found in fish, sea birds and marine mammals. well done everyone. this year's children in need reached a record on—the—night total of more than £50 million. highlights of the programme included an eastenders musical, singing countryfile presenters, and blue peter does strictly come dancing.
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since 1980, the appeal has raised over £900 million. an original drawing of the comic book hero tintin is expected to sell for nearly £1 million today. the artwork, by the belgian artist herge, was published in 1939 as the cover of a story called "king ottokar‘s sceptre". other pieces up for auction in paris include herge's designs for board games. those are the main stories. have you ever played a tintin board game? no, i read the books. i'll lend you some. 0h, thanks. do you want some as well? i'll share, yeah. i used to read it in french. 0h! as well? i'll share, yeah. i used to read it in french. oh! so pretentious. so talented. no it was pa rt pretentious. so talented. no it was part of my — i did french as a degree, used to read some, you know. you were reading kiddie books when
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you did your degree? yeah. laughter don't sound so clever now, do you? 0h, don't sound so clever now, do you? oh, that's cruel. shall we talk about the sport! i love you. we are talking about the fact that chris coleman has stepped down as wales manager. i mean, maybe not a shock. i think people perhaps knew that was going to happen when they failed to qualify for the world cup and a huge disappointment there. he got them to the semifinals of the euros. the shock is where he's going now. some are saying he could have managed a premier league side if he'd waited for the right opportunity. but he's opted to go for sunderland, who are bottom of the championship. it's a challenge. maybe he likes the challenge. who is favourite to take the role? tell us? ryan giggs. ryan giggs is the odds—on favourite to become the next wales manager, after chris coleman stood down. his new challenge is to rescue sunderland, who are bottom of the championship. coleman led wales to
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their greatest success — reaching the semi—finals at last year's european championship. after they failed to qualify for next year's world cup, it looked likely that coleman would move on, despite the best efforts of the wales fa to keep him. northern ireland manager, michael o'neill, had also been linked to the sunderland job, but he's now been given permission to speak to the scottish fa about their vacant manager's position. o'neill was bitterly disappointed when northern ireland just missed out on qualifying for next year's world cup. he's been in charge for six years, leading them to last year's euros — their first major finals for 30 yea rs. the football league returns this weekend after the international break, dan's here to tell us what's coming up on football focus. what do you make of all this chris coleman stuff going to sunderland? it's a big coup for sunderland. i think lots of teams have been interested in him and he's been carefully plotting where he'll go. but for sunderland it's a great move. if he gets the money, he's got a good reputation. hopefully he can
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turn things round. they've had a pretty miserable last — well, few yea rs. pretty miserable last — well, few years. but last 12 months have been particularly pants from a sunderland point of view. a good way of describing it. that's good analysis. that's why they pay me the average bucks! let me talk about football focus. willian on chelsea are speaking to us about his friendship with david luiz. sam queck who won a hockey gold medal is the right word at the olympics, she's a big liverpool fan. she's been to interview james milner this week. kenny dalglish live as well. we're asking people to send in their questions. not many tv interviews at all. the breakfast one is the only one he's doing in person. he's doing our one live from anfield today. sendin our one live from anfield today. send in your questions for him. the north london derby. big one today.
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gilberto on the show live. he scored in the first ever north london derby at the emirates in 2006. he has fond memories of that. we're with shrewsbury today. i know some people call it shrows—bury. i'm looking forward to this. this man is appearing on football focus. it's will ferrell. so moustache, without a moustache. here he looks like a dishevelled sea captain. looking for his ship. there it's a strong gaze off into the horizon, when he used to have a ship. here he's lost the ship. he is talking about more than mark lawrenson's moustache, premier league predictions today. is he a
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football fan? a massive fan. what tea m football fan? a massive fan. what team does he support? chelsea. ah! that makes sense. i saw his prediction for the chelsea result. ah, he'sa prediction for the chelsea result. ah, he's a massive fan. he always goes to see a premier league game when he comes to this country. i hold my hands up, we had robert deniro on and he predicted 52—0. he knows nothing about football. but he isa knows nothing about football. but he is a big football fan. bit of him and all the other stuff as well from midday on bbc one today. dan thank you. we'll be watching, i'm sure. we're moving on to cricket a bit of a sobering experience for england with the first ashes test nowjust five days away. they were lucky to get away with a draw against a cricket australia 11. the hosts piled on the runs. jason sangha — who's only 18 — hit england all over the place to score his century, before moeen ali had the only success of the tourists' day, getting him caught out. the cricket australia side still finished day four on 364 for four though!
