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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 21, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello — this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. theresa may gets the backing of her cabinet to offer a bigger brexit payout. senior ministers have agreed that britain should offer more money to the eu, if it clears the path for trade talks to begin. but the prime minister is facing anger from some of her own mps who are accusing the eu of holding the uk to ransom. good morning — it's tuesday the 21st of november. zimba bwe‘s parliament prepares to take legal action to force robert mugabe from power. early screening for lung cancer. doctors say a trial using mobile scanners in supermarket car parks has proved a huge success. work experience is the link between education and the economy. but in some places fewer than 1 in 10 young people get any.
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i'm taking a look at how to improve that. in sport, could mike ashley's days at newcastle be numbered following a formal bid for the football club? and it's only november, but could getting in the festive mood early but help improve your winter wellbeing? it's like celebrating joy. like, i was so it's like celebrating joy. like, i was so excited to come to the christmas markets this evening. christmas markets this evening. christmas trees up at ridiculous times. everyone is waiting to put pictures of christmas trees on facebook. and carol has the weather. you can see the lights of regent street behind me. it is mild around london, mile across many parts of the uk. some rain in the north and the uk. some rain in the north and the west so that further east you are, the dry conditions are here but
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more details on 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may looks set to offer the eu a bigger divorce bill payment in return for starting trade talks next month. the bbc understands the move was approved at a meeting of senior cabinet ministers yesterday. the uk had been told it must make more progress on its financial offer, if talks are to move into the next phase. but political uncertainty in germany has complicated the picture, with chancellor angela merkel saying she would prefer new elections rather than lead a minority government. it follows a breakdown in coalition talks, which plunged the country into political crisis. we can get the latest on that from our correspondent, damien mcguinness, who is in berlin. but first, let's speak to our political correspondent alex forsyth in westminster. alex, what else came out of yesterday's meeting? we are. to reason they effectively gathered some of her senior figures around her to try to thrash out the issue of money because that has been stuck just issue of money because that has been stuckjust —— issue of money because that has been stuck just —— such issue of money because that has been stuckjust —— such as stumbling block —— block and part of the
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problem for to reason they is there a different views about what should be done in cabinet, some saying let's agree to some more, others saying, if you give away too much, you have no cards that to play down the line. to reason they had already indicated the uk would meet its current budget obligations. that amounts to some 20 billion euros. it is understood when the meeting took place, there was broad agreement the uk must up its financial offer but only if the european union agrees to start talking trade in december in return. no figures have been discussed yet but the danger for to reason they is if she agrees to pay too much, she could anger some of her own brexit mps who say it is a fine line to keep everyone happy and there is this added convocation because there is a time pressure on these talks and now there is political uncertainty in germany, one of the eu's biggest figures
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which could further complicates things or slow things up and sum up thinking that to reason they should have waited to see how that plays out before giving more in terms of money. 0ur correspondent, damien mcguinness, is in berlin. could we see a snap election in germany in the coming months? it really depends what happens over the next few days. right now, there is political gridlock because as alex said, there is a failure really to form a coalition here. it's important not to overstate the connection between brexit in the political crisis in germany because there is no direct impact in one sense. that is because the negotiations feature exactly zero times in the coalition talks. there was a document in which brexit was not mentioned once and any attempts by pro— brexit mps would be
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rebuffed. german politicians across the board are united in the brussels sta nce the board are united in the brussels stance effectively and how it's been dealing with brexit. having said that, it's also true that political instability here in germany is not good for the eu as a whole and it there is a deadlock year and gridlock in a long drawn—out process of new elections, that does mean it heart are potentially for germany to offer or take part in pushing forward. to many of the britain a better deal. it does make things more difficult and does mean there could be more political instability over the next few months. much to consider. we'll speak to conservative mp nigel evans and green party co—leader caroline lucas about this just after 8 o'clock. a scheme aimed at detecting lung cancer, earlier is to be extended
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to thousands more patients. nhs england says the use of mobile scanners at supermarkets and shopping centres in greater manchester proved so successful, similar schemes will now be rolled out to other parts of the country. caroline rigby has more. it has saved my life, definitely saved my life, because i could have gone maybe two or three years and it could have spread everywhere. michael brady was diagnosed with lung cancer thanks to a project which offered extra screening to smokers and former smokers in some of the poorest manchester areas. patients thought to be most at risk we re patients thought to be most at risk were given ct scans in mobile trucks and supermarkets at shopping centres. lung cancer is the biggest cancer killer in the uk, claiming 35,000 each year. nhs england says during the pilot one case was detected every 33 people screamed and four out of five cases were diagnosed early when the disease is easier to treat. —— easier. similar
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schemes in london and the north of england. many have welcomed it but there are warnings there will be extra staff needed if more lives are to be saved. president trump has announced that the us is re—designating north korea a state sponsor of terrorism, nine years after it was removed from the list. he said the move would trigger "very large" additional sanctions to be announced later. mr trump blamed the country's nuclear programme, and support for what he called international acts of terrorism. south korea has welcomed the move. robert mugabe is faces being impeached after refusing to step down as president of zimbabwe. the country's ruling party, zanu—pf, could ask parlimament to begin the process today. the 93—year old, who remains under armed guard in the presidential palace, is accused of allowing his wife to usurp power and many believe he is now incapable of governing. last night, the military
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suggested a plan was emerging for the transfer of power. we have made the consultation with the president to agree on a roadmap to the prevailing situation in the country. the zimbabwe defence and security services, are encouraged by new developments which include conduct between the president and the former vice president. he is expected in the country shortly. the argentine navy says noises picked up by two ships in the south atlantic on their sonar equipment are not coming from a missing argentine submarine. the sub with 44 crew on board disappeared 6 days ago off the coast of argentina. relatives are waiting patiently for news. the united states has sent specialist underwater rescue equipment to help in the search, which has been hampered by heavy winds. paul hollywood has accused former
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presenters mary berry and mel and sue of abandoning the show when it moved to channel 4. he says the criticism he received was not fun and that he felt he became the most hated man in the country. you can't have a pop at mary berry, can you? i don't know. he is on the front page of many of the papers. you are going to be with us for the papers but you have all the sport fries as well.|j got my glasses on. for reading the paper later. can't read the paper without them ? paper later. can't read the paper without them? no. those are excellent. aren't they brilliant? i will have a go. hello. 0h, excellent. aren't they brilliant? i will have a go. hello. oh, my goodness. very good. can i do them
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now? we have all tried my glasses oi'i. now? we have all tried my glasses on. they are fabulous. ijust love them. anyway. what's going to happen at newcastle? newcastle have been quite a leaky clu b newcastle have been quite a leaky club at the moment. would be interesting to find out where information is coming from. could mike ashley's time as owner of newcastle united be coming to an end? a financial firm led by british businesswoman amanda staveley has launched a takeover bid in the region of £300 million. newcastle are yet to comment publicly on the news. brighton twice came from behind to draw 2—2 at home to stoke. they are now unbeaten in five premier league matches while stoke are only four points above the relegation zone. australia rugby union head coach michael cheika is being investigated over his comments and conduct during the defeat against
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england on saturday. he reacted angrily when a series of decisions went against his team at twickenham. and the rematch between david haye and tony bellew has been pushed back to either march or may next year. haye has torn a bicep in a freak training accident. bellew won the original fight — and the second clash had been due to take place at london's o2 arena next month. you as training and training on the stairs, we have seen his extreme training regime. —— he was. he was oi'i training regime. —— he was. he was on stairs and he fell down. they we re on stairs and he fell down. they were just stairs. in the gym, there are sets of stairs. justin johnson did that? he fell down the stairs and he was the overwhelming
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favourite. what was -- was he training? he was foolishly wearing socks. i've fallen down the stairs a couple of times before. it's not nice. top to bottom of the stairs. and i didn't have anything to drink. at first? no, tumbling. twice in two months. was it the middle of the night and was a dark? i'd just had new baby. i was discombobulated. that is a good work —— good word. there was no style involved. full tumble and crying. we are all glad you have recovered. moving on from the stairs tumble. paul hollywood is on the front page of the newspapers.
