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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  November 20, 2017 9:00am-11:00am GMT

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hello, it's monday, it's 9am, i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme. our top story today, robert mugabe has an hour to resign as president of zimbabwe or face impeachment — he certainly showed no signs of resigning last night. the operation i have alluded to did not amount to a threat to our well cherished constitutional order, nor was it a challenge to my authority as head of state and government. we'll get reaction from some of those who've been tortured by the mugabe regime. also on the programme — punishment attacks featuring kneecapping or assaults using anything from sledgehammers to electric drills are taking place in this country right now. i walked to the place that they told me to go and they were standing there. they showed me the gun and
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told me to lie down on the floor. that was it. we'll find out why so—called punishment attacks by paramilitaries are on the rise in northern ireland. and it's 70 years since the queen and prince phillip got married. it is their platinum anniversary today. we'll look back at a relationship which has been a constant in british life. hello and welcome to the programme, we're live until iiam. throughout the programme, the latest breaking news and developing stories — and as always really keen to hear from you — do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning. our top story today, zimbabwe's president robert mugabe has less than an hour to resign, before a 10 o'clock deadline set by his own party. he was removed as leader yesterday, but in a rambling television address in which he was expected to resign as president, he refused and instead insisted he would lead the party's
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congress next month. former allies have condemned his decision and over the weekend huge street rallies demanded his resignation. if he doesn't step down, his party, zanu—pf, says he will be impeached. the influential head of the war veterans organisation said they would initiate legal action in the high court to remove president mubabe. they also repeated their calls for him to be impeached and for further protests, including a sit—in to force him to resign. he went on national television to pretend as if everything is normal and he said he would be attending his party congress. we are saying, mugabe, go now. mugabe, go now. yourtime is up. please leave state house and let the country start on a new page. you should have the dignity and decency to spare the country
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further turmoil by simply announcing your departure immediately. if he can't, and this is the call we are doing and repeating again from when we came here on thursday last week, we are bringing back the people of zimbabwe to the streets. you will then have to settle these issues with the people of zimbabwe. ben brown is in the zimbabwean capital harare. are you getting any sense of what might happen in an hour, if anything? i am not getting a sense that he is going to resign. until we hear it from his mouth, no one will believe he is going to resign. everyone was expecting him to resign last night after his own party, zanu—pf, had sacked him as their leader, after the military had had their takeover here, and after seeing thousands of people on the streets here in harare on saturday. so much pressure from the people,
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from the army, from his own party to resign. everyone thought he would last night, and then he didn't. he is nothing if not stubborn. he is the world's oldest head of state, 93 yea rs of the world's oldest head of state, 93 years of age, and still technically president of this country although extraordinarily, he is still under house arrest. so the impeachment process will begin if he continues to refuse to resign. in the parliament behind me in harare, it would need both chambers of parliament to agree with a two thirds majority to impeach him. i was talking to one mp this morning who said that that could take weeks oi’ who said that that could take weeks or even months, and that means mr mugabe could still be president in 2018. and in the meantime, the citizens of zimbabwe today where industry is over the weekend —— they we re industry is over the weekend —— they were on the streets. what are they doing today? it is fair to say they are disappointed. they watched that tv address in their millions. they
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we re tv address in their millions. they were expecting him to resign. almost everybody you talk to want him to go. it is almost impossible to find anyone who wants him to stay. so they are disappointed and angry. let me show you just one newspaper front page from this morning. " arrogant mugabe disregards zanu—pf". that is just a flavour of how people are thinking. there has been a call for another big demonstration on the streets tomorrow. maybe we will see thousands more people calling for mr mugabe to resign, but frankly, he doesn't listen to the people and i don't think you will make any difference. thank you, ben. obviously, as things continue to change in harare, we will be their live for much of the morning, talking to residents of zimbabwe and we will of course be there at ten o'clock when that deadline passes. let me bring you this news. jana
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novotna has died. she was wimbledon champion in 1998. she wasjust novotna has died. she was wimbledon champion in 1998. she was just 49. here is the statement. after a long battle with cancer, jana novotna died peacefully, surrounded by friends and family in her native czech republic. she has died aged 49. she had cancer. more on that to come in the sport in a few moments. now a summary of the rest of the day's news. germany is on the cusp of a political crisis following the collapse of talks over the formation of a coalition government. eight weeks of negotiations following september's general election have collapsed, with the centrist free democrats pulling out. angela merkel will meet the german president who could call a new election. police say there were no injuries to suggest "any other person was involved" in the death of the missing teenager gaia pope.
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the 19—year—old's body was found on saturday in a field near swanage, 11 days after she was last seen. dorset police are treating her death as "unexplained" pending toxicology results. women are being advised to sleep on their side in the last three months of pregnancy to avoid having a stillborn baby. a study ofjust over 1,000 women found the risk doubles if women go to sleep on their backs, but researchers say women should not worry if they are on their back when they wake up. the study authors estimate that about 130 babies' lives a year could be saved if this advice was followed. mps are calling for a crackdown on the so—called "gig economy". delivery riders and minicab drivers for firms like deliveroo and uber are being exploited by loopholes in employment law, according to two committees of mps. they say they face an "unacceptable burden" of having to prove
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they are "workers", rather than self—employed. the government says it's already considering the findings of a review of working practices. the convicted cult leader charles manson — who orchestrated a series of notorious murders in the 19605 — has died in prison in california at the age of 83. in 1969, members of his group killed seven people including the actress sharon tate, wife of the film director, roman polanski. manson himself was initially sentenced to death, before the penalty was abolished in california. church leaders across northern ireland have released a statement condemning so—called "punishment" attacks by paramilitaries. they can take the form of kneecappings, where victims are shot in the legs, or serious beatings with weapons like iron bars. they've been declining in recent years, but saw an increase of 30% last year. you can watch our report including
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exclusive interviews with two teenagers who were shot in the knees by paramilitaries, coming up in a few minutes. the queen and duke of edinburgh are today marking their 70th wedding anniversary — the longest in the royal family's history. they will celebrate the occasion privately with family and friends at windsor castle. our royal correspondent sarah campbell reports. in the gloom of post—war britain, their marriage was, in the words of winston churchill, a flash of colour. he was the dashing naval officer, she the future queen. in the 70 years since, theirs has proved to be a relationship which has truly stood the test of time. it's worked because their personalities and their characters complement one another. they're quite different, in many ways, but prince philip is the first to make the queen laugh
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uproariously, and is probably the only person who can also tell her to shut up. pictured in 1939, 18—year—old philip first caught princess elizabeth's eye on a visit to dartmouth naval college. it was the beginning of a friendship which grew into a lifelong partnership. the queen has referred to him as her strength and stay. the duke remarked that tolerance is essential to any happy marriage, and the queen, he added, has that quality in abundance. 70 years after the royal couple exchanged their vows here, the bells of westminster abbey will peal for more than three hours in their honour. these images have been released by the palace to mark the couple's milestone anniversary. the queen and prince philip will celebrate at a private party at windsor castle this evening. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30. there are a couple of lines coming
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out of zimbabwe, according to the reuters news agency. they don't necessarily make the situation clearer. according to senior political sources, robert mugabe's speech last night was intended to make clear that the military intervention last week was not a clue. —— it was not a coup. mr mugabe was supposed to say that in his speech. the second line is that robert mugabe had agreed to resign, but zanu—pf, his party, did not want him to step down in front of the generals. that is according to senior political sources talking to the reuters news agency. as i said, that does not necessarily make the situation clearer. does that suggest that at ten o'clock, when this imposed deadline reaches us, he will
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step down if the generals are not the picture? stay tuned, and we will try to bring the latest. let me bring you these comments about punishment attacks, which are on the rise in northern ireland and a lot of the victims are under 25, some including children. and we are talking predominantly about boys being shot in the back of the knee as punishment for petty crime, for stealing a car, for drug dealing. inclusive 2017 says young teenage boys are being maimed. politicians fail to act. in northern ireland, we need a strategy to end violence against men and boys. we are beaten, shot and assaulted daily. another says, these brutal attacks on young people need to stop. the victimisation needs to stop. these young people need a chance in life. this is abuse and it is child abuse.
