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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 20, 2017 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at two: protesters are back on the streets in zimbabwe as robert mugabe ignores a deadline to quit — there's to be a military address on state tv. we are sick and tired because of it, we wa nt we are sick and tired because of it, we want him to resign. the constitution should change, the parliament should change, we should reshuffle our country. i'm ben brown live in harare and as president mugabe ignores that deadline for him to resign, his own party, zanu—pf, launch impeachment proceedings against him. merkel‘s shaky leadership — the german chancellor's attempts to form a coalition government collapse. she now faces her biggest challenge in 12 years. death of a monster — charles manson, the notorious cult leader who directed his followers to commit a string of brutal murders, has died aged 83. m.-
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five years fl: fixatfz "’ ’* '" '* " "' five years later. : w ,, ~ ,,, five years later. more ~ w ,, ~ ,,, five years later. more on w w ,, w— title five years later. but more on the kind messages that have been coming in. and ben with the weather. something much mother, also a change in the look, cloudy with outbreaks of rain. also coming up... my husband and i — the queen and the duke of edinburgh celebrate 70 years of marriage with the release of these new portraits. hello, everyone, this
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is afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. what now for zimba bwe's robert mugabe? he won't quit and his party now wants to impeach him. the deadline for him to make his decision passed a couple of hours ago. let's go live now to harare, where we canjoin my colleague ben brown. yes, hello from harare, that deadline for mr mugabe to resign has come and gone and he has shown no intention of quitting his post as head of state here, just as he did not show any intention of resigning last night when he addressed the nation in a television address, and there was huge expectation that he was on the verge of resigning, then
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when he did not, there was shock and disbelief, and real anger around this country. so, zanu—pf have already deposed him as their leader and are now launching impeachment proceedings against him. to do that, parliament would need both chambers to pass a vote of impeachment by two thirds majority. how long will that take? it could take days. one mp said it could take weeks or even months. in the meantime, there has been a call for another big demonstration against mr mugabe here tomorrow in the capital, harare. our zimbabwe correspondent has this report. the next stage of the battle is set, robert mugabe is on one side and his party on the other. i will preside over... last night he didn't step down as expected. party leaders had given him until today to do so. the midday deadline to resign has come and gone. the zanu—pf party is planning to put the final wheels in motion, it has summoned its lawmakers
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to the zanu—pf headquarters behind me to discuss a possible impeachment. the process will then move to parliament, where the constitution says a two—thirds majority will be needed to remove the leader. lawmakers can cite misconduct, violating the constitution or mental or physical incapacity as grounds for dismissal. but it's not clear how long the process will take and this president doesn't appear to be in the mood to play ball. it depends how fast it moves, it could take days or months, but the beauty is it's a process that has provided the constitution in section 97 so i think it is now the only hope for the country that the president is removed in terms of that section of the constitution. unprecedented waves of protest across the country have failed to persuade the only leader of
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this country has known to go. and they continue to spread. students at the main university are now boycotting their exams. we are sick and tired, we want him to resign. we want change. the constitution should change, the parliament should change. and the war veterans say they will escalate their protests this week. mugabe, go now, go now. your time is up, please leave the house and let the country start on a new page. it's been a long week of events never witnessed here before and the desire to at least give the appearance of removing him by the book is slowing the process down, but finding the quick resolution to this impasse may
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prove very hard to find. so, if zimbabwe is to get rid of its president, robert mugabe, it looks like it is going to have to be through impeachment, that is certainly what millions of people here appear to want, and also what his own party wants. they are proposing the motion of impeachment in the parliament. let's talk to a constitutional expert who joins me now. just talk to us about how easy oi’ now. just talk to us about how easy or how difficult it is to impeach a president in zimbabwe. well, that all depends on the numbers that zanu—pf will be able to muster in the parliament. both houses have to come together, 350 mp5, and the two
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thirds of that would be 233 members, so thirds of that would be 233 members, so zanu—pf need to try and raise those 233 members to get the motion through. how long could it all take? is this a long process or something they could fast track? dally—mac this is really new territory. we have not had an impeachment process before. it could be quickly done in a matter of days and i understand the chief whip is running around trying to rally his mps so it could be done in a matter of days, but if they cannot get the ducks in a row, it could take much longer. let's talk about the constitutional impact of the military takeover. it seems clear that the army commanders here have been stressing that this is not a coup in the old—fashioned sense, but to everyone in the outside world, it looks like that. but they have been trying hard not to force
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mr mugabe out at the barrel of a gun. there has not been a takeover of government as such, there is no reason why the cabinet could not meet, the military is at pains to say that mr mugabe has not been overthrown, they have gone out of their way to have him present a public event, we saw him on tv last night, we saw him at a graduation ceremony, so night, we saw him at a graduation ceremony, so this is all part of the sharad that mugabe has not been overthrown and that this process will unfold constitutionally. overthrown and that this process will unfold constitutionallym overthrown and that this process will unfold constitutionally. it is such a weird situation, because he is still president, and yet technically he is supposed to be under house arrest. this is why bringing him out into public creates the impression he is not under house arrest. you would have thought if he was under house arrest, when he appeared in public, he would say, help, somebody, i appeared in public, he would say, help, somebody, lam being held against my will. he has not done that because it is to his advantage to go along with this sharad that he
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has not been overthrown. so he is managing to play for time. were you surprised when you saw the tv address last night? a lot of people expected him to resign. it was standing because it came on the back of the very strong statements that came out of the central committee, removing the party president. he stated not long ago that he will rule for so long as the party wants him there, and then the party no longer wants him, he will step down. the party very clearly indicated they did not want him there, so we thought this was the moment he would say, ok, the party has got rid of me, it is time to go, but he is still there. thank you very much indeed. well, as he says, president mugabe is still there, despite all the pressure that has been on him from the generals, from the military in negotiations with him, pressure also from his own party, stripping
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him of the party leadership, and pressure from the people. we saw a huge demonstration over the weekend, tens of thousands of people marching through the streets here demanding he goes. he hasn't gone yet and we hear that there is going to be another big demonstration. according to one organiser it will be even bigger than the one at the weekend. again, trying to get him to resign. but so far he has been deaf to all the protests. he doesn't seem to listen to people power. and we will return if there is any sign of that later. the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier, has warned britain that it can't cherry pick parts of the single market it wants to keep. but he said that brussels was ready to offer the uk the most ambitious free trade deal if its terms are met. theresa may is chairing a meeting of senior cabinet ministers to discuss the size of the so—called divorce bill — the money the uk needs to pay to start trade talks. our political correspondent eleanor garnier reports from westminster. busy ahead of the budget
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on wednesday, highlighting the government's plans for investing in technology and engineering but the prime minister and the chancellor too know that brexit is the backdrop to everything. and it is the money, the so—called brexit bill that is the sticking point in the negotiations. we have been very clear we will honour our commitments but i want to see developing that deep and special partnerships with the european union for the future and i want to see us moving together because a deal that is good for the uk is a deal that's good for the rest of the eu. the eu's chief negotiator said the preference was for an ambitious trade deal, but only if divorce issues get sorted. i'm settling the accounts accurately, we owe this to taxpayers as well as to all those benefiting from eu funding projects. but there was also a clear message on sticking to the rules and the free movement of goods,
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capital, services and people. those who claim that the uk should cherry pick part of the single market must stop this contradiction. the two sides have been sitting down to negotiations for months with no major breakthroughs. there's increasing pressure from brussels for the uk to come up with solutions, and back here calls on the chancellor to watch how he spends taxpayers' money. he cannot afford play santa claus to jean—claude juncker and donald tusk, a needs to make sure we are paying for what we are absolutely contracted for, and for every pound he unnecessarily gives away to the european union is a pound not being spent on british public services. when theresa may and senior ministers meet later to discuss the size of the brexit bill, they will know agreeing to pay more will quicken the talks but also cause anger amongst some.
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getting agreement within cabinet is crucial and as eu leaders keep pointing out, the clock is ticking. the conservative mpjohn redwood joins us live from westminster. i saw you smile when nigel evans said we should not be playing santa claus. is that a view you share? of course. the prime minister has been very careful in a language throughout, she has always said we will pay those things we have debate. i have not seen any legal base for payments other than our contributions after the date of leaving. in mind the extra nine months today over the court proceedings, it does mean that roughly 30 billion of payments will be made on the date when we decide to leave until the date when we do leave, and it gives you a long transitional period for both sides, which should be sufficient. and yet,
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there is huge pressure to get started on these trade talks, and if the eu are saying, look, not much further to go, you are nearly there, then they can get started, the temptation to come up with the extra cash, you can understand that? no, because i think it has to be well grounded legally. a british minister cannot just give grounded legally. a british minister cannotjust give money to countries they want to, there has to be a legal basis and this is not going to be overseas aid because it is a gi’oup be overseas aid because it is a group of rich countries so they have to be very careful. one of the reasons people voted to leave was that we want to spend the money on oui’ that we want to spend the money on our priorities as soon as we leave the eu, so we don't want to be paying to the eu for years after we have left. i'm sure they are not planning to give us money back under their programmes in the years after we have left. so it doesn't look very symmetrical. i know it is very convex, but there is a list of things that we should be paying for,
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even after we have left. —— very complex. i'm sure you have gone through that another rough idea as to what that would cost. of course i have looked at all these games but i still have not find a single one for we have a legal obligation to make payments after we have left. it comes down to a couple of fundamental points, did we get a payment when wejoined fundamental points, did we get a payment when we joined to take account of the commitments the others had built up before we joined? no, we didn't. will we be getting anything back if they have winnings or extra revenues after we have left? of course we will not. i think the legal position is that yes, you're obligated to pay everything up to the date of leaving. the long transition gives some adjustment time and it almost coincides with the seven—year budget plans anyway. they have plenty of time to sort it out. i still remain to be persuaded that there are other items after march 2019 that we have to legally paid. not 1p? can you
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namea to legally paid. not 1p? can you name a legal base for payment after we have left? what about pensions to eu staff, which will include some britons who will be returning without any income. we didn't get an adjustment for pensions when we joined the eu. there is nothing in the treaties saying that liabilities that extend beyond your exit are down to the leaving member. that is not in the treaty. if it was, we would have had a payment when we joined, surely. so, when the prime minister is with her cabinet this afternoon, what would your advice be? just say you are paying nothing and threatened to pull out? no, i think she is saying that anything that we are legally required to pay, we will play and we look forward to seeing what the legal basis for the bravest things is. the prime minister has been making generous offer throughout and i think she should carry on with that, her tone
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and language are excellent, she wa nts a and language are excellent, she wants a full wide—ranging partnership after we have gone, she is offering free access to our lucrative market without tariffs and new boroughs, a very extensive intelligence and defence partnership where we make a very large contribution, all sorts of other offers and cultural fields and trading fuels, which imply that we are warmly disposed towards the eu once we have left. i think on reflection, if they get to the point where they think there is not any more money on offer, they will want to ta ke more money on offer, they will want to take that up. but everything there is a lot more money, they will dig in and beat up. at one point do you say, that ridiculous? there is not a sum of money. we have been through this. but inevitably, there will be. roughly 30 billion that we pay from the date when we voted to leave to the day that we leave. i think that is a generous transitional payment. i think it should be seen as such. because
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clearly we are on the way out and they are already making adjustments to their programmes. john redwood, thank you forjoining us. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: more protests on the streets of zimbabwe as mps discuss impeaching president mugabe, who has refused to stand down. angela merkel holds crisis talks with germany's president after the collapse of negotiations to form a coalition government. charles manson, the us cult leader who sent his followers to commit a string of brutal murders, has died in prison aged 83. and in sport, tributes have been paid to the former wimbledon tennis champion jana novotna, who paid to the former wimbledon tennis championjana novotna, who has died from cancer at the age of 49. west brom have sacked tillie pulis with the club one point above the relegation zone and without a win 11 games. —— tony pulis. and jake ball and the rest of england men's cricket team relax ahead of the first ashes test.
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jake ball says he is fit. more on all those stories just after half past. the german chancellor angela merkel‘s attempts to form a coalition government have collapsed, raising the prospect of the country facing another general election. mrs merkel met the german president this morning. mr steinmeier said the country was now facing an unprecedented situation. this is the moment when all of the involved political parties should come to a standstill and should reflect ha rd, all come to a standstill and should reflect hard, all parties represented in the chamber of the —— lower chamber of the german parliament are obliged to serve the country, serve the general well—being of the country, and i would expect that the formation of a government will take place in let's cross over to berlin and speak to our correspondent, due course.