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also front page of the mail as well. we are talking about people being offered cancer scans. the front page offered cancer scans. the front page of the times this morning. mentioning the death of charles manson. the picture of here is of angela merkel. the possibility of another german election next few months. the brexit bill. the likes ofjacob rees—mogg months. the brexit bill. the likes of jacob rees—mogg who months. the brexit bill. the likes ofjacob rees—mogg who are months. the brexit bill. the likes of jacob rees—mogg who are saying that brexit talks should stall. i love how newspapers use pictures to tell a story. that is the angela merkel front page. she might have had something in her right. it made the telegraph? ina it made the telegraph? in a different form. angela merkel facing battle for
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survival. you could use that for an eye test. in america, you get politicians, like ed miliband doing the cough mixture. this is an interesting story. sailors from the royal navy will perform that first changing of the guards next week at buckingham palace. what are you reading over there? british gas, you might remember that announced they were getting rid of the standard variable tariff, the most expensive tariff, which people can end up on, where it is variable depending on what is happening with gas prices and electricity prices, which is leading the papers this morning. the government, you will remember, theresa may suggested she would bring a cap on energy prices, so would bring a cap on energy prices, so it is energy companies trying to pre—empt what might happen. they say
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thatis pre—empt what might happen. they say that is not why they have done it. it is good news for people who are on these rates. just another story, obviously there is lots of food delivery companies now, mainly to your home, but apparently you can get it to the pub. if you are in a pub, oran get it to the pub. if you are in a pub, or an establishment that doesn't serve food, you can deliver it now to serve food straight to the pub. iam it now to serve food straight to the pub. i am sure i have done that before. i am sure i have had peter ina pub. before. i am sure i have had peter in a pub. have you? yes -- pizza in a pub. talking about weird injuries, stuart broad, get in on this picture here, he has been mysteriously injured in brisbane ahead of the first test on thursday. that is a bruise. do you know what happened? he was hit by a stray golf ball. an
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assailant overhit his driver and struck him on the back. joe root was having a laugh. it could be quite serious. we need him. and before i go, iwant serious. we need him. and before i go, i want to show you this. favourite headline, who else would you call if you had a club and needed a manager? fireman sam, west brom in talks with sam allardyce. i have not given any way to that. i thought it was a nice headline. lovely stories as well about jana novotna, she worked for the bbc for bbc wimbledon. she was so warmhearted and brilliant. the news of her death hit many people hard. thank you. from festive adverts to music in the shops, christmas seems to arrive earlier and earlier every year. but how soon is too soon
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to start celebrating? it's been suggested that putting up your decorations sooner can actually make you feel happier. do you agree? we went to the manchester christmas markets to find out if people are feeling warm and fuzzy inside or frustrated that it's too much too soon. i love christmas. it is my favourite time of year. november is a good time. no, i think time of year. november is a good time. no, ithink december time of year. november is a good time. no, i think december onwards, not november. the earlier, the better. i love the vibes. i have been looking forward for this. yes. by been looking forward for this. yes. by the time christmas comes, i am fed up with john by the time christmas comes, i am fed up withjohn lewis by the time christmas comes, i am fed up with john lewis and sainsbury's. wait until december. when i was little, we put it up on christmas eve. it can start in
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september, we will still be here. christmas eve. it can start in september, we will still be harem is celebrating joy. i was so excited to come this evening. people start putting up the trees at ridiculous times. everyone is rating to put up pictures of christmas trees on facebook. as soon as halloween is done, anything can come out christmas related. is it controversial? i think we need to know what you think about this.|j really know what you think about this.” really wa nt know what you think about this.” really want to hold on until december the first. that is too early for me. i can see. the weekend of the ninth or the 10th, giving you a buildup to get the juices flowing. lots of you have got your decorations up. some of you like to start early and some of you just before christmas. as soon as the tree goes up, i start eating brazil nuts. nothing wrong with that. you can't have an entire month of nuts. it looks like christmas has come
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early. good morning, carol. good morning. keep christmas in december. you see why businesses have to start early. look at the magnificent light twinkling in the darkness on regents street. london is a light with christmas lights. as indeed are at many other towns and villages in the uk. the forecast for us all is fairly cloudy and mild, and some will see some rain at times. if we start looking around the country at nine o'clock this morning, we have some rain across northern england and scotland, and a little dry weather to start with as well. it is very mild at the moment. temperatures will go up quite high for the time of year. we have rain from the west moving east through the course of the day. so the dry weather will be across central and eastern areas with cloud at times. we might see a little drizzle coming
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out of the cloud at times and brightness in the shelter of the hills. by the time we get to three o'clock in the afternoon we will have the rain moving north across scotland. further south into northern england we will have rain crossing the pennines. for north—east england you will have some bright skies and then for the midlands there is rain across the north midlands, nothing very heavy, four east anglia, essex, kent, the isle of wight, a lot of cloud around with limited brightness. to the south—west of england, we have a fair bit of cloud, the odd spot of rain or drizzle coming out of that, and we have rain across parts of wales as well, a lot where it is not raining, and for northern ireland one or two raining, and for northern ireland one oi’ two showers raining, and for northern ireland one or two showers and a little brightness across the north of northern ireland. it is unseasonably mild today. as we move through the evening in overnight we have distinctive band of rain. 0ne evening in overnight we have distinctive band of rain. one in the north of scotland will be heavy and
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persistent with winter is across the northern isles. and here the wind will strengthen gusting to gales or possibly even severe gales. but a mild night for most of us. the final for scotland, the north—east, in cold conditions. but for the rest of us, double figures. as we head on into tomorrow, more rain in the north and west. some of it will be heavy and persistent, particularly so across, heavy and persistent, particularly so across, for example, cumbrian fels, snowdonia. the further east, it will be dry. this rain is heading towards the east. still mild for many but cooler conditions spreading across into northern england and northern ireland. and then by the time we get to thursday we have the rain clearing away from the south—east, a new band will come in across the south—west and we also have a band across the northern half of scotland, which will turn wintry later on in the day as it is going to be colder. in between, there will be some dry weather, and just south by then that looks like it is hanging onto the milder conditions.