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ourfilm on that this is abuse and it is child abuse. our film on that is this is abuse and it is child abuse. ourfilm on that is coming up. if you are getting in touch, you are very welcome. let's get some sport withjessica. sad news from the world of tennis this morning? yes, we have had it confirmed in the last half—hour that the former wimbledon champion jana novotna last half—hour that the former wimbledon championjana novotna has died aged 49. we have a statement from the women's tennis association, the wta. they say "it is with deep sadness that we announce the passing on sunday of yana novotna, the former wta world number one and number two singles champion. after a long battle with cancer, jana died peacefully, surrounded by herfamily in her native czech republic. the ceo of the wta, steve simon, said jana was an inspiration both on and off court to anyone who had the opportunity to know her. her star
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will always shine brightly in the history of the wta. it goes on to say "our condolences and our thoughts are with jana's family".m was 1998 when she won wimbledon and lots of people will remember her reaction afterwards. yes. she will be well known to british tennis fans. she captured the hearts of many when she burst into tears after losing to the german great steffi g raf losing to the german great steffi graf in1993, losing to the german great steffi graf in 1993, she was consoled by the duchess of kent. she was renowned for her serve in the volley game and achieve a career—high singles ranking of number two. she was twice a beaten finalist, in 1993 and 1997. but a year later, it was third time lucky for novotna. of her career, she won 2a singles titles in 14 career, she won 2a singles titles in 1a years on the professional circuit, along with 76 doubles
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titles. and she was inducted into the tennis hall of fame in 2005. but it is sad news from the world of tennis that jana novotna it is sad news from the world of tennis thatjana novotna has it is sad news from the world of tennis that jana novotna has died after a battle with cancer, aged 49. they're a legacy of decades in conflict in northern ireland — so—called "punishment" attacks by pa ramilitaries, usually kneecappings or serious beatings using anything from an iron bar to an electric drill. those responsible claim it's a way of clamping down on crime and anti—social behaviour in their community. if you deal drugs, for instance, you face being kneecapped. and now, after a period of decline, these attacks are on the rise, with a 30% increase over the last year. almost half of those targeted are 25 or under. today, church leaders across northern ireland have for the first time released a statement
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condemning the threat against young people, timed to coincide with the united nations universal child ren's day. this programme has spoken exclusively to two teenagers about their experience of being shot by paramilitaries and to the psni officers leading the fight against the attacks. some of the details in greg dawson's report are graphic from the very beginning and you may not want young children to hear. police have just released details of what they believe was a paramilitary—style attack on a teenager in londonderryjust after midnight yesterday morning... ...after being shot in the legs at their home in west belfast. it happened just after six o'clock. .. ...the vicim's injuries aren't believed to be life—threatening. i walked to the place, and they told me to go, and they were standing there. they showed me the gun and told me to lie down on the floor. that was it. the first time they shot me, i only moved a bit, but see the second time they shot me, i was screaming. it went right through
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and hit my main artery, busted my whole kneebone. a 17—year—old boy has been shot in the leg after two masked men... it's an enormous human rights abuse, whatever the age of the person, but it's happening a lot against young people and children. if you speak to young people in the communities, i think they'll tell you there is a climate of fear for them. we have a choice here, this doesn't need to be the future of our children. belfast is a city that prides itself on its progress. from the darkest depths of the troubles, it has emerged as one of the uk's most popular tourist destinations. but in small pockets of this city, there are many communities still living with the legacy of northern ireland's division and violence.
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many of the recent victims of paramilitary threats and attacks will have little memory of the good friday agreement. some were born long after it. we've come out with the police service of northern ireland's new task force, set up specifically to tackle paramilitaries, the armed groups active in both protestant loyalist areas and catholic republican communities. we're leaving the lower shankill and we're going to go in from a loyalist... ...the nationalist catholic area. but certain paramilitary groups still see it as their role to police these communities and crack down on what theyjudge to be anti—social behaviour. even in 2017, the self appointed men in charge assert control with baseball bats and bullets. we've spoken to two young victims of paramilitary—style attacks. james and thomas, not their real names, were shot in the legs. for their safety, we've hidden
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their faces and voiced their words. they got in contact with someone in the family. they told me i had to go and meet them. i changed my trousers, went out of my house and went to the pub. i had two pints and i got a text message that i had to go, so i walked over on my own, and that was it. i walked to the place and they told me to go, and they were standing there. they showed me the gun and told me to lie down on the floor. that was it. how did you feel when you were making that walk over from the pub? i was scared, of course i was scared. i was fearing for my life, in case they did something else. someone who was really, really close to me was first out because they knew i was getting shot. they brought out a pillow, and then the ambulance came. the first time they shot me, i only moved a bit. but, see, the second time they shot me, i was screaming. it went right through
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and hit my main artery. busted my whole kneebone, know what i mean? i couldn't even move my leg. there ended up being loads of people around me and i asked someone for a fag, and then i just went blank. and all i remember wasjust waking up in the ambulance. these paramilitary—style attacks may have been happening in certain communities in northern ireland for decades, but after a fall in recent years, the numbers are creeping back up. in 2016—2017, there were 94 reported casualties of shootings and assaults, that's up 30% on the previous year. attacks a re currently at their highest level since 2010, and, since 2009, 47% of attacks targeted people aged 25 and under. the actions of these paramilitary groups range from everything from threats to individuals, either in person or by proxy,
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up to beatings, and right up to the end of the scale which can include serious assault, shootings, and, on occasion, has resulted in the murder of individuals. this 15—year—old from londonderry is a recent victim. injune, he was beaten with iron bars, including this one that officers in derry recovered. paul smith is a youth worker and has devoted years to campaigning and speaking out against attacks. there isn't any due process involved, nobody appears in front of a court and can defend themselves, and a lot of the victims end up being traumatised for the rest of their lives. one of the hallmarks of these attacks is that many of the victims know it is coming. they're often given notice to attend an appointment. last month, this flyer was posted through doors in west belfast. it lists the names 01:14 men accused of selling drugs and orders them to come forward to the republican movement, adding that failure to do so could result in execution. in some cases, parents of victims
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are faced with a dreadful dilemma — protect their child, or hand them over to paramilitary groups for appointments. see, i used to be a happy child, always up and bouncing. then i did one or two bad things, and they were just picking on me and picking on me. i was trying to change my life around and they were still picking on me. they put me out of the country, and then my mummy visited me and said, "listen, i've been talking to someone to try and sort it out. to get someone to give you an easy shooting." i put my shoes on straight away and i said, "yes, let's get it over and done with." so i put my shoes on and straight to belfast, right? just talk me through the day that it happened. i was told to walk up the street, and i looked behind me and two men were there. i turned round and i said to them, "there are ten times as many people out there doing worse than me," and hejust said, "listen, kid, i'll look after you." how is that looking after you? i think people are appalled when
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they hear about parents bringing their kids for appointments. but i feel deeply sorry for those people, i think that they have reached a point where they feel they really have no option. and, in one incident recently, a couple who tried to intervene to protect their child was shot themselves. injuries sustained in an attack may not be life—threatening, but more often than not they are life—changing. we've spoken to a surgeon in the city who told us often the beatings are more brutal than the shootings, with paramilitaries using everything from iron bars to sledgehammers, and even electric drills. you were shot in the legs. just give us an idea of how that actually felt? it's a burning sensation for, like, two minutes straight, then it stopped for 30 seconds. then it started again. it was burning and burning, you know what i mean? see, when i'm playing xbox, my whole leg locks up. i get pains every single day.
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it's like shooting pains. but it's notjust the physical scars that do the damage. or beaten by paramilitaly- organisations, and within a matter of weeks they've taken their own lives. so it's an awful, it's a double tragedy forfamilies, and it's a terrible toll that our society's taking for this ongoing problem. i had depression already, but now it's far, far worse. i've been going to the doctors, seeing psychiatrists. before this i wasjust like a stupid kid, know what i mean? other people were doing far worse, stealing cars, burning this and that. i didn't do anything that bad. i've had very bad depression, everything you can think of, know what i mean? i couldn't leave the house. i was sitting in the house every single day. i'm not scared of violence, i'm just scared because of what's going through my head because of the depression. i've actually lost count of how many
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times i've tried to kill myself. i've sliced my arms. sometimes it's been a cry for help, but a few times i really, really did want to kill myself. the last time, i was in my bathroom, and i waited until everyone was asleep, and i tried to hang myself, but my mummy must have been listening, know what i mean? she busted the door and i just dropped. my eyes were in the back of my head, and i looked dead and all. i heard my mummy was shouting, "he's dead, he's dead!" then ijust woke up and came to and was like, "what's wrong, what's wrong?" the police may be determined to prevent these attacks and punish those responsible, but they face enormous obstacles. victims who are too scared or simply just refuse to name the culprits because of a stigma of so—called touting, the nickname for talking to officers. it all means only around 4% of attacks result in charges being brought. for people who would be surprised by that figure, can you explain why it is so low?
