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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 19, 2017 8:00am-9:00am GMT

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the meantime, from media feeds. in the meantime, from everybody here, in fukushima, goodbye. hello this is breakfast, with rogerjohnson and naga munchetty. a woman's body is found in the search for missing teenager gaia pope. the 19—year—old has been missing for 12 days, family members say they're devastated. she is the absolute light of my life. so beautiful, so emotionally wise and intelligent. good morning, it's sunday the 19th of november. also this morning... after thousands of people in zimbabwe take to the streets president mugabe will meet with army chiefs this morning to decide his fate. a promise of 300,000 new homes a year as the chancellor says he'll do whatever it takes to fix the housing market. after 3a years of leading sinn fein,
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gerry adams announces he's standing down as president of the party. in sport, england are into the rugby league world cup semi finals — in the last few minutes they've beaten papua new guinea by 36—6 in melbourne. philip as the weather. good morning. there is a fine, and for some frosty start to sunday. a decent day in prospect for many parts of the british isles, but there is a change on the way. i will have all of the details in a few minutes. first, our main story, police in dorset say they believe they've found the body of missing teenager, gaia pope. the 19 —year—old had not been seen for 11 days. specialist search teams made the discovery on saturday close to a coastal path near swanage. her family have said they are absolutely devastated.
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she is... i'm not go going to say "was", and i never will. she is the absolute light of my life. so beautiful, so emotionally wise and intelligent. and so passionate, and artistic, and creative, and understanding. was the news that everybody was dreading. 0ur reporter, james ingham, is in swanage for us this morning. many people waking up to the news of the discovery, although the body was discovered yesterday afternoon, police only confirmed that they had made the discovery late into the evening yesterday. it will be a very sombre mood in swanage? at will. for the last 11 days, the community have really got behind gaia's friends and family, trying to help locate her.
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the news was devastating to the family and also the community. the small town has been really rocked by her disappearance. yesterday, hundreds of people actuallyjoined the family, trying to search for the body. it was at that time, as they we re body. it was at that time, as they were out and about around the town, that the police, on coastal cliff footpaths, made the discovery. it was close to where her clothes had been found on thursday. they will now continue forensic investigation in that area, and also on the body, and a postmortem examination will ta ke and a postmortem examination will take place. at the moment, the police say that her death is unexplained. they had been investigating whether she may have been killed and they had arrested, but subsequently released three people yesterday. they say the results of further scientific tests will help guide their further investigations. thank you. zimbabwe's president, robert mugabe, is expected to meet military commanders this morning, a day after tens of thousands of protestors called for his resignation. mr mugabe has so far resisted calls to step down. his party, zanu—pf,
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is expected to begin the formal process of stripping him of his role. ben brown is in zimbabwe for us. good to see you. how has mr mugabe reacted to the calls for him to step down? at the moment, he is still technically president. it looks like he is refusing to budge, despite the fa ct he is refusing to budge, despite the fact that the army is against him, his own zanu—pf party is against him. yesterday we saw how many of his people are against him. tens of thousands marching on the streets down there behind me, showing with some euphoria that they believe the mugabe era 37 years is at an end. and yet he is still there in office, technically. there are more negotiations between him and military commanders today. significantly, the leadership of zanu—pf, his ruling party, they are having a central committee meeting this morning. they are expected to
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dismiss him as party leader. the mood in zimbabwe, we are seeing pictures ofjubilation mood in zimbabwe, we are seeing pictures of jubilation on mood in zimbabwe, we are seeing pictures ofjubilation on the streets, those rallies. what is it like now? yes, it is calm, but people are joyful. they are absolutely euphoric. they think that yesterday was an absolute sea change in the history of this country, that nothing can ever be the same again. not only mugabe has to go in the next few days, one way or another, whether he resigns or whether he is fired, and it looks like if he doesn't go voluntarily he will be impeached by parliament. also, i think they feel that after yesterday's display of people power there cannot be another dictatorship as we have seen and the robert mugabe, where there has been political repression and economic mismanagement. they are hoping not only that he goes, but that everything changes now in this country. good to talk to you. thanks
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very much. we are going to be talking to somebody later in this programme, a protest at the rallies yesterday. the chancellor of the exchequer has pledged to use wednesday's budget to help build 300,000 new homes a year. philip hammond has told the sunday times he'll invest billions and fix planning regulations to get builders building. he'll also announce funding to get driverless cars on the road within four years. 0ur political correspondent emma vardy is in our london newsroom. what else can we expect from mr hammond's budget? the papers are full of different spec elation and little leaks of what may or may not happen. —— speculation. one of the things we are seeing is philip hammond reaching out, particularly to the younger generation, who feel it is much more difficult for them to get onto the housing ladder than it was for their parents. the way that he putts today in the sunday times is to say that he is staging an intervention on housing. he is pointing the finger at all of these sites where there as planning permission, but where you are not