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for the rest of us, temperatures will be tumbling. it is lovely here this morning, i must say. isn't it lovely, i must say. thank you. let's move to one of the main stories this morning, zimbabwe. his party want to impeach him and the military are on the streets of the capital, harare, but despite this, robert mugabe remains the president of zimbabwe. so what now for the man who has ruled the country for 37 years? gilbert nyambabvu is editor of the news website, new zimbabwe, and hejoins us now. good morning and thank you very much for joining good morning and thank you very much forjoining us. it has been an extraordinary couple of days. so what will happen? there is talk of impeachment. is it likely to start happening today? the more important development overnight, contact has been initiated between the two principal players in this farcical drama. mugabe spoke with the former vice president, thought to be behind the coup. and he is expected to be
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continuing negotiations with mugabe so continuing negotiations with mugabe soi continuing negotiations with mugabe so i expect that should lead to a resolution of the crisis one way or another. in terms of the possibility of impeachment, what sort of process would that take, and where would that lead robert mugabe to eventually beat, maybe in prison, would he leave zimbabwe, what do you think? it is not easy for the ruling party. what will have to happen is the process be initiated this morning. a committee of parliament will be chosen to discuss it. then, if the committee thinks there are grounds for impeachment, it comes back to a joint sitting of the senate and they also have an assembly to carry through the impeachment, after which mugabe won't be president. and then what happens after that is the vice president takes over for a period happens after that is the vice president takes overfor a period of up president takes overfor a period of up to 90 days in which time the ruling party must advise the speaker of who their new leader is. could robert mugabe ignore the process,
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like he has ignored the calls to step down? it is difficult for him to ignore the impeachment process but i am not sure how sincere the ruling party are on the impeachment process. i suspect they are using that to force him to negotiate. the impeachment is not the easiest route for the ruling party. they will have to make serious concessions to the opposition. they need the support of the opposition to carry through. not all of these mps support what is going on. some of the concessions the opposition demand include political reforms to ensure free and fair elections and zanu—pf will never reform itself out of power. they also demanded a coalition government. zanu—pf does not want that. my sense is the impeachment process is to force mugabe to come to an agreement in this process which started with mugabe. how much support do you think there is in zimbabwe for robert mugabe?
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support do you think there is in zimbabwe for robert mugabe7m support do you think there is in zimbabwe for robert mugabe? in terms of the ordinary people? yes. he would have got a sense of that on saturday. generally, zimbabwean clue that won him to go. his spokesperson said something important with the financial times —— zimbabweans want him to go. it is not on the will of the people but with those who wield power and those who wield power at the moment the military. in his view, he really doesn't care what people think, that is why he can't ignore is ignored the demonstration on saturday. there is no sign of grace mugabe? no, it is believed it is at the family private home. 0k. and how key is what happens to her to the future of zimbabwe?” and how key is what happens to her to the future of zimbabwe? i think it is important, mugabe will seek guarantees for her safety, if he decides to set down, which i don't expect he will. he has always said
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he will retire the mugabe way, which means going out in glory, in a dignified way. so he will try to ensure that he is allowed to continuing office until the zanu—pf c0 ng ress continuing office until the zanu—pf congress in december, which might choose a new leader, allowing him to finish his term, which should end next year during the elections. so than a contest will be held. it sounds as you say unlikely he will spend any time injail sounds as you say unlikely he will spend any time in jail eventually because if he goes there will have to bea because if he goes there will have to be a deal signed that will allow him to leave with his head held high? exactly, he will try avoid any of this. good to talk to you, thank you for talking to us. thank you for having me. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we have a packed programme, we haven't even mentioned paloma faith is coming on the programme. you have now. we will be back with their headlines in a couple of minutes' time. good morning.
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i'm asad ahmad. well, this morning, a woman has died in a fire in a block of flats in hampstead. around 60 firefighters have been tackling the blaze since the early hours of this morning. 20 people managed to escape, but the woman died at the scene. the fire is now under control. over £350 million is currently being spent by councils across london, in order to make social housing safer, following the grenfell tower in june. bbc london has found that around half of local authorities have asked for financial help from government to meet the costs involved, but have yet to receive any. which has left councils unhappy. it seems entirely unfair that money is coming from the repairfund. we have a problem with damp in council flats. many kitchens have not been replaced in 30 or a0 years. there are always works to be done on the grounds and the external of the building. this vast amount of money
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could do an enormous amount of good and it seems only fair that the rather than the tenants paying for that it should come from general taxation. more than iao firearms, including two second world war machine—guns, have been handed in to the police this week as part of a gun amnesty. automatic guns, revolvers and rifles have also been collected, with another week left to run of the campaign. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes, the district line has no service between turnham green and ea rl‘s court because of a track fault. and the piccadilly line has no service between acton town and rayners lane for the same reason. 0n the roads, on the m25, the outside lane remains in both directions remains closed betweenjunction 21 for the mi and junction 22, for repairs to the crash barrier. let's have a check on the weather now with kate. good morning. the temperature overnight last night didn't drop down far at all, so we start the day
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ona down far at all, so we start the day on a very mild note. it is, however, rather grey and cloudy. it should stay mostly dry today. there is a chance of the spotlight rain, maybe drizzle, but most places avoid it. the strengthening south—westerly wind as well. the temperature is u naffected. wind as well. the temperature is unaffected. maximum of 13 or ia degrees, so mild in november. 0vernight we still have all of this cloud, the chance of a spot of light rain and drizzle. but the wind will continue to strengthen overnight. and it helps keep up the temperature. it stays very mild. a minimum of 13 degrees means tomorrow morning it will be a very mild start. 0n morning it will be a very mild start. on wednesday, the breeze continues to strengthen. some bright spells tomorrow. the temperature up to 1a spells tomorrow. the temperature up to ia or 15 degrees. through thursday and into friday, low pressure remains in charge and that flings towards us various weather fronts, so becoming quite wet,
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especially as we go through friday. some heavy bursts of rain. you will notice into the weekend the wind sta rts notice into the weekend the wind starts to shift direction and things get much colder as we head through saturday. va nessa vanessa feltz has a breakfast show on bbc radio london from 7am until 10am andi on bbc radio london from 7am until 10am and i will be back in half an hour. year will get hello — this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: we'll be looking at why so many older people feel excluded from the high street and why more seating could help tackle the problem. the government has promised to scrap tampon tax next year. but with the budget looming, we'll discuss whether the move goes far enough to end so—called period poverty. she has a big voice and she's using it to tackle big issues. paloma faith will be here to tell us how she's using music to explore modern society and politics.