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well, it's down to a number of factors, one of the biggest issues is the noncooperation of the victims, and i think that's understandable in circumstances where people have already been beaten or shot. the fear of engagement with the police and what that might lead to in terms of the party that were responsible for the initial attack clearly is something that would inhibit their wanting to get involved with the police. at the same time, these groups are sophisticated in terms of how they go about carrying out these attacks, they're very careful to make sure they're done in areas where they won't have witnesses, where there won't be the likes of cctv, and many of the groups are, as well, forensically aware. when the police came to you, they must have asked you, "do you know who did this?" what did you tell the police? of course i can't say, because that's touting. you'd be scared to tell the police? not scared, i just wouldn't. round those areas, it counts as touting, and you don't want to be a tout. the paramilitaries come back and shoot you for that, too. worse, they'd shoot you dead. but there's another obstacle. it's been labelled the societal
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shrug, where many in these communities see a paramilitary—style attack as an imperfect but necessary solution to crack down on crime and anti—social behaviour in their neighbourhood. what would you say to people who would say, well, you were hurt in a punishment attack, you must have done something wrong to deserve this? aye, i did do wrong, yeah, but i was punished for that through a court of law. i didn't need to be punished by gangsters in the street. i was punished for what i did. there was no need for them to shoot me. a court of law is for punishment. it shouldn't be overlooked that the numbers of these attacks has drastically reduced since the height of the troubles here, but campaigners believe more could be done to eradicate them altogether. finding a political solution has become even more of a challenge since the power—sharing agreement between the dup and sinn fein collapsed in january, leading to deadlock here at the stormont assembly. beyond doubt there is an attempt by some of these paramilitary groups to continue to exert
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their influence within communities. i think this is one area where they see a degree of populism, and they think it's a way in which they can re—establish or promote their legitimacy within communities, and obviously from my perspective i am absolutely committed to denying them any potential oxygen in that respect. ican rememberevery bit of what happened, it repeats in my mind all the time. my mental health issues, it's made them worse. i'm still young, i should be enjoying myself in bars, and now i'm scared to go out. i won't leave the house unless i have family or friends with me. this has changed my life. greg dawson reporting. after 10am, we'll hear from someone who mediates between paramilitary groups who carry out these so called punishment beatings and the community. thank you for your comments.le jamie says, "this has been a curse of belfast life. i used to not being able to walk down the street without
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seeing an otherwise fit young man on crutches." patricia says, "these young people are drug dealers or joyriders who don't care what they do do others. they know if they are found out, what are the consequences." another viewer says, " if consequences." another viewer says, "if the psni don't do theirjob, these people will take it upon themselves to issue punishments. sometimes you think to yourself well if they didn't deal the drugs or rob grannies then they wouldn't have had their knees blown off." still to come, robert mugabe's party has given him half an hour to stand down as president. what happens if he doesn't? we'll bring you the latest analysis. we will speak to those who suffered at the hands of president mugabe's regime. 70 years ago to the day, the queen and prince phillip got married. we'll take a look back at their lives together and speak to another couple, also celebrating their platinum wedding anniversary. time for the latest
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news, here's rebecca. the bbc news headlines this morning. a deadline set by zimbabwe's ruling party for president robert mugabe to resign orface impeachment runs out shortly. in a speech to the nation last night, mr mugabe made it clear it he had no intention of stepping down. the influential head of the war vetera ns the influential head of the war veterans organisation said they would initiate legal action in the high court to remove president mugabe, and called forfurther protests, including a sit—in to force him to resign. the german president frank—walter steinmeier is to hold crisis talks with chancellor angela merkel, after her failed attempt to forge a coalition cast doubts over her political future. the centrist free democrats pulled out of talks late last night, blaming irreconcilable differences with mrs merkel‘s christian democrats and the other party in the talks, the greens. talks have been going on for eight weeks following september's general election.
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police say there were no injuries to suggest "any other person was involved" in the death of the missing teenager gaia pope. the 19—year—old's body was found on saturday in a field near swanage, 11 days after she was last seen. dorset police are treating her death as "unexplained" pending toxicology results. the convicted cult leader charles manson — who orchestrated a series of notorious murders in the 19605 — has died in prison in california at the age of 83. in 1969, members of his group killed seven people including the actress sharon tate, wife of the film director, roman polanski. manson himself was initially sentenced to death, before the penalty was abolished in california. women are being advised to sleep on their side in the last three months of pregnancy to avoid having a stillborn baby. a study ofjust over 1,000 women found the risk doubles if women go
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to sleep on their backs but researchers say women should not worry if they are on their back when they wake up. the study authors estimate that about 130 babies' lives a year could be saved if this advice was followed. the queen and prince philip are celebrating their 70th wedding anniversary today — the longest in the royal family's history. the occasion is being marked with a new series of portraits, a set of stamps and a private party for the royal family at windsor castle. the church's bells of westminster abbey, where they married, will ring for more than three hours to mark the occasion. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. here's some sport now withjessica. as you have been reporting, sad news from the world of tennis and you can bring some of the tributes being paid to jana novotna. yes, it has
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been confirmed this morning that the former wimbledon champion jana novotna has died aged 49. our tennis correspondent russell fullerjoins me now. she will be well known to british tennis fans, but most remembered perhaps for crying after losing the wimbledon final in 1993? yes, in many ways, that will be the abiding memory of jana yes, in many ways, that will be the abiding memory ofjana novotna amongst british fans. she couldn't help but share her emotion after losing the wimbledon final to steffi graf in 1993. it wasjana novotna's first wimbledon final. the great steffi graf was her opponent. novot na steffi graf was her opponent. n ovot na wa s steffi graf was her opponent. novotna was in a winning position, but steffi graf came back to win and when she received her runners—up trophy from the duchess of kent, the duchess literally provided her with a shoulder to cry on. she was back in the final four years later, losing to martina hingis. the duchess of kent then said to her, if you come back and make the final
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again, i'm sure it will be third time lucky, and so it proved. she came back in 1998 and this time, jana novotna was victorious. she won her one jana novotna was victorious. she won herone and jana novotna was victorious. she won her one and only wimbledon singles title. and incredible career, 24 titles that she won during her career, inducted into the hall of fame in 2005. how do you think she will be remembered? those titles we re will be remembered? those titles were just that singles level. she was a wonderful doubles player as well. she won a number of doubles titles. 16 grand slam doubles titles. 16 grand slam doubles titles. she was a serve and volley. she was a very athletic player. she won the team competition for her country, the czech republic. she won olympic medals in singles and doubles. she was number one in the world in doubles, numbertwo doubles. she was number one in the world in doubles, number two in the world in doubles, number two in the world in doubles, number two in the world in singles. we had the privilege of sharing a commentary box with her at wimbledon in recent years. she was never ostentatious in
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her delivery, but you could see her passion for the sport, her love of the game and the way the players conducted the points. russell, thank you. that is all the sport for now. confirmation again that the former wimbledon champion jana novotna confirmation again that the former wimbledon championjana novotna has died aged 49. welcome to the programme. as things stand right now — robert mugabe is still zimbabwe's president — despite a warning that he'll be impeached and removed by his own party unless he resigns in just under half an hour's time. he didn't step down last night, as many expected, as many hoped, even though his own party have sacked him as leader; instead he said he intended to chair the party's congress next month. the congress is due in a few weeks from now. iwill
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the congress is due in a few weeks from now. i will preside over its processes , from now. i will preside over its processes, which must not be pre—possessed by any act is calculated to undermine it or to compromise the outcomes in the eyes of the public. robert mugabe's grip on power weakened big time since the army intervened on wednesday, in a row over who should succeed him. the crisis began two weeks ago when the 93—year—old leader, who's been in charge since 1980, sacked his deputy emmerson mnangagwa, angering army commanders who saw it as an attempt to position his wife grace as next president. since there have been huge street raliies in the country, demonstrations including the country's influential war veterans, all demanding he step down. under his presidency, he's overseen economic collapse, rampant corruption and the brutal oppression of anyone who dared to criticise him.
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ishmael kauzani joins us from harare — he was tortured numerous times under mugabe's regime. marcellina chikasha is also in harare — she's president of the opposition african democratic party. ishmael, president mugabe has 20 minutes before the deadline expires to resign. do you think he's going to? no, i don't. he's not going to resign. he said last night, i'm going to preside over the zanu—pf congress, so going to preside over the zanu—pf congress, so i don't see him resigning. what do you think will happen, then? for now, i can't say
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anything. but as events are unfolding, anything can happen. as we speak right now, we are gathered in the square where we are having some prayers so in the square where we are having some prayers so that god might hear oui’ some prayers so that god might hear our prayers and he might resign. there are also other groups, the war vetera ns there are also other groups, the war veterans and other social movements who are planning some demonstrations and sit—ins. they are planning to march to the blue roof, his residence. anything can happen. according to one reuters witness, stu d e nts according to one reuters witness, students at the university of zimbabwe are not doing their exams, 01’ zimbabwe are not doing their exams, or the exams have been postponed today because students have started chanting and singing songs against
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resident mugabe. i wonder if you can tell our british audience how you have been treated under his regime? mine isa have been treated under his regime? mine is a long story. it started in 2000. for now, i can say i have been arrested more than 130 times by mugabe's regime. why? i was arrested because i was a member of the mdc and i am because i was a member of the mdc andiama because i was a member of the mdc and i am a human rights activist. and mdc stands for the movement for democratic change, which is an opposition party. and they understand in 2008, yourfriend and your brother were murdered by the regime. tell us what happened. yes.