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seeing a lot of house building going on, and to change this he says there will be billions of investment and new planning rules. he is really putting the pressure on what he calls people who are speculatively hoarding the sites, whether as planning permission but they are not building. he is putting out this strong message to a structured companies. saying if you got the sites, you got the permission, you need to get on and build. elsewhere, futuristic technology, there is going to be a change in the rules to help developers carry out more on road testing of driverless vehicles. saying this is the future and it is important not only for the environment, but also so that we can keep up to the development elsewhere in the world. don't forget, this is philip hammond's second budget of the year. in the last one he was forced to make an embarrassing u—turn over national insurance contributors. he won't want to take too many risks in this one. he won't wa nt to too many risks in this one. he won't want to have to back down on anything like that again. after 3a years at the helm,
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the sinn fein leader gerry adams says he plans to step down. during his time as leader, he persuaded the ira to call a ceasefire and pursued a political settlement in the form of the good friday agreement. his decision to resign brings to an end the longest party leadership in britain or ireland. republicanism has never been stronger. this is our time. we will grow even stronger in the future. but leadership means knowing when it's time for change. and that time is now. i will not be standing in the next election. the argentine navy says it has detected signals likely to be from a submarine which has been missing since wednesday with 44 crew on board. the sanjuan was on a routine mission off the southern tip of argentina when it lost contact with naval command. the defence ministry is now working with a us company to trace the location of the seven satellite calls made on saturday. new advice on how to recognise and tackle sexual harassment
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in the workplace is published today. the advisory and conciliation service acas has released guidelines for employers and employees which outlines the kind of behaviour which could be considered inappropriate and how to report it. sophie long has more. allegations of inappropriate behaviour by men considered to be hollywood greats and high profile politicians at westminster started a conversation about what sexual harassment is and what needs to be done to tackle it. now the conciliation service acas says it wants to help people identify sexual harassment at work and to give tips on how to handle it. the advice includes examples of the forms that sexual harassment can take, such as written or verbal comments, displaying explicit images or unwanted physical contact. sexual harassment can happen anywhere, at any time, to anybody. there are things that employers can do that will help manage that risk.
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but, nevertheless, it is a possibility and people need to be ready to identify it when it happens, they need to know what to do if it happens and they need to have a safe place and a safe way to report that, and possibly resolve it will take action around the matter as well. acas says if someone feels they are experiencing harassment, there are a number of people within an organisation that can help deal with complaints — like members of the human resources team, or union representatives. any kind of harassment that includes sexual assault or physical threats, it says, is a criminal act and should be reported to the police. sophie long, bbc news. the actor and singer david cassidy is being treated in a florida hospital for multiple organ failure. the 67—year—old, who first found fame in the tv sitcom, the partridge family, was rushed to hospital three days ago and requires a liver transplant. he is believed to be conscious and surrounded by his family,
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following reports he had been put in an induced coma. the queen and prince philip will celebrate their 70th wedding anniversary tomorrow. to mark the milestone, buckingham palace has released this new portrait. a set of six commemorative stamps have also been issued by royal mail, they feature the couple's engagement and wedding. they are the first royal couple to celebrate their platinum anniversary. congratulations to them, quite a milestone. cat will have the sport at the bottom of the hour and we will get the latest weather. victims of domestic abuse are too scared to leave violent relationships because they're worried their pets will be maimed or killed. a bbc investigation discovered more than 700 cases last year where abusers had hurt family pets and other animals. charities have told five live investigates the figures could be much higher. there are now calls for funding for refuges that accept pets. let's speak to gemma willis — who was scared to leave
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a relationship in case her partner killed her dog — and from brighton, lisa king from the charity refuge. good morning to you both. who have you got with you? dusty. he was one of the reasons that you are very scared to leave an abusive relationship? dusty is more like my child than a pet. the level of commitment, loyalty, love and compassion i have for him, i hold exactly the same for my son. my ex never touched logan, but the dog got the brunt of it. it was really hard. we should make clear that your partner was jailed. yes, 413 and a
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half years in june. partner was jailed. yes, 413 and a half years in june. for violence and abuse what kind of consequences was the violent relationship having on your pet? the consequence now is that he is funny with men. i have to assure him it is fine, keep the tone relaxed and happy for him to feel co mforta ble. relaxed and happy for him to feel comfortable. the consequence of what it was going on, he got pinned in the shed and was punched and kicked, he got hit with a shovel. pieces of wood. he would cut his eye open. it was horrendous. lisa, in brighton, from refuge, is this a story that you hear from a from refuge, is this a story that you hearfrom a lot from refuge, is this a story that you hear from a lot of different people in different places? yes, sadly. gemma's story about having a pet and being concerned about its well—being, while pet and being concerned about its well— being, while living pet and being concerned about its well—being, while living with a perpetrator of domestic violence, it