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good morning. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. to reason they look set to offer the eu are bigger divorce and returned the trade talks. the bbc understands the trade talks. the bbc understands the move was given a go—ahead at a meeting of senior cabinet ministers. the prime minister is acted to put the offer to the eu later this week, britain told it must make more progress if talks are to move on to the next phase. robert mugabe faces being impeached after refusing to step down as president of zimbabwe. the country's ruling party, zanu—pf, could ask parliament to begin the process today. the 93—year old, who remains under armed guard in the presidential palace, is accused of allowing his wife to usurp power and many believe he is now incapable of governing. last night, the military suggested a plan was emerging for the transfer of power. we have made further consultation
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with the president to agree on the roadmap in the prevailing situation in the country. the zimbabwe defence and security services are encouraged by new developments which include conduct between the president and the former vice president, emmerson mnangagwa, who is expected in the country shortly. a scheme aimed at detecting lung cancer, earlier is to be extended to thousands more patients. nhs england says the use of mobile scanners at supermarkets and shopping centres in greater manchester proved so successful, similar schemes will now be rolled out to other parts of the country. there is an increase in cages found at stage one or two when the disease is more easily treated. president trump has re—declared north korea as a state sponsor of terrorism — nine years
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after it was removed from the list. mr trump said the move would trigger very large additional sanctions, which will be announced in the future. he blamed the country's nuclear programme, as well as its support for what he called "international acts of terrorism". south korea has welcomed the move. the argentine navy says noises picked up by two ships in the south atlantic on their sonar equipment are not coming from a missing argentine submarine. the sub — with aa crew members on board — disappeared six days ago off the coast of argentina. the united states has sent specialist underwater rescue equipment to help with the search, which has been hampered by heavy winds. paul hollywood has accused his former bake 0ff colleagues including mary berry of abandoning the show. she and mel and sue that the programme when it moved to channel a. he says the criticism he received
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was not fun and that he felt he became the most hated man in the country. there you go. that brings you up—to—date with bake 0ff news. the latest bake 0ff news. if you didn't want to be the most hated man in the country, would you criticise mary barry? would you do that? let's not go there. let's talk about mike ashley instead. his time as owner of newcastle united could in fact be coming to an end. a financial firm led by british businesswoman amanda staveley has launched a takeover bid in the region of £300 million. newcastle are yet to comment publicly on the news. brighton twice came from behind to deny stoke all three points at the amex stadium in the premier league last night. stoke took the lead through choupo—moting — his third goal of the season. jose izquierdo got the final goal of the night to earn chris hughton's side a point — brighton are now
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unbeaten in five league matches. i would have liked more, certainly, it probably the overall performance wasn't good enough to get all three points and i thought we showed great credit and character to come back twice from being behind the wallaby overall, i think the draw was a fair result. west bromwich albion are looking for a new manager after sacking tony pulis. a a—nil home defeat to chelsea left the club one point above the relegation zone and ended pulis's reign after less than three years in charge. he is the fifth premier league manager to be dismissed this season. gary megson has been put in temporary charge. australia head coach michael cheika is being investigated for his comments and conduct during saturday's match against england at twickenham. the disciplinary authorities are investigating with an update expected later. cheika reacted strongly to a series of decisions that went against his side in the 30 points to 6 defeat, while he also was involved in an exchange
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with a supporter. staying with rugby union and sarah hunter will win her hundredth cap for england women later. she'll lead the red roses out against canada for the second match in their autumn series. the 201a world cup winner was named world player of the year last year. david haye's heavyweight rematch with tony bellew has been postponed after a freak training accident. the fight was due to take place next month, but haye slipped during a stair conditioning session and tore his bicep when he grabbed a bannister to stop himself falling. he's had surgery and it's now hoped the fight will go ahead next march or may. after retiring from football, former liverpool and manchester united striker michael owen turned his attention horse racing. and ownership in particular. (00v) but now for the first time he'll compete as a jockey — his first race will be at ascot in aid of the prince's countryside fund.
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0wen will be the only novice in the race. he first sat on a horse less than a year ago and started riding for the first time in april. we tried to put the on the nice horses to start with, one is that aren't keen spin and spin around so i've had a gentle introduction but there is no hiding place, you have to go and do it and the ups and downs, the weight loss, getting dumped on the floor, the pain. it's all been a massive learning curve and way harder than i thought. he must have known how hard it was going to be. anybody knows that jockeys are about as tough as boxes, they had to be incredibly tough. just one year he has done that. have you ever been on one of those fake
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bourse machines? we always send michael rushall to go there when that happens. have you done that? i tried it but it looked ridiculous.” am not built to be a jockey. me neither. from cleaners to security guards, more than 3 million people in the uk are outsourced to companies rather than being employed directly by them. that can mean less generous pensions, as well as holiday and sick pay. but a group of staff are seeking a landmark tribunal ruling that they have the right to negotiate better terms and conditions at the university where they work. it could have wide implications for other outsourced workers. let's discuss this with hannah reed who works in employment rights at the tuc. they give arejoining they give are joining us. what exactly is the problem? there is a real concern. when we go into the workplace we see different collea g u es workplace we see different colleagues and we think we are all employed by the same organisation that many will have been outsourced
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and they will often be receiving less pay, losing out on sick pay and most importantly, they will not have a say over how their working lives are organised. this case really looks at ensuring that everybody in the workplace has a fair deal, everybody gets the same decent pay and conditions. you talk about being outsourced. most of them all many of them will be employed by an agency is why does the agency not have responsibility for them? they may be employed by an agency also this company but the real concern is a lot of employers choose to outsourced workers in order to cut back on wages and cut back on pay and conditions so these individuals who might have previously been directly employed by the same employer will find they are being paid employer will find they are being pa id less employer will find they are being paid less per hour and losing out on holiday pay and sick pay. let's get back to the agency thing. why are the agencies not pay in holiday pay?
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they might well be paying minimum standards that many outsourced workers don't receive the going rate for thejob. many workers don't receive the going rate for the job. many individuals who are outsourced workers are women, bme workers who are already disadvantaged. what's the tuc believes is that all working people should receive the going rate for thejob. should receive the going rate for the job. i know they are pursuing this. how would it work the un and ideal world? would you judge on everybody in the same building? how would you begin to judge things? the tuc believes the government should bring together unions and employers to agree on what the going rate should be to make sure there was a level playing field and make sure whether you are employed directly by a company or by a service company or an a company or by a service company or c , a company or by a service company or an agency, you receive that going