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it was on the 19th of april 2008 when i was abducted together with my friend. we were taken away from harare to our place about 80 kilometres away, and we were beaten and dumped in the mountains. i sustained three broken ribs. my friend had multiple fractures to the league. we were rescued by the women who were fetching firewood. then we we re who were fetching firewood. then we were taken to a clinic and later transferred to another clinic. i was
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in hospitalfrom the transferred to another clinic. i was in hospital from the 20th of april until the 5th of may, when i was discharged. on the eighth, i planned to leave harare to go to south africa for further medication. i was also running away because i felt my life was in danger. so you had to get out. let me bring in marcellina. sorry, ishmael. marcellina, you are the leader of an opposition party in zimbabwe. what do you think is going to happen in the next 15 minutes? do you think mugabe is going to resign? i don't think he is going to resign
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at all. he has proved that he's not going be a pushover for anyone, and he doesn't want to deliver this presidency on a silver platter to emmerson mnangagwa. so what will happen if he doesn't resign?|j emmerson mnangagwa. so what will happen if he doesn't resign? i am a bit worried, because we could descend into anarchy. these demonstrations could get out of hand. what people don't realise is that, in as they are desperate to get rid of robert mugabe, they have joined the system that has always oppressed them and they could just be collateral damage. we need to think about the citizens and the best way forward for the country. if
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the street protests and the marches that are being proposed go on on wednesday, we could descend into anarchy. that is something that cannot be overlooked. asi as i understand it most people out on the streets, most of the army, wa nt on the streets, most of the army, want president mugabe to step down. so everybody is on the same side? everyone is on the same side now, but it only takes a moment for people to realise that it's not actually just people to realise that it's not actuallyjust mugabe people to realise that it's not actually just mugabe that people to realise that it's not actuallyjust mugabe that they want out, it's the system that they want out. it's zanu—pf they want out. depending what happens in the situation and who takes advantage of the situation, you know, it'sjust fragile at the moment. ijust think that the army intervening in civilian politics, you know, roping people in, citizens to in to fight
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their factional battles is not a good place for a country to be. thank you very much for talking to us. that's the president of an opposition party called the african democratic party. thank you for your time. he was arrested over 100 times since robert mugabe came into power and he had to flee effectively for his life. he had to save himself. he had to flee to south africa. we will be live in harare, of course, as we reach that deadline at 10am. on this day in 1947, the queen and prince philip got married at westminster abbey. they'd actually got engaged a year earlier, but the palace kept it a secret until the then princess elizabeth turned 21. they'd first met when the queen was 13 years old. and for the last 70 years, their marriage has been a constant in british life. here's how it all began. # when you are in love
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# it's the loveliest night of the year... the king and queen announce the betrothal of their dearly beloved daughter, the princess elizabeth, to lieutenant philip mountbatten. i am so happy that on this, my third visit, my future husband is by my side. into the dull november morning, two greys draw the irish state coach.
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inside, the royal highness princess elizabeth and her father. # ...it‘s the loveliest night of the year # when you are in love # it's the loveliest night of the year # stars twinkle above # and you almost can touch them from here # words fall into rhyme # any time you are holding me near # when you are in love
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# it's the loveliest night of the year let's talk to the queen's former press secretary dickie arbiter. christopher lee is a royal historian. alun and delphine richards are in swansea and they celebrated their 70th wedding anniversary injune and got a card from the queen. welcome all of you. thank you so much. dickie, you have seen this relationship of the queen and prince philip's from close quarters. give us an philip's from close quarters. give us an insight into what they are
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like together? they are like pretty much a normal married couple. the fa ct much a normal married couple. the fact that the queen is head of state and head of nation is neither here nor there when they are sitting across the table from one another. i was there in the crowd watching the procession and there was love and adoration when they were driving back from westminster abbey and that exists today. they have got humour. they've got affection for each other. they have got chemistry. they've got affection for each other. they have got chemistrylj other. they have got chemistry.” can imagine him making her laugh. does she make him laugh? yes, she does make him laugh. what you see in public is the very different to the person you see in private. they are two people that are pretty much wrapped up in each other, but they give each other space. she has got a job to do. he has got a role and they allow each other to get on with it, but when it's time to come together they do come together. christopher, you believe their marriage is symbolic of british national identity. explain? well, one of the roles of the monarchy
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apart from providing an heir is to reflect identity of the nation and it's not so much look at us this is how you ought to behave, but it is somehow they do reflect the feelings you look at the, looking at ascot earlier this year and in all the crisises that's going on throughout the world and suddenly up came the carriage and then there they were waving, and suddenly, that seemed right because it reflected another side of the nation. let me brael in alun and del fen. both 93 and celebrating the 70th wedding anniversary. congratulations first of all. thank you. thank you. tell us how you do it. how have you done it for 70 years? what's the secret? well, i really don't know. i
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think it is a bit of give—and—take. she gives and i take! and we manage fine that way. laughter yes, i agree. laughter yes, iagree. that's laughter yes, i agree. that's the sum of it. how would you describe what it is like being married for 70 years?” don't know. it's, we'vejust like being married for 70 years?” don't know. it's, we've just got on so don't know. it's, we've just got on so well. we don't know the time passes even. we're good friends. we have laughs together and it's just normal to us that we should be together. do you still love each other? sorry? how much do you still love each other? 0h, very much. 0h
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sorry? how much do you still love each other? 0h, very much. oh yes. very much, yes. alun? yes. how much do you her? of course, i do. alun? yes. how much do you her? of course, ido. more alun? yes. how much do you her? of course, i do. more than i ever did. i know you got a card from the queen and a commemorative coin from the royal mint to celebrate, didn't you? what else did you get for your platinum wedding anniversary? well, on the actual anniversary, i don't think we got each other, that's all we wanted. we did have a special service for us in chapel as part of the normal sunday service which was rather moving. we renewed our wedding vows. and how was it for
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you? we are just like wedding vows. and how was it for you? we arejust like one being, i feel, you know, we have become one being and we know what the other wa nts being and we know what the other wants and sometimes we disagree, but it's not much of a disagreement. it's just sort of, oh well, i think so it's just sort of, oh well, i think so and so and that's it. thank you very much. let me bring in dickie and christopher. dickie former press secretary to the queen. the queen and prince philip, do they have disagreements? do they argue? they might argue. they might have a little bit of a spat, but it is over very quickly. their body language, looking at the pictures released today, there is one picture of them looking at each other, look at the picture behind us, they have that
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look and it permates through the course of their marriage. there have a lwa ys course of their marriage. there have always been pictures like that. their body language is terrific. they do adore each other and it does come through. it does show and they just have this ability to connect, to communicate without actually being joined at the hip. do you think christopher, they have taught us think christopher, they have taught us any lessons about how to make marriage work? i don't think it is making marriage work because they failed to teach some of the other members of the royal family, haven't they how to make marriage work? what is fascinating here when they get married, he is going to be a very good naval officer. he was a very good naval officer. he was a very good naval officer. he was a very good naval officer. he under standings that this would be a complete change his life. when he becomes, when the queen becomes the queen, he turns around and says, "i have nothing to do. i haven't got a role in this. you can go off a
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design the royal naught and go off to australia and cause levels of friction, like talking to the couple here, we look round and we look at them and we look at the royal family and the queen and prince philip and say, 70 years, now what made it work? what was it? is it like the older you get in marriage, the more forgiving you are ? older you get in marriage, the more forgiving you are? it becomes something which you split into two roles. the queen, about whom we know very little surprisingly and prince philip who we seem to know far more about, and they become symbols and that's why i come back to this idea that's why i come back to this idea that they somehow reflect society as it is at the moment. so, we are moving towards a complete change in the way society is and the way monarchy will reflect that society. i think it's the end of an era. thank you very much.