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let's cross over to berlin and speak to our correspondent, damien mcguinness. might she have to call a snap election? that's right, the german president said political leaders should not back away from their responsibility and seve hand back the responsibility to voters. —— simply. he is against new elections because many people agree that this would really lead to a great amount of political uncertainty here in germany. it is quite a long and complicated process to trigger fresh elections. so it would take months before they actually took place. after that, there would be another negotiation process between coalition partners because that is generally what always happens. we could end up with a similar situation. that is why most parties do not want fresh elections. the president said he is going to talk to all these four parties, the political leaders involved, and really try to get them to go back to
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the table, because he said he expected a certain amount of willingness to talk, to create a new government, but it will be difficult because the free—market liberals have walked out of the talks saying they are not getting anywhere, the ce ntre—left they are not getting anywhere, the centre—left party, who were in government with mrs merkel in the last month have said they will not entertain the idea of entering government with her, but there is pressure building on those two parties in particular to change their minds, because there is a feeling that if it took months to form another government, if we had that political uncertainty, it would have an impact on the economy. and the rest of europe is also looking at what happens in germany and wants at what happens in germany and wants a government as soon as possible. that is why it depends how the public mood develops over the next few hours and days, and what the debate here in germany is like. because that pressure could lead to
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certain political leaders changing their minds. she has been chancellor for 12 years, this is by far her biggest challenge. where did it go wrong for her? was at when she said our borders are open? it is quite complicated because in a sense, the election result was such that you had to have these four parties entering into coalition, that is what the numbers indicated. these parties have completely diverging views on key policy areas from migration, to climate, to eurozone reform. as far as one of the key stumbling block skills, it was migration, immigration, because two of the parties had opposing ideas about what to do, one wanted to come down, the other wanted more support for refugees and they couldn't come to an agreement. this is in the background of a large influx of refugees and migrants over the past few years in germany so many people
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say that was one of the key issues that has led to a certain weakness in mrs merkel‘s position. the fate of mrs merkel herself is the big question because people say politically it will be hard to survive this but she may emerge from its strength and because right now the public debate is really critical of those other parties who are refusing to talk. mrs merkel is being seen more and more as a sort of anchor of stability, which is often the case when things get uncertain here. so it might be, depending on how the debate develops, that she urges stronger from this rather than weaker. but it depends what happens over the next few days. thank you very much. let's return to the crisis in zimbabwe — and its ruling party has summoned its mps to a meeting to discuss its strategy after president robert mugabe ignored a deadline for his resignation. there are also reports that the military may make a statement in the next few hours. professor of international development at the london school
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of economics, ted brett, joins me from brighton. a betting man would say mugabe, no way. but there will be looking to replace him and the question is, have things got better or worse? well, that is what we don't know. the interesting fact is that they could get better and they could also get worse. of course, what is going to determine that is the way the aftermath of this process gets organised. the situation is that this is not going to mean a transition from zanu—pf that has governed the country, or mist covered it, for the last that veneers, because covered it, for the last that veneers, because it has been organised by zanu—pf and it isn't going to mean a change of governance of that party, and therefore one critical variable is, are the people
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who have moved into position, they have all been dominant figures, going to be willing to do something different from what they have been doing? essentially, they destroyed what was once probably the most successful economy in africa. how important is it, as internationally other countries react to what happens? well, that is critical. there has been very little discussion about external donors, which is a good thing, because in the past, they have been seen as playing a key role and actually blamed for all the crises which happened, even though they did not cause them. right now, the critical problem that confronts any new regime in zimbabwe is that they are bankrupt, literally. to the extent that they are trying to issue paper money because people do not have dollars in the pockets that they can spend on things. so actually, the
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critical role is going to be played in the next months, it will be played by foreign donors who if they do not come in and provide resources , do not come in and provide resources, are going to see zimbabwe disintegrate into the most disastrous economic crisis. so, what we really need to see, as our government along with other donors, and our government will play a leading role because of its long experience in zimbabwe, how they deal with this situation. we know what president mugabe thought of this country, we also know that it was at one point —— at one point an important part of the common wealth, is it institutions like that that could be crucial in the future? is it institutions like that that could be crucial in the future ?|j think the critical point is that with mugabe out of the way, we now have a situation in which the people who come in are no longer blaming us for their crises and using us as a scapegoat, but essentially, are
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going to depend on us, and i don't just mean ass, but the whole of the global donor community, to actually get them out of the hole therein. —— ido get them out of the hole therein. —— i do notjust mean us. i think it will be perfectly possible for britain to come back into zimbabwe, do deals with whatever group has taken over zanu—pf, and do deals with whatever group has taken overzanu—pf, and i do deals with whatever group has taken over zanu—pf, and i think bush foran taken over zanu—pf, and i think bush for an inclusive economic and political settlement. —— push. that is to say to create a situation in which over the next months, possibly longer, we get all groups from the country into an inclusive movement that actually is committed to using the resources that we will have to give them to get things going again. there is an enormous potential there, i watched this process happening at the end of the 1980s in
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uganda, where an inclusive government managed to get the country out of a much more desperate situation. so i think that there is a massive opportunity here, and so fari a massive opportunity here, and so far i think that the donors are playing this very well. the only thing i would say is that they should not place too much reliance on calling for early elections, because early elections are going to simply restart the whole of the political conflict that has always undermined effective economic policy. zanu—pf is going to win the next election because actually, this new group are much more popular now they have got rid of mugabe, so what we wa nt they have got rid of mugabe, so what we want is a period of calm or political compromise, offered donors and the leading citizens in babouli can get together to deliver a broad—based, progressive, economic reconstruction programme. professor, thank you forjoining us. the former wimbledon singles
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championjana novotna has died of cancer at the age of 49. the czech tennis player won the championship in 1998, after losing five years earlier to steffi graf in a memorable match. ms novotna, who also had an outstanding doubles career, has been described by the women's tennis association as an inspiration. our sports correspondent david ornstein looks back at her life. it is one of wimbledon's most enduring images. jana novotna may have lost the final at she got a shoulder to cry on from the duchess of kent and the hearts of the british public. shejust told me, you will do it. i believe one day you will do it. and ijust became very emotional. it was very nice. i appreciated it. novotna finished runner—up again in 1997, but a year later she finally won the trophy.
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news of her death has been met with a mixture of shock and an outpouring of tributes. i can only describe her as a ruthless competitor on the court but utterly sweet and charming off it. she was such a warm person, always very friendly. she would come up and give you kisses and smiles, she was really loved by everyone. she rose to prominence in the early 90s and went on to become one of the most exciting, popular and successful players of regeneration. players of her generation. wimbledon was her only grand slam singles title but she collected 16 in doubles and 100 tournament wins across a glittering career, laying her way into the international tennis hall of fame. she was back on the lawns of wimbledon as recently as 2016, rolling back the years in the invitational mixed doubles. butjana novotna will always be
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remembered for the tears and then the triumph, refusing to let the setbacks keep her down, eventually coming back on top and writing her name into history with a smile. a driver has been caught doing a mph in manchester. —— 136 six miles per hour. and not checking the dibble behind, of course a term of endearment for the police. the driver has been reported for a court summons. let's look at the weather.
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this was taken yesterday, but there we re this was taken yesterday, but there were a few people on my train this morning dressed for weather like this. they would be a bit hot then! maywood, autumn is a chop and change kind of season. yesterday, minus two. this morning if you were wearing scarf and gloves you would have regretted it, 10 degrees in some places but the price you play asa some places but the price you play as a lot of cloud. i have your favourites... lots of pictures of lovely cloudy scenes across the british isles. that's essex for you. some flowers in that one. from powys. whereabouts empowers? 0h no... new dish it out, but you can't ta ke no... new dish it out, but you can't take it! you can read it for yourself. all in all, i think you we would agree... 0h hello, and a selfie as well. lovely. that went
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well. this always does go well, i find. so, yes. milder in our direction as you would have felt. south—westerly wind, in moist wind direction. bringing a lot of cloud. you can see for this cloud out in the atlantic, piling in our direction. outbreaks of rain at times over the next few days. this afternoon into this evening, lots of outbreaks of patchy rain, through the night some heavy rain into northern ireland and northern england and the good part of scotla nd england and the good part of scotland as well. rather cloudy, murky night for many and very mild in the south, 12 in plymouth. across the far north, still cold air holding on across shetland. a chilly start tomorrow for much of scotland. soggy start, cloud and outbreaks of rain, 8 degrees in glasgow. not going to feel too pleasant for the morning commute. northern ireland
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mostly dry, a grey drizzly start across the north of england, then further south you will see some glimmers of brightness through the cloud generally pretty great conditions, in its drizzly foothills in the west. but 11 or 12 degrees. through the day will turn breezy, quite windy across the far north, rain trudging north across scotland. this band of rain swinging in from the west. for central and eastern areas, we could see some sunny spells at times and it should stay just about dry, 11 to 1a degrees for most of us. out of tuesday night into wednesday, this low—pressure tries to slide away, this hot on its heels now. this wriggling weather front will feed in some rain, a pretty soggy day for wales and north—west england. could be enough rain to cause some issues. a windy day in the south, further north that cold air still trying to hold on. end of the week, that cold air will make something of a return. a bit of
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uncertainty at this stage about how far south that cold air will get, but certainly across the northern half of the country we can expect temperatures to dip away. showers could be wintry over high ground, even south we can expect temperatures to drop a bit towards the end of the week, that it will stay mostly cloudy with some outbreaks of rain at times. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. protestors are back on the streets in zimbabwe as robert mugabe ignores a deadline to quit — another military address is expected on state tv. german chancellor angela merkel has met the country's president to discuss next steps — after her attempts to form a coalition government collapsed. senior cabinet figures are meeting this afternoon to discuss the terms of britain's divorce from europe. the meeting is being seen as an attempt to break the deadlock over brexit talks. charles manson — the notorious cult leader who directed his followers to commit a string of brutal murders — has died aged 83.
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in a moment: the queen and the duke of edinburgh celebrate 70 years of marriage. we'll be looking back at their lives together. sport now on afternoon live. what's going on in sport? we've just had confirmation that one of man city ‘s key defenders is injured. obviously manchester city, one of the best defensive records in the premier league. scoring goals forfun at the premier league. scoring goals for fun at the moment. but stones will be out for a while. wonder how much that might affect their momentum and their push to the premier league title. also, the england cricket team as you've never seen them before, well, not quite. the pictures aren't that good but they are lounging by april, relaxing in brisbane ahead of the first ashes test on thursday. perhaps boosted by news that jake ball the pace bowler will be fit. poolside pictures! and
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of course another premiership manager on the move? yet another manager. tony pulis has been sacked by west brom, the fifth manager in the premier league, and we are only 12 matches into the season. he leaves the hawthorns just a point above the relegation zone without a win in ten top—flight games. albion thrashed 4—0 by chelsea in front of home fans on saturday. gary megson has been placed in temporary charge, and we have heard the decision was inevitable. i think this morning 's announcement will have come as no surprise to anybody who has had any connection with west brom or anybody who was at the hawthorns on saturday, a few less has a reputation for being a results man. he is the god to man if you're in trouble. he has 12 points from 21 league games. —— he is the go to
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man. he has the lowest number of shots, lovers possession, all this evidence has stacked up. —— lowest possession. the fans booed him on saturday, the ambitious chinese club owner was making a rare visit to the hawthorns, his first visit since the opening day of the season. that cannot have gone unnoticed. there was really only one outcome after saturday's game. the manchester city defender john stones will be out for up to six weeks.. stones injured a hamstring in city's 2—0 win at leciester on saturday... city of course are in champions league action on tuesday when they take on feyenoord at the ethiad. pep guardiola says he's not worried about his defence...saying he'll find a soluation and it won't be a problem. england have arrived in brisbane ahead of this week's first ashes test the atmosphere at the gabba was slightly more relaxed than what england can expect to face in a few days' time.
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bowlerjake ball says he's fit and 100% ready to play. the nottinghamshire player missed the last warm—up game because of an ankle injury, but insists he's now ready to battle with craig overton for a place on thursday. i think it made the injury a bit more frustrating, the fact i was bowling really well. things were going so well, to have picked up the little niggle was a bit of a setback, but the last few days i was off my full run, i had two sessions in the field, so i'm in a really good position at the minute. i've had enough bowling, so hopefully come the first day i will be ready to get on. australia's cricketers meanwhile have hit back at criticism levelled at them following the annoucement of their test team. shane warne said they were in a state of ‘confusion' after the selection of wicketkeeper tim paine — chosen for his first test in seven years, and 34—year—old shaun marsh. paine though says he's going to prove the critics wrong.. it's been well documented the last
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few years, my batting has not been fantastic. i tend to agree. but i know my best cricket is good enough, i've played test cricket before an done ok so i can take some confidence from that. the last five or six months as well i've been batting as well as i ever have, so lucky the opportunity has come at the right time for me. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. hope you enjoy those poolside pictures! just an update on the royal anniversary. the queen has been making the appointment to the royal victorian order so the duke of edinburgh will be a night of the grand cross royal victorian order, the letters gcb oh, after his title of his royal highness the duke of edinburgh. these are personal awards made by the queen for services to
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the sovereign. meanwhile, the european union will decide this evening where two major eu agencies, currently based in london, will be relocated after brexit. 19 cities are bidding for the european medicines agency, while eight want to host the european banking authority. more than a thousand people work for the two agencies. our business correspondent theo leggett has the details. london's canary wharf is home to some of the world's biggest banks and two prestigious eu agencies — the european banking authority, which monitors the health of the region's biggest banks, and the european medicines agency, which supervises drugs used on both humans and animals. but now we're leaving the eu, both organisations will have to move and today they'll find out where they are going. two dozen cities are scrambling to host them. the european commission says the two agencies employ about 1100 people, many of them are well—paid, but they also attract many business visitors for meetings, conferences and expert panels, who between them book about 40,000 hotel rooms per year. the uk will lose 1100 good jobs
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of regulators who spend money in the capital but there is more to it than that. having a regulator creates a halo effect because lots of american and japanese businesses set up shop in london because they want their staff to be close to the regulator so they can help shape its decisions, get their products under their noses. it is a similar story in the banking sector. the european banking authority may be a relatively small agency but it wields a lot of influence. it tells us a lot about where the europeans want their financial centre to be — will it be dublin, paris or frankfurt? and secondly there is a whole ecosystem that's built up around the banking authority here in london. will that move as well? quite possibly there are more jobs than just that 160 that will move with retail banks moving to follow the regulator. the result has been a kind of beauty parade, with cities across europe setting out their stalls. they have to provide offices,
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it systems, good transport links and hundreds of school places. bucharest is a vivid euopean city... and they have been offering extra perks such as subsidised rent, language lessons and free visits to the zoo. even heads of government have been helping with the hard sell. dublin is an open, cosmopolitan and multicultural city. other eu members may not necessarily be keen on britain's departure but they are happy to pick up benefits where they can. three people arrested in connection with the disappearance of gaia pope have been released from the police investigation without any further action. the 19—year—old's body was found on saturday in a field near swanage, 11 days after she was last seen. dorset police are treating her death as "unexplained," but are waiting for toxicology results. the notorious cult leader charles manson, who directed his
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followers to commit a string of brutal murders, has died aged 83. he'd been in prison in california for more than four decades. in 1969, his followers, known as the manson family, killed seven people. among them was the heavily pregnant hollywood actress sharon tate, the wife of roman polanski. james cook reports from los angeles. charles manson. shocked the world. in august 1969, followers of his cult broke into the home of sharon tate. the pregnant actress, who was married to the director roman polanski, was brutally murdered along with four of herfriends. the next night, the so—called manson family killed again, tying up and murdering a wealthy couple. this was the ramshackle ranch in death valley where manson lived in a commune with his runaway fans. they apparently used lsd and saw the guitar playing ex—convict as a kind of saint. or perhaps a devil. charles manson was charged,
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not with wielding a knife orfiring a gun, but with controlling and directing the killers. i don't accept the court, i don't accept the whole situation. i was in the desert minding my business. this confusion belongs to you. it is your confusion. i don't have any guilt, i know what i've done. no man canjudge me. i can judge me. what have you done, charlie? why had he done it? apparently to spark a race war, it would be called helter skelter, and he would use it to seize power. in 1971, he was sentenced to death on seven counts of murder, later commuted to life in prison. over the years, charles manson applied for parole time and time again, but he died a prisoner, having shattered the peace and love of the 1960s with diabolical violence. james cook, reporting on the death of charles manson.