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is all too common. refuge here is daily stories from women we support about torture that pets are put through as a way of exerting power and control over a woman in her home. it's a very upsetting and scary situation, as gemma has described. she clearly dearly loves her fabulous dog, dusty, and it is a difficult position to be in when you can see that something you care deeply about us being tortured and hurt as they way of controlling you and limiting the options that you are then able to take. we often talk about how people can spot signs of domestic violence or trouble in the home of other people. what can be done if you are concerned, to spot signs that an animal is being abused? that's right. it's a really key indicator. there are lots of links now known about pet abuse and the links to domestic violence in households. it is really important that the police are aware of these
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links and can look for evidence when investigating a domestic violence call out. the police receive a domestic violence call every 30 seconds in this country. an awareness of pets that are injured should be high in the priority list. vets have an opportunity to identify when pets are coming too frequently to the service because they may have broken legs of fractured ribs, to understand there is an important conversation to start about domestic violence, raising awareness of support services like those that refuge runs, so that women like jenna and dogs like dusty can receive support and be safe and well. you mentioned at the beginning of your abusive ex—partner didn't touch your son. in some ways, do you think he knew what he was doing, and that it was very calculated? at least he didn't touch your son, but
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he knew that he could get the same effect? he did. it shows how callous he was, really. hitting a child, i think he knew the boundary and were not to go, because i would have had him arrested and walked away straightaway. the dog, i had a fear that he was going to be killed or i was going to have him taken away from me. the rspca were called to my house several times over reports of the dog being beaten. i didn't dare say a thing because i thought i was going to lose the dog, i will lose my son. i didn't know anything about refuge, any thing about help you can get. i couldn't open my mouth and speak to anybody because i was frightened of repercussions. what would you say now? there are people watching that will be in a very similar situation and scared. what would you say to them?” similar situation and scared. what would you say to them? i understand
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where everybody comes from, you don't want to walk, you have fear and anxiety, you don't know how to move forward and you're not going to move forward and you're not going to move forward and you're not going to move forward until you are personally at that point where you are not taking any more. i was ready to die. it was the point where i actually come in the end, reached out to a friend. she said, you're coming with me, that's it. we organised to get me out of the relationship. my point, u nfortu nately, relationship. my point, unfortunately, was that i was good to ta ke unfortunately, was that i was good to take my own life if it doesn't happen. you don't need to get to that point. there was support all over the place. there are people that will help and they are there to offer services and support. you are not on your own. you're really not. you're not going to lose your children. you're not going to lose your pets. it is a bit a process to go through and it does cause some separation for a while, like it did with dusty. but i got him back. you are not stuck and you can get out. and inspiring story. i view articulated it so beautifully. thank
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you for coming and thank you for bringing dusty. thank you tulisa, we are very grateful. refuge is one of many organisations you can turn to if you are in a situation. you can find details on domestic violence at the website shown. it is time to find out what is happening with the weather. a glorious start for money. we have been majoring on the fact that many central and eastern parts are waking up central and eastern parts are waking up to sky is similar to this. mist and fog in places, but that will pop away and we are in for a decent sort of day. unlike the rest of the week, a pretty dry one as well. a different story in the west. some drizzly rain close by to the far west of cornwall. i think we could see before the day is out the old spot getting into northern ireland, maybe the western side of scotland. here we are, almost an early lunch. the major difference between now and then we'll be that we will bring a
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veil of cloud in across central and eastern parts. the cloud is thickening all the while across western parts. come mid—afternoon, there may be a greater chance of pushing rain into devon and west dorset. maybe flirting with pembrokeshire. many areas, as you see, will be dry. not overly warm. we will come back to that in a second. northern ireland, you may see a spot of rain. there will not be much on the western side of scotland. it will ramp up later on. i was talking about how chilly the afternoon will be. that is quite important. as the mild egg comes from the atlantic, it will convert to snow. north of the central belt, 200 metres initially. the snow level rising. the temperatures will pick up. it was —4 —5 in some places. five or six at its coldest. then here comes the mild air from the atlantic. it makes for a really great, murky date, tricky across
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high ground, a lot of surface water and spray. that moves away and then we are left with a grey afternoon across scotland and northern ireland. scotland is chilly, it gets into you, that sort of cold. the middle part of the week, still importing vast amounts of moisture and mild airfrom the importing vast amounts of moisture and mild air from the south—west. that will mean that there is a lot of cloud around. you will not see many dry days in the middle part of the week. it really will be quite windy and time. notice the number of isobars. —— at times. robert mugabe, the president of zimbabwe, will this morning meet with the military leaders who've taken control of the country, it is expected that that they will try to persuade him to stand down. his zanu pf party, will also meet to discuss stripping him of his title, so what does this mean for the people of the country? let's speak to shalu who is there. thank you for talking to us today. i