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congratulations again. thank you. 70 years. the latest news and sport coming up. latest from harare in a couple of minutes. before that, the weather. here is carol. thank you, victoria. this morning it has been a cold start, but a very mild start for others. as we go through this week, the forecast is a mild one. there will be rain at times and it is often going to be windy a the moment in parts of north wales, the temperature is 14 celsius. low pressure is dominating our weather. we have got an array of fronts moving from its west to the east, taking rain with them. with transient hill snow across the highlands of scotland. we are pulling in our wind from the south—west which means that's a mild direction, hence the higher temperatures, milderair direction, hence the higher temperatures, milder air holds moisture so there is a lot of cloud and rain. the exception to the mild air is across the far north—east of scotland. so as we go through the course of this morning, the rain
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continues to edge into the north sea. behind it, there will be spots of rain coming out of the thicker cloud and there will be a lot of cloud and there will be a lot of cloud around this afternoon with just one or two exceptions where we will see sunshine. so into the afternoon across south—west england, we hang on to the cloud. some splashes of rain, some splashes of rain not everywhere as we push across southern counties, but it is going to be fairly cloudy everywhere, but one thing you will notice particularly compared to yesterday is, it's fairly mild. across northern england we are looking at that cloud producing rain andindeed looking at that cloud producing rain and indeed we are too across scotland. the heavier rain having pushed off into the north sea. the rain drizzly and murky conditions. in scotland it will be chilly. seven celsius the tomp ture in aberdeen. spots of rain coming out of the cloud across northern ireland. here too, very mild for the time of year and for wales, quite a murky afternoon, all having said that, parts of east wales and herefordshire, also the west midlands seeing sunshine. lieu this evening and overnight, the rain
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across scotland rejaouf nates. we have south—westerly winds and another mild night. the temperatures wouldn't be too bad for day time maximums, the mild air pushing up across the north of scotland. tomorrow the rain continues to push up tomorrow the rain continues to push up into the north and a new band comes into the west and for a time at least it will be dry in the east. hello. it's monday, it's 10 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. welcome to the problem — programme what a freudian slip. the deadline for robert mugabe to stand down as president of zimbabwe has passed. i will have the latest live from zimbabwe, a nation still in shock and disbelief that president mugabe failed to resign in his live televised address last night. there are televised address last night. there a re calls televised address last night. there are calls for people to turn out
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onto the streets tomorrow in huge demonstrations, demanding that he goes. we will bring you the latest reaction to events in zimbabwe over the next half—hour and try and find out happens next. also on the programme — so—called "punishment" attacks by pa ramilitaries, usually kneecappings or serious beatings. they're happening in this country right now and they're taking their toll on society. i know of several examples where young people have been shot or beaten by paramilitary organisations and within a matter of weeks, they've taken their own lives. our correspondent ben brown is in harare. welcome to the special coverage of the crisis in zimbabwe. we are in the crisis in zimbabwe. we are in the capital, harare, and that deadline for mr mugabe to resign has just passed. to our knowledge, he
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has not resigned. he certainly didn't in that much anticipated televised address last night on zimbabwean national television after days of pressure from the military here, from his own party, zanu—pf, which sacked him as party leader, andindeed which sacked him as party leader, and indeed from the people, with huge demonstrations here on saturday. despite all of that pressure, he refused to resign. what looks now inevitable is that there will be moves to impeach him. in the parliament behind me, they will need a two thirds majority in both houses of parliament to impeach him. we have been told this morning by one mp that that impeachment process could take quite a while. days, weeks, maybe even months. so mr mugabe is still technically president of this country, still the old est president of this country, still the oldest president in the world, and also, bizarrely, under house arrest. we have been hearing from the war vetera ns, we have been hearing from the war veterans, the men who fought alongside mr mugabe in the war of
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liberation for zimbabwe, the war of independence. they want him out. they have just a news conference. yesterday, the party record him, and today they are starting to initiate impeachment proceedings, so i hear. and they will be calling upon the various province chairman to call upon the mps from those provinces to come to parliament and make sure that impeachment proceedings begin against mr mugabe. this is a welcome thing and we want it to proceed. we encourage the party to expeditiously do that as soon as possible. we are also appealing to other party in the parliament, the mdc, to coordinate their efforts with the ruling party so their efforts with the ruling party so that we achieve the desired end to see mugabe out of office immediately. that was the leader of
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the war veterans association here, saying that mr mugabe has been in power for 37 years saying that mr mugabe has been in powerfor 37 years in saying that mr mugabe has been in power for 37 years in zimbabwe. he should not be allowed to stay in power, he says, for another 37 seconds. just an example of the hostility to mr mugabe that there is, but for the moment, hostility to mr mugabe that there is, but forthe moment, he hostility to mr mugabe that there is, but for the moment, he shows no sign of resigning. let's talk to beatrice, a zimbabwean human rights lawyer who joins us now in beatrice, a zimbabwean human rights lawyer whojoins us now in harare. what do you make of mr mugabe's refusal to resign when so many were expecting that he would?” refusal to resign when so many were expecting that he would? i think everybody knows that he is a very stubborn man. i'm surprised that people thought he would just cave in because people say he must resign. that is typical robert mugabe for you. 0k! that is typical robert mugabe for you. ok! but what will he do now? is
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he going to stick this out? we have an impeachment process. is that going to be successful?” an impeachment process. is that going to be successful? i think impeachment is probably the best route to take. firstly, it is legal and secondly, since everybody agrees from all the political divide that he should go, they can short—circuit the process by ensuring that parliamentary rules are suspended for the purposes of ensuring that it goes through. parliament has the power to regulate its own rules, so they can fast—track it if they wish to. and by all accounts, they do wa nt to. and by all accounts, they do want it over and done with by yesterday. what was the reaction? millions were watching the televised address last night and a lot of people were thinking he was going to resign. one news agency reported that he had resigned, in fact. but he didn't. was there shock, anger, disappointment? for the ordinary
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people enlisted, the thinking was, why would he have a press conference u nless why would he have a press conference unless he was going to say what they wa nted unless he was going to say what they wanted him to say? but from a strategic point of view, it is a good thing he didn't resign, because he cannot challenge the process on the basis that he was coerced and resigned under duress because he was surrounded by the military. so the fa ct surrounded by the military. so the fact that he was made to go there with a statement that didn't say what the military wants in itself can be used to show that actually, he was not under any form of coercion and the military would be able to save the guy came, made his statement. we didn't like the statement, but he was a free man. so this is not a coup, because in a coup, you make someone read what you wa nt coup, you make someone read what you want him to read. so this was a
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masterstroke, because he cannot argue that it was a forced resignation. but he is still president and that is extraordinary. if he under house arrest? again, from a strategic point of view, it is easy to argue that this is not a coup because when one has a coup, the military takes over the levers of government. here, all the levers of government. here, all the levers of government. here, all the levers of government are still with zanu—pf. all the ministers except the few who are in custody are this judging their duties. the army commanders have not taken over mugabe's office. it is still functioning normally. it is probably meant to disguise the fact that there is military intervention, which ordinarily is a coup. but because they have not taken of the government, they can argue that actually, it wasn't a coup. how much longer do you think he's going to be president, weeks, months or days?
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when one looks at how this thing is snowballing, his period is becoming shorter and shorter. i would definitely say not weeks. we are talking days, depending on how the impeachment goes. the university stu d e nts impeachment goes. the university students are also making their own demands, which means other civil society activists will join the bandwagon. it looks like the country will be made ungovernable unless he steps down. beatrice, a zimbabwean human rights lawyer, thank you for your time. despite what beatrice was saying, mr mugabe has not got a great track record of listening to the people, although there is another big penetration being called for tomorrow in harare by the war vetera ns for tomorrow in harare by the war veterans association. their leader told us he will expect that demonstration to be even bigger than the vast demonstration we saw here on saturday, when thousands took to
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the streets, demanding that mr mugabe goes now. let's get the thoughts of our southern africa correspondent, milton nkosi, in johannesburg. the deadline has come and gone. he is still technically president? yes. we now expect that zanu—pf will deliver on its threat, or promise, that they will start impeachment receiving is and there will start carrying them out in parliament on tuesday. even if this process was started by the military, they are now taking a step back and allowing it to be a popular movement by the people. beatrice is correct that the students are joining in. they will have mass action following this. last week, we saw the military
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taking charge and the people following the military. i think from now on, things will be turned around so now on, things will be turned around so that the people are taking charge of the process and the military will be behind them. and what is important is the region. they want the transition of robert mugabe stepping down to be choreographed carefully. that is why you have this delicate constitutionalism getting in the way of what we all thought was a coup d'etat. what they want is that by the time robert mugabe is gone, they cannot say he was removed by the barrel of a gun. maybe we we re by the barrel of a gun. maybe we were wrong to be surprised last night when he made that address and failed to resign. maybe we should never have expected a man as stubborn as we all know robert mugabe is to just cave in? well, it
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was a natural expectation once you hear the president is going to address the nation live on television. you expect something unusual. and of course, robert mugabe held onto his line that he has been holding since the army parked a tank outside his house. it is clear that he has no intention of stepping down. we heard him in his own words saying that he is hoping to be presiding over the zanu—pf co ng ress to be presiding over the zanu—pf congress in december. we are in november. so the president thinks he will still be president by december. thank you. that was milton nkosi, our southern africa correspondent. calls for big demonstrations again tomorrow. let's talk to an activist who was on the streets on saturday. will you come out onto the streets
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again to demand that mr mugabe goes? i will be on the streets until he goes. there is no other option. i just need to see him go. so we are sitting in africa unity square until he goes. when you saw that speech last night on tv, how surprised, disappointed or angry where you that he barely mentioned all the pressure on him to go and never mentioned the demonstrations or the fact that the people are against him, certainly in harare? yesterday, before the speech, i was ready to celebrate. and then when i heard the speech, i was really disappointed. it was heartbreaking. i was actually in tea rs. we heartbreaking. i was actually in tears. we expected him to step down and do the right thing. and all he said was nothing. isn't that classic
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robert mugabe, in a sense? yeah, thatis robert mugabe, in a sense? yeah, that is classic robert mugabe. his sole ambition was to have power from the beginning. he got that power which is so dear to him, and he wa nts to which is so dear to him, and he wants to hold onto it for ever. do you think something has changed in this country with that amazing demonstration on saturday that you took part in? it was euphoric and full of joy. people were took part in? it was euphoric and full ofjoy. people were on the streets. they were taking selfies with the army. has everything now changed in zimbabwe after that? yes, there was a sense of a freedom that we had never experienced in this country. as an activist, some of the demonstrations we have been doing we re demonstrations we have been doing were under police brutality. you could not walk a step without police throwing tear gas at you. so there isa throwing tear gas at you. so there is a sense of freedom and hope in the country that something can be done. thank you very much. that is
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the latest from here. we know that that deadline has passed. mr mugabe has still not resigned, but we will bring you the latest throughout the day on bbc news. so—called punishment attacks, knee—cappings, serious beatings using sledgehammers and electric drills as punishment for carrying out a crime or anti—social behaviour is something we associate with isis—controlled parts of iraq and syria. but it's also happening here in the uk in 2017. after a period of decline, such attacks by paramilitaries are on the rise in northern ireland, with a 30% increase over the last year. talking to people who've been victims of them is incredibly rare, for obvious reasons. but our reporter greg dawson has spoken to two young men who were kneecapped. we brought you his full report earlier; here's a short extract.