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in a moment, the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live more protests on the streets of zimbabwe — as mps discuss impeaching president mugabe who has refused to stand down. angela merkel holds crisis talks with germany's president after the collapse of negotiations to form a coalition government. charles manson, the us cult leader who sent his followers to commit a string of brutal murders, has died in prison aged 83. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. centrica, the owner of british gas, confirmed this morning that it will bring to an end the standard variable tariff for new customers — that's the tariff that energy suppliers force on customers when they don't opt for a specific fixed term deal, it's also the tariff the government said it would rein back by putting a cap on it. changes could be afoot for those in the gig economy. a draft bill was published this morning aimed at stopping companies
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signing up workers and calling them self—employed to cut costs the bill suggests employees be called workers by default — and automatically be given basic safety standards and benefits. british airways is introducing a boarding policy that means those buying the cheapest seats will be called last. from 12 december, passengers will be assigned a number between 1—5 printed on boarding passes, with the highest figure reserved for economy fares. ba said the move is about simplifying the boarding process. let's talk about british gas. what they've announced, will bring prices down? that's the intention, at the moment most of british gas's customers on the standard variable terrorists, we are talking about 67% of 11 million customers that british gas hats, still the most of any. ——
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standard variable tariffs. from next year, anyonejoining standard variable tariffs. from next year, anyone joining will standard variable tariffs. from next year, anyonejoining will not be given a standard variable tariff, those joining given a standard variable tariff, thosejoining from given a standard variable tariff, those joining from april. it will make things cheaper, that's the hope. this is the question we put to ian conn, the boss of centrica, the pa rent ian conn, the boss of centrica, the parent company of british gas. yes, we believe so, we believe the better offers, us continuing to drive costs down, the government looking at some of the costs in the bill which recognises a difficult subject, all of this i believe, we believe will give a fairer, better, more competitive deal for customers and yes, better deals ultimately. he says the plan works for you wonder why now, why is it taken this long? regulation, author of regulation basically. cast your mind back to ed
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miliband in 2013, as the labour leader, talking about an energy price cap, something mildly ridiculed at the time that very popular with the general public. it's something the conservative government is now taking steps to put the regulatory framework in place for, that the standard variable tariffs will be capped or phased out, so companies now are moving ahead of that regulation coming into play, and british gas is actually the third major energy supplier to bring in this tariff. markets? are we going straight to markets? or we can talk about regulators in nebraska. let's stick with energy. trying to make things as easy as possible by totally throwing year. perfect. we are going to go to samir hussein, where we are talking about major pipeline deal which may or may not be receiving approval today. talk of spirit. this
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is the keystone pipeline, is supposed to bring oil from canada or the way down through the us into texas. in order to do that you have to go through different us states, and of course you will have to abide by the regulatory bodies in each state. so far every state has now agreed to this except one. it is nebraska. today, nebraska will be voting on whether to allow the keystone pipeline to go through with their state or to deny it. this is a project that is very close to the heart of president donald trump, does that mean it is more likely to get approval or is he really not... has no influence in this decision? it's hard to say how much influence he will have. president trump certainly caught the governor of nebraska to apply some pressure just to say how important it is, but ultimately it's not up to the governor, it's up to the nebraska
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regulators. they will vote on it, but absolutely this is something president trump has wanted because he believes it will bring a lot of jobs to the state and the country. it will make the us much more energy independent. on the other side, you have a lot of people, landowners nebraska and environmentalists, native americans, who are all absolutely against this, saying it would appreciate the value of their land, and of course the environmental concerns. just before the weekend, we saw that a pipeline operator by the same company that will build this one had a spell, we sought 210,000 gallons of oil has spilled. mike demonstrates how potentially dangerous this could be. thank you very much. we will be watching that decision with interest later. now, as we've rehearsed already, time for the markets... seem less.
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very little action on the footsie today. the dax has a little more. despite the news we had earlier. a bit of chaos in germany? a bit, government wise. centrica, no real reaction to the news of the change to the standard variable tariffs. fabulous. thank you. that's all the business news. iam here i am here to make everybody‘s life as difficult as possible! the new chair of uk sport dame katherine grainger, has called for "a lot more" to be done to improve the welfare of athletes. several governing bodies are embroiled in bullying allegations, and dame katherine, an olympic rowing gold medallist, says they must "rise to the challenge" of improving the culture in top level sport. uk sport is issuing new guidance to coaches on how to treat athletes with respect, as richard conway reports. it has been an era of unprecedented success for british sport but with complaints and now enquiries under way within a number
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of the uk's leading sports federations, many are asking if winning has been prioritised over athlete welfare. in response, olympic gold medalist rower dame katherine grainger, who now chairs uk sport, the funding authority for elite athletes, is urging british sports to improve. nobody in the system believes it should be medals at any cost. there is an understanding that the healthiest atmosphere you can have, it will always be tough, but to keep people in the system, you want them succeeding and being pushed hard but also, you need to enjoy it, you need to be passionate about it. british gymnastics is the latest body to be dragged into the welfare crisis after enquiries about duty of care standards at british cycling, british canoeing, gb taekwondo and the british bobsleigh and skeleton association. change cannot come soon enough for those who say they've
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experienced a culture of bullying. for us there was no—one to talk to. you fear that if you speak up, you're going to be kicked off the team. there needs to be something or someone we can speak to, where there'll be no repercussions, who will have the athlete's back. uk sport has now released new guidance to help sports such as britain's hugely successful cycling team. it includes advice to coaches on how to treat athletes with more respect. the hope now is that medal performances and a greater focus on welfare can forge a new winning combination. the queen and the duke of edinburgh are today celebrating their 70th wedding anniversary — the longest in the royal family's history. they are marking the occasion privately with family and friends at windsor castle. the church bells have been ringing out at westminster abbey, where the queen and prince philip were married. our royal correspondent
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nicholas witchell reports. archive newsreader: for any girl, wedding day is the day of her life. as the 21—year—old princess arrived at westminster abbey, it was her moment too. a november day two years after the end of the second world war. at westminster abbey, a wedding of the then princess elizabeth and lieutenant philip mountbatten. and now the solemn service begins. i, elizabeth alexandra mary... take thee, philip... to my wedded husband. band plays the wedding march. it was the start of a marriage which has endured for 70 years and which from the moment elizabeth came to the throne in 1952 has underpinned the success and stability of her reign as queen. those who know them have no doubt
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that the bride and groom who signed the marriage register that day at the abbey were deeply committed to each other. obviously they were very much in love. it's early love, as far as i can understand, so it's a love match, essentially, it's a great love story. deeply loyal sense of duty, which is bolstered and encouraged and uplifted, as it were, by their faith. the early years of the queen's reign were not without difficulty for the duke. he felt he had no clear purpose, but he adapted to the role of consort to the monarch and for decade after decade they toured the world and fulfilled official duties together, a couple so much of whose lives have been public, sustained by the private bond between them which remains strong and deep, as the latest photographs, issued to mark their platinum wedding anniversary, make clear. at westminster abbey bells are being rung to mark the anniversary.
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as for the couple themselves, they are spending the day quietly at westminster, where there will be a quiet family party in their honour tonight. let's get the weather with ben rich. i'm sure you will have noticed a milderfield to the i'm sure you will have noticed a milder field to the weather for the start of the new working week, but with that a lot of cloud and outbreaks of patchy rain. this was how it looked in worcestershire earlier. it will keep cloudy conditions tonight, and outbreaks of patchy rain and heavy bursts of rain developing across northern ireland, england and southern scotland. a very mild night in the south, temperatures dropping no longer than ten, 11, 12. holding on to something cold across the northern isles and generally across scotland in the far north of scotland, a soggy start tomorrow. outbreaks of of rain trudging north slowly. quite windy
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in the south, a mild day, this further band of rain swinging in from the west later on. quite a range of temperatures, 1a plymouth and nine in aberdeen. into wednesday, some heavy rain for central and northern areas, by thursday it will start to turn cold again, particularly in the north. wada today at 3: protestors are back on the streets in zimbabwe as robert mugabe ignores a deadline to quit. there's to be a military address on state tv. until robert mugabe comes to his senses, he is over, we want a new president. theresa may is to meet ministers this afternoon to discuss the bill for the brexit divorce. german chancellor angela merkel under pressure as her failure to form a coalition makes a snap election more likely. coming up in sport, sad news from tennis. tributes being paid to yarn
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of, who has died after a long battle cancer, she was a9, and more in sport coming up later. ——jana novotna. plenty of cloud and rain coming up, any chance of cold air returning, find out with me a little bit later on and also coming up, queen and duke of edinburgh celebrates 70 years of marriage with the release of these new portraits. what next for zimba bwe's robert mugabe? he won't quit, and his party now wants to impeach him. a draft motion, drawn up by the zanu—pf party, describes mr mugabe as a "source of instability" and claims he has shown disrespect for the rule of law. the process could begin tomorrow.
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my colleague ben brown is in harare. the deadline for robert mugabe to resign has come and gone and he has shown no intention of quitting his post, just as he showed no intention of resigning last night when he addressed the nation in a television addressed the nation in a television address and there was huge expectation that he was on the verge of resigning, when you did not, there was shock and disbelief and real anger. zanu—pf have already deposed him as their leader and is now launching impeachment proceedings against him to get rid of him. to do that, parliament would need both chambers to pass a vote of impeachment by two thirds majority. how long will that take? could take days, one mp i spoke with said it could take weeks or even months and in the meantime, a call for another
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big demonstration against mr mugabe here tomorrow in the capital, harare. this report. the next stage of the battle is set, robert mugabe is on one side, his party on the other. i will preside over these processes... last night he did not step down as expected, party leaders had given him until today to do so. the midday deadline today to do so. the midday deadline to rid resign has come and gone, the zanu-pf to rid resign has come and gone, the zanu—pf party is now planning to put the final deals in motion, summoning all its lawmakers to the headquarters behind me, to discuss a possible impeachment. the process will then move to parliament, with the constitution —— where the constitution says a two thirds majority will be needed to remove the long—time leader. lawmakers can cite misconduct, violating the constitution, mental or physical incapacity as grounds for dismissal.