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england looking a bit shaky there. england's women have lost their ashes as well. england have one just one of the five matches so far, with two t20s left to play. it's been a good week for the england women's rugby team. this week, it was announced the rfu will pay them match fees for the first time, and last night, they thrashed canada 79—5 in the opening match of their three—test series. harlequins wing jess breach scoring six of them on her debut. the sides play again next tuesday and saturday. the autumn internationals continue today: wales play georgia, ireland take on fiji and scotland are hoping to beat new zealand for the first time. england face australia at twickenham and mike tindall, world cup winner in 2003, knows a thing or two about beating the wallabies. he's in our london studio. mike, thank you so much for getting up mike, thank you so much for getting up early to talk to us ahead of the game. talking about how strong,
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dominant australia are in the cricket. now here they are facing england in rugby. are they still the world force in world rugby that they used to be? i think they're on a little bit of a resurgence at the moment. they could have had two wins over the all blacks in the rugby championships. they did one with that win over them. i think from england's point of view they need a good win. the last four times they've played, we've had those victories. they need to cement themselves as the real challengers for the can i ways when they —— kiwis when they face them next autumn. what do england need to do to improve? even eddiejones said of that match last weekend that it was like watching a bad movie — you sit through it but didn't enjoy. it what do they need to do so we speak more positively about their performance tomorrow? it's a point where they need a performance. if they get the performance, they will get the win. but they need a performance more
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than anything. through the six nations, they didn't really hit their stride either. so people are starting to say if they win ugly again, they're going to start questioning a little bit more about jones and how england are actually playing and are they actually as good as what they think. i think he knows. last week was what looked like the first game of the year. they were sloppy. their handling skills, normally great, weren't as good as what they've been. their break—down work wasn't up to scratch. there are questions there to be answered. ijust want scratch. there are questions there to be answered. i just want to see them back playing that high tempo by them back playing that high tempo rugby that saw them smash australia 3-0 rugby that saw them smash australia 3—0 in their own backyard lastjune. hopefully, if we can get that, you can see a great game today and they normally are high scorers. i still think england are favourites to win it. i just hope think england are favourites to win it. ijust hope we'll see a good game. big names returning for england as well. owen farrell back after he was rested for the last fixture. also otogi back on the
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bench as well. big players for england. how important to see those big names back in the squad? yeah, those two guys have obviously, they're up for world player of the year. it shows how important, how good they are. owen farrell coming backin good they are. owen farrell coming back in to make that partnership. i think ford and farrelly understand each other very well. we didn't release the back last week. with jonny may coming in and watson at fullback, we have a lightning fast back three. eddie jones fullback, we have a lightning fast back three. eddiejones will be keen to get the ball in those three's hands early. that's why farrell is back in. i'd like to see henry slade to get more game time, to see how he fits in. maybe taking off ford and farrell play 10 and slade12. with otogi it's a shock not to have him straight back in the team
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considering how he's grown over the last two years in terms of stature ofa last two years in terms of stature of a player and he's seen as one of the most important players for england. but eddie jones the most important players for england. but eddiejones is trying to figure out the pecking order of his second row. we're blessed to have four or five very, very strong players in that second row. i think kourtney laws has been outstanding. he's trying to figure it out. mario will play his role during the game. 0k, mike. will play his role during the game. ok, mike. thanks very much for bringing us all the latest ahead of that. new zealand are out of the rugby world cup. a tight low—scoring match. the 2008 winners were beating 4-2 match. the 2008 winners were beating 4—2 by match. the 2008 winners were beating 4-2 by fiji. match. the 2008 winners were beating 14—2 by fiji. it match. the 2008 winners were beating li—2 by fiji. it was a famous night for the fijians. they are into the world cup semifinals for the third time. they play the holders australia next. tonga survived a bit of a scare to reach their first world cup semi—final.