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it is graphic from the beginning and you may not want young children to hear it. shootings, beatings, threats. paramilitary—style attacks may be a legacy of decades of conflict in northern ireland, but even in 2017, the self—appointed men in charge still see it as their role to police their communities and crack down on what they deem to be antisocial behaviour. james and thomas, not their real names, were shot in the legs. we voiced their words for them. they got in contact with someone in the family, they told me i had to go and meet them. i walked to the place and they told me to go and they were standing there, they showed me the gun and told me to lie down on the floor. that was it. one of the hallmarks of these attacks is that many of the victims know it's coming. in some cases, parents are faced with a dreadful dilemma of how best
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to protect their child. hide them from paramilitary groups or hand them over for so—called appointments. i did one or two bad things and they were just picking on me and picking on me. i was trying to change my life around and they were still picking on me. they put me out of the country and then mummy visited me and said, "listen i've been talking to someone to try to sort it out to get someone to give you an easy shooting". i put my shoes on and went straightaway and went straightaway and i said, "yes, let's get it over and done with". so i put my shoes on and straight to belfast, right. talk me through the day it happened? i was told to walk up the street and i looked behind me and two men were there. i turned round and i said to them, there are ten times as many people out there doing worse than me and hejust said, "listen, kid, i'll
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look after you". and how's that looking after you? in 2016—2017, there were 94 reported casualties of shootings and assaults, that's up 30% on the previous year. attacks a re currently at their highest level since 2010. and since 2009, 47% of attacks targeted people aged 25 and under. the police service of northern ireland has now teamed up with officers from the national crime agency for a dedicated task force to deal with paramilitaries. beyond doubt, there is an attempt by some of these paramilitary groups to continue to exert their influence within communities and i think this is one area where they see a degree of populism and they think it's a way which they can re—establish or promote their legitimacy within communities. obviously, from my perspective, i am absolutely committed to denying them any potential oxygen in that respect. although the majority of injuries from attacks aren't life—threatening, they can be life—changing and campaigners argue the mental health consequences can be the most damaging. let's talk to koulla yiasouma, northern ireland's commisioner
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for children and young people. tommy mccourt is a mediator at the rosemount centre in derry. i want to ask you tommy mccourt first of all why do some parents choose to hand over their sons to the paramilitaries to be subject to a so—called punishment beating or shooting? well, i mean that's a very difficult question to simply answer. what you need to do is ask why are the punishment shootings taking place in the first place and also to look at the overall history of this society that we have been living in for 40 years. if someone is coming to tell a parent that their son, his behaviour has got to a level or it has got to a point where he has to be stopped in one form or another, that's an indictment of our society
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in not being able to put proper resources in place to deal with these things. why wouldn't people go to the police to report anti—social behaviour? well, people, some people will go to the police. this is not, them or us attitude. some people try all sorts of different methodologies. they go to social workers and the local church and they go to the police, they go to local communities and different organisations to try and get help because their son is maybe behaving ina because their son is maybe behaving in a fashion which is creating mayhem within their communities or taking drugs or selling drugs or whatever and parents do, as what pa rents whatever and parents do, as what parents do, they do everything in their power to prevent this and try and stop it, but the reality is there is insufficient resources to be able to deal with this and sometimes, you have to be careful here, if you try to explain these things or try to analyse them in some fashion you are maybe portrayed as trying to justify them. i want to be clear, our position is
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straightforward. we make it clear from day one that violence is not the answer to social problems. but at the same time, if you're going to say violence isn't the answer you have to say what is and if the resources aren't there then frustration sets in and because of the history of this society that we have been living in, there is a tendency for people to say if we don't get help from the state and if we don't get it from outside, we will turn to our own people and that's where marred military organisations step into the picture. koulla how do you react to the significant rise in the punishment shootings and beatings particularly on young people? i am appalled and what your piece today has highlighted just how devastating it is, not only to the lives of children and young people themselves, but their families and their communities and tommy is right, this is a multi—facetted issue. so there is the issue of making sure that the criminal
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justice systems have the support of the local community to be able to deal with their issues. if you see somebody committing a crime, you should report it. if you see somebody abusing or assaulting a young person or anybody else, you should feel the confidence to be able to report it, but why is it in particular communities and we have to look at stained funding. we have to look at stained funding. we have to look at support for communities because these communities are vibrant, but disjointed funding, piecemeal funding, different people doing different things in different ways isn't helping to find a long—term solution to this issue. and just one thing, let's not romanticise, these aren't paramilitaries fighting for a cause, these are in the main criminal gangs fighting, looking to take control so that they can continue with their criminal activity whether it is drug dealing or any sort of criminal activity and they are trying to control children and young people.
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evenif control children and young people. even if there were more resources that wouldn't necessarily lead to communities trusting the police more? how does that happen? there needs to be a piece of work, the police need to go in there and not just the police, our criminal justice system, i have heard continually from communities and let me say that i have been working on this from the day and hour i became commissioner and other organisations and you have heard from some of them today have been working on this a lot longer including my office under my predecessor, but the police and the whole criminaljustice system need to go in and demonstrate to these communities that they are there police service, that they are theircriminal there police service, that they are their criminal justice there police service, that they are their criminaljustice system. there police service, that they are their criminal justice system. since 2009 we have had devolution of crime and justice. the parties who signed up and justice. the parties who signed up to devolution of policing, are the ones who are getting the highest votes. they must send the message to their communities and the police and their communities and the police and the rest of the criminaljustice
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syste m the rest of the criminaljustice system must demonstrate on a day and daily basis, notjust system must demonstrate on a day and daily basis, not just when something happens and then theyjust walk in, but on a day and daily basis that they are there for them. they are there to protect them, notjust they are there for them. they are there to protect them, not just to criminalise them and notjust there to protect them, not just to criminalise them and not just to arrest them which they should do if arrest them which they should do if a crime is being committed, but they are there to keep them safe. tommy, let me read some messages from our audience to you. this text from chris, "what the paramilitary groups are doing to teenagers is illegal and unacceptable. this is the no the wild west. the police and courts are there to decide on punishment legally and fairly. anybody who thinks the paramilitaries are doing the community a service, they are wrong. for them to scare, threaten, mums and dads to take their children to be beaten or shot or knee capped is sick." neil, there are a couple like this, tommy, "am i supposed to feel sorry for the young men who involve themselves in criminal activity that they know is likely to result in a punishment beating? play with fire and you get burned." what
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dud say to that? well, i think it demonstrates the ambivalence that there is towards this. again, i think you have to understand in the history and the context of the state that we're living in. i mean we would see people and hear people regularly saying things that was terrible, that young man being shot was an awful thing and two seconds later out of the same voice, it says but he didn't get it for nothing. he didn't get it for saying his prayers. the behaviour of these young people are destroying our communities and ruining the lives of people living within the communities and somebody needs to do something about it. now, i mean, that's not to justify the shooting and i want to be clear about that, but it does raise the question if this behaviour is inscresing, which —— increasing which it seem to be, there needs to be activity or some kind of action or programmes to look at it rationally, not in an emotional sense. i mean, you know, i havejust listened to and people have their
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own views, but for somebody to say, "they are all criminal gangs and all they are interested in is drug dealing or whatever." the people who are involved in the organisation like it or lump it are the same type of people who were involved in the republican movement whether it is the provisional ira or sinn fein who have moved on into political debate and it is similar type of people who don't agree with the position that's going on. you can condemn their actions and all the rest, but sometimes you have to be able to be rational in dealing with them and i agree that you know programmes, we rana agree that you know programmes, we ran a programme here in derry for four years, called time to choose. within that programme we have dealt with over 1300, 1300 cases which could potentially have gone towards a punishment beating or shooting and every last one was resolved and they we re every last one was resolved and they were resolved without violence and resolved with helping the young people to move in a different direction and we called the programme time to choose. that programme time to choose. that programme is no longerfunded and we are doing this voluntarily. you
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mediated between young people who had potentially been involved in anti—social behaviour and the paramilitaries, did you? well, it is not a direct line, you call a meeting in the bar or a meeting in some office with a paramilitary. there are lines of communication which have been in existence from the start of the troubles and always have been. direct lines of communication in number ten downing street. so, for people to assume that there is no longer any method of contacting people it is foolish. certainly, we do have some means of contact, but those means of contact we try to find out what is the issue here? why is this person being threatened? what here? why is this person being threatened ? what is here? why is this person being threatened? what is their behaviour and we do our best to resolve it. it means trying to convince local communities that doing is being done to alleviate the problem. koulla why do you think some people tolerate the attacks on young people?” do you think some people tolerate the attacks on young people? i think it's probably because theyjust feel
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so it's probably because theyjust feel so frustrated that they can't find a long—term solution and resolution to certain behaviours by young people and anyone who thinks that anybody can do anything that justifies an arbitrary response like this, a violent response arbitrary response like this, a viole nt response like arbitrary response like this, a violent response like this is sorely mistaken. communities who are affected deeply by anti—social and criminal behaviour by young people or anybody else have a right to be safe. that was the point i was trying to make about criminal justice systems, the police going in and keeping the communities safe. finding a timely and speedy response to young people and also then going in behind them working with, there is fantastic community organisations across our communities in northern ireland, with a sustained plan, with a plan that's been developed by the community, including young people, including adults, of all ages and going in there on a long—term basis and saying, "let's work on this together. let's fund what needs to
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be doneded." the first thing that has to happen is communities have to have confidence in their criminal justice system. the police is there for them and justice system. the police is there forthem andl justice system. the police is there for them and i understand frustration when they see young people committing crime or anybody else committing crime and no response, but let me tell you and we all agree that, it's not right, it's not legitimate and it's outrageous the way we are responding to this sort of behaviour by young people is violence. it does notjustify this sort of thing and it has to stop and these people have to be arrested and brought to book. thank you both. thank you very much. northern ireland's commissioner for children and young people and tommy mccourt, a mediator at the rosemount centre in derry, thank you. still to come: as the future of zimbabwe hangs in the balance, we'll bring you the latest analysis on what happens next. ministers are expected to discuss the next brexit steps at a mini—cabinet meeting later.