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understand that you were part of the rallies yesterday. what was the atmosphere like? good morning! yes, i proudly walked with all of my fellow zi m ba bwea ns yesterday on i proudly walked with all of my fellow zimbabweans yesterday on the march. the atmosphere was electric. it was amazing to see all zimbabweans of all races and ages coming together to stand as one. the solidarity, it was amazing. what is wa nted solidarity, it was amazing. what is wanted now? even if robert mugabe does stand down, as expected, what will change in the country? what change is wanted ? will change in the country? what change is wanted? well, you know, better education, better health, people being able to afford more things, people being able to get the basics. just being able to live a lot better and to do a lot more with what they can. we are a nation with a lot of potential. we would just
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like to live up to that. tell us about life in zimbabwe. you said it is difficult to afford many things, what are the main struggles that people are experiencing? you know, mainly young families can't afford to have children these days. school fees alone, it is just a nightmare to think of that. just basics like food, health care, trying to get that, it is not a healthy situation. elections are scheduled for next year. what is hoped, what are you hoping to see on your ballot paper? what choices are you hoping to be given? well, anyone! basically we are hoping for change. we are just hoping that whoever does come in, they are going to rise our country up. you know, we are open to all candidates that are willing to take
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some bubbly forward. one of the things that is hopeful —— to take zimbabwe forward. 0ne things that is hopeful —— to take zimbabwe forward. one of the things thatis zimbabwe forward. one of the things that is hopeful is that we have seen peaceful rallies so far. is their concern that people could become more restless? no, i don't think so. we are zimbabweans, we are proudly peaceful, proudly a loving nation. i am glad that the world is getting to see that. no. shalu it has been very good to talk to you, thank you for giving us inside and thank you for your time. thank you. you are watching capital breakfast. time to take a look at the sunday newspapers. dan hughes is a specialist in handling negotiations. he is here here to tell us what's caught his eye. we'll speak to dan in a minute,
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the sunday times, has an interview with the chancellor where he pledges to use wednesday's budget to help build 300,000 new homes a year. the 0bserver‘s main story is about the protests in harare overnight. people in zimbabwe marched on the capital to urge president mugabe to resign. the sunday mirror leads with the story we're leading on this morning about the body of missing teenager gaia pope, being found by police. the telegraph also leads with the budget, saying that philip hammond will announce a pay rise to nurses on wednesday. you are starting with the times. we are heading towards december 25. 0ften, are heading towards december 25. often, i think, are heading towards december 25. 0ften, ithink, it are heading towards december 25. often, i think, it is fair to say, you do find under the tree a bottle shaped present? a bottle of
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something nice. yes, there is this thing in the times, the headline is to not buy your grandpa a drink for christmas. they are most at risk from drinking too much. worrying, i was looking for that exact gift yesterday! maybe i shouldn't? then it says the over 50s. i am noti million miles away from that. it looks like we are heading back to just getting a pair of socks and a tie, rather than a bottle of anything more interesting. not good news for us. one of the things they picked out was loneliness. they say booze cannot be used as a substitute? there is a serious point behind it, it shouldn't be. we don't wa nt to behind it, it shouldn't be. we don't want to make anybody in that situation worse. for others, it might not be such a welcome article. i think might not be such a welcome article. ithinkl might not be such a welcome article. i think i have to go back to the drawing board and think again! i don't want people to get the
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impression that you've got a drinking thing going on this morning. all about alcohol! we're talking about pub bosses being a threat to the uk. the pubs closing down, a community impact? a big impact. also relevant with the budget coming up and philip hammond perhaps has an opportunity here. in scotland, the minimum pricing on alcohol, rightly so, targeting certain areas. also, the effect it can have on communities. the village i grew can have on communities. the village igrew up can have on communities. the village i grew up in, i was there yesterday and my pub has closed. it hits the communities. especially in the village, they are certainly a focal point of community activities. village, they are certainly a focal point of community activitiesm village, they are certainly a focal point of community activities. it is not without consequence. you are looking at the observer, hull, city of culture. it is amazing what being given the title does. when a lot of
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people see this originally, it looks like a people see this originally, it looks likea gimmick people see this originally, it looks like a gimmick to get a title. this one grabbed my attention. i went to university in hull a number of years ago. to think then that it might have been city of culture would have been quite an extraordinary thought. what is interesting about this article in the observer is that it looks at the individuals, the people of hull and how they see the city differently. the positive impact it has had on their lives, notjust on a city level, but for those people as well. great story. what have they picked out? just that those individuals get to see things that they wouldn't normally do. when you are living there, you don't often get the chance to metaphorically look up and see what is around you. a city like hull, historically, it might have been derided for its cultural impact, shall we say. to be spoken about positively, it gives people a sense of community and a steamer. do you think there is a positive legacy that comes after being named city of culture?”
