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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 18, 2017 3:00pm-3:30pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at three: tens of thousands of people are on the streets in zimbabwe, calling for president mugabe to resign. new zimbabwe, freedom has finally come! i don't know how to express it because i can't believe it, it's like i'm dreaming! richard leonard is the newly elected scottish labour leader, replacing kezia dugdale, who stepped down in august. police and air accident investigators search for clues as to why two aircraft collided, leaving four people dead. also in the next hour... taxing takeaway boxes to tackle what's described as a "global emergency". the chancellor is considering measures to help cut the 12 tonnes of plastic going into the oceans every year, often found inside birds, fish and sea mammals. malcolm young, co—founder and guitarist of the australian rock
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bank ac/dc, has died aged 64. he founded the group in the 1970s with his brother, angus, and, ‘made in china'. the click team are looking at mobile phone production in shenzhen. that's in half an hour, here on bbc news. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. tens of thousands of people have taken to the streets of harare, in zimbabwe, calling for the resignation of president robert mugabe. he's been under house arrest — apart from one public appearance yesterday — since the army seized power on wednesday. our senior africa correspondent, anne soy, reports from harare. this is not the typical coup,
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it's more like a carnival. zimbabweans here are already celebrating the end of president robert mugabe's rule. this is an unprecedented show of defiance against the strong man. these soldiers are the new heroes in town. zimbabweans are ecstatic. they say the soldiers have granted them their second independence. a moment they've all been waiting for. years of emotion poured out on the streets. what does this mean for you? new zimbabwe, freedom, it has finally come! cheering. what about you 7
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i don't know how to express it because i can't believe it, it's like i'm dreaming. first lady grace mugabe hasn't been seen in public since the military took control of the country. neither has the former vice—president, emmerson mnangagwa, the man tipped to succeed robert mugabe. these people fought for independence led by robert mugabe. now they are asking him to resign. this is all choreographed to put pressure on the president to leave and to give the transition some legitimacy. like many zimbabweans, rachel has only ever known mr mugabe as president. it means a new zimbabwe, a new era, and i'm fighting for my children so that they can have a better future. i'm happy that she will grow up knowing a different president from the one that i grew up knowing. yes. thousands of zimbabweans are out to make a strong statement.
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they want change. for now, any change would do. in the last hour, we heard from our correspondent, shingai nyoka. she explained the pressure mr mugabe is under to step down. well, it's difficult to see how he wouldn't be affected by these scenes that he is no doubt watching from his home, under house arrest, probably on tv. hundreds and thousands of people have been pouring through the streets, with one message, that president mugabe must go. moments ago, we understand that some of those protesters not only marched to his official state residence, but also to his private house, and that they were singing at his gate and telling him that his 37 years in office is up. we haven't heard anything formally from him, but his nephew, patrick zhuwao —
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who is also a cabinet minister — spoke to the reuters news agency earlier today. he says that president mugabe will not legitimise a coup. and he will not break the constitution by stepping down. so at this stage, it seems that he remains defiant. richard leonard has been elected the new leader of scottish labour. mr leonard — who's backed by most trade unions — replaces kezia dugdale who resigned in august. in his victory speech, he called for "a vision for the future — and a vision for hope again." our scotland editor, sarah smith, reports. applause. electing richard leonard as their leader marks a left turn for the scottish labour party. he says his victory means they will now follow a more radical agenda. there is now a settled consensus established around a radical policy agenda for the scottish labour party of extending public ownership, tackling inequality and poverty, a more progressive taxation system. applause.