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it is not clear how long the process will take and this president does not appear to be in the mood to play ball. depends upon how fast parliament moves, it could take a few days, could take a few months. but the beauty is, it is a process provided for in the constitution, section 90 seven. i think it is now the only hope for the country, that the only hope for the country, that the president is removed in terms of that section of the constitution. unprecedented waves of protests around the country have failed to persuade the only leader this country has known to go. and they continue to spread, students at the main university are now boycotting their exams. we are not going to write an exam until this is decided. we are sick and tired of this. we wa nt we are sick and tired of this. we want him to resign! we want change,
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the constitution should change, the parliament should change. war vetera ns say parliament should change. war veterans say they will escalate their protests this week. robert mugabe, go now, robert mugabe, go now, go now, yourtime is up! please, leave the state house, let the country move onto the next page. it has been a long week of events never witnessed here before, and the desire to give at least the appearance of removing him by the book is slowing down the process, finding a quick resolution to this impasse may prove very hard to find. if zimbabwe is to get rid of its president, robert mugabe, looks like it will have to be through impeachment, that is what millions of people here appear to want and what his own party wants, zanu—pf, a
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proposing the motion of impeachment in parliament. we can speak with a constitutional expert, joining me in harare, from the institute of security studies. talk to us about how easy or difficult it is to impeach a president in zimbabwe. that depends on the numbers that zanu-pf will be that depends on the numbers that zanu—pf will be able to muster in the parliament, both houses must come together, 350 mp5, and two thirds of that would be 233 members... so zanu—pf needs to try to raise those 230 two... 233 members to get the motion through. how long could it take, is this going to be long and drawn out? could it be fast tracked? this is really terranova, we have not had an impeachment process before, there is no rules established for it, could be done in a matter of days and i understand the chief whip is running around trying to rally his mps. so
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it could be done in a matter of days... if they cannot get ducks in a row, it could take much longer. let's talk about the constitutional impact of this military takeover, because it seems pretty clear that the army commanders here have been stressing that this is not a coup, a coup d'etat, in the old—fashioned sense of the world, but to everyone else in the outside world, it looks like that but they have been trying very ha rd like that but they have been trying very hard not to force him out at the barrel of a gun, as it were. no ta ke over of the barrel of a gun, as it were. no takeover of government, as it were, no reason why cabinet could not meet, as you have said, military is at pains to say that robert mugabe has not been overthrown. they have gone out of their way to have him present at public events, we saw him on the television last night, we saw him ata on the television last night, we saw him at a graduation ceremony. this is all part of the sharad that robert mugabe has not been overthrown. this process is going to u nfold overthrown. this process is going to unfold constitutionally. such a
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weird situation, he is still head of state and yet technically he is supposed to be under house arrest... ! this is why bringing him into public gives the impression that he is not under house arrest, if he was under house arrest, when he appeared in public you would have thought he would say, help, help i am being held against my will! has not done that, because it is to his advantage to go along with the sharad that he has not been overthrown, and he is managing to play for time. when you saw the television address last night, were used to pride, a lot of people inspecting him to resign, we re people inspecting him to resign, were you surprised? —— expecting. people inspecting him to resign, were you surprised? —— expectingm was astounding, not very long ago he said that he will roll for so long as the party wants him there, when the party no longer wants him there, he will step down. the party very clearly indicated they did not want
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him there, we thought this was the moment he could say, ok, the party has got rid of me, it is time to go. he is still there! thank you very much adjoining is. from the institute of security studies. as he that robert mugabe is still there, despite all the pressure there has been on him from generals and military in negotiations with him since the takeover, and pressure from his own party, as we have heard, stripping him of the party leadership, and pressure from the people, we saw a huge demonstration over the weekend, tens of thousands of people marching through the streets demanding that he goes. he has not gone yet and we are hearing there will be another big demonstration. according to one organiser, even bigger than the weekend demonstration, again, trying to get him to resign. so far he has been deaf to all those protests, he does not seem to listen to people power. updating you on the situation
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regarding gaia pope according to police there is no indication that anyone else was involved in her death. 11 days after she was last seen, her remains were found in a field near swanage. a statement: my beautiful gaia, a true gaia spirit, burns far too bright for this gaia pope our free burns far too bright for this gaia pope ourfree spirit, burns far too bright for this gaia pope our free spirit, our wild burns far too bright for this gaia pope ourfree spirit, our wild pony. a light that will radiate for all eternity, meet me at the gate and so we are here, longing for you, for the rest of our lives. together for ever, united as one. signed, your mother, always, natasha. a statement from the mother of gaia pope whose body was found over the weekend in swanage. the eu's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier has warned britain
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that it can't "cherry pick" parts of the single market it wants to keep. but he said that brussels was ready to offer the uk the "most ambitious" free trade deal if its terms are met. theresa may is chairing a meeting of senior cabinet ministers to discuss how to end deadlock over the so—called divorce bill — how much money the uk needs to pay to start trade talks. our political correspondent eleanor garnier reports from westminster. busy ahead of the budget on wednesday, highlighting the government plans for investing in technology and engineering. the prime minister and the charles leno that brexit is the backdrop to everything. and it is the money, the so—called brexit bill, that is the main sticking point in the negotiations. we've been very clear that we will honour our commitments but i want to see is developing that deep and special partnership with the european union for the future and i want to see us moving together because a deal that's good for the uk is a deal that's good for the rest of the eu. in brussels the eu's chief negotiator said the preference
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was for an ambitious trade deal, but only if brexit divorce issues get sorted. on settling the accounts accurately, we owe this to taxpayers as well as to all those benefiting from eu funding projects. but there was also a clear message on sticking to the rules and the free movement of goods, capital, services and people. those who claim that the uk should cherry—pick parts of the single market must stop this contradiction. the two sides have been sitting down to negotiations for months with no major breakthroughs. there's increasing pressure from brussels for the uk to come up with solutions, and back here, calls on the chancellor to watch how he spends taxpayers' money. he cannot afford play santa claus to juncker and tusk. he needs to make sure we are only paying for what we are absolutely contracted for, and every pound he unnecessarily gives away to the european union is a pound not being spent on british public services. when theresa may and senior
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ministers meet later to discuss the size of the brexit bill, they will know agreeing to pay more will quicken the talks but also cause anger amongst some. getting agreement within cabinet is crucial, and as eu leaders keep pointing out, the clock is ticking. let's speak to our chief political correspondent vicki young who's in westminster. are not going to use the word blackmail but we're getting to the point where if the eu says it is a question of coming through with some money, and that is the debate that the prime minister is having, it looks as though someone is holding a gun to her head...? looks as though someone is holding a gun to her head. . . ? the question is,
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whether she and the rest of the cabinet are willing to make some kind of contribution, beyond the 18 million that has already been agreed. —— 18 billion. that takes us to the end of the current period. what many mps are already saying is that united kingdom pays £10 billion in net terms, of course this sounds like an eye watering amount of money, if you were to double that to £a0 billion, what if you consider what is already being paid, then thatis what is already being paid, then that is how it will be sold to people, i think, that is how it will be sold to people, ithink, the that is how it will be sold to people, i think, the question is, what we get in return. yes, the eu says, we need some more of your money, more of your money to cover the commitments you already made, pension liabilities for instance, they say that legally, we will owe this money, that is very much disputed by some in government, by a house of lords mitty was questioning that. the other thing which is still
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unknown is whether we will agree with whether the calculation is made. —— house of lords committee. do not expect them to be signing a big cheque, we do not expect anything about money, it will be a move forward, to talk about the future relationship, it is all about a future negotiation and relationship, what the ties will be, what access we will have two the european union market, all of that will dictate how this ends up. this ina will dictate how this ends up. this in a "brexit" cabinet that the prime minister is meeting, who is on it, are those the ones that make these decisions? normally, a cabinet subcommittee would not have the cameras outside the doors of number ten, normally you would not know it is going on, but laura kunz burke found out that it was happening, wonderful colleague found out, that is why we are here today, this is pretty evenly balanced between those on the leave side of the organ,
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cameras have run to the end of the street, from the be looking for the foreign secretary, boris johnson. street, from the be looking for the foreign secretary, borisjohnson. —— laura kuenssberg. michael gove has gone in, the chancellor has gone in, amber rudd, pretty evenly balanced between those seem to be on the remains side and those on the leave side and they will have to make a decision about whether they are willing imprints appal to offer more money to the european union, we do not know if we will hear about that today, but it seems pretty likely that that'll be the case and although there is some mps we heard from him may be unhappy about this, there is many others who think this is what it is going to take two move forward , is what it is going to take two move forward, still a question about what we get in return, if anything, and that will decide whether a deal is done. shall we see who is coming up? pretty deserted, actually. in which case, my next question! it does appear that there is quite a carrot being dangled, we had michel barnier
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saying there is a great trade deal to be done. that is what many people here feel as well, do not forget, both sides will be talking pretty tough, it is a negotiation, at the beginning of the process, theresa may said, —— did not say 18 billion now, and 20 billion for the divorce settlement, that is not how negotiations work. both sides know there is a deal to be done and both sides want a deal. the question is can they reach it without it falling into recrimination and the whole thing falling apart? money is not the only issue, it does appear to be the only issue, it does appear to be the biggest stumbling block at the moment but there is also the issue of the border between northern ireland, and ireland, there is no desire for a hard border to be returned, that is a thorny issue with lots of implications way beyond theissue with lots of implications way beyond the issue of being in the european
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union. they must sort that out as well. for theresa may, union. they must sort that out as well. fortheresa may, of union. they must sort that out as well. for theresa may, of course, at the moment to be able to in the eu summit in december say another progress has been made and we can move forward, she really needs that boost. i now have a little screen in my desk that is always knew, if anything happens, give us a wave and we will come straight back to you! there you go, there is a threat(!) laughter you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines more protests on the streets of zimbabwe as mps discuss impeaching president mugabe who has refused to stand down. theresa may is due to meet ministers to discuss the bill for the brexit ‘divorce'. german chancellor angela merkel under pressure as her failure to form a coalition makes fresh elections more likely. in sport, tributes are being paid to the former wimbledon tennis champion jana novotna, who has died from cancer at the age of a9. west brom sack tony pulis, with the club one point above the premier league relegation zone and without a win in
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11 games. keeping their cool, pace bowlerjake ball 11 games. keeping their cool, pace bowler jake ball and the 11 games. keeping their cool, pace bowlerjake ball and the rest of england's men's cricket team relax ahead of the ashes test in brisbane, he says that he is fit. i will be back with more on all of those stories just after half past. the german chancellor angela merkel‘s has been holding crisis talks with germany's president after the collapse of negotiations to form a coalition government. mrs merkel‘s centre—right christian democrats and the greens blamed the liberal free democrats for pulling out of coalition talks. the president, frank—walter steinmeier said the country was now facing an unprecedented situation. this is the moment when all of the involved political parties should come to a standstill and should reflect hard, all of the parties represented in the lower chamber of the parliament are obliged to serve
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the parliament are obliged to serve the country, to serve the general well— being of the the country, to serve the general well—being of the country, and i would expect that the formation of a government would take place in due course. matthew karnitschnig is chief europe correspondent at politico and joins me now from brussels. it is clear that the president once a resolution but there is there anything she can hold onto? the real problem is that the mathematics does not add up, the smaller parties, the greens and the fdp no longer available in the constellation that angela merkel wa nted constellation that angela merkel wanted and the social democrats, the other mainstream party in germany, say they do not want to re—enter a grand coalition which is what you have had in germany for the past four years. angela merkel‘s only real option is to try a minority government, which has never been attempted in germany
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before, or, call new elections, asked the president to call new elections which he does not want to do straightaway. we are at a stalemate and we will have to see how this plays out. we probably will not have a government in germany until the spring of next year from the looks of it. weeks of uncertainty, possibly months, nothing that the germans hate more than uncertainty. it is a country which is famous for its desire to have continuity and stability. which is why a lot of people were hoping the social democrats would come in and say, we are happy to sit down with merkel and form a coalition but over the past several years they feel that they have been diminished by angela merkel‘s conservative party, that the conservatives got all the credit for the achievements of the government and the social democrats were blamed for all the problems and they say there will not make that mistake again. in terms
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of... there are issues, this side of the water we are thinking about brexit, all this uncertainty, how will it affect the european union when it is facing so many difficulties at the moment? big problem for the european union and could become a problem in the brexit negotiations because angela merkel is diminished by this, her ability to ta ke is diminished by this, her ability to take bold steps with emmanuel macron, for example, in france, towards restructuring the eurozone in some way are going to be very limited and her ability to reach out across the channel to london to do something on brexit that she might not be able to do otherwise given that she does not have this strong mandate to lead a government. also going to be almost impossible. i think she is going to have to think ha rd think she is going to have to think hard about whether she wants to push for new elections, because she may also end up having a somewhat worse
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result this time around than she did last time and she was already, you know, she had already been falling in the polls. it is a risky situation for angela merkel and at the end of it she could find herself out of power altogether. at one point she seemed unassailable, where will historyjudge that things went wrong, was it the moment she opened up wrong, was it the moment she opened up the borders? no avoiding that interpretation at this point, the refugee crisis is something that has really been the persistent issue in germany, it disappeared a little bit before the election and then in the heat of the campaign it re—emerged. angela merkel has struggled to justify her actions to germans, although many support her in the general population, people in her own conservative base have held it against her, these are the votes she has lost two parties like the far right, alternative for germany, alternative for deutschland, finishing third in the elections. there is a realfear within
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finishing third in the elections. there is a real fear within the conservative party that if there is another election, the afd could do even better and some people are thinking that this is one of the reasons that the liberals decided to pull the plug last night because they sense weakness and see an opening to attract conservative voters who are disgruntled with angela merkel to their own party. thank you so much for your time full of the prime ministers voting amy sting in downing street of the " b rex it" amy sting in downing street of the "brexit" committee. —— the prime minister is hosting a meeting in downing street. they had to make some progress in the stalled talks. we can talk to stephen hammond, former government minister, he backed the remain campaign during the eu referendum. what you hope will company stores?” the eu referendum. what you hope will company stores? i hope that the cabinet subcommittee will decide on the way forward, unblock everything
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so that regress and discussions can start. and more wider discussions about the ongoing relationship and security can also start. that is key to getting a deal, key to getting that done in good time. there is a money issue, what is the acceptable amount do you think that the government should offer or sega is available to make these talks go somewhere? two components, as the prime minister has said, we will need to fulfil our legal obligations whatever they are, some people have been speculating that is around 15 to £18 billion. we need to fulfil legal obligations, thereafter, if you have left any club or wantjoin parts of it again afterwards, you have to pay something for it, we will have to look at what we are prepared to put forward to trade with the club or some of the concessions we now get on trade and i would think there are some prices we would be prepared to pay to
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ensure we get a deal that allows the smooth trade of services, for instance, and goods, in the future, which would be beneficial to the uk economy. sounds like blackmail, and blackmail that is working. not to me, sounds like the normal rules, if we leave a club and want to go back in because we want the food, then we pay for the food, simple thing, has been said by the prime minister and the chancellor takes chequered, we need to consider whether there is a price we are prepared to pay. i did not say we should pay any nor that we should but we need to consider our best interest. we are not going back into the club to eat the food provided by the club, we want a deal wherein we dealfairly provided by the club, we want a deal wherein we deal fairly with the club, do not necessarily need to spend a penny to do that. the club can say you do not want us back in any parts of the club. —— you back. there will be benefits to uk industry, we must assess the value of that and what we are perfect to
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pay for them. no one on any side is saying, open cheque, people are saying, open cheque, people are saying, what is to the benefit of the uk and what should we prepare to spend to get that. looking at what is happening in germany, angela merkel‘s position looking dubious, is that a help or a hindrance to negotiations? unfortunately a hindrance, for all sorts of reasons but the principal reason, it will mean probably that negotiations take longer to complete, which again makes the point about putting a fixed date on the bill more and more dubious in terms of flexibility of those negotiations. what is the atmosphere like in that building at the moment, is there a lot of seething and tension, is there now a feeling that theresa may should come out with a figure and we should move on. a lot of people are waiting to see what the prime minister says, clearly a very important moment. a lot of people like me are looking at what is the figure, what it covers,
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but if you are asking how colleagues are, we are all members of the conservative party family, there is a lot more that unites us than divides us. come on, though, does not take too many of that family to be squabbling, and actually, the whole family begins to look rather vulnerable. families often have fights and disputes, but in terms of last week, almost all of my collea g u es last week, almost all of my colleagues have said, we are all pa rt colleagues have said, we are all part of the same family, we have differences of views on this but we must stay together to stop the bigger evil, a labour government. thank you very much for joining us. a quick line of news from zimbabwe, after robert mugabe fails to resign last night and ignored a request to resign by midday today. and impeachment proceedings now looked likely. he has called for a weekly meeting of his cabinet at state house. that is the announcement coming out from his
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chief secretary, reuters news agency reporting that. there may be a clearer idea of what his intentions are after the meeting and we will keep you updated. the former wimbledon singles champion, jana novotna, has died of cancer at the age of a9. the czech tennis player won the championship in 1998, after losing five years earlier to steffi graf in a memorable match. ms novotna, who also had an outstanding doubles career, has been described by the womens tennis association as "an inspiration." our sports correspondent david ornstein looks back at her life. it is one of wimbledon's most enduring images. jana novotna may have lost the final but she won shoulder to cry on from the duchess of kent and the hearts of the british public. shejust told me, you will do it. i believe one day you will do it. and ijust became very emotional. it was very nice. i appreciated it.