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positive legacy that comes after being named city of culture? i hope so. certainly it led to a lot of investment in the city. notjust for this year, but for the long term. i think that is the case. over on the other side, a fairly well watched tv programme that is starting. i like the headline, it has my surname on it, but it is not me, king of the jungle. if you look at the photo, you might see a family resemblance. boris's dad is in? the two things you can't avoid in the papers, the johnson family, who seemed to be everywhere, and i'm a celebrity. focusing on stanley himself, in one of the papers he is described as a dinosaur. you know, with the spotlight on men of a certain demographic and their behaviour, rightly so in recent weeks and months, it is going to be very interesting to see how he is perceived and how he comes across. is it certain he will be in the jungle? he has confirmed he is
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there. what this is written by his daughter, rachel. we are getting an insight into his life? it goes into his background and some of his views on certain things. there in yesterday's papers about how he is interacting with some of the young ladies, shall we say. it will be interesting. they always catch the little asides on the microphones. i suppose if you were in the jungle for three weeks, potentially, sooner or later you might say something with a microphone on that perhaps you would not want to say. they catch everything. it could be uncomfortable. could be uncomfortable. could be uncomfortable for boris, you never know. but he might come across brilliantly and win the whole thing. it would be interesting to see. will you be watching? i have to admit that i will be. lovely to talk to you. the headlines are coming up, see you soon. hello, this is breakfast with
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rogerjohnson and naga munchetty. coming up before nine, philip will have the weather for you. first, here's a summary of the main stories from bbc news. police in dorset say they believe they've found the body of missing teenager, gaia pope. the 19—year—old had not been seen for 11 days. specialist search teams made the discovery on saturday close to a coastal path near swanage. detectives said the death was being treated as "unexplained". the family have thanked all those who've helped in the search for gaia. we wa nt we want to thank each and every one of you for everything you have done. if there is one ray of light is the
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compassion, humanity and community spirit you have shown over the last ten days. your dedication and selflessness for a girl that many of you don't even know has been staggering, and one of the few things that caps going. —— kept us going. zimbabwe's president, robert mugabe is expected to meet military commanders this morning, a day after tens of thousands of protestors called for his resignation. mr mugabe has resisted calls to step down but his party, zanu—pf, is expected to begin the formal process of stripping him of his role. mr mugabe has led zimbabwe since independence from britain in 1980. the chancellor of the exchequer has pledged to use wednesday's budget to help build 300,000 new homes a year. philip hammond has told the sunday times he'll invest billions and fix planning regulations to get builders building. he'll also announce funding to get driverless cars on the road within four years. after 34 years at the helm, the sinn fein leader, gerry adams, says he plans to step down. during his time as leader, he persuaded the ira to call a ceasefire and pursued a political
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settlement in the form of the good friday agreement. his decision to resign brings to an end the longest party leadership in britain or ireland. republicanism has never been stronger. this is our time. we will grow eve n stronger. this is our time. we will grow even stronger in the future, but leadership means knowing when it is time for change. and that time is now. i will not be standing in the next election. the argentine navy says it has detected signals likely to be from a submarine which has been missing since wednesday with 44 crew on board. the sanjuan was on a routine mission off the southern tip of argentina when it lost contact with naval command on wednesday. the defence ministry is now working with a us company to trace the location of the seven satellite calls made on saturday. new guidelines on how to recognise and tackle sexual harassment in the
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workplace are published today. acas has released advice for employers and employees to help them identify inappropriate behaviour at work, as well as giving tips on how to handle it. the actor and singer, david cassidy, is being treated in a florida hospital for multiple organ failure. the 67—year—old, who first found fame in the tv sitcom, the partridge family, was rushed to hospital three days ago and requires a liver transplant. he is believed to be conscious and surrounded by his family, following reports he had been put in an induced coma. the queen and prince philip will celebrate their 70th wedding anniversary tomorrow. to mark the milestone, buckingham palace has released this new portrait. a set of six commemorative stamps have also been issued by royal mail, they feature the couple's engagement and wedding. they are the first royal couple to celebrate their platinum anniversary. good luck macro to. in massive milestone. we are
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celebrating this morning? we are. a really exciting game between england and papua new guinea at the rugby league world cup. england dominated. they are through. some good sport today. the race to dubai is hotting up. we're glad we start by talking about rugby league. england are through to the semi finals of the rugby league world cup after a 36—6 victory over papua new guinea this morning. here's how they did it. 0'loughlin... watkins... yet another try forjermaine macgillivray —— jermaine mcgillvary! josh widdicombe with the kick. curry with the cuts. ben currie into score. that will be a popular try. mcg illva ry score. that will be a popular try. mcgillvary inside again. he has got support. 0ff goes kallum watkins. is
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he going to be caught? no. there is the hooter. 36—6. it is a win for england. job done. we're joined now byjon wilkin, st helen's captain and part of bbc sport's commentary team. you have been up since the early hours of the morning because it is in melbourne. what time did your alarm go off? yes, 2:30am. a great time for england. what did you make of it? a great result. really exciting game to watch. you think there is more to come? without doubt. papua new guinea are a tough side. difficult opposition. england did well to beat them. they become quite comfortably. i think in the bank of england's minds they will be frustrated at how many arabs they made. —— the back of england's minds. they need to be more clinical
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in the execution. they will need that if they want to beat australia. the best, —— team in the competition. england against australia is the dream final. how likely is it going to be? it is going that way. england played tonga in the semifinal. injermaine mcg illva ry in the semifinal. injermaine mcgillvary they have probably got one of the best players in the world at the moment. a lot to be positive about. tough tests to come. you said earlier the defence was very good. was the implication that the other end wasn't that hot? england's defence has been exceptional all tournament. but their unforced errors as the top of international by errors as the top of international rugby has left a sour taste for england fans and the england coach, who is not enthusiastic as it is. he was highly critical of the amanda berrys england made. they need to
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get better. but they can. england are in the semifinal of the world cup. they have a huge opportunity to get to the final. we get to play australia if we get there. it massive opportunity. that would be the dream ending to the world cup, for england and australia fans. what have you made of it so far? some good stories. new zealand going out, lebanon doing really well. they were com pletely lebanon doing really well. they were completely unknown before this tournament. what do you think of it? a huge talking point has been new zealand dropping out. i think it was the first time in decades that new zealand haven't made a major semifinal. fiji won that game. they play australia, which will be a tough game for them. fantastic scenes watching fiji celebrate and their national song in the changing room after that big result. look at next week for the semifinals. tonga and their version of the haka. there will be 20 30,000 tongans in the
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crowd. they will not be many england shirts. a big test for england. the world cup is going great. we are in the semifinals. hopefully more to come. john, thank you for coming in. sleep well! what is the difference between their haka and the new zealand haka ? between their haka and the new zealand haka? i don't know. from outside, it looks like the tongans doa outside, it looks like the tongans do a lot more kneeling down, and the kiwis are stood up with a stick! there is more intricate difference. you are boiled it down. there is more intricate difference. you are boiled it downlj there is more intricate difference. you are boiled it down. i think that is it. we will leave it at that. you need to learn it. i will do it live. john, thank you. get some kip. in rugby union, england continued their dominance against australia under head coach eddiejones. they got their fifth straight win over the wallabies at twickenham, scoring three tries in the final ten minutes of the game. danny care going over for the final score to seal a record win by 30—6. england face samoa next weekend.