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hello, ben, it's richard leonard... richard leonard was only elected to the scottish parliament last year. he is a yorkshireman who has spent his adult life working in scotland as a trades union organiser and he is a committed corbyn loyalist. there are times in the past where it has appeared that the scottish labour party has looked to pick fights with jeremy corbyn. i certainly will not be doing that. we can't afford the luxury of splits and divisions. we need to work together, and i am determined that the scottish labour party, from whom today i have received a mandate, will be working closely and in step withjeremy corbyn and the entire labour party. anas sarwar, the defeated candidate in a fractious race, says the party must now unite around their new leader. the departing leader, kezia dugdale, has surprising news of her own today. she is to appear on "i'm a celebrity...get me out of here!", a decision that has been sharply
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criticised by members of the party. sarah smith, bbc news. we will shortly speak to our correspondent in scotland so stay tuned to find out more about the selection for scottish labour. air accident investigators are trying to find out what caused a light aircraft and a helicopter to collide over buckinghamshire yesterday afternoon. two pilots and two passengers died near the village of waddesdon. our correspondent, danjohnson, is there for us. the police say it's still too early to tell what caused this crash and piecing together exacty what happened is still going to take more time. it's difficult, complicated work and it's not being helped by the conditions here on a very wet, miserable day. but this morning, air—accident investigators have been going through the pieces of wreckage, which are across woodland just further down this road. on the edge of that country estate.
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at midday, locals heard a loud bang. and they saw two black objects spinning down to the ground. before another loud crash. and the wreckage is spread throughout the woodland. so work for investigators to do, and police say they will not release the identities of the four people who died in this crash until they've spoken to their families and until they've been officially identified. investigators expect to be here, at the crash scene, probably over the weekend, until monday. that was dan johnson. the sinn fein president, gerry adams, has said he will set out a plan for a leadership change in his party at its conference in dublin this evening. mr adams, who is one of the most significant figures in irish politics, has led sinn fein since 1983. he's indicated he won't stand down immediately, but will talk about future plans. let's talk to our ireland correspondent, chris page, who's in dublin. what sort of reaction has there been
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to this announcement?” what sort of reaction has there been to this announcement? i think at sinn fein‘s annual gathering in dublin, a lot of focus is going to be on gerry adams's speech tonight at half past eight. he has billed it as particularly significant in that he says he is going to set out plans for what he has called a process of generational change. mr adams is nearly 70 and four the last couple of years, there has been speculation as to when he might stand down as leader of sinn fein. he is going forward once again to be the leader of sinn fein for at least another year so he is not going to be standing down immediately. but he may well indicate some kind of timetable for him stepping down from his role as head of the party and for others to take over. he says he has agreed a plan in advance with his allied, the late martin
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mcguinness, the late deputy first minister of northern ireland who died later this year. and michelle o'neill is already leading the party in northern ireland. mr adams switches political home from stormont to dublin six years ago and isa stormont to dublin six years ago and is a member of the irish parliament in dublin. when he does stand down as leader of the overall party, the job could go to the party vice—president who is a member of the irish parliament in this city. what sort of leadership has this been, has it been successful? well, he has been leader of sinn fein since 1983, 3a years, so the leader ofa since 1983, 3a years, so the leader of a major party for longer than any other party leader in britain or ireland. he is well known around the world as the public face of the irish republican movement as it moved from violence to peace. security forces believed he was a senior ira member during the
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troubles but he has always denied that. under his leadership commission fain have grown strongly in electoral terms. the second biggest party in northern ireland and the third biggest party in the irish republic, challenging for a place in government, many think, at the next general election, and perhaps after that. so in terms of the party and its growth and mr adams, it has been a success story from their point of view and he ripped does remain a very divisive figure in the party's association with the ira during the long conflict in the northern irish. 3,000 supporters gathered here at dublin and they will be focused on what he has to say at around half past eight. thank you very much. richard leonard has been appointed the leader of scottish labour and he replaces kezia dugdale who resigned in august. we can speak to our scotland correspondent, steven godden. what can you tell us about mr