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but how much should britain pay to get talks moving forward? we'll have insight from across the political spectrum. time for the latest news, here's rebecca. the bbc news headlines this morning. the deadline set by zimbabwe's ruling party for president robert mugabe to resign or face impeachment has expired. in a speech to the nation last night, mr mugabe made it clear he had no intention of stepping down. the formal process could begin tomorrow. the mdc may refuse to support the zanu—pf motion. the german president frank—walter steinmeier is to hold crisis talks
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with chancellor angela merkel, after her failed attempt to forge a coalition cast doubts over her political future. the centrist free democrats pulled out of talks late last night, blaming irreconcilable differences with mrs merkel‘s christian democrats and the other party in the talks, the greens. police say there were no injuries to suggest "any other person was involved" in the death of the missing teenager gaia pope. the 19—year—old's body was found on saturday in a field near swanage, 11 days after she was last seen. dorset police are treating her death as "unexplained" pending toxicology results. the convicted cult leader charles manson — who orchestrated a series of notorious murders in the 19605 — has died in prison in california at the age of 83. in 1969, members of his group killed seven people including the actress sharon tate, wife of the film director, roman polanski. man5on himself was initially sentenced to death, before
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the penalty was abolished in california. women are being advised to sleep on their side in the last three months of pregnancy to avoid having a stillborn baby. a study ofjust over 1,000 women found the risk double5 if women go to sleep on their backs, but researchers say women should not worry if they are on their back when they wake up. the study authors estimate that about 130 babies' lives a year could be saved if this advice was followed. the queen and prince philip are celebrating their 70th wedding anniversary today — the longest in the royal family's history. the occasion is being marked with a new series of portraits, a set of stamps and a private party for the royal family at windsor castle. the church's bell5 of westminster abbey, where they married, will ring for more than three hours to mark the occasion. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. and here is some 5port now.
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former wimbledon champion jana novotna has died, aged 49. in a statement, the women's tennis a55ociation confirmed that novotna died yesterday, surrounded by her family in her native czech republic, after a long battle with cancer. she was famou5ly consoled by the dutche55 of kent after losing the wimbledon final in 1993, before eventually winning the title in 1998. west brom has 5acked manager tony puli5, with the club just a point above the premier league zone. with the club just a point above the premier league relegation zone. in a statement, the club's chairman john williams says results have been "very disappointing." west brom have managed two wins in their last 21 premier league games, and were thrashed 4—0 by chelsea over the weekend. assistant head coach gary meg5on will take over until further notice. england's men cricketer5 have arrived in brisbane ahead
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of their first a5he5 te5t at the gabba on thursday. seem to be in relaxed mood, don't they? boosted by the news perhaps that pace bowlerjake ball has confirmed he is fit for that match, after overcoming an ankle injury. and golfer tommy fleetwood has won the race to dubai title to cap a remarkable year for the englishman. in the biggest victory of his career, fleetwood held off the challenge of olympic championjustin ro5e. and it means fleetwood is now europe's top player. so, there is uncertainty about zimbabwe's so, there is uncertainty about zimba bwe's future. robert mugabe has been told he had to stand down by 10am our time orface impeachment. robert mugabe has ruled zimbabwe for almost 40 years now. how will he be remembered?
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ido i do swear that i will be faithful and bear true allegiance to zimbabwe. let's talk now to lloyd m5ipa. he is a friend and supporter of robert mugabe — he says he is "sad" about the situation and that mugabe has been a brilliant father of the nation who deserves forgivene55, why is he a father of the nation? mugabe i5 why is he a father of the nation? mugabe is an african icon. and what i5 mugabe is an african icon. and what is happening now is sad in the sense that he is refusing to listen to his own people. that is potentially going to affect his legacy. he was a revolutionary. he had the land redistribution exercise. if you notice, even the military are try to negotiate with him. no heavy handedne55 from the military, because they want to see how much they can protect that legacy so that he goes out in a dignified way. that
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deadline has passed for him to re5ign, 40 minutes ago. we know he i5a re5ign, 40 minutes ago. we know he is a survivor. he has been in power for 37 years. and he has ruled zimbabwe with an iron grip. how long can he hang on? well, it's in his nature. his brain is always working. he is one of those politicians who has re5pect he is one of those politicians who has respect acro55 he is one of those politicians who has re5pect across africa. but at this time, he probably understands that he has been rejected by his own military, he has been rejected by the people and his party has kicked him out. so for him, the writing is on the wall. what is left now is for him to step down. that is what they have been trying to do and it appears that either somebody out there is telling him to dig in, or it is not in his nature to reject other5. my concern is that there are others telling him what to do. that
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doesn't sound like the robert mugabe that we know. that is my concern, that we know. that is my concern, that there are somebody pulling the strings from elsewhere. like who? somebody like the foreign minister, who is out there and has been talking to mini5ter5 who is out there and has been talking to ministers in botswana. there are others who still have access to him. we cannotjam mobile communications, so somebody somewhere is speaking to him. communications, so somebody somewhere is speaking to himm could be his wife. it could be his wife. but these people are going to potentially cause anarchy, because as long as this thing draws out, the people will become impatient. you say he is an african icon and father of the nation. people here disagree. how will robert mugabe be remembered
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by the world, as a horrible man, a racist, and a corrupt politician?” am not saying he is a saint, but he is still a revolutionary. he took the country from where it was, in the country from where it was, in the hands of the coloniser, and gave it to his own people. after that, he took the land, something mandela never did, and tried to run the economy through in digitisation programmes. he is dearly loved by his own people. but at the same time, they feel that he is now an old man. he is not dearly loved by all people in zimbabwe, not those who were brutally oppressed by him. it will depend on what you call loved, but there is a lot of respect for what he stands for, the values of the liberation struggle, the image that he has put straight that are portrayed. let me introduce some more guests. we have a member of the
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main opposition party in zimbabwe, the movement for democratic change. also with us is dr knox chitiyo from the internationalforeign also with us is dr knox chitiyo from the international foreign affairs think—tank chatham house. he is a zimbabwean who covers zimbabwe. we will talk to two people in zimbabwe injusta will talk to two people in zimbabwe injust a moment. a5 will talk to two people in zimbabwe injust a moment. as an will talk to two people in zimbabwe in just a moment. as an opposition politician, what do you think will happen next? mugabe is going to be kicked out by his party. it is time for him to go. but he is still there. he has oppressed us for 37 years. i heard the fellow saying he was a father of the nation. no, he is not. the man is a dictator who has oppressed us and ruined the country. he has made most of us in the uk run away from our country. we we re forced the uk run away from our country. we were forced to leave our country. so were forced to leave our country. so we want him to go. and we wanted
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transition of government that is inclusive of all the political parties and civic organisations. and we demand from zanu—pf that they do not sideline the opposition like they did before. we are also looking for a new voters' role. —— a new voters' law. we know there are over 1 million dead voters on it. so we wa nt 1 million dead voters on it. so we want a new one and we want the transition government to include voters' role server zanu— pf transition government to include voters' role server zanu—pf. stealing the elections. we also want these elections to be internationally monitored and they should be free and fair and there will not be any intimidation. we are fed up with zanu—pf and mugabe. will not be any intimidation. we are fed up with zanu-pf and mugabe. what do you think will happen? there are a numberof things do you think will happen? there are a number of things happening simultaneously. the generals are talking to mugabe. the party will be
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talking to mugabe. the party will be talking to mugabe. the party will be talking to him, and an impeachment process is likely to begin any time now. that could take time. so he may hang on for a bit longer, but as everyone agrees, the longer this drags out, the more volatile the situation gets. we have at the moment is a national convergence where the people and the military and the politicians agree that he has to go. beyond that, if it drags on longer, the national maksel fault lines in zimbabwe could develop into a dangerous situation. let me speak to two residents. glanis, what is it like in harare at the moment with robert mugabe still your president? what is happening comes from the
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anxiety that people have of getting robert mugabe to resign or get him impeached. i think he is not going to come back as our president and i don't want to see him coming back. given that he is taking longer to give in to the demands by the military, i think people just need to go back onto the streets like we did on saturday. this time, my coachman to fellow citizens who we are mobilising right now is, let's not leave the streets of harare until robert mugabe goes. he needs to see the muscle of the people. let me bring in patience in bulawayo. glanis was appealing to people to get out on the streets and stay there until robert mugabe has gone. patience, do you want the same to happen in bulawayo? after experiencing saturday, where everyone was marching for a better
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zimbabwe, they didn't care about political parties, they didn't care if you were black, white, yellow or blue, i think everyone is now united for one cause. and the best cause for one cause. and the best cause for now is a better zimbabwe. i am sure he saw as well that the people have spoken. you can't have thousands of people across the country, and it wasn'tjust thousands of people across the country, and it wasn't just across the country, it was across the world where every zimbabwean, wherever they work, came together, and we we re they work, came together, and we were marching for him to see that the people have spoken and he needs to hear what they are saying. ephraim tapa joins us as well from the movement for democratic change, an opposition party. tell us why you we re an opposition party. tell us why you were exile here? i arrived in the uk
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in 2002, having been rescued from a torture place where i had been held for 23 days. i experienced horrendous torture thank god i was rescued. basically, the opposition movement, the trade union movement which belonged to, facilitate my escape from zimbabwe. i came to the uk. can you imagine going home under a new president? it would be fantastic to go back home and a new president. but i have got my
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apprehensions with the way things are playing out. for instance, we must look at all of what is happening within the context of the zanu—pf factions fighting over his succession. if you look at that, you are also looking at the possibility of one zanu—pf henchmen are fighting over zimbabwe. these are the same people who denied the opposition their electoral victory in 2008. these are the same people who orchestrated the genocide...