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well, yeah, i thought early on probably we were just a little bit sloppy in our attack. we created some opportunities, picked some wrong options. defensively we were good most of the game, dropped our line speed. but having so many players coming in and out of the side, i was really pleased. the game of the day though was in scotland — they came within one converted try of a first ever win over new zealand, but they were beaten 22—17 in a thriller at murrayfield. fly—half beauden barret scored this breath—taking try for the all blacks to put them into what looked like a commanding lead, but scotland pushed the world champions all the way. in the final minute of the match stuart hogg thought he might‘ve broken through to win the game, but he was just forced out of play as the clocked hit full—time. we spoke in the week.
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you don't get too many chances, just because of scheduling, injury and non—selection. this is one of the best teams in world sport, notjust rugby. let's not forget that. what we do is pretty good, but we are gutted, to be honest, gutted that we lost the game. i'm very proud of the effort, but we lost. an experimental welsh side hung on to beat georgia 13—6 at the principality stadium. wales made 14 changes to the side that lost to australia last time out. young winger hallam amos got the only try of the game. and a below strength ireland beat fiji in dublin — but onlyjust. they started well and were 14 points ahead at one stage, but needed a late ian kearney penalty to finish the match off, 23—20. manchester city still look unbeatable as they preserved their big lead at the top of the premier league. they beat leicester 2—0 with a couple of special goals in the process. manchester united, chelsea, liverpool and arsenal
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all won as well. ben croucher has the pick of saturday's action. sitting comfortably? it is as cosy as you get to manchester city at the top of the table, playing the kind of football few could live with. leicester city were the latest to come up against a side having their own goal the season competition. jesus finished off a flowing move. kevin de bruyne providing the brilliance. he help us to win another one, to give more distance for the three contenders. we will keep going. still eight points clear of manchester united, who rediscovered their swagger against newcastle. paul pogba back from injury and on the scoresheet in a 4—1 win. still daylight between the manchester clubs. just a point between those in north london. arsenal beat tottenham 2—0 in the derby. chelsea have jumped over spurs.
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they beat west brom 4—0. they are now without a win in ten games. their fans made an early exit. could their manager follow? the important thing is doing the right thing for the football club. whether that is me staying and keeping going, whether it is a change, they will have to make that decision. the decision should be made for the benefit of the football club, not the benefit of any individual. what west brom wouldn't give for a win. liverpool have three in a row. mo salah scored twice against southampton. it is equally sweet for burnley. three straight wins as well. their 2—0 win at home to swansea keeps them seventh and swansea city in the bottom three. celtic look unbeatable too.