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leonard? firstly, what can you tell us about mr leonard ? firstly, this what can you tell us about mr leonard? firstly, this was the result that most people expected. it was a long contest at times, at dit was a long contest at times, at dit was bitter pitting richard leonard against anas sarwar. richard leonard isa against anas sarwar. richard leonard is a former union official and a member of the labour party for 35 yea rs, member of the labour party for 35 years, but for the majority of that period, he has had a very low profile. he was elected to holyrood last year. but he is a former union official and as such, coming from the left wing of the party, he is a strong supporter ofjeremy the left wing of the party, he is a strong supporter of jeremy corbyn. he was pitched against anas sarwar, who was viewed as a more moderate alternative. so in that sense, that vision for the labour party has come to the forefront with what was ultimately a clear victory for richard leonard as the polls closed yesterday. both candidates said, things are too close to call. but it
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was a clear and decisive victory for richard leonard. the question for him now is, what comes next? it was at times a fairly bitter election campaign. it got quite personal at times. what richard leonard said he has to do is to try and unite the party. he said he will united behind this radical agenda, this radical socialist agenda that he believes he 110w socialist agenda that he believes he now has a mandate for, given the result. so more progressive tax system. one example of the things he is looking to do. he will try to unite the party behind that agenda, but he needs to do that in scotland where things have been fractious, and he needs to find a degree of harmony between the scottish party and the uk party. in the past, there has been a degree of friction between the two and the scottish labour party has been labelled a branch office in the past of the uk party and there has been friction in previous leadership. richard leonard
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well placed to do that given that he isa well placed to do that given that he is ajeremy well placed to do that given that he is a jeremy corbyn supporter, but thatis is a jeremy corbyn supporter, but that is something he has to now do. from glasgow, thank you very much. the government is considering a tax on single—use plastics that are used in packaging and polystyrene takeaway boxes. the chancellor, philip hammond, is expected to use next week's budget to announce a consultation on the measure to cut waste and pollution. an estimated 12 million tonnes of plastic enters the oceans each year, and residues are routinely found in fish, sea birds and marine mammals. joining me now is the environmental campaigner and founder of the environmental consultancy group green gumption uk — dr paula owen. thank you forjoining us. what do you think about this consultation and possible tax? it is fantastic
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moves if it happens. it is what we need, half the plastic we produce every day is single use plastic, that means it is used a few minutes before we throw it away, if we're lucky, into a recycling bin. if not, into landfill sites and eventually oceans, so fantastic move. will it be enough? is there more you would like to see happen? 0h, be enough? is there more you would like to see happen? oh, yes. i would like to see happen? oh, yes. i would like to see an end to the point as plastics. plastics that we use without even thinking every day. over packaged items from the supermarket. plastic bags. we have a plastic bag tax, but that only accou nts plastic bag tax, but that only accounts for the supermarkets are not the small stores so you have a lot of plastic bags used for single items, a couple of items, in your local corner store. there is lots of alternatives to the use of plastic and we have got to promote and tell people how dangerous plastic is when
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they get into our environment and oceans. tell me about pointless plastic. what are you doing and what reaction you getting? it has not launched yet, it is launching next week. myself and my partner organisation global good at michael woods, a sustainable scheme. we're launching it at an awareness raising and education campaign. we want the public to take pictures of wherever they come across a point as plastics. that is the single wrapped banana. the aubergine in plastic. three orfour banana. the aubergine in plastic. three or four straws they give you in yourgin and three or four straws they give you in your gin and tonic. and they photograph them and put them on media and we devise a rogues' gallery of plastic. i understand in america, they already ban some single use plastics. why have we not done that in the uk? do you know what the boundaries are wedged up
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where we not going that far? good question. it took england several yea rs question. it took england several years longer than even wales and scotla nd years longer than even wales and scotland to bring in the plastic bag tax, the 5p tax. there are no technological barriers because there are barriers, it isjust the technological barriers because there are barriers, it is just the will, technological barriers because there are barriers, it isjust the will, i think. and now we have so much publicity about it and the blue planet at the moment is talking about plastics in the oceans. people are becoming aware of our use of plastic. and hopefully, we can reduce the amount point is plastic we have. and do you agree with the reward and return scheme that may be introduced? four bottles? i am old enough to remember the old deposit scheme where we used to get back our glass bottles of pop. you do need to reward people before it becomes a habit. so, yes, whatever it takes! thank you very much.