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novotna finished runner—up again in 1997, but a year later she finally won the trophy. news of her death has been met with a mixture of shock and an outpouring of tributes. i can only describe her as a ruthless competitor on the court but utterly sweet and charming off it. she was such a warm person, always very friendly. she would come up and give you kisses and smiles, she was really loved by everyone. she rose to prominence in the early 90s and went on to become one of the most exciting, popular and successful players of her generation. wimbledon was her only grand slam singles title but she collected 16 in doubles and 100 tournament wins across a glittering career, playing her way into the international tennis hall of fame. she was back on the lawns
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of wimbledon as recently as 2016. rolling back the years in the invitational mixed doubles. butjana novotna will always be remembered for the tears and then the triumph, refusing to let the setbacks keep her down, eventually coming out on top and writing her name into history with a smile. jana novotna who has died at the age of a9. someone was in a rush to get home last night! a driver has been caught doing 136mph on the m60. how do we know? well, the police were behind him and filmed the car. they tweeted 136mph and not checking its the dibl behind. dibl means police. anybody that's watched top kat knows that!
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the driver has been reported for a court summons. now the weather. here is ben rich. iam sure i am sure you will have noticed a milder start to the working week. during this evening and tonight we will keep generally cloudy conditions and outbreaks of patchy rain and heavier bursts of rain developing across northern ireland and northern england and southern scotland. a very mild night in the south. temperatures dropping no lower than ten, 11 or 12 celsius. still holding on to something colder across the northern aisles and across the northern aisles and across scotland and the far north of england, tomorrow it will get off to a foggy start indeed. further south, a foggy start indeed. further south, a windy day. a mild day. this further band of rain swinging in from the west later on in the afternoon. quite a range in temperatures, 1a celsius in plymouth and nine celsius in aberdeen. into wednesday, some heavy rain for some
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central and northern areas. by thursday, it will start to turn colder again particularly in the north. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: protestors are back on the streets in zimbabwe as robert mugabe ignores a deadline to quit — another military address is expected on state tv. theresa may meets ministers this afternoon to discuss how to break the deadlock over the divorce bill for brexit. the german chancellor angela merkel has met the country's president to discuss next steps after her attempts to form a coalition government collapsed. the president says parties need to keep working on a deal and that he does not favour new elections. charles manson, the notorious cult leader who directed his followers to commit a string of brutal murders, has died aged 83. in a moment, the queen and the duke
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of edinburgh celebrate 70 years of marriage. we'll be looking back at their lives together. sport now with jessica. could sport now withjessica. could there bea sport now withjessica. could there be a chink in the man city chain? man city high flying, bun of their key defenders, john stones is injured. the manchester city defender john stones will be out for up to six weeks. the england men's cricket team have arrived in brisbane ahead of the first ashes test. they are looking relaxed lounging by the pool, perhaps boosted by the news simon that the pace bowlerjake ball will be fit after overcoming an injury. of course, another premier manager off. he is indeed. this is tony pulis. he has been sacked by west brom. this is the fifth premier league manager of the season. we are
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only 12 games into it, but tony pulis leaves the hawthorns with the clu b pulis leaves the hawthorns with the club a point above the relegation zone and without a win in ten top flight zone and without a win in ten top flight games. albion were tharbd on saturday. man city manager has offered his sympathy to tony pulis and offered a big hug to the sacked manager. we have to accept that and we know that and everybody knows when we don't have results, managers in the premier league, a month later, they will be sacked. so, i have to accept that and we're in that situation. the man city defenderjohn stones will be out for up to six weeks. stones injured a hamstring in city's 2—0 win at leciester on saturday. city, of course, are in champions league action on tuesday when they take on feyenoord at the ethiad. pep guardiola says he's not worried about his defence, chris coleman has spoken
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to the media for the first time since becoming manager at sunderland, and says he's aware of the challenges facing the club. sunderland are bottom of the championship, and haven't won a home game in 20 matches. i got the opportunity to manage a big football club, seriously big foot ball clu b big football club, seriously big football club and i wasn't going to turn that down. i know all the challenges here. i know that. i'm under no illusions, but i'm super excited. i can't tell you how excited. i can't tell you how excited i am. it's a big task. huge challenge. and i certainly won't be in my comfort zone up here, but i will say nothing good ever comes from a comfort zone. i'm looking forward to it. england have arrived in brisbane ahead of this week's first ashes test. ahead of this week's first
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the atmosphere at the gabba was slightly more relaxed than what england can expect to face in a few days' time. bowlerjake ball says he's fit and 100% ready to play. the nottinghamshire player missed the last warm—up game because of an ankle injury, but insists he's now ready to battle with craig overton for a place on thursday. i think it's made the injury frustrating in the fact that i was bowling really well and things were going so well and to have picked up the niggle was a setback, but the last few days when i was off my full run and! last few days when i was off my full run and i had two sessions in the field. iam run and i had two sessions in the field. i am in a run and i had two sessions in the field. iam in a really run and i had two sessions in the field. i am in a really good position at the minute. i feel like i have had enough bowling so hopefully come the first day then i'm ready to go. australia's cricketers meanwhile have hit back at criticism levelled at them following the announcement of their test team. shane warne said they were in a state of "confusion" after the selection of wicketkeeper tim paine chosen for his first test in seven years, and 3a—year—old shaun marsh. paine though says he's going to prove the critics wrong. it's been well documented the last
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few years my batting hasn't been fantastic and again i tend to agree, but i know my best cricket is good enough. i've played test cricket before and done ok so i can take some confidence out of that and the last five or six months as well i have been batting batting as well as i ever have. i'm lucky the opportunity has come at the right time for me. three days until the first test. i can't wait. john watson up next. he will have more for you in the next hour. let's return to the crisis in zimbabwe — where the ruling party has been discussing their next move after president robert mugabe ignored a deadline for his resignation. a draft impeachment motion, drawn up by zanu—pf, describes mr mugabe as a "source of instability" and claims he has shown disrespect for the rule of law. ted brett told me that things in zimbabwe could now go one of two—ways. the interesting fact is they could
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get better and they could also get worse and what's going to determine thatis worse and what's going to determine that is the way the aftermath of this process gets organised. now, the situation is that this isn't going to mean a transition from zanu—pf that's govern the country or misgoverned it for the last 37 yea rs, misgoverned it for the last 37 years, because it has been organised by zanu—pf and it's actually simply going to mean a change of governance of that party and therefore, one critical variable is are these the people who have moved into position, they have all been dominant figures, going to be willing to do something different from what they have been doing for the last 20 years when essentially they destroyed what was once probably the most successful economy in africa. how important is it? how internationally other countries reacts to what happens?
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well, that's critical. there has been very little discussion about foreign donors, external donors which is actually a good thing because in the past they have been seen as playing a key role and actually blamed for the crisises which happened or even though they didn't cause them. right now, the critical problem that confronts any new regime in zimbabwe is that they are bankrupt. literally bankrupt to the extent that they are trying to issue paper money because people don't have dollars in their pockets that they can actually spend on things. so, actually, the critical role that's going to be played in the next months is going to be played by foreign donors who, if they don't come in, and provide resources a re they don't come in, and provide resources are going to see zimbabwe disintegrate into the most disastrous economic crisis. so what we really need to see is our government, along with the other donors, and our government will play
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a leading role because of its long experience in zimbabwe. how they deal with this situation. the new chair of uk sport dame katherine grainger, has called for "a lot more" to be done to improve the welfare of athletes. several governing bodies are embroiled in bullying allegations, and dame katherine, an olympic rowing gold medallist, says they must "rise to the challenge" of improving the culture in top level sport. uk sport is issuing new guidance to coaches on how to treat athletes with respect, as richard conway reports. it has been an era of unprecedented success for british sport but with complaints and inquiries under way within a number the uk's leading sports federations, many are asking if winning has been prioritised over athlete welfare. in response, dame katherine grainger, who chairs uk sport, the funding authority for elite athletes, is urging them to improve. nobody believes it should
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be medals at any cost. there is an understanding that the healthiest atmosphere you can have, to keep athletes in the system, you want them succeeding and being pushed hard but also, you need to enjoy it, you need to be passionate about it. british gymnastics is the latest body to be dragged into the crisis after care standards were questions at other organisations. change can't come soon enough for those who say they've experienced a culture of bullying. for us there was no one to talk to. you fear that if you do speak up you're going to be kicked off the team. there needs to be something or someone that we can speak to, with no repercussions,
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who will have the athletes back. uk sport has now released new guidance to help sports such as britain's hugely successful cycling team. it includes advice to coaches on how to treat athletes with more respect. the hope is that a greater focus on welfare can forge a new winning combination. charles manson has died aged 83. he had been in prison in california for more than four decades. in 1969 his followers known as the manson family killed seven people. among them the hollywood actress, sharon tate. james cook reports from los angeles. charles manson. the name itself is synonymous with evil. a killer who did no killing but whose crimes shocked the world. in august 1969, followers
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of his cult broke into the home of sharon tate. the pregnant actress, who was married to the director roman polanski, was brutally murdered along with four of herfriends. the next night, the so—called manson family killed again, tying up and murdering a wealthy couple. this was the ramshackle ranch in death valley where manson lived in a commune with his runaway fans. they apparently used lsd and saw the guitar playing ex—convict as a kind of saint. or perhaps a devil. charles manson was charged, not with wielding a knife orfiring a gun, but with controlling and directing the killers. i don't accept the court. i don't accept the whole situation. i was in the desert minding my business. this confusion belongs to you. it is your confusion. i don't have any guilt, i know what i've done. no man canjudge me. i can judge me. what have you done, charlie? why had he done it? apparently to spark a race war, it would be called helter skelter, and he would use it to seize power.
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in 1971, he was sentenced to death on seven counts of murder, later commuted to life in prison. over the years, charles manson applied for parole time and time again, but he died a prisoner, having shattered the peace and love of the 1960s with diabolical violence. james cook reporting on the death of charles manson. in a moment the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. more protests on the streets of zimbabwe — as mps discuss impeaching president mugabe who has refused to stand down. theresa may is due to meet ministers to discuss the bill for the brexit divorce. german chancellor angela merkel under pressure as her failure to form a coalition makes fresh elections more likely. here's your business headlines on afternoon live.
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centrica, the owner of british gas, confirmed this morning that it will bring to an end the standard variable tariff for new customers — that's the tariff that energy suppliers force on customers when they don't opt for a specific fixed term deal. it's also the tariff the government said it would rein back by putting a cap on it. changes could be afoot for those in the gig economy. a draft bill was published this morning aimed at stopping companies signing up workers and calling them self—employed to cut costs. the bill suggests employees be called workers by default — and automatically be given basic safety standards and benefits. british airways is introducing a boarding policy that means those buying the cheapest seats will be called last. from 12th december, passengers will be assigned a number between 1—5 printed on boarding passes, with the highest figure reserved for economy fares. ba said the move is about simplifying the boarding process. british gas taking this action which
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it says will lower average bills. british gas taking this action which it says will lower average billsm says what it is doing, anybody new who signs up to british gas from april next year will not be put on to their standard variable tariff, instead they will be given other ta riffs instead they will be given other tariffs and meantime its existing customers will be edge couraging to shop around for cheaper deals because most of us don't do that. i don't know about you, but i don't!|j don't know about you, but i don't!|j do actually. anyway, will it make things cheaper? that's the question. well, we did ask the chief executive of centrica this question and this was his reply. we, we believe so. we believe the better offers, us continuing to drive our costs down, the government looking at some of the government looking at some of the costs in the bill which i
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recognise is a difficult subject, all of this, i believe, and we believe, will give a fairer, better, more competitive deal for customers and yes, better deals ultimately. he says he thinks it will work. now in brexit related news, 1,000 people working in london, probably having to move or looking for other work because the eu agencies they work for are told you're getting out of london? the european banking authority and the european medicines agency and 27 member states, the ones that don't include us, of course, will be making it the decision as to where the agencies will be housed later today. 19 countries have been interested in the european medicines agency. rather fewer in the european banking agency, that's eight. read into what whatever you will. joining me now is michael hewson, chief market analyst from cmc markets. why is the banking agency apparently
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less popular than the medicines agency? i think largely because it's the smaller of the two. and ultimately i think when you actually look at financial expertise, there is only really three european capitals comparable to london. so you are really talking about frankfurt, or paris or dublin. frankfurt, or paris or dublin. frankfurt is in the lead for the banking agency. the medicines agency as you have said, much more popular and has cities like milan, and amsterdam in the box seat with respect to that simply because it has about 900 people working for it and throughout the year hosts a numberof and throughout the year hosts a number of meetings, scientific meetings, which in turn i think is much more, i think, meetings, which in turn i think is much more, ithink, reflective meetings, which in turn i think is much more, i think, reflective of the importance of the industry itself. are these bodies lucrative to have based in your city? well, i think if you're the pharmaceutical sector,
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very much so. in the case of the medicines agency, i did a little bit of research before hand medicines agency, i did a little bit of research beforehand and in the past 12 months they have had 36,000 people visit the agency in a raft of different scientific meetings. you have got to cater for these people and you have got to get these people to and from the locations. so, i think in terms of the pharmaceutical industry and the fact that ultimately i think your multinationals from the us and japan will probably want close proximity to that agency given its overlooking regulation in europe, i think there could be a significant economic boost to the host city for that particular agency. thank you, michael. we will be watching that decision with interest. . watching that decision with interest.. : the european medicines agency, milan and copenhagen are through to the next round. they have not really changed since we last talked about them. talk me through
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them. what's happening? germany, not very much reaction to the fact that the coalition talks have broken down. which is interesting. there is a country that depends on certainty and hates uncertainty and yet they seem happy with it. perhaps they weren't surprised. that would be my random guess. up 0.5% for the dax. centrica down 1% at the end. that was a dramatic move considering it was a dramatic move considering it was barely changed all day. so maybe we will be saving some money! rebecca, thank you very much. women are being advised to sleep on their side in the last three months of pregnancy to avoid having a stillborn baby. a study ofjust over a thousand women found the risk doubled if women slept on their backs, but researchers say women should not worry if they are on their back when they wake up. the study authors estimate that about 130 babies' lives could be saved each year if this advice was followed. ali fortescue reports.