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rate of pay. we believe it's important that all individuals whether they are employed to an agency or a service company, they should have a voice in the workplace and the best voice you can get in the workplace is having a trade union representing you. with the university, if they were to go on and win their case, would there be widespread changes? means employers would consider thinking twice and keep staff directly employed that it could mean the main employers, the employers at the top of the chain, would have a responsibility to ensure that whenever they outsource their staff, those staff receive a fair deal but also to ensure they are getting paid the rate for the job. we talk about holiday pay and pensions. some of these people might
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have missed out on all of those pensions, holiday pay. what happens to that? this case particularly involving cleaners, when cleaning contractor outsourced, individuals receive lower rates of pay. what we are arguing is there should be a level playing field for everyone. thank you for your time and practised. not many 91 -year-olds are asked to help with dancing, particularly when they describe their owners dancing. next year is their owners dancing. next year is the 70th anniversary of the ss empire windrush, bringing the first wave of post—war caribbean immigrants to the uk colin patterson has been to rehearsals to find out more. the empire windrush brings to britain many jamaicans. they
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the empire windrush brings to britain manyjamaicans. they served this country well. history being turned into dance. next year as the 70th anniversary of the empire windrush bringing the first large group of post—war caribbean immigrants to the uk. swing, swing. don't go too soon. sharon watson is the artistic dance director of dance company in leeds, inspired by her own mother's journey from jamaica in 19605 own mother's journey from jamaica in 1960s and decided to create a piece about empire windrush. it resonates without family in leaving a home and place. relocating somewhere new, somewhere different.” place. relocating somewhere new, somewhere different. i picked her brain considerably. her mum had come along to see the work in progress and it was bringing back memories of own arrival in the uk. you could see icicles hanging down from the windows which you don't see now. i had a big coat on a big boat and we
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had a big coat on a big boat and we had never seen them before. it was a bit unusualfor had never seen them before. it was a bit unusual for me. members of leeds caribbean community had also been invited sydney could give feedback based on their own voyages. that windrush, it reminds me so much, like sardines packed in that boat. and they are thrilled the story will be on stage next february. when the younger people come and see what's going on, they understand what the old ladies and old gentleman had to go through. so this is leeds, i9a0... i9a8. phoenix has also made an old discovery they hope they can show. alfred gardiner is 91, lives in leeds and came over on windrush. his agreed to share his memories to help shape the production. he was a mechanic in the raf in britain during the second world war and a
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lack of work at home made him want to come back. in jamaica at the time, if you haven't got a job, you area time, if you haven't got a job, you are a nobody. what was it like on windrush? we had six ex- army boys who want to commandeer our money. between us, we got them on the boat. we were busy hiding the money. three men ina we were busy hiding the money. three men in a toilet hiding. that is what happened. what can i say, it's part of history now. it is history. and 70 years on, alford, who worked in factories and had nine children, thinks getting on windrush was a great decision. i have family, music. i support. great decision. i have family, music. isupport. after them great decision. i have family, music. i support. after them three things, good luck for everything else. you strike me as a man who has enjoyed life. and i am still
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enjoying it. and i will always be enjoying it. and i will always be enjoying it. 10am and i will be back in half an hour. 0h, oh, what 0h, whata oh, what a charming 0h, whata charming man. oh, what a charming man. yeah. windrush: movement of the people will premiere at the west yorkshire playhouse in february, before touring the country. shall we find out about the weather? carol is looking festive. it might be cold. it might indeed. today, it is mild. look at this display of christmas lights, the spirit of christmas lights, the spirit of christmas on regents street, which comprise of 300,000 led lights, they are or nor mind. it is mild to start the day across many areas. if we go from northern ireland over to england — scotland borders, even south of that, roughly between ten and ia degrees at the moment. it is cold in scotland. generally, for most of us, the forecast is a mild
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one, it is fairly cloudy and there is also some rain in the forecast. so, the rain at the moment is across scotla nd so, the rain at the moment is across scotland and northern england. a lot of dry weather currently. however, we have another band of rain which is going to swing in from the west through the course of the day. so, the further east that you are, it will be drier. even as we head into the afternoon, we have a move north across scotland, so the central lowlands, into the highlands and the grampians. south of that, cloudy and dry and very mild with temperatures in double figures. south across northern england, fairly cloudy, rain across the pennines. north—east of england have something bright. and we have rain in parts of the north midlands. in east anglia, essex, kent, down to the isle of wight, a lot of cloud, limited brightness and the cloud for example in the south—west of england is thick enough for the odd spot of rain but nothing too heavy. moving into wales, more rain, the north
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hanging on to some cloud, with brea ks hanging on to some cloud, with breaks in the sheltered hills, and for northern ireland, rain to the south of northern ireland, not immune to some showers, a little brightness in the north of northern ireland. through the course of the evening and overnight there are two distinctive band of rain you can see on the charts. the first across the north of scotland is likely to be heavy and persistent. and across the northern isles, where it will be cold, we are looking at wintry showers. for the rest of us, it is going to be another mild night, unseasonably so, with temperatures in double figures. then as we head into tomorrow, increasingly tomorrow, the wind is going to strengthen, especially in the west, with gusts to gale force. windy in southern counties as well, and more rain coming in across the north and the west, some of which will be heavy and persistent, particularly across snowdonia, the cumbrian fels, and drifting eastward. tomorrow, london might hit 15 celsius. then as
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we head into thursday, the rain will clear from the south—east, then later in the day we've got more rain coming in across the south—west, and we've also got rain and snow across the northern half of scotland, primarily the grampians and the highlands, and some of that snow will get down to road level. something to bear in mind if you are travelling. then the cooler air will filter in that bit further south as well. did you know that regents street was the first st to actually have festive christmas lights? that was way back in 195a. dan, did you switch them on? oh, what? (laughter).. carol. hang on a minute! that was unnecessary. i have been really nice this week. that was unexpected, wasn't it? she has been working on that for a while, you ratbag. thank you very much indeed. excellent, they would have looked different in 195a. excellent, they would have looked
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different in 1954. thank you. i was going to chat to carol, but i can't be bothered any more. we are talking about christmas decorations. yes. and we mentioned it last week, when did they go up in your house? you have to wait till december. at least december? yes. lots of people have gone very december? yes. lots of people have gone very early. i know. that was the christmas decoration falling down in the background. they don't go down in the background. they don't 9° up down in the background. they don't go up in the studio and to two weeks before christmas. we will get some comments on this in a moment. lots of people have got in contact a moment. lots of people have got in co nta ct to a moment. lots of people have got in contact to say when it is right, wrong and playing insane. yes, more on that later. first of all, steph is talking about unpaid work experience. lots of discussion about this. did you do work experience? yes, the bbc world service latin american section. it led you to a greatjob. american section. it led you to a great job. dan? i put american section. it led you to a greatjob. dan? i put floppy american section. it led you to a great job. dan? i put floppy disks in the olden days into piles of ten.