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they just scraped past lebanon, winning21i—22 , but they were a shadow of the side that beat new zealand in their previous game. tonga will be england's opponents, if england beat papua new guinea tomorrow. andy murray has split with his coach ivan lendl for the second time. under his guidance, murray won three grand slam titles, two olympic golds and made it to world number one, but he's been plagued with injury all season, and he'll continue to work on regaining his fitness, leading up to january's australian open. the battle between tommy fleetwood and justin rose to finish the year as europe's number one golfer is getting exciting. it's advantage rose, who's two shots off the pace at the dubai championship — and two clear of fleetwood. they're chasing this man, defending champion matthew fitzpatrick, who's leading the field going into round three. he's ten—under par, one shot ahead of tyrrell hatton. the race to dubai concluding in dubai. they've got to dubai, they just have to race to the end of the tournament to see who is the best. then get home from dubai. that's it,
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christmas time. it would be a great christmas time. it would be a great christmas if you win that race. thanks very much. he famously tackled unhealthy school dinners, and nowjamie oliver has the selfie in his sights. the celebrity chef has announced he's banned his 14—year—old daughter from taking them, and described selfies as the unhealthy "sugar of social media". he also warned parents to be more aware of how children are presenting themselves online. we'll talk about this more in minute, but first let's take emma kennyjoins emma kenny joins us. emma kennyjoins us. what do you make of this? i have some empathy with jamie oliver. i don't think he's just reacting from a perspective that's personal. he's taking on board a lot of the research and evidence that we're seeing, the trends that are developing in young people's mental health. there's an irony as well, because he hasn't shied away from his family being in the public eye and under scrutiny. the difference
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is though is what we're seeing with young people, particularly young girls is this real emphasis on their physicalform. girls is this real emphasis on their physical form. they're girls is this real emphasis on their physicalform. they're not taking pictures to capture moments, memories. they're taking the same image in the same space, in a bedroom, heavily edited it with their apps. then posting online and wanting approval. we've seen in research kids are now responding to likes as a sense of self—value. we don't want kids to feel that way. we wa nt don't want kids to feel that way. we want kids to feel good about their bodies, whatever it is. we don't wa nt bodies, whatever it is. we don't want them to feel that pressure. of course we do. i wonder if there's a generational thing here going on, whether for kids today, taking a shelfy is just taking a shelfy. we can't get used to it, but it's more normal than we think. my niece is taking thousands of selfies. she's beautiful. i don't think she needs that many. she gets lots of positive points for it. lots of young people feel that way. the problem i have is that well being is at an all time
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low for our young people. whether we like to acknowledge that is in symmetry to suggest with those selfies, we do know it is. the truth is that we don't want your people to feel the pressure of having to look a certain way all the time, having to present as perfect. i think that most young people, as you said, probably have a level of selfie taking within a moderate level. but for some, it's actually destroying their self—esteem and the research is saying that. it's not me saying that. i'm not voicing my opinion. i'm saying that as you know, generationally of course we've changed. when i was a young girl, we couldn't afford to take pictures. they were expensive to develop. sometimes you get it back with a sticker on your head because you hadn't got the focus right. that's not the case now. what we see is the kardashian culture is not positive for our pictures. it's notjust glamorous pictures of themselves, like these with make up on and looking great. sometimes they're taking pictures of anything, in the
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corner shop and at the bus stop. it's part grammar of their lives.“ you're taking a picture of something and you put yourself in it smiling, that isn't considered, in my perspective, a real selfie. ithink they are constructed, posed, every different outfit and basically also using lots of filters. young people are beautiful. i don't know about you, i cannot tell what is a beautiful and less beautiful child because they all look gorgeous to me. they don't appreciate how beautiful they are. that's an old age problem, as in a long standing problem. we didn't realise when we we re problem. we didn't realise when we were young we were beautiful. you are at your most beautiful, you could argue. absolutely. the fact is that there is that difference. john was saying if took a picture, a selfie, it's i'm here, i'm enjoying this. just mucking around. psychologically, what is the thing that's most at risk, so to speak? the major thing is one, female—wise,
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the objectification of whimper say. we know we want to get away from girls being valued for the way they look and not who they are. secondly, we see when the brain acknowledges that you're getting likes the validation causes a reaction in our brains that makes us want more ever it, like an addiction cycle. you're saying that's more dangerous than the taking of the picture. both together, objectification, possible sexualisation and validation. thanks for being here. what do you think of jamie oliver's decision to ban his daughter taking shelfies. get in touch in the usual way this morning. we'll try to read out some of the comments later. time to talk to phil with a look at the weather. if you we re with a look at the weather. if you were to take a selfie, what ideal weather would be behind you? not that! exactly, jon. thank you very much. moving swiftly on. we tell it like it is much. moving swiftly on. we tell it like it is with much. moving swiftly on. we tell it like it is with the much. moving swiftly on. we tell it like it is with the weather. occasionally, we have to do this sort of thing to you, because it is that way in south wales at the moment. you're close to a weather front. there's thickening cloud