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i knew something was wrong. i woke up in the morning and ijust knew something was wrong. and we went to the hospital and when they couldn't find the heartbeat, they nipped off to go and find a doctor, i knew that there was something not quite right. so lots of cards. these are his footprints. grace lost baby louis at 35 weeks. she still doesn't know what caused her stillbirth. he was so tiny. he was just perfectly formed. he had a beautiful upper lip. and i think you always think about the what—ifs, what if i did this differently, why has this happened, what have i done wrong? a lot of guilt. just sadness beyond anything that i have ever experienced. grace says she was never given any advice on sleep positions when she was pregnant.
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she's one of around 1,000 women to have taken part in the midlands and north of england stillbirth study, which is the largest of its kind. it found that one in 225 pregnancies in the uk ended in stillbirth. that's around 11 babies a day. it also found that the risk of stillbirth drops by nearly a% if women sleep on their side in the third trimester, which could save around 130 lives a year in the uk. # there were two in the bed, then the little one said, "roll over". the study comes alongside a charity campaign. the advice is simple, sleeping on your side could halve the risk of a stillbirth. you might end up in all sorts of positions when asleep, but the important thing to remember is to start on your side. it's hard to know for sure, but it's thought when you lie on your back you could be putting weight on important blood vessels and restricting the flow of oxygen to a baby. research has shown that the number of stillbirths in the uk has gone down, but the figures here are still high and above those
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in many other high—income countries. we want to be one of the best countries in the world and one of the safest places to have a baby. so there's lots of work to do. and, actually, this study will contribute to that, because it has given us some simple advice to give to women to cut the risk of having a stillbirth. grace has now started a new chapter. nine months ago, reuben joined the family. hearing that baby cry in the delivery room was just amazing. she'll never know what would have happened if she'd had this advice, but grace hopes her story and her part in the study can save lives. the queen and the duke of edinburgh are celebrating their 70th wedding anniversary — the longest in the royal family's history. they are marking the occasion privately with family and friends at windsor castle and the queen has awarded her husband a new honour, appointing him a knight grand cross of the royal victorian order. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. archive newsreader: for any girl,
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wedding day is the day of her life. as the 21—year—old princess arrived at westminster abbey, it was her moment too. a november day two years after the end of the second world war. at westminster abbey a wedding of the then princess elizabeth and lieutenant philip mountbatten. and now the solemn service begins. i, elizabeth alexandra mary... take thee, philip... to my wedded husband. band plays the wedding march. it was the start of a marriage which has endured for 70 years and which from the moment elizabeth came to the throne in 1952 has underpinned the success and stability of her reign as queen. those who know them have no doubt that the bride and groom who signed the marriage register that day at the abbey were deeply committed to each other. obviously they were very much in love. it's early love, as far as i can understand,
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so it's a love match, essentially, it's a great love story. deeply loyal sense of duty, which is bolstered and encouraged and uplifted, as it were, by theirfaith. the early years of the queen's reign were not without difficulty for the duke. he felt he had no clear purpose, but he adapted to the role of consort to the monarch and for decade after decade they toured the world and fulfilled official duties together, a couple so much of whose lives have been public, sustained by the private bond between them which remains strong and deep, as the latest photographs, issued to mark their platinum wedding anniversary, make clear. at westminster abbey bells are being rung to mark the anniversary. as for the couple themselves, they are spending the day quietly at westminster, where there will be a quiet family party in their honour tonight. in the next hour we will be taking
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you to downing street where there is a brexit subcommittee with the prime minister to discuss ways of pushing forward the talks and someone arriving, my eyes have let me down and it was very quick anyway. the door doesn't seem to be opening! david davis, michael gove and liam fox are in there. let's get a weather update while we can. here is ben. good afternoon. i'm sure you will have noticed a milderfeel to good afternoon. i'm sure you will have noticed a milder feel to the weather for the start of the new working week, but with that a lot of cloud and outbreaks of patchy rain. that was how it looked in worcestershire earlier. during this evening and tonight we will keep cloudy conditions. some outbreaks of patchy rain and heavier bursts of rain developing across northern ireland, northern england and southern scotland. a very mild night in the south. temperatures dropping no lower than ten, 11, 12 celsius. still holding on to something colder
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across the northern isles and generally across scotland and the far north of england tomorrow it will get off to a soggy start indeed. outbreaks of rain trudging northwards. further south, a mild day. this further band of rain swinging in from the west later on in the afternoon quite a range in temperatures, 1a celsius in plymouth and nine in aberdeen. by thursday, it will start to turn colder again particularly in the north. good afternoon. protest is our back on the streets in zimbabwe as robert mugabe ignores a deadline to quit, there will be a military address on state television. senior ministers arrive at downing street for talks with the prime minister to discuss the bill for the "brexit" divorce. german chancellor angela merkel under pressure as her failure to form a coalition makes fresh elections more likely. coming up in sport: new premier league manager
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required. so often tasked with gliding clubs to safety, he will not get the chance now. tony pulis has been sacked by west brom today. get the chance now. tony pulis has been sacked by west brom todaym the weather forecast: mild, been sacked by west brom todaym the weatherforecast: mild, often cloudy, sometimes wet for the next couple of days, any chance of cold—weather returning? join me a little bit later on. coming up: the queen and the duke of edinburgh celebrates 70 years of marriage with the release of these new portraits. so, what next for zimbabwe's robert mugabe? he won't quit, and his party now wants to impeach him. a draft motion, drawn up by the zanu—pf party, describes mr mugabe as a "source of instability" and claims he has shown disrespect for the rule of law.
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my colleague ben brown is in harare. hello from harare, six hours ago that we had the deadline from robert mugabe said by his own party, he ignored the deadline, it came and went, just has he failed to announce his resignation in his speech to the nation on television last night. it had been expected that he would stand down and when he did not announce that, there was widespread shock and disbelief and quite a bit of anger across zimbabwe. he is still clinging to power. his own zanu-pf still clinging to power. his own zanu—pf party now launching impeachment proceedings against him. we hear from impeachment proceedings against him. we hearfrom one senior zanu—pf member, that it could be wrapped up, that impeachment process, within two days. he says it will be launched in
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parliament tomorrow, parliament is just down there, in harare, there would be an investigative committee to investigate robert mugabe, a vote on wednesday, and if there is a two thirds vote in both chambers, then he would be impeached and out of office. this report. the next stage of the battle is set, robert mugabe is on one side, his party is on the other. i will precise over the processes... last night, he did not step down as expected, party leaders had given him until today to do so. the midday deadline to resign has come and gone, zanu—pf is now preparing to put the final wheels in motion, it has summoned all its lawmakers to the zanu-pf has summoned all its lawmakers to the zanu—pf headquarters behind me to discuss a possible impeachment. the process will then move to parliament, where the constitution says a two thirds majority will be
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needed to remove zimbabwe's long—time leader. lawmakers can cite misconduct, violating the constitution or mental and physical incapacity as grounds for dismissal. it is not clear how long the process will take and this president does not seem to be in the mood to play ball. pens upon how fast parliament will move, could take a few days, could take a few months. the beauty is that this is a process which is in the constitution, section 90 seven. it is now the only hope for the country that the president is removed in terms of that section of the constitution. unprecedented waves of protest across the country have failed to persuade the only leader this country has known to go. and they continue to spread, stu d e nts and they continue to spread, students at the main university are now boycotting exams. until robert
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mugabe resigns, we will not write an exam. no one is going to write an exam. no one is going to write an exam. this university is closed! we are sick and tired of this, we wanted him to resign. we want change, the constitution should change, the constitution should change, the constitution should change, the parliament should change. we should take back our country. war veterans say they will escalate protests this week. robert mugabe, go now, robert mugabe, go now, go now. but time is up! please, leave the statehouse, let the country leave the statehouse, let the cou ntry start leave the statehouse, let the country start on a new page. leave the statehouse, let the country start on a new pagem leave the statehouse, let the country start on a new page. it has been a long week of events never witnessed here before and the desire to at least give the appearance of removing him by the book is slowing down the process. finding a quick resolution to this impress may prove very ha rd to resolution to this impress may prove very hard to find. —— impasse. let's talk about that process, to
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try to unseat robert mugabe, in other words, parliament could kick him out of the presidency, the people who demonstrated here in such large numbers on saturday would finally get their way. we can speak toa finally get their way. we can speak to a member of parliament in zimbabwe. she is from the opposition mdc. tell us what was your reaction when you saw robert mugabe making that televised address and he did not resign, lots of people expecting him to resign. definitely disappointed, but it provided an opportunity for the mdc, as you know, by last night, even those that we have seen have become arrogant, saying they did not need the opposition. when he did not go, it provided an opportunity for the opposition to negotiate with zanu-pf, the opposition to negotiate with zanu—pf, the ruling party.
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opposition to negotiate with zanu-pf, the ruling party. are you negotiating for a role in a future government? certainly not but if and impeachment must happen, it cannot happen without the opposition. the 9—member committee that sits as to include every party represented in parliament. zanu—pf has no choice but to talk to us so we will make demands before we agree to the impeachment. will he be impeached, thatis impeachment. will he be impeached, that is the bottom line, that is what people want to know, one way or another, will parliament dismiss him as president? i cannot see any sane person in zimbabwe not wanting him to go but in must be on conditions that we set, security sector reform and free and fair elections. military intervention should never be repeated again and that is what we need to put onto the table as the opposition before we go into government. how long could impeachment take, zanu—pf said it could be a couple of days, all over by wednesday... ? could be a couple of days, all over by wednesday. . . ? it could be done in 48 hours with our agreement. and we
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could have a new person as president. who with the new president. who with the new president they? that is what people are saying, will zimbabwe be better off with a strongman, like emmerson mnangagwa, who was one of the henchman of the regime and not very popular in the country. henchman of the regime and not very popular in the countrylj henchman of the regime and not very popular in the country. i am not for a zanu-pf popular in the country. i am not for a zanu—pf president or four zanu—pf, but right now, we are looking at constitutional provisions. unfortunately, i cannot control what zanu-pf unfortunately, i cannot control what zanu—pf does, from what i hear, it certainly maybe emmerson mnangagwa. has the country change, amazing demonstration, thousands of people, euphoria, joy, no security forces beating them stopping them, is that a huge change in this country that can never be reversed? i'm not sure if it can be reversed, that is why we must negotiate. remember, before
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this was okayed, in 2008, we were beaten, a lot of people died, beaten by the army, beaten by the state. we are hoping we will negotiate for a proper new zimbabwe. we are not sleeping. are you grateful to the army for intervening, some people have said this was a coup d'etat, but are you glad that they did intervene? i'm not sure that i am glad of military intervention, it sets the wrong precedent, but i am happy that 37 years of robert mugabe is over, he needed to go. i am completed, the army coming in is not ideal, but he had to go. are you optimistic about the future, more optimistic about the future, more optimistic about the future, more optimistic about the future of zimbabwe given what has happened?“ we play our role very well and negotiate before impeachment, then i
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can be optimistic. the people of this country, huge expectations, they sensed change is coming and they sensed change is coming and they will be disappointed if there is not change. it will only come if we change government and change the dna. we cannot just we change government and change the dna. we cannotjust bring in another zanu-pf, we dna. we cannotjust bring in another zanu—pf, we need to change the echoes and values of the democratic setup of zimbabwe. that is what some of us will do. i will certainly not be joining zanu-pf, i will be will certainly not be joining zanu—pf, i will be new to fight outside of it. a member of parliament for the opposition mdc, priscila misihairabwi—mushong. she has confirmed what we were hearing, that this impeachment could be wrapped up within 48 hours and robert mugabe, if he does not resign within then, he could be impeached and out of office before then. some people say it could take much longer
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than that. the eu's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier has warned britain that it can't "cherry pick" parts of the single market it wants to keep. but he said that brussels was ready to offer the uk the "most ambitious" free trade deal if its terms are met. theresa may is chairing a meeting of senior cabinet ministers to discuss how to end deadlock over the so—called divorce bill, how much money the uk needs to pay to start trade talks. our political correspondent eleanor garnier reports from westminster. busy ahead of the budget on wednesday, highlighting the government's plans for investing in technology and engineering, but the prime minister and the chancellor too know brexit is the backdrop to everything. and it's the money, the so—called brexit bill, that is the main sticking point in the negotiations. we've been very clear that we will honour our commitments but i want to see is developing that deep and special partnership with the european union for the future and i want to see us
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moving together because a deal that's good for the uk is a deal that's good for the rest of the eu. over in brussels, the eu's chief negotiator said the preference was for an ambitious trade deal, but only if brexit divorce issues get sorted. on settling the accounts accurately, we owe this to taxpayers as well as to all those benefiting from eu funding projects. but there was also a clear message on sticking to the rules and the free movement of goods, capital, services and people. those who claim that the uk should cherry—pick parts of the single market must stop this contradiction. the two sides have been sitting down to negotiations for months with no major breakthroughs. there's increasing pressure from brussels for the uk to come up with solutions, and back here, calls on the chancellor to watch how he spends taxpayers' money. he cannot afford play santa claus to juncker and tusk. he needs to make sure we are only paying for what we are absolutely contracted for, and every pound
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he unnecessarily gives away to the european union is a pound not being spent on british public services. when theresa may and senior ministers meet later to discuss the size of the brexit bill, they will know agreeing to pay more will quicken the talks but also cause anger amongst some. getting agreement within cabinet is crucial, and as eu leaders keep pointing out, the clock is ticking. we are keeping an eye on twitter and we have seen this coming in from the electoral commission: a statement regarding the vote to leave, and darren grimes and veterans for britain. they have launched a new investigation into spending at the eu referendum by vote leave. darren