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that was my work experience. who did you work for? packaging company near gatwick airport. and it has served you well, clearly. yes, thank you. good morning. work experience is a great way of bridging the gap between what you do at school and what he might do for a living and for business it is good to connect with talent. there has been some criticism about it with some employers exploiting these young people who come and work for them. what can be done to make sure this doesn't happen? i'm joined by businesswoman sherry coutu, who wants to change that. good morning. what is it you want to do? i want to make it really easy for all young children between 16 and 18 to find great work experience with small companies and large companies and medium—sized companies. and there is research that shows 1a0 hours of work experience between 16 and 18 makes it much easier to think aboutjobs
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they will hold or create later on in life. and with the world going very quickly, bringing it all together in a single place, making it easierfor the young person, on a mobile phone, isa dream. the young person, on a mobile phone, is a dream. this is a charity launch, so what are the issues with work experience? it is a great way to solve the skills gap to have young people getting skills early on, but many young people struggle to get work experience. often they will go to companies at a no. but there are 5 million companies in the uk. -- that there are 5 million companies in the uk. —— that they know. it is hard if you don't know them or your teacher doesn't know them and you don't know where to look. so you go to the large ones. 100% of newjobs come from small and medium—size companies in the uk. if you put them into a single place and they like using phones, so we put it on the phone, and you just make it easy so with a couple of taps you can say, i am interested in that, so you get recommendation engines to say, well,
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have you thought of this one, or this one? so the same thing that an engaged parent or teacher can do, but we go further afield than what you would with your own contacts. essentially it is to help young people find work experience. what about the employers' side of it, how you can make sure they will provide good work experience for people? yes, good enough work experience — the children rate the work experience that they have and if you provide not great work experience then you know what to do better. we provide the briefing and everything. so these work experience types for children this age, you know, try a project, there are lots of how to guides so that the business leaders know confident in what they are doing. so you think, will this be meaningful, will it make a difference? everyone wants to make a difference. if you run a small company, you love the company, so it provides great experience. itjust gives them role models that allows
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them to know what they need to do. what is the definition of meaningful work experience, what would you say? i think one where the young person knows they made contribution and for the business i don't want someone just filing discs like you said, i would rather a project that you know will help the company. so to be about work experience, you know, what can we do that would be great for the young person? have them on the monday, present a project on friday, and that is a deal with a beginning, middle and end. that can beginning, middle and end. that can bea beginning, middle and end. that can be a lot of work and it can be tough to get people responsibility if they are only teenagers. i don't think it is tough. there is a lot of things we can all do. and we know that the single biggest issue we have a small business is the talent coming in the door will stop they don't really know how to work. if i have someone coming in from 18 who has had a summerjob coming in from 18 who has had a summer job and coming in from 18 who has had a summerjob and an easterjob and another one and i know they are far
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more thoughtful and they feel co mforta ble more thoughtful and they feel comfortable about what they will do. i think we all need to lean in and make a difference here. there is one point a million children who are 16, 17 or18, —— point a million children who are 16, 17 or 18, -- 1.8 point a million children who are 16, 17 or 18, —— 1.8 million people. the world is changing really fast. so without helping... i think about dunkirk, the move. when you see all of the soldiers on the beach and you think, there is no way we can help them all. but actually what they did is they got all of the people on the small boats to come across the channel and pick them up. to me, thatis channel and pick them up. to me, that is the analogy. look at the children on the beach. let's help them make the bridge into the world of work a lot more easily. fascinating. i wish we had more time. that is it for now. that was really interesting. thank you. and good advice. you're watching and good advice. brea kfast. —— you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: they've entertained fans for almost a century and the pope and whoopi goldberg
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are honorary members. we'll be talking extreme stunts and slam dunks with the harlem globetrotters a little later. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. i'm asad ahmad. a woman has died in a fire in a block of flats in hampstead. around 60 firefighters have been tackling the blaze since the early hours of this morning. 20 people managed to escape, but the woman died at the scene. the fire is now under control. over £350 million is currently being spent by councils across london, in order to make social housing safer, following the grenfell tower in june. bbc london has found that around half of local authorities have asked for financial help from government to meet the costs involved, but have yet to receive any. the government says "building owners are responsible for fire safe," which has left councils unhappy. it seems to me entirely unfair that that amount of money is coming
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from the repair fund. we have a problem with damp in council flats. many kitchens have not been replaced in 30 or a0 years. there are always works to be done on the grounds and the external of the building. this is a vast amount of money which could do an enormous amount of good and it seems only fair that the rather than the tenants paying for that it should come from general taxation. receptionists and porters are among staff launching a legal challenge over pay and conditions at the university of london this morning which could impact upon millions of agency staff right across the uk. workers at the outsourcing company wouldn't want the right to determine conditions with the university itself, but the university says it doesn't employ any of the staff. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes, the district line has no service between turnham green and ea rl‘s court because of a track fault. and the piccadilly line has no service between acton town and rayners lane for the same reason.
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0n for the same reason. the roads, and on—screen roa closed 0n the roads, and on—screen road is closed because of a fire. —— bounds green road. let's have a check on the weather now with kate. good morning. the temperature overnight last night didn't drop down far at all, so we start the day on a very mild note. it is, however, rather grey and cloudy. it should stay mostly dry today. there is a chance of the spotlight rain, maybe drizzle, but most places avoid it. the strengthening south—westerly wind as well. the temperature unaffected. we're looking at a maximum of 13 or 1a degrees, very mild for november. 0vernight we still have all of this cloud, the chance of a spot of light rain and drizzle. but the wind, that's going to continue to strengthen overnight. and it helps keep up the temperature. it stays very mild. a minimum of 13 degrees means tomorrow morning it will be another mild start. on wednesday, the breeze continues to strengthen. that
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continues to strengthen. south—westerly, westerly some bright spells tomorrow. continues to strengthen. the temperature up to 1a or 15 degrees. through thursday and into friday, low pressure remains in charge and that flings towards us various weather fronts, so becoming quite wet, especially as we go through friday. some heavier bursts of rain. you will notice into the weekend the wind starts to shift direction and things get much colder as we head through saturday. vanessa feltz has a breakfast show on bbc radio london from 7am until 10am and i will be back in half an hour. hello — this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. theresa may gets the backing of her cabinet to offer a bigger brexit payout. senior ministers have agreed that britain should offer more money to the eu, if it clears the path for trade talks to begin. but the prime minister is facing anger from some of her own mps who are accusing the eu of holding the uk to ransom. good morning — it's tuesday
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the 21st of november. zimba bwe's parliament prepares to take legal action to force robert mugabe from power. early screening for lung cancer. doctors say a trial using mobile scanners in supermarket car parks has proved a huge success. i'll be speaking to the boss of budget airline easyjet — about how they're swooping in on struggling rivals, after the airline industry's tough summer. in sport, could mike ashley's days at newcastle be numbered following a formal bid for the football club? and it's only november, but could getting in the festive mood early help improve your winter wellbeing? it's like celebrating joy. like, i was so excited to come to the christmas markets this evening. christmas trees up at ridiculous times. everyone is waiting to put pictures of christmas trees on facebook. and carol has the weather.
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you can see the lights of regent street behind me. it is mild around across many parts of the uk. except scotland. some rain in the north and the west so that further east you are, the dry conditions are here but more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may looks set to offer the eu a bigger divorce bill payment in return for starting trade talks next month. the bbc understands the move was approved at a meeting of senior cabinet ministers yesterday. the uk had been told it must make more progress on its financial offer, if talks are to move into the next phase. but political uncertainty in germany has complicated the picture, with chancellor angela merkel saying she would prefer new elections rather than lead a minority government. it follows a breakdown in coalition