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64 games its now been since their last league defeat but they had to wait until 12 minutes from time to beat ross county — leigh griffiths' free kick the difference between the sides. hamilton, stjohnstone and motherwell also won england's women have lost the ashes — but they've won their penultimate t20 of the series in australia to save a bit of face. england set the aussies a total of 153 to win in canberra, and then bowled the aussies out for 112 to win by 40 runs, withjenny gunn taking four wickets very exciting golf. they are on the course. a straight shoot out for the race to dubai title betweenjustin rose and tommy fleetwood. rose has regained his lead. should either of them win the tournament, they will top the money list for the year on the european tour. who would have predicted this final of the atp world tour finals
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at the start of the week? grigor dimitrov against david goffin dimitrov saw off american jack sock, but belgian goffin sprung the biggest surprise of the finals by beating roger federer in three sets. he said the win gave him so much happiness whilst federer suffered only a fifth defeat this year maybe never really reached my best level. the first set was all right. but he didn't play very well in that set. i don't believe. yeah, so it is pretty disappointing. but at the end he did play extremely well and he was the better player on the court. i feel like it's ok like this. philosophical. and british speed skater elise christie has won the first world cup short track event of the season, taking gold in the 500 metres in seoul after making a false start. earlier this year she became the first british woman to win a
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world championship gold. that makes one of britain's best medal hopes at the winter olympics. that is taking place in south korea. she's getting a taste. not often we get speed skating on the programme. it is nice. winter olympics in february. around the corner. hopefully we will have more winter sport for you to enjoy. the pictures are brilliant. the bobsleigh guys won a bronze yesterday as well. britain didn't do badly. moving on with your life after being caught up in a terrorist attack can be a difficult if not a daunting prospect. one of the victims of may's manchester arena bomb attack has been, quite literally, fighting her way back to fitness. her name is lily, she's eight years old and she couldn't wait to get back into her karate kit. yunus mulla has been to meet her. in karate, this is a way of passing
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down knowledge from master to student. today it was lily's turn to lead this ancient practice. back to fighting fitness at karate club, six months after she was injured in the manchester arena bombing. when you are in hospital, did you miss karate? tell me what you missed about not being able to do it.|j missed seeing my friends do it, and getting these belts. it made me feel a lot left out. 22 people were killed in the terror attack at the ariana grande concert. lily, one of hundreds of others heard that night. she suffered shrapnel wounds and spent two weeks in hospital. among her visitors while she was in hospital was ariana grande herself. i told her that i fractured my shoulder. and she said that she had
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broken her arm three times. lily started learning karate two years ago but had to miss practice was she recovered from the attack. her club is delighted to finally have her back. and this weekend she officially opened their sports hall ina officially opened their sports hall in a special ceremony. i'm quite a tough little guy but i was close to tears when they said it. the great thing about the karate community as we all clubbed together. as soon as we found out she was injured, we were 100% behind her. her mum and dad were also injured in the attack. they say they have made sure they talk to their eight—year—old girl about what happened many times. we were very open with from day one and said, this is what is happened, it is one bad person among hundreds and hundreds of good people. we are more focusing on that rather than him and what happened. the good things that came out of it.
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lily enjoys being back among her friends. she says she doesn't even mind the early starts. you get up really early and that was the only thing that got me out of bed. here, they arejust bed. here, they are just pleased to one of their favourite kids back. go, lily. the main stories... police who were looking for a 19—year—old gaia pope says a body has been found on land near swanage. police are confident it is that of the missing teenager who disappeared ii it is that of the missing teenager who disappeared 11 days ago. zimbabwe's president, robert mugabe, will meet military chiefs later this morning amid intense pressure for him to step down. nagger will be reading the news at
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nine o'clock for andrew marr. you are about to leave. at the moment, phil would give us the weather. a glorious picture. sunshine but a little bit of frost on the ground? yes, i thought so, too. little bit of frost on the ground? yes, ithought so, too. a little bit of frost on the ground? yes, i thought so, too. a hint of frost in the shadows. no great surprise when you see how clear the skies have been. that is the a cce pta ble skies have been. that is the acceptable face of autumn. make the most of today. things will change quite markedly as early as tonight. this little ridge of high pressure responsible for clearing those skies overnight above many part of the british isles. a frontal system and west. the odd bit and peace of rain from the word go for the far west of cornwall. that is a threat we will see increasing as we go into the afternoon. that france will try to make progress into more of the british isles, so the clouds thickening in the south—west. —— that front. further east, dry, yes. you will lose that sparkle to the
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skies. it is not one either. thicker cloud for the afternoon through northern ireland, western scotland. we will see a bit more in the way of rain. part of the problem that we had overnight is that the cold air is in place. then in comes the mild airfrom the is in place. then in comes the mild air from the atlantic. no is in place. then in comes the mild airfrom the atlantic. no more is in place. then in comes the mild air from the atlantic. no more the -5 air from the atlantic. no more the —5 of last night. here we go. snow down to around about 200 metres. that is on the high ground in scotland. the snow level rising with time. relatively is milder than what we had last night. here comes the really mild stuff behind. what does that give us to start monday? it down today. heavy rain for a time across western hills. that moves into the north sea. behind, a lot of cloud, bits and pieces of rain and drizzle. yes, mild, except for scotland. penetrating the cold. a little on the way of sunshine. the
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forthcoming week, more of the same. wet and windy weather. it will stay mild. at the weekend it will turn markedly colder. sunny spells and showers. a better north—westerly wind. thank you. volu nteers volunteers restoring the last paddle steamer in britain are seeking help to restore artefacts and equipment that disappeared from the ship. —— ship. the maid of the lock was mothballed 35 years ago. now a mothballed 35 years ago. nowa group mothballed 35 years ago. now a group of enthusiasts are hoping to see her set sail again. lorna gordon reports. in the grey drizzle of an autumnal day, the last paddle steamer to be built in britain. she's not sailed for more than 35 years, moored up and, for part of that time, left to rot — until steam—ship
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enthusiasts saved her from sinking. it's a thing of beauty, but it needs a bit of work. absolutely, it sure does. it needs a lot of work, and a lot of money spent on it. the obvious things are that the paintwork and all that kind of thing... bit of rotten wood there? rotten wood. all of that will be replaced or renewed. the paddle boxes will be bright and sparkling again. in her 30 years of service, royalty and heads of state were amongst the millions of passengers who graced her decks. on a saturday night, there'd be entertainment. and on a summer's day, it would be full of families who'd come from glasgow to see loch lomond. in its heyday, the maid of the loch would have been packed with passengers enjoying a day out on the water. many of those who are helping to restore it have fond memories of this ship, and want a new generation to enjoy it too. was it exciting, as a boy? oh, yes, fantastic. never seen anything like it in my life. there's a wonderful feeling about watching the power —
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i mean, this is power. this is raw power. all these pistons — the two pistons going backwards and forwards, turning the shafts, making the paddles go through their cycle, making her go through the water... it'sjust — i mean, "magic" is the only word there is to it. hard work by volunteers has erased some of the damage caused by the years of neglect. but with anything of value stolen, any metals that could be melted down sold as scrap, they now need help in tracking down any artefacts that still exist, like this recently returned ship's wheel. the ship was stripped bare before we took it on. but over the years, we've had one or two things back. the most important one is the ship's bell. you want to hear it? yeah, go on, then... you need to give me a hand...! if i lift it, you can give it a ding... there's lots of other ones that people have taken off. no recriminations, wejust need to know that, if they're safe, would people please give them back?