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grimes and veterans for britain, specifically looking at whether he may have delivered a return that was incorrect in relation to a donation he has received. and whether not vetera ns for he has received. and whether not veterans for britain delivered a return that was incorrect in regard toa return that was incorrect in regard to a donation that it received and campaign spending. more on that later. that has just come in from the electoral commission. let's speak to our chief political correspondent vicki young who's in westminster. discussion with the prime minister and the subcommittee looking at brexit, who is at the meeting and why is it so important? we have seen them all go in, normally not troubling, many would not know this is happening, but this one is important because it is all about
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trade and brexit. it is a pretty balanced committee, we have seen borisjohnson go balanced committee, we have seen boris johnson go in, balanced committee, we have seen borisjohnson go in, amber rudd, michael gove, philip hammond also pa rt michael gove, philip hammond also part of the committee, chaired by the prime minister, theresa may, speculation is they will be talking about weather in principle britain is willing to stump up more money for the so—called divorce bill. theresa may has already committed to £18 billion of money, saying that no one in the european union should be worse off in this budget cycle, taking us up to about 2020, this would be different, this is about the actual amount that might be paid as we leave the european union. we don't know yet whether they will be talking specifics, whether this is the principle, but it has been made pretty clear to britain, by the european union, that there needs to be more money on the table to move ahead to the next phase of discussions, which will be about what the future relationship is with
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the european union including a possible trade deal. interesting to remember, we do not really know from the british government exactly what it wants our future trade deal to be all a future relationship, they talk about a close relationship, frictionless trade as much as possible, but specifics, we still do not know and that has not yet been thrashed out, that could be something they are talking about as well as the issue of money. the eu is dangling a carrot saying there could be an amazing trade deal available if we can just go through this bit of the talks, which is down to money, other issues like the northern ireland border of course, but it is the old cheque—book issue, and it smacks a bit of, show us real money and then we can move on. once we have moved on, the question is, how do negotiations go and we do not know the answer. michel barnier has been talking about the city of london not expecting to have the same kind of deal, same kind of access to the single market as it
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does now, even if this money were to be forthcoming. that is where the interesting bits will come, at the moment, although some mps are clearly thinking we should be handing over not a single penny, there are more who think, yes, we will have to do this, we will have two meet obligations. question is, what are the obligations, legally, are there any? many think there is not any. but there are others who say, actually, we do need to do this, move onto the next stage and see how negotiations go from there. how long will it last, when will we come back to you? who knows, but we will be here! foreshore! lets get the thoughts from the conservative mp, suella fernandes, who voted leave. do you think this offer goes far enough, should more be spent? theresa may made it
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very clear in her florence speech, in terms of making a very constructive offer, and making it clear to the eu that we were going to be paying our dues, and no one on the other side of the negotiating table would be left worse off. that is very honourable and decent and really now the ball is in the eu's court to reciprocate in—kind. really now the ball is in the eu's court to reciprocate in—kindlj don't mean bickering, but behind the scenes, in that building where you are, when you bump into colleagues, you don't all share the same views, are you all unified for the sake of national unity or is there a real chance this could break out into civil war? chance this could break out into civilwar? my chance this could break out into civil war? my personal experience is that there is a lot of unity within the conservative parliamentary party. we are all behind the prime minister and we know that it is in the national interest to deliver on that instruction sent by the british people last year and i personally have not really experienced the
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hostility and the tension that you might believe is the case. if you read some of the papers. you are a brexiteer, are you optimistic about this process? i am, ithink brexiteer, are you optimistic about this process? i am, i think we have an historic opportunity for our country to regain control over laws, over borders, to set the direction of travel for trade. there are countries all around the world waiting desperately to strike free trade agreements with britain so we can sell british goods all over the world which we currently are limited in doing because we are locked into an eu customs union. if you were sitting at the table would you say, doesn't matter, spend extra, put more money on the table, it is worth it in the long run. i would say to theresa may, if she were listening, ta ke theresa may, if she were listening, take a reasonable and legally justifiable stance, because at the end of the day, anything paid or
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owed really does need to be justifiable to the british taxpayer, because that is who will be paying at the end of the day. one of your colleagues, nigel edmonds, he said, we must not play santa claus to the eu and offer them the earth. we must not play santa claus to the eu and offer them the earthlj we must not play santa claus to the eu and offer them the earth. i think this is a negotiation, involving two parties, theresa may has been very constructive in what she has laid out in florence and what she and cabinet colleagues are discussing right now. really is incumbent on the eu to step up and respond in kind, because we cannot keep negotiating with ourselves, we need somebody to do it with. thank you very much forjoining us. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. more protests on the streets of zimbabwe as mps discuss impeaching president mugabe who has refused to stand down. senior ministers arrive at downing
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street for talks with the prime minister to discuss the bill for the brexit ‘divorce'. german chancellor angela merkel under pressure as her failure to form a coalition makes fresh elections more likely. ina in a moment, the notorious cult leader charles manson, who directed his followers to commit a string of brutal murders dies in prison. jana novotna has died from cancer, the wimbledon champion was 49. tony pulis has become the fifth premier league manager to be sacked this season, west brom have sacked him. and jake ball and the rest of the england cricket team relax ahead of the ashes on thursday. —— in sport, tributes are being paid to the former wimbledon tennis champion jana novotna, who has died from cancer at the age of 49. west brom sack tony pulis, with the club one point above the premier league relegation zone and without a win in 11 games. keeping their cool, pace bowler jake ball and the rest of england's
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men's cricket team relax ahead of the ashes test in brisbane, he says that he is fit. the german chancellor angela merkel‘s has been holding crisis talks with germany's president after the collapse of negotiations to form a coalition government. mrs merkel‘s centre—right christian democrats and the greens blamed the liberal free democrats for pulling out of coalition talks. the president frank—walter steinmeier said the country was now facing an unprecedented situation. this is the moment when all of the involved political parties should come to a standstill and should reflect hard, all of the parties represented in the lowerchamber of the parliament are obliged to serve the country, to serve the general well—being of the country, and i would expect that the formation of a government would take place in due course. matthew karnitschnig is chief europe correspondent —— matthew karnitschnig is chief europe correspondent at politico. the real problem is that the mathematics does not add up, the smaller parties, the greens and the fdp are no longer
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available in the constellation that angela merkel wanted and the social democrats, the other mainstream party in germany, say they do not want to re—enter a grand coalition which is what you have had in germany for the past four years. we probably will not have a government in germany until the spring of next year from the looks of it. i think she is going to have to think hard about whether she wants to push for new elections, because she may also end up having a somewhat worse result this time around than she did last time and she was already, you know, she had already been falling in the polls. we probably will not have a government in germany until the spring of next year from the looks of it. weeks of uncertainty, possibly months, nothing that the germans hate more than uncertainty.
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it is a country which is famous for its desire to have continuity and stability. which is why a lot of people were hoping the social democrats would come in and say, we are happy to sit down with merkel and form a coalition but over the past several years they feel that they have been diminished by angela merkel‘s conservative party, that the conservatives got all the credit for the achievements of the government and the social democrats were blamed for all the problems and they say there will not make that mistake again. in terms of... there are issues, this side of the water we are thinking about brexit, all this uncertainty, how will it affect the european union when it is facing so many difficulties at the moment? big problem for the european union and could become a problem in the brexit negotiations because angela merkel is diminished by this, her ability to take bold steps with emmanuel macron, for example, in france, towards restructuring the eurozone in some way are going to be very limited and her ability to reach out across the channel to london to do something on brexit that she might not be able to do otherwise. given that she does not have this strong mandate to lead a government. also going to be almost impossible. i think she is going to have to think hard about whether she wants to push for new elections, because she may also end up having a somewhat worse result this time around than she did
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last time and she was already, you know, she had already been falling in the polls. it is a risky situation for angela merkel and at the end of it she could find herself out of power altogether. angela merkel‘s only real option is to try a minority government, which has never been attempted in germany before, or, call new elections, asked the president to call new elections which he does not want to do straightaway. it is a risky situation for angela merkel and at the end of it she could find herself out of power altogether. police in dorset say that three people who'd been arrested in connection with the disappearance of the teenager gaia pope have been released from their investigation, and will face no further action. the 19—year—old's body was found on saturday afternoon near the town of swanage. the police said a postmortem examination was conducted on sunday but did not identify any injuries to suggest the involvement
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of other people. a short time ago, gaia pope's mother, natasha, released a statement, paying tribute to her daughter. the sinn fein leader gerry adams, who announced his plan to stand down at the weekend, has said he wants to be "part of a process of reconciliation." but in a bbc interview, mr adams defended the ira campaign, saying it was a "legitimate response" to what he described as the "oppression" of a "huge amount" of people in northern ireland. mr adams was interviewed by bbc northern ireland's political editor mark devenport who joins us live belfast. gerry adams is no ordinary politician, is announcement he is standing down after 34 leaders as —— 3a standing down after 34 leaders as —— 34 years as leader ofjim
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—— leader of sinn fein saw him defending actions of the ira for yea rs, defending actions of the ira for years, some victims have felt that he should provide more information about what happened to their loved ones. he said he felt an affinity with ira victims because his own family had suffered during the troubles, and i asked him about the fa ct troubles, and i asked him about the fact that unionists tends to believe his assertion that he was never a member of the ira. that may be clear, i have them the eye rake at times, i have been hugely critical at times, but at the same time, i did except and do accept in response to the situation, of a state that repressed its citizens, and the british government response to that was british government response to that was too militarised the situation and the ira was a legitimate response to that, i will never move away from that. what i have also said, i recognise the bravery of not
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just ira people but also those within the old are you see, within the british army, because their families see them as republicans see their loved ones as doing their duty. only when we get to the point where we can all have that sort of acceptance, we don't have too agreed, i acceptance, we don't have too agreed, lam acceptance, we don't have too agreed, i am not expecting anyone to come out and extol the virtues of the ira, anymore than they expect me to extol the virtues of the uci will british army, but i do recognise on an individual level that the families of those folks have suffered and there has been brave individuals on those forces. sinn fein is expected to organise a successor to gerry adams through election, the bookies favourite is his vice president, mary lynn macdonald, thought to be well placed
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to potentially lead the party into negotiations that should happen after a future irish election, on putting together a coalition. gerry adams says he will not seek elected office, whoever is the new leader he wa nts office, whoever is the new leader he wants them to put a new stamp on the party but you will still be a republican and still be keen to play his part within the movement. let's look at the weather, you have brought your photo album with you. weather watchers always catch the right mood. this comes from powys. cloudy scene, bright flowers, to brighten the mood a little bit, he we go, lyme regis, looking pretty decent, despite the cloud. the tide is out. i imagine that this is what
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the viewers at home are saying, that is why it is good to have you here. shropshire, one or two favourite places or sunshine. —— favoured places. but basically all about the cloud. my favourite picture of the day here. you were quite rude about it last time. i hope the photographer is all right, did he get out of the field ok? please don't do that at home! we need to put a warning in there! it may have been slc, you never know. —— selfie. feeling pretty cloudy out there as well as the mild weather, how will well as the mild weather, how will we shape up for the rest of the week? here is the satellite picture from the last 24 hours, you can see all the cloud piling its way in from the atlantic, cloud continuing to produce outbreaks of rain at times.
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this is how the evening shapes up, lots of cloud, misty and murky, later in the night, through northern ireland, and into scotland, some heavy bursts of rain developing. the northern isles turning chilly, exceptionally mild, those are your overnight lows. into tomorrow, chilly start, much of scotland, soqqy chilly start, much of scotland, soggy start, outbreaks of heavy rain, 8 degrees in glasgow, largely dry at this stage, eight o'clock in the morning, pretty cloudy, murky and drizzly weather, and as we look further south, squinting at the map you can make out some brighter glimpses, generally speaking, cloudy, 11, 12, 13 degrees for the tuesday morning commute. as we go on through the day the band of rain is slowly edging north. the next batch of rain sliding in from the west through the day, blustery day and
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for central and eastern areas, holding onto dry weather for a good pa rt of holding onto dry weather for a good part of the day, these areas might get lucky with a little bit of sunshine, eight to 14 degrees. looks like we will lose the area of low pressure but down here, moving in from the south—west, wriggling weather front looks like it will feed a lot of rain in across wales and north—west england during wednesday, perhaps enough rain to cause one or two issues, windy day towards the south and south—east but here we should see sunshine, 15 degrees. a bit cooler, and this is where the cold air welcome back into play, as we have wednesday and towards the end of the week. a bit of uncertainty about just how far south this cold air will get but if you live in the northern half of the british isles, expect temperatures did get away into thursday and friday, further south, more of a chance of holding onto milder weather, with temperatures in some spots holding up into double digits.
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looks like all of us will turn colder by next weekend. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. protestors are back on the streets in zimbabwe as robert mugabe ignores a deadline to quit. another military address is expected on state tv. senior ministers arrive at downing street for talks with the prime minister to discuss the bill for the brexit divorce. the german chancellor angela merkel has met the country's president to discuss next steps after her attempts to form a coalition government collapsed. the president says parties need to keep working on a deal and that he does not favour new elections. charles manson, the notorious cult leader who directed his followers to commit a string of brutal murders, has died aged 83. an exclusive report into historic sexual abuse among jehovah's witnesses.