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talks, which plunged the country into political crisis. we can get the latest on that from our correspondent, alex forsyth in westminster. money has been a huge problem. not just for the eu which wanted more but that the uk government. there we re but that the uk government. there were different views about what the uk needed to pay. to reason they got some seniorfigures to uk needed to pay. to reason they got some senior figures to thrash out the government's negotiating position. we understand there is broad agreement they should up the financial offer that only if the eu agrees to start talking about trade in transition when they next meet in december. there is no figure that has been mentioned in part of the reason that is deliberate. to reason they knows that if they pay a
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certain amount, that might anger some mps in their own backbenchers, particularly those who are adamant we shouldn't be paying the european union too much. getting the agreement from cabinet might up the offer that there is this extra layer offer that there is this extra layer of political instability coming from germany. that matters because germany. that matters because germany is influential in the eu. it isa germany is influential in the eu. it is a chance the uk to push the negotiations forward. 0thers is a chance the uk to push the negotiations forward. others feel about the strength and stability of angela merkel, it could affect things. damien mcguinness in berlin. the front page of the times mentions what alex said. they say to reason they needs to exploit angela merkel‘s political weakness. what is the situation in germany? right now, it is political uncertainty. we are
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ina it is political uncertainty. we are in a state of gridlock. talks broke down to the new coalition government. today, the german president is meeting with the leaders of various parties to persuade them to get back to the table. a couple of different options. those potential partners, it could be fresh elections or a minority government. neither option is ideal. she does come out of both options potentially weakened. the brexit connection is interesting. there is no real direct link in a sense. brexit wasn't mentioned during four weeks of coalition negotiations between those for parties. all politicians in germany are parties. all politicians in germany a re pretty parties. all politicians in germany are pretty united on saying that actually it's brussels that needs to deal with the uk. in a sense, whatever happens on german politics —— in german politics doesn't have a direct effect. as alex mentioned,
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what happens in the eu's largest economy does have an impact on the broader eu and if anything it could make britain's position worse because it there is a weakened and divided eu, it might make it more difficult for brussels to give britain a good deal. damien, thank you. we will discuss this further with conservative mp nigel evans and green party mp caroline lucas. robert mugabe is faces being impeached after refusing to step down as president of zimbabwe. the country's ruling party, zanu—pf, could ask parlimament to begin the process today. the 93—year old, who remains under armed guard in the presidential palace, is accused of allowing his wife to usurp power and many believe he is now incapable of governing. last night, the military suggested a plan was emerging for the transfer of power. we have made further consultation with the president to agree on a roadmap on the prevailing situation in the country. the zimbabwe defence and security
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services are encouraged by new developments which include conduct between the president and the former vice—president, comrade emmerson mnangagwa, who is expected in the country shortly. president trump has announced that the us is re—designating north korea a state sponsor of terrorism, nine years after it was removed from the list. he said the move would trigger very large additional sanctions to be announced later. washington's latest and most anticipate —— anticipated salvo in its war of words with north korea, donald trump expected to use pressure on the regime. this will impose further sanctions and penalties on north korea and related
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persons and supports a maximum pressure campaign to isolate the murderous regime. the president says this should have been done long time ago. the is compelling. president trump is warning of what he calls large sanctions. north korea is under crippling international pressure and there is not much more the us can do. we still hope for diplomacy. the president's secretary of state is holding the door open, talks are still the preferred way to end the stand—off. more than two months since north korea last carried out a missile test. authorities in south korea say further tests could come at any time but they are not seeing any tell—tale signs of preparation. this morning, the government welcomed washington's latest move but it would not halt efforts to get north korea back to the moment ——
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negotiating table. but the regime in pyongyang is keeping up its rhetoric. it called donald trump and old lunatic whose recent visit to south korea was all nonsense. amid this war of insults and pressure, it's not clear how or if negotiations can resume. staff employed by an outsourcing company cordant are asking a tribunal to rule that they have the right to negotiate better terms and conditions with the university of london where they work. if the tribunal agrees that the university should be recognised as the workers' joint employer it could have implications for more than 3 million people in the uk who work for facilities companies. the university says it doesn't employ any of the staff. unions say the workers have a strong case. young persons railca rd young persons railcard which —— rail cards are to be extended to 30 —year—olds. the chancellor is set to announce a change in wednesday's budget. things didn't go according to plan
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for one unfortunate cameraman waiting to capture the moment the old georgia dome sports stadium in atlanta, georgia was demolished. he was all set up for the money shot, when this happened. you can't see it. at bus pulled up right in front of the camera. com pletely obscuring his view. needless to say he wasn't too happy — we've bleeped out what he says. you got to question his positioning? it's the end of an era for the stadium, which during its 25 year history, hosted two superbowls and an 0lympics. we had a stunning performance in that 0lympics. 0ne solitary gold medal. steve redgrave. imagine that
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poor cameraman as well.” medal. steve redgrave. imagine that poor cameraman as well. i think it was a man, because you could hear it. he had one chance to get the shot. a scheme aimed at detecting lung cancer earlier is to be extended to thousands more patients. nhs england says the use of mobile scanners at supermarkets and shopping centres in greater manchester proved so successful, similar schemes will now be rolled out to other parts of the country. caroline rigby has more. it has saved my life, definitely saved my life, because i could have gone maybe two or three years and it could have spread everywhere. michael brady was diagnosed with lung cancer thanks to a project which offered extra screening to smokers and former smokers in some of the poorest manchester areas. in an effort to boost early detection, patients thought to be most at risk were given ct
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scans in mobile trucks and supermarkets at shopping centres. lung cancer is the biggest cancer killer in the uk, claiming 35,000 lives year. nhs england says during the manchester pilot, one case was detected every 33 people screened and four out of five cases were diagnosed early when the disease is easier to treat. similar schemes are being rolled out in london and the north of england. many have welcomed it but cancer research uk warns there will need to be extra staff needed if more lives are to be saved. brian hope is a gp and is with us now. the papers have said they will be tests in supermarket car parks. what they have done in manchester is they have piloted and targeted people or an area that actually has a very high level of lung cancer. i think that is important in screening. screening is not diagnosis. it is trying to pick out
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a population that will be more at risk than the general population. i think that's where this has been really successful in that one, it's been accessible for people. we are the people who don't get screened are the people who don't get screened a re often the people who don't get screened are often the people who should get screened. in cervical cancer screening, we often don't get it. we often don't get the 20, 30%. when we look specifically at lung cancer survival rates which is poor in the uk, is that because the right people are not being screened? it's very positive because we know that if we catch it early, your chances of survival are much greater. the higher up that number you get, the less survival rate is you get up. catching it early is absolutely critical. there will be a wider
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expansion of these mobile schemes. what's good as they have pirate —— piloted it. they have proved its worth. we know that it's actually going to be effective and that's a really good thing. also talking about an introduction, or extension. the one we have at the minute, when you have a screening programme. you don't have a lot of false positives and a lot of false negatives. this new test is a pacific. if it positive, it means you definitely need to do something about it so looking through the whole system of the nhs, we are not clogging the system the nhs, we are not clogging the syste m u p the nhs, we are not clogging the system up with people who have a false positive. having tests done that might not need to be done.