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coming into the southern counties of england and wales and bringing with it not only the murk, but also the possibility and it is only that, of patchy rain. as we move further north, the supply of showers across northern england that tends to fade with time. brighter skies. what won't change is if we skip to north—eastern scotland, windy through the day and a supply of showers. essentially, it's through the day and a supply of showers. essentially, its bright here, bright too for northern ireland. but rather cloudy at times and here, those brightening skies getting into northern england too. even in the south, i have to say, that through the afternoon, not a write—off by any means at all. there will be brightness even here. i have to throw in the possibility of there being a wee bit of rain, which gradually moves into the south—western quarter of the british isles through the course of the night. elsewhere, the skies are pretty clear and as a consequence certainly in the countryside, there could be a widespread frost. for some quite a hard one as well, there in the borders area. that equates to a glorious start to the new day on sunday. save for the south—western
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quarter. through the day, we'll find cloud getting into many of these western areas. there you see the extent of the rain. out east, despite the sunshine, never better than five, six or seven. back to you guys. more than 100,000 people in low paid jobs who are paid weekly could be facing a bleak christmas this year. those affected are people who claim universal credit to top up their low pay, but the bbc has established that in many cases their benefit will not be paid in december and they will have to reclaim universal credit in january. it's the latest in this ongoing saga of universal credit. paul lewis from the bbc‘s money box programme has been doing the sums. let's get this dead clear then. so this is because there are more weeks in the month than there might other be, yeah? yeah, that's right. universal credit is paid monthly, by
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that a calendar month. if you're paid weekly and nearly half of all universal credit claimants are paid weekly when they're in work, then you can have four or five weekly when they're in work, then you can have four orfive pay weekly when they're in work, then you can have four or five pay days in the month. in december there are five fridays, which is a typical pay day. if that's your position, then that fifth pay day will stop you getting your benefit. and not only does it mean you get no money, but you'll have to reclaim the following month. that's a procedure you have to go through. have you to do it at the right time. there could be another delay before you get the next payment. it's a pretty bleak prospect for people that the benefit they expect to get every month, they won't get this month. this is the way the system is meant to work, is that right? i'm afraid to say it is. if you go to the gov. uk website and look it up, you'll find the details. there it's had no publicity until we worked out some numbers. it's very clear there that in the week, so you
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have five pay days, your benefit will be reduced, usually stopped and you'll have to reclaim it. on the figures, there are about a quarter ofa figures, there are about a quarter of a million universal credit claimants who do work. we know that nearly half of them are paid weekly from other research, so that makes a figure over 100,000. it won't affect every one of them. it will affect almost all of them. mps were voting this week and trying to improve universal credit. was that part of this? no, it got a brief mention in the house of commons. the issue they we re the house of commons. the issue they were looking at is why you had to wait more than six weeks to get your first payment. and that is where we expect a bit of movement in the budget. we don't know quite how much or when it will start. but this is a com pletely or when it will start. but this is a completely separate issue and like the long delay, it is built into the system and only a change in the underlying rules of universal credit can solve this problem. and the government say what? well the government say what? well the government says it is paid monthly. it reflects people's actual
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circumstances, after they've received their pay. they don't deny it, they just say that's received their pay. they don't deny it, theyjust say that's how it works. paul, thank you very much. paul's investigation in full, more details on money box on radio 4 at lunch time today. let's talk about strictly. they're in blackpool tonight. why is blackpool so special? 12,000 square feet dance floor made from 30,000 wooden blocks. it's been putting a spring into dancing's steps for over a severnery. tonight —— century. tonight they hit blackpool. we are talking about it in a moment. first, let's ta ke talking about it in a moment. first, let's take a look behind—the—scenes. seagulls, chip butty on the prom and queues. it's that time of year when strictly comes to blackpool. # let me entertain you... #
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it's the excitement. i've got the hiccups, literally. i can't stop. goodness me. oh, i need to control the excitement. i love it here. i'm just enjoying every minute. it's really exciting and it just feels fantastic to be a part of this special moment. i've never been in this ballroom. i've heard amazing things. when i first walked in here, i couldn't believe. it reminds me of the ballroom in beauty and the beast. it's wonderful. every minute of practice counts before tonight. but it's the tower ballroom's sprung dance floor the celebs are desperate to get out on it. really quick quickstep for you. how's it going? i'm loving it. it's so energetic. it's quick. it is! we're bouncing round this amazing floor. i can't wait for rehearsal. and a sexy
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salsa. it's a salsa, we don't know how sexy. give us some hips, joe. no, you have to watch on saturday. i don't give that away for free. it's amazing. it's a lot of fun. i think i've ticked a great big box of life there. if i get to do that, i can die happy. you're embracing blackpool. we've got you something else as well. have a go. i've gone all out blackpool, right? what do you reckon. not so much bond as eltonjohn. you reckon. not so much bond as elton john. the excitement inside matched only by the fans waiting outside in the cold. fantastic, we're from leeds. we've travelled in from leeds this morning just for strictly. yeah. just want to see it, yeah. love blackpool. it will be great, yeah. good luck to gemma. we're from bury.
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who'll be a seaside smash and who'll bea who'll be a seaside smash and who'll be a dancing donkey? we'll find out tonight. bbc one tonight, the blackpool experience. you didn't quite get there, did you? nowhere near there! i was being nice. yeah don't bother. headlines in a moment. stay with us. hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay.
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thousands of people take to the streets in zimbabwe to protest against the president robert mugabe.
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