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we'll be getting the details on that and other top stories from across the uk in news nationwide. sport now on afternoon live withjohn watson. another vacancy in the premier league managership. tony pulis departs from west brom. news of an injury for man city. sad news from the world of tennis. tributes being paid to a former wimbledon champion? yes, it was one of the ten during of wimbledon history. jana novotna being comforted by the duchess of kent after her defeat in the final of wimbledon. she came back to win the title five years later. tributes being paid. the world of tennis remembering jana novotna who died at the age of a9 remembering jana novotna who died at the age of 49 after losing her battle with cancer. david ornstein looks back on her life. it is one of wimbledon's most enduring images. jana novotna may have lost the final, but she won shoulder to cry
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on from the duchess of kent and the hearts of the british public. shejust told me, jana you will do it. i believe one day you will do it. and ijust became very emotional. it was very nice. i appreciated it. novotna finished runner—up again in 1997, but a year later she finally won the trophy. news of her death has been met with a mixture of shock and an outpouring of tributes. i can only describe her as a ruthless competitor on the court but she was utterly sweet and charming off it. she was such a warm person, always very friendly. she would come up and give you kisses and smiles, she was really loved by everyone. she rose to prominence in the early 90s and went on to become one
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of the most exciting, popular and successful players of her generation. wimbledon was her only grand slam singles title but she collected 16 in doubles and 100 tournament wins across a glittering career, playing her way into the international tennis hall of fame. she was back on the lawns of sw19 as recently as 2016. rolling back the years in the invitational mixed doubles. but novotna will always be remembered for the tears and then the triumph, refusing to let the setbacks keep her down, eventually coming out on top and writing her name into history with a smile. so often a manager trusted with steering clubs to safety. tony pulis won't get the chance at west brom. he was sacked today with the club one point above the relegation zone. the manchester city manager
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pep guardiola, whose side are eight points clear, has his sympathies. we have to accept that, we know that, and everybody knows when we don't have results, managers in the premier league, a month later, they will be sacked. so, i have to accept that and we are in that situation. what guardiola won't be pleased about an injury sufffered
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well, this was the sight that greeted the england players on their arrival in brisbane at the gabba where they face australia in the first test of teh ashes on thurday. a pool deck is in place to allow fans top watch the match and enjoy a dip at the same time. england bowlerjake ball enjoying it theer along with his teamamtes england bowlerjake ball enjoying it theer along with his teammates that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. now on afternoon live — let's go nationwide — and see what's happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. amy cole is in birmingham talking about a bbc exclusive report into historical child abuse. in a moment i will speak to amy garcia in leeds about details on new research to prevent stillbirth.
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so amy, formerjehovah‘s witnesses have been speaking to the bbc about historic abuse by the organisation, what have you been hearing? this is a really harrowing story. we have tone a lady called louise palmer and she says from the age of four she was repeatedly raped and sexually assaulted by her brother. she says it went on for years and she said she thought it became so normal she thoughts that's what brothers did to their sisters. she was born into thejoe hoe vas witness faith. when she went to reveal what happened to her, to her elders years on, they told her not to go to the police because it would reflect badly on the organisation. she said she felt extremely let down by this. in 2015 her brother was
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jailed for ten years for sexually abusing her. the charity commission started an inquiry into thejehovah‘s witnesses organisation back in 2013, can we expect more people to come forward? it's difficult to say how widespread this is. one interesting thing is we spoke to a couple who used to belong to the jehovah's witness organisation and they have heard about a two witness rule which they worry could put children and has put children at risk. they say that an individual, who maybe has concerns, perhaps they are being molested have been told that when they go to the elders, they are asked if there are two witnesses that can prove what has happened and if there aren't, they have been told by elders to leave it in the hands of god. the jehovah's witness organisation has
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denied the accusations and it says it abhors child abuse and it is not seeking to shield any abusers from the authorities. who knows how widespread this could be. louise, who we spoke to, is urging people to go to the police and we may see other people come forward. amy, how significant is this new research in the prevention of stillbirths? this is our top story tonight. it is new advice that could help pregnant women save the lives of their unborn babies. research has shown the risk of still birth is doubled if women go to sleep on their backs in the third trimeser. that's the last three months of pregnancy. the midlands and north of england stillborn study is the largest of its kind and it focussed on 1,000 women over a two year period. one in
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125 pregnancies end in still birth. that's 11 per day. the findings reveal if all pregnant women in the uk went to sleep on their side, in the third trimeser, there would be a 3.7% decease in still births, saving around 130 babies lives a year in the uk and that could be up to 100,000 babies a year across the world. later on look north, we will hear from world. later on look north, we will hearfrom a world. later on look north, we will hear from a midwife who was one of the researchers in this study and a mum from bradford who took part in it. she is called grace and she lost her baby boy at 35 yeks. she wasn't given advice about sleeping on her side, although she doesn't know what caused her baby to die, she hopes her story and the study will help other mums and that's an important point here, simon. this is a public health campaign being rolled out to reduce the risk of a still birth. if you are pregnant this is the advice.
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use a pillow or pillows behind your back to encourage sleeping on your side. if you wake up during the night, just check your position pa go back to sleeping on your side again. pay the same attention to your sleep position in the day as your sleep position in the day as you do in the night and if you wake up you do in the night and if you wake up on your back during the night, don't worry just roll up on your back during the night, don't worryjust roll back on to your side. i have two little ones at home and i know what a nerve—wracking experience it can be when you are pregnant, you want to do all the right things and eat the right things and take the right advice and sometimes that can be conflicting, but hopefully this new advice will really help mummies to be. amy, thank you very much. amy cole, thank you too. you're watching afternoon live. if you'd like to catch up with more of those news nationwide stories, go to the bbc iplayer. all the stories are available on the iplayer and don't forget your local news your local region at 6.30pm. the notorious cult leader charles manson, who directed his
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followers to commit a string of brutal murders, has died aged 83. he'd been in prison in california for more than four decades. in 1969, his followers, known as the manson family, killed seven people. among them was the heavily pregnant hollywood actress sharon tate, the wife of roman polanski. james cook reports from los angeles. charles manson, the name itself is synonymous with evil. a killer who did no killing but whose crimes shocked the world. in august 1969, followers of his cult broke into the home of sharon tate. the pregnant actress, who was married to the director roman polanski, was brutally murdered along with four of herfriends. the next night, the so—called manson family killed again, tying up and murdering a wealthy couple. this was the ramshackle ranch in death valley where manson lived in a commune with his runaway fans. they apparently used lsd and saw the guitar playing ex—convict as a kind of saint. or perhaps a devil.
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charles manson was charged, not with wielding a knife or firing a gun, but with controlling and directing the killers. i don't accept the court. i don't accept the whole situation. i was in the desert minding my business. this confusion belongs to you. it is your confusion. i don't have any guilt, i know what i've done. no man canjudge me. i can judge me. what have you done, charlie? and why had he done it? apparently to spark a race war, it would be called helter skelter, and he would use it to seize power. in 1971, manson was sentenced to death on seven counts of murder, later commuted to life in prison. over the years, charles manson applied for parole time and time again, but he died a prisoner, having shattered the peace and love of the 1960s with diabolical violence. first of all from germany, we are
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just hearing the chancellor, angela merkel, has said she would prefer new elections to leading a minority government after talks about forming a three—way coalition collapsed overnight bringing great uncertainty to berlin. she has been speaking to television and said my point of view would be that new elections would be the better path. her plans did not include being chancellor in a minority government. so further uncertainty. this follows her talks with the german president earlier and he had suggested and tried to persuade her that it was in the country's interests to try and sort out some sort of coalition agreement. it doesn't appear to have happened and it looks more than likely that elections will have to be held. that's in germany. news
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from harare, zimbabwe's ruling zanu—pf party has officially notified president mugabe as his removal as party president and will later tomorrow, will table a motion to impeach him after a deadline was set for his resignation and that passed earlier today. zanu—pf removed mugabe, who has led the party since 1977 and been in power for 37 years. well, that's our main story. in a moment the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live more protests on the streets of zimbabwe — as mps discuss impeaching president mugabe who has refused to stand down. senior ministers arrive at downing street for talks with the prime minister to discuss the bill for the brexit divorce. german chancellor angela merkel under pressure as her failure to form a coalition makes fresh elections more likely. here's your business
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headlines on afternoon live. centrica, the owner of british gas, confirmed this morning that it will bring to an end the standard variable tariff for new customers — that's the tariff that energy suppliers force on customers when they don't opt for a specific fixed term deal, it's also the tariff the government said it would rein back by putting a cap on it. changes could be afoot for those in the gig economy. a draft bill was published this morning aimed at stopping companies signing up workers and calling them self—employed to cut costs. the bill suggests employees be called workers by default — and automatically be given basic safety standards and benefits. british airways is introducing a boarding policy that means those buying the cheapest seats will be called last. from 12th december, passengers will be assigned between one and five printed on boarding passes,
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with the highest figure reserved for economy fares. ba said the move is about simplifying the boarding process. so, what's been getting investors talking today? centrica. the change to the tariff for its subsidiary british gas. that's one of the things that is being talked about. it didn't have much impact on the share price as you and i were watching until right at the end when the share price was down 1%. let's hear if we can shed any light on this. joining me now is lawrence gosling, editor in chief, investment week. centrica, the announcement was largely expected. we are seeing the slow death knell of the standard variable tariff and i think we are ina sort variable tariff and i think we are in a sort of period really where the industry wants to put its house in order before the regulator does it for thesmt not too big a surprise, but this move affects about 67% of
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the five million british gas customers. a great many potentially affected by it. let's look at the pound because the pound seemed to have yet another good day, this is relative, but it is five days in a row that the pound has gone up against the dollar and the euro? a couple of things. clearly, the political uncertainty in germany which has got worse in the last half an hour or so is a big pa rt of the last half an hour or so is a big part of that. germany is the biggest economy on the continent. but also, the european equity markets have been performing very well and we are beginning to see the institutional investors like pension funds take their profits as well because they need to close down their accounts for the year and prove to their policyholders that they have made a big return on their money. sol think there is a couple of things going on at the same time here. let's look at barclays because that was the best gainer for much of the day of the top 100 companies in this country. around 2%. not clear to me
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why that move happened unless it was because a particular broking firm decided there was further to go for the share price, they put a higher target on it is roughly speaking the technical term? target on it is roughly speaking the technicalterm? some target on it is roughly speaking the technical term? some days you see companies respond to the bits of so—called research from broking firms and sometimes you don't. you it did today. it's monday. barclays is one of the high street stocks that the market likes. it is performing well and in the sort of period we are in, anybody saying something positive, you know, particularly on a monday is going to give other investors cause to run out and start buying the shares. laurence gosling, from investment week, thank you. let's look at the markets. oh let's. 100 share index. up less than ten points by the end. 7389. now the dax has been bouncing about as the situation in germany unfolds. a gain
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of 0.5%. i never understand this because i mean surely the dax with such uncertainty you would expect to drop likea such uncertainty you would expect to drop like a stone. bets are being placed. we will talk more about it tomorrow. it has been very volatile throughout today. the nasdaq in the us, very little happening there and i'm making it sound thrilling. i'm sure you will have me back soon. the dow not much going on there. it is not my fault. no, it's not and it is monday and it is great to see you. rebecca, thank you very much. the queen and the duke of edinburgh are celebrating their 70th wedding anniversary — the longest in the royal family's history. they are marking the occasion privately with family and friends at windsor castle. the church bells rang out this lunchtime at westminster abbey, where the queen and prince philip were married. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. archive newsreader: for any girl, wedding day is the day of her life. as the 21—year—old princess arrived at westminster abbey, it was her moment too.
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a november day two years after the end of the second world war. at westminster abbey a wedding of the then princess elizabeth and lieutenant philip mountbatten. and now the solemn service begins. i, elizabeth alexandra mary... take thee, philip... to my wedded husband. band plays the wedding march. it was the start of a marriage which has endured for 70 years and which from the moment elizabeth came to the throne in 1952 has underpinned the success and stability of her reign as queen. those who know them have no doubt that the bride and groom who signed the marriage register that day at the abbey were deeply committed to each other. obviously they were very much in love. it's early love, as far as i can understand, so it's a love match, essentially, it's a great love story. deeply loyal sense of duty,
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which is bolstered and encouraged and uplifted, as it were, by theirfaith. the early years of the queen's reign were not without difficulty for the duke. he felt he had no clear purpose, but he adapted to the role of consort to the monarch and for decade after decade they toured the world and fulfilled official duties together, a couple so much of whose lives have been public, sustained by the private bond between them which remains strong and deep, as the latest photographs, issued to mark their platinum wedding anniversary, make clear. at westminster abbey bells are being rung to mark the anniversary. as for the couple themselves, they are spending the day quietly at westminster, where there will be a quiet family party in their honour tonight. a driver has been caught doing 136mph on the m60 in greater manchester.
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police filmed the car on sunday evening. and tweeted, "136mph and not checking its the dibble behind" — the driver has been reported for a court summons. that's it from your afternoon live team for today, next the bbc news at five with clive myrie and ben brown. time for a look at the weather. here's ben rich. good afternoon. temperatures are on something of a roller—coaster ride at the moment. rewind to sunday morning. many of us saw a touch of frost and temperatures below freezing. monday morning though, this morning, a very different feel to the weather. double digits in some spots and with
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that, a lot of cloud and outbreaks of rain. the satellite picture shows the cloud feeding in from the south—west, a conveyor—belt pushing in across the atlantic. those south—westerly winds feeding mild air across the country through the next few days. still something colder holding on across the far north. so, during this evening and tonight, it's going to stay cloudy. there will be outbreaks of rain and later in the night the rain will turn heavier across northern ireland and northern england and southern scotland. across the far north, it will be another cold night, but further south, very mild indeed. ten or 11 celsius. so we begin tuesday morning ona celsius. so we begin tuesday morning on a chilly note across the far north, particularly shetland. further south across scotland a lot of rain. many areas starting with heavy bursts of rain. not as wet across northern ireland or northern england, but here there will be drizzly weather and murky weather and cloud. further south, a cloudy start, but a mild one with
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temperatures of 11 or 12 celsius for the tuesday morning commute. the rain will trudge northwards across scotland. further south, we will see another band of rain swinging in from the west. for central and eastern areas of england, staying dry for eastern areas of england, staying dryfora eastern areas of england, staying dry for a good part of the day and sunny breaks peeking through the cloud. still chilly further north. through tuesday night, we say goodbye to this area of low pressure. this wriggling bending weather front will bring a lot of rain across parts of wales and north—west england particularly. to the south and east, dry. windy and mild. further north, still something a little bit colder and actually, as we head towards the end of the week it looks like the cold air will stage something of a comeback. there is uncertainty about how far south the cold air will get and what type of weather it will bring. northern areas look like turning chilly on
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thursday and friday. perhaps holding on to something a little bit milder further south. today at five: zimbabwe's president robert mugabe is facing impeachment proceedings after a deadline set by the country's ruling party for him to step down expired. protestors are back on the streets in zimbabwe. they are demanding an end to the 37 year rule of mugabe. until robert mugabe comes to sentences, we are stu d e nts mugabe comes to sentences, we are students who are demanding we want an end. senior ministers are meeting at downing street to discuss the so—called brexit divorce bill. could there be more money on the table? germany's chancellor angela merkel
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is under pressure, after her failure to form a coalition government makes fresh elections more likely.
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