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securing the heritage of this historic ship, and moving one step closer to seeing the maid of the loch raising steam and sailing once again. she looks really beautiful. we are going to continue the watery theme. often it can seem that the problems caused by climate change affect communities on the other side of the world. the documentary maker, henry iddon, has investigated the effects of rising temperatures much closer to home, by focusing on the plight of a fish which until recently had thrived in the lake district for hundreds of years. before we speak to henry, let's take a look at what he found. the lakes got warmer because of global warming in general. this water as one up like all other la kes. water as one up like all other lakes. they are on the edge of the environmental limit. they take a lot
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of change before it threatens the species. —— they can't take a lot. right, come on, you chart. there is a fish. did you see that? that is a fish. beautiful pictures. henry is here. it is the arctic charr, the fish you are talking about. we heard the gentleman talking about some of the effects. windermere is the patch of water that we are talking about. how concerned should we be? the environmental changes are affecting the whole ecology of the lake, both the whole ecology of the lake, both the water temperature and the
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general environmental conditions. there have been problems in the past with phosphate running into the lake from water treatment. that has improved a lot. the lake is increased —— has increased by a degree. it is gone up by a degree in the last 30 years. presumably these act —— arctic charr have been there act —— arctic charr have been there a long time? there aren't many ways inundate. since the ice age they have in there since the glaziers receded. as the age receded, they we re receded. as the age receded, they were rem na nts receded. as the age receded, they were remnants of it. —— glacier. receded. as the age receded, they were remnants of it. -- glacier. you mention of the run—off. that is not rainwater? no. it is the water treatment through sewage and drainage. the lakes are a popular place. tourism, the effects of washing liquid, that anything. that contains phosphates. that goes into
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the drains. that goes into the lake. the utilities companies have started to strip that out where they can. that has improved things. the fish isa that has improved things. the fish is a vehicle to explore the broader issues. how much of an impact is the way the climate is changing having on the lake district and the communities that live there?m affects the whole world. it affects the legs as well. the lakes is a popular place for tourism. there are organisations involved in the lake district that are keen to promote sustainable tourism so people visit the lakes and do it in an eco—friendly way, reduce car travel and that kind of thing. give us an example of some of the eco—friendly measures? there are train services as far as windermere. absolutely. when you are there, use environmentally friendly detergent, act in an environmentally friendly way. the charr you have brought a
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pot in. just explain how people... it is not a well—known fish these days. in the victorian era they were popular with well—to—do families? yeah, even in the 1600s it was caught and potted. it would be shipped to london and the like. that is one of the pots they kept it in? yes, this is the size and shape are one of the pots. the originals would have been white. for the film we wa nted have been white. for the film we wanted to introduce a contemporary angle and have a pot remade. follow the environmental theme. the pink in the environmental theme. the pink in the middle is made from granite. the colour has come from driftwood that has been burnt. aceh has been used in the blaze. environmental products we used in the manufacture.
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it is great to see. the film is showing at the kendal film festival today and online after that? yes, online next week. people can go online. thank you. that's all we've got time for this morning. dan and louise will be here tomorrow from six on bbc one. until then, whatever you do, have a good day. bye— bye. this is bbc news. i'm sophie lond. the zimbabwean military and the country's ruling zanu pf party are expected to take steps today to remove robert mugabe from office and expell grace mugabe from the party. police say they're confident that the remains of a body found near swanage is that of the missing teenager gaia pope. tests of driverless cars on uk roads are set to be given the green light in this week's budget. the chancellor philip hammond has signalled he'll investigate why some house builders and speculators are hoarding land rather than building on it.
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gerry adams, sinn fein's leader for the past 34 years, will step down from the role next year. and our sunday morning edition of the papers is at 9.30 five — this mornings reviewers are katy balls, political correspondent of the the spectator and the journalist and broadcaster,

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