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the headlines on bbc news: demonstrations outside the house of mugabe as tens of thousands of people are on the streets of the zimbabwean capital harare to call for the resignation of the president. richard leonard is the newly elected scottish labour leader, replacing kezia dugdale, who stepped down in august. police and air accident investigators search for clues as to why two aircraft collided over buckinghamshire, leaving four people dead. in a moment... asa as a service is held to remember the victims of the king's cross fire, we speak to one of the survivors. in sport, arsenal ston spurs in the north london derby. a contentious free kick headed in for the opening goal. alexis sanchez scores the second. and manchester city have drawn 0—0 at leicester and chelsea one goal up at leicester and chelsea one goal up at west bromwich.
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england play with —— australia at twickenham in the second of their internationals, the score is 3—0 to england. and in cardiff, wales 10—3 up against georgia at half—time. scotla nd ta ke against georgia at half—time. scotland take on new zealand later. justin rose shoots a brilliant third round at gol‘s world tour championship to read by a shot and closed in on tommy fleetwood for the race to dubai title. and british speed skater elise christie leads at the first world cup christie leads at the first world cu p eve nt christie leads at the first world cup event of the season, taking gold at the short track in south korea. that is the sport, we will have more for you in one hour. large numbers of volunteers are helping dorset police search for the missing teenager gaia pope, who disappeared 11 days ago. the search is focussing on three locations around swa nage. miss pope's family confirmed that an item of clothing found earlier this week matched what she was believed to be wearing on the day she went missing. yesterday, detectives released a 49—year—old man who'd been
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arrested on suspicion of murder. malcolm young, co—founder and guitarist of the australian rock bank ac/dc has died aged 64. he founded the group in the 1970s with his brother angus, retiring more than a0 years later to receive treatment for dementia. the band were best known for albums highway to hell and back in black, and were inducted into the rock and roll hall of fame in 2003. in a statement on the group's website, they described malcom as ‘a perfectionist‘, ‘with enormous dedication and commitment, and the driving force behind the band'. emergency services have been called to cardington, in bedfordshire, after the airlander a10 airship — the world's longest aircraft — fell from the air. the airship wasn't flying at the time, as it was secured to its mooring mast, and there was no—one on board. but one member of staff has received minor injuries after the incident.
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only yesterday, the airlander 10 had completed a successful test flight. today marks 30 years since the king's cross fire, when 31 people lost their lives in the worst blaze in the history of the london underground. it started when a single match was discarded on a wooden escalator. as tom edwards reports, the tragedy brought about monumental changes in fire safety. thousands use this escalator every day and many don't know this is where the worst fire in the history of the tubes started. stewart button is now retired, but nearly 30 years ago, he was one of the first firefighters to arrive. we were laying out the equipment and it was then that we heard or started hearing all the screams. i thought there must be loads of people down there. just scream after scream. 30 years on and this official report
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still makes terrifying reading. it describes how this station, full of commuters, turned into a furnace. it also outlines how the response from the emergency services was hampered, due to a breakdown in communication. and there was a lack of knowledge of the station layout. even 30 years on, for the families of those who died, the memories are still raw. you cry a lot... for a long time. it's a shocking thing. and every time something like that happens — whether it's grenfell or a terrorist incident — you just think of all the people who are getting that news and the shock of it. i mean, you're in shock for quite a long time.
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the following inquiry led to a huge change to the tube and the fire service's safety regimes. among the many recommendations, wooden escalators should be removed, smoking should be banned, and heat detectors and sprinklers should be installed. and crucially, the emergency services should be able to communicate with each other underground. most of the recommendations have since been implemented. these types of exercises are now part of training. and legislation ensures minimum staffing levels on deep—line stations. there isn't a month goes by in myjob where we don't reference the king's cross fire. it had such a phenomenal and beneficial effect on the organisation. so out of a desperate tragedy, good things have actually come. with cuts due on the tube, the unions say they will resist anything that they think could compromise safety. and these changes only happened after the deaths of 31 londoners.