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i want to bring our guests in the studio back in. you have talked about potentially the situation on the streets getting a bit more difficult. one guest earlier talked about a decent into anarchy being possible. what if mugabe steps down or is forced to step down and the vice—president steps in? is that ok with you? yes, that's, let's look at this in its proper context. whilst we appreciate and value the opposition and every zimbabwean united in this course to get mugabe to step down. the premise of this whole exercise was to democratise zanu—pf, that's how it started and that's why the military stepped in in the first place. obviously it has become bigger than what it initially was thought to be and we are happy that the opposition are buying into
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this whole exercise because we share one common goal, we want mugabe to step down and get his replacement coming in. zanu—pf has been bottlenecked for so many years. what is happening now is a product of the succession failure. if mugabe had dealt with the succession issues earlier on, we wouldn't behaving this problem. the faction at zanu—pf isa this problem. the faction at zanu—pf is a result of mugabe's entrance against. thank you. —— entrance against. ministers are expected to discuss the next brexit steps at a mini cabinet meeting later. on the agenda will be a key sticking point in the negotiations with brussels, how much we should pay to settle our debts with the eu and unlock the stalled talks. nina schick is a political adviser and commentator from germany and we can talk to brexit—supporting founder of wetherspoons pubs, tim martin.
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thank you very much for coming on the programme. i'm going to start with you tim martin. are you surprised that our list of liabilities, what we owe, isn't a matter of fact, but seems to be more a matter of opinion? yes. i understand that the legal position from the government is that we are under no obligation to pay anything. so it's one of those situations where in a divorce you don't have to pay anything, but you might do so to be nice. you clearly believe that legal opinion, but it doesn't make sense, does it? we have signed off what we owe them as a member and now that we're removing ourselves, we need to settle up with our leucts? well, all the public knows is the legal advice that the government has had and the legal advice, which hasn't con
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contradicted so far as i am aware, is that we are under no legal obligation to pay anything. we might decide to do so anyway if we feel there is some sort of moral obligation, but that's a different matter really. 0k. obligation, but that's a different matter really. ok. you spend a lot of time talking to figures in brussels. what do the europeans think about this sticking point over the bill? well, it's quite clear. for them this is really a legal issue, will the uk honour its commitments or not? we won't see any progress in the talks, the next crunch point is in december unless the uk decides to move and despite the uk decides to move and despite the legal advice that mr martinjust quoted, i mean realistically, the government has conceded that it will have to pay. so it's not contesting the principle that it will have to pay something, the only thing that it is contesting is how big the figure should be? theresa may made a suggestion of 20 billion and the eu said well, that actually doesn't
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cover your financial liabilities so the kind of meeting, the brexit cabinet meeting today, we think, they are going to up the offer to 40 billion to see if that moves talks forward. so this idea that the uk is not going to pay anything is not the government's position and it's not the position of brexit supporting cabinet ministers either. are you surprised that there isn't a list of what britain is supposed to pay up list of what britain is supposed to pay up because of what we have said we will pay as a member? there is a list and the commission has, of course, revealed what it contests in the brexit bill and the uk is going through it line by line and trying to diminish the overall sum and the realisation is that the real issue here is not the question of whether or not the uk will pay, because even though the sums sound large, 60 billion, 100 billion, in the grand scheme of things, it is not that much for the government to pay because if there is no deal the government would have a bigger financial hit than the 60 billion, 20 billion, 40 billion. it's one
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much more to do with domestic optics because, of course, during the campaign nobody said there would be a brexit bill or we would be having to pay the eu to leave. so this is a question of how can you portray this at home without incensing the public really? tim martin you are a successful businessman. you negotiated lots of times and successfully lots of ti mes. negotiated lots of times and successfully lots of times. what would you advice to get the talks going? i'd say that we are under no legal obligation to pay any money in spite of what you have just heard. it didn't amount to a legal obligation. it is horse trading by the eu. i would say we are perfectly happy to trade on world trade organisation rules, contrary to the spin that will reduce food prices, we will save £200 million per week so we will save £200 million per week so the public knows unlike the comments from your guest now that thatis comments from your guest now that that is one heck of a lot of money. soi that is one heck of a lot of money. so i would say we want to be friends
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with europe. we want to trade with europe. we're not going to pay huge sums of money and we're quite happy to trade on world trade organisation rules as we do with america, with china, with india, etcetera. 0k. china, with india, etcetera. ok. we will leave it there, thank you. thank you very much both of you. the american cult—leader charles manson who masterminded a killing spree in california in 1969 has died in prison at the age of 83. joining me is cheish merryweather from the website crimeviral.com. tell us why this, the way he masterminded the killings has fascinated people for decades? i think it's definitely still that fas narks with charles manson, if you were to take one face of evil it would be charles manson's face would you see. he didn't commit any of the murders, hejust instructed you see. he didn't commit any of the
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murders, he just instructed young, impressible, very intelligent, very outgoing adults to go and commit the worst crimes possible and i think it still haunts still to this day a lot of people. how did you manage to manipulate those well educated people? over the time it was out in the outskirts in california, they were very young followers and he took them, he band clerks and calendars and watchers, they were following under net his rule and he instructed them to go to the house to carry out the crimes in his words in the most gruesome way that they could do so. most shocking of all perhaps the killing of susan tate who was eight—and—a—half months pregnant? just two weeks away from giving birth and it is the home invasion aspect. especially as it was on the end of the decade of free love, pa rt of was on the end of the decade of free love, part of the hippie culture had been born, the summer 1967, two
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yea rs been born, the summer 1967, two years later, it was definitely sharon tate's murder, the wife of roman polanski the depravity of it was barbaric. and what did the followers think of charles manson? why were they willing to follow him to such gruesome? they looked up to him as very god—like. he wasn't domineering. he wasn't threatening in anyway. charles manson himself, he is 5'3" in anyway. charles manson himself, he is 53" inches, so he wasn't a very overpowering figure, but certainly especially in a lot of his interviews which you can find online, he has that voice and he can talk and he has got that sort of charisma that what he says goes. he has a lot of commentaries about society and how society is wrong and then especially if you were to read
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then especially if you were to read the book healther scelter. they were young impressionable adults and they believed anything he said and they left theirfamilies believed anything he said and they left their families behind and they we re left their families behind and they were under his spell so to speak. thank you very much. the queen and the duke of edinburgh celebrate their 70th wedding anniversary. alun and delphine explained what it takes to have a good and happy marriage. she gives andi good and happy marriage. she gives and i take and we manage fine! laughter that's the sum of it. delphine, how would you describe what it is like being married for 70 years? i don't know. it's, we've just got
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on so i don't know. it's, we've just got on so well. we don't know the time passes even. we're good friends. we have laughs together. and it'sjust normal to us that we should be together. do you still love each other? sorry? how much do you still love each other? oh, very much. yes. very much, yes. alun? yes? how much do you love delphine? very. of course, i do. more than i ever did. alun and delphine richards who celebrated their platinum wedding anniversary this year. on the programme tomorrow — three remarkable survivors to stand up to extremism.
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some changeable weather as we move through this week. today, temperatures creeping back into the double figures. a lot of cloud around and outbreaks of rain working eastwards and becoming patchy in the north as it does so. there will be a few breaks in the cloud particularly to the east of high ground. temperatures today in the double figures. in the south highs of 13 celsius. cooler in the north where we are in the cooler. this evening and overnight, we start to see our next weather front working north—east wards. it will bring rain. turning heavy into the early hours for northern ireland and southern scotland and northern england. murky conditions as well. temperatures in the south staying in
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the double figures. a wet start to the double figures. a wet start to the day for northern scotland tomorrow. it will stay wet there as we move through the day. our next weather front starts to edge in from the west into northern ireland. southern scotland, south—west england and wales, further east, drier with patchy cloud around. there will be plenty of cloud, but breaks. temperatures tomorrow at a maximum of 14 celsius. the wind will pick up as well. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11am. the deadline for zimbabwe's robert mugabe to resign orface impeachment expires with no word from the president. i'm ben brown, live in harare, where
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is that deadline has come and gone with no word from mugabe. it seems inevitable there will be an attempt to impeach him in parliament and end his 37 year rule. charles manson — the us cult leader who sent his followers to commit a string of brutal murders — has died in prison aged 83. theresa may will meet ministers to discuss how much the uk should offer to pay the eu to settle its bill as it leaves. in the past couple of minutes, the
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