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with me now is the bbc journalist, author and former firefighter clifford thompson. clifford was one of the officers on duty that fateful night. good afternoon. lovely for you to be here today, what has it been like today? a very powerful and moving event 30 years on from this terrible tragedy. and of people have gathered at king's cross station today representatives from the london fire brigade, the london ambulance service, the metropolitan police. the mayor of london. and british transport police officers, some of whom were very badly injured because they were among the first on the scene at the fire on that terrible night. we heard one of the survivors, family members saying that the memories of rule. what are your memories of that night? yes, they are very painful. this has been
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described as a game changer in terms of fires, at a time when there were many major incidents. ten major disasters in the second half of the 19805. disasters in the second half of the 1980s. and ultimately, change had to come about, it came about relatively quickly, changes came about the firefighting besiegers, equipment. we were issued with plastic garden gloves, that is the only protection we have for our hands. what sticks in your mind about that night? when you look back now and you see how things have moved on, if you flash back to that night, what still do you think i cannot believe we used to do that? most of all, it is the fa ct we to do that? most of all, it is the fact we wanted to be involved, i was based in stratford in east london and we thought we would get called on to the incident because we were relatively close. we knew that stations around the west end were called, there were 30 fire engines, more than 150 firefighters, and we stayed in the fire station all
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night. we did not move. the mood sank, we heard the radio messages coming back, people missing and unaccounted for, trapped below the escalators. and the terrible news that one of our own officers, station officer colin townsley, we called him the governor of red watch, he lost his life that night in terrible circumstances and he was awarded a medalfor in terrible circumstances and he was awarded a medal for his actions. when you look back on the lessons that were learned, you spoke about the emergency services. london underground, we have heard about these changes. take us through that. changes came pretty quick, but there we re changes came pretty quick, but there were also some areas that it took a while for changes to be fermented andi while for changes to be fermented and i covered this story ten years ago. on the 20th anniversary, just after 77. even then, we were still talking about the emergency services not able to talk to each other underground at the time the british transport police could and the emergency services could not. since then, firefighters had been issued
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with personal radios, i have spoken to london underground over the past few weeks and they said migratory drivers can talk the platform staff and the concourse. king's cross was and the concourse. king's cross was a small fire and it was described in the public inquiry report as being the public inquiry report as being the size of a cardboard box. and this fire was allowed to build up because of delay after delay and it eventually erupted into a deadly flashover, taking out everything in the ticket hall from the escalator to the piccadilly line up to the surface. it stripped tiles from the walls and ceilings, it was that bad and horrific. that change has come 30 years on, communication is better. procedures are better. and the way the emergency services talk to each other is a lot clearer. how do you feel when you use the underground now? you are looking at it as underground now? you are looking at itasa underground now? you are looking at it as a former firefighter and having lived through this tragedy. what do you feel when you walk and you use the underground? do you feel
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safe ? you use the underground? do you feel safe? i suppose being a former firefighter, you are always looking for potential risk but i do feel safe on the london underground. london underground have done a fantastic job today london underground have done a fantasticjob today in showcasing their staff and talking to us. we met the families and the victim is as the firefighters, we have seen some of them today who were the first into thatjob from soho fire station. today has been a celebration of the efforts of what came about from that terrible, terrible night. thank you very much for sharing your memories, thank you. let's find out how the weather is looking. grey and drizzly across southern parts of the uk. it is going to be cold so sunday morning is going to be frosty across the uk. we still have damp weather in the far south and a lot of cloud across central areas, but the north
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is clearer. by midnight, temperatures will drop like a stone. by temperatures will drop like a stone. by the early hours of sunday morning, in the countryside, temperatures down to —5 in the north and close to freezing, if not below, in central london. not in cornwall and devon, here, it is milder overnight. tomorrow, lots of fine weather across central, eastern and northern parts of the uk, but low pressure and a weather front with thick cloud and maybe light rain into the far west of the uk are in the afternoon. so monday is looking down and soggy across many parts of the uk, it bit colder in scotland. hello.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: zimbabwe soldiers prevent demonstrations marching on robert mugabe's house, as tens of thousands of people are on the streets to call for the resignation for the resignation of the president. he's been under house arrest, apart from one public appearance yesterday, since the army seized power on wednesday. richard leonard is the newly elected scottish labour leader, replacing kezia dugdale who stepped down in august. police and air accident investigators search for clues as to why two aircraft collided over buckinghamshire, leaving four people dead. hundreds of volunteers assist dorset police in searching for missing teenager gaia pope, who disappeared 11 days ago.

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