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getting people early, that is one of the key things in treatment. we have screening programmes already. it means that people are reluctant because people are frightened by the word, to come forward and all of us say, if i don't do anything, it's the opposite of that. the more we do get tested appropriately, that gives a better chance of survival. so if people go to a supermarket car park ora so if people go to a supermarket car park or a shopping centre and they see these screening areas, is it not on the door or go in? i don't think thatis on the door or go in? i don't think that is happening. you have to have an appointment, to be referred or whatever, because that's what happens with screening programmes. people say, why am i not in it? you have to have a system or else it
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gets overloaded and the knock—on effect to the nhs could be negative. so there has to be as system of calling people in and having it done in an appropriate manner. very interesting, thank you. let us know what you think about that. we have been talking about the regents street christmas lights, which they have put up since the 19505. which they have put up since the 1950s. here is how it was reported backin 1950s. here is how it was reported back in 1957. the mayor of westminster will switch on one of london's christmas displays, the regions —— regents street.” london's christmas displays, the regions -- regents street. i love that. absolutely brilliant. they are still putting up the lights on regents street. carroll, the first to have christmas lights? that's right. good morning. lots of others followed of course and you can see
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them behind me and the theme is the spirit of christmas. they were switched on by paloma faith, who will be here at 9:05am, and she will be with michael ball, and of course emma bunton as well. now, the weather is lovely and mild across england, wales and northern ireland. at the moment, temperatures are between 11 and 1a degrees. in scotland, they are lower with a range roughly between five and ten. in parts of the grampians, they are as low as freezing. for most of the day, the forecast is cloudy and mild and some will see some rain at times. some of us already have some rain. this morning at 9am we have rain. this morning at 9am we have rain in northern england and scotland. there is a lot of dry weather around. it is breezy today with a federal cloud. the cloud is thick enough for the odd spot of
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rain is all. —— with a fair bit of cloud. we have another band through the day from the west. if we start the day from the west. if we start the forecast this afternoon in scotla nd the forecast this afternoon in scotland at three o'clock you can see the rain north of the central belt moving steadily northwards. south of that in the southern uplands and northern england, there isa uplands and northern england, there is a lot of cloud and across the pennines we also have rain moving from the west to the east. so at this stage north—east england has brighter skies. for the midlands, into east anglia and southern counties, a lot of cloud. the north midlands seeing some spots of rain. and as we drift to the south—west, we are looking at the cloud thick enough for the odd spot of rain, but nothing too heavy. then we run into the rain across wales, a lot of cloud, raining all the time, when not it will be fairly grey, and for northern ireland, to the south this afternoon, with the spot out of the cloud. the bright skies north of england. it will be unseasonably
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mild temperatures into the midteens. . then into the evening and overnight you can see the distinctive banns of rain on the charts with their heaviest and most persistent across the north of scotland. here across the northern isles it will be wintry. it is going to feel cold here and the wind will be picking up. for the rest of the uk it is going to be relatively mild once again in the night with temperatures in double figures. 0n wednesday, more rain across the north and west, some of that will be heavy and persistent, particularly so across, for example, snowdonia, the cumbrian fels, we will see large totals and the other feature is it will be very windy, particularly so in the west with exposure and gusting winds across the south and the english channel. tomorrow, london could hit 15 celsius. then as we head into thursday, the rain clears away from the south—east, there is a dry spell and then we have more rain coming in from the
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south—west, and at the same time from the word go there will be some rain across scotland falling as no even down to road level across the highlands and also the grampians, something to bear in mind if you are travelling. and you will notice the cooler conditions filtering that bit further south, so the very south of england hangs on by the skin of its teeth to double—figure temperatures. 0k, thank you very much. going to have a look at some of the front pages of the papers.” going to have a look at some of the front pages of the papers. i am ready to go. we were talking about the cancer test and moment ago and i was saying a moment earlier about how a picture can be used to tell a picture and this is about angela merkel fighting for her future after the collapse of talks to form a coalition government. angela merkel faces a battle for survival. it is the use of the picture which is clever. my favourite story here is sailors from the royal navy next week will perform their first changing of the guard, 90 of which trained in the routines and real movement needed for the royal guard duties at buckingham palace. and paul hollywood was giving an
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interview with the radio times which accuses three old bake—0ff collea g u es accuses three old bake—0ff colleagues leaving him in the lurch when he moved to channel a. and he is in there for a different reason, the breakup for hollywood and his wife of 20 years and the main story is what we were talking with doctor brian hope about, cancer scan at the supermarket, slightly polished, this story, still really interesting development in the treatment of cancer and scanning of cancer in this country. paul hollywood is fodder in this sun and the mirror as well. what else? i've got a cat story. all-white. interesting cat dog story —— all right. they kitten's site are saved by a great dane. look at zephyr, with painful eyes. this expert vet suggested the way to deal with this was to take blood from a healthy big dog and try
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to inject it into the eyes. it sounds a bit we had. so, a long qaim hali, a great dane, and what they did —— along came harley, they used the clear fluid, did —— along came harley, they used the clearfluid, then... did —— along came harley, they used the clear fluid, then... it is like you are a scientist. they put it into the cat's rise and stopped it from degrading and now zephyr is fully healthy thanks to his big mate the great dane. and i love the way the great dane. and i love the way the great dane doesn't like cats. the great dane. and i love the way the great dane doesn't like catsm is one of those... the great dane doesn't like catsm is one of those. .. it is a classic story. i was out of my depth, delving into science, and i rescued it. and this cat was rescued. as soon as i started mentioning plasma, my soon as i started mentioning plasma, ' logy soon as i started mentioning plasma, my biology lessons from the gcse came back. when you're out shopping it can be nice to find a seat for a quick rest and to take the load off your feet. but for some the availability of seating can be the deciding factor in whether it's possible to go out at all.
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new research suggests around a quarter of older people feel excluded from our high streets. breakfast‘s john mcguire has been to find out more. will you walk around a sainsbury's, or sitdown? sitdown. clive and margaret enjoy getting out and about in the local town of fleet in hampshire. if you are tired, sitdown. it is ok. they like exercise, fresh air and the chance to see what they are buying. that looks nice, that lemon cake. it is nice to choose your own fruit and vegeta bles nice to choose your own fruit and vegetables rather than have them delivered and get the wrong number or the wrong variety. but also very important, somewhere to sit down and ta ke important, somewhere to sit down and take the weight off their feet. would you choose a supermarket that had seating over one that didn't? yes, we would, because we wouldn't wa nt to yes, we would, because we wouldn't want to stand for half an hour. some you have to wander around and stand forever, you know. the anchor trust,
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which houses all the people, says access to the high street is a real concern and, as the population ages, also a growing one. potentially retailers are missing out on a.5 billion pounds a year by 2030 by not providing adequate seating, so this talk about the high—streets kind of dying and the death of the high—street, it is premature and actually there is a really big opportunity for retailers to provide seats for shoppers of the future. the charity asked 1000 over 70s for their views on going shopping. almost a quarter of the people questioned by the survey, 23%, in fa ct, questioned by the survey, 23%, in fact, said they felt excluded from the modern high—street. unexpected item in the bagging area, around 2a% people are put off with these self scan machines. and are there enough places to sit down in towns and
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cities centres? 60% of people thought not. the charity has launched this idea. standing up for sitting down. it is backed by large chains including sainsburys, morrisons and debenhams and more than 200 independent shops. so this is ourchairand we than 200 independent shops. so this is our chair and we have it for anybody that comes into the shop, used often for alves in a older guests and customers if they want to sit down and have a break when they are shopping. even if it is a tiny thing, it is really important so they can take a break if they want to. and the campaign says it benefits both older shoppers and retailers, aiming to see some of the grey pounds spent online coming back into high—street til. —— tills. the british retail consortium says retailers have been working to bring in seating, as well as introduce other initiatives to make high streets more accessible to more people. tell us what you think about that. do you find difficulties as well? you're watching breakfast.
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still to come this morning: she's been described as "britain's most wanted boss" and dame carolyn mccall will be speaking to steph ahead of her move from easyjet to itv. yes, she will be here with us in a few minutes' time. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. i'm asad ahmad. a woman has died in a fire in a block of flats in hampstead. around 60 firefighters have been tackling the blaze since the early hours of this morning. 20 people managed to escape, but the woman died at the scene. the fire is now under control. following, the grenfell trower injune, bbc london has found that councils in london say they're spending over £350 million in order to make social housing safer. around half of them have asked for financial help from government, but have yet to receive any cash. that's left councils unhappy. it seems to me entirely unfair that that amount of money is coming from the repair fund.
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we have a problem with damp in council flats. there are many kitchens have not been replaced in 30 or a0 years. there are always works to be done on the grounds and the external of the building. this is a vast amount of money which could do an enormous amount of good and it seems only fair that the rather than the tenants paying for that it should come from general taxation. the government says it "will consider financial flexibilities for councils who need to undertake essential fire safety work. but building owners are responsible for ensuring their buildings are safe." receptionists and porters are among support staff launching a legal challenge over pay and conditions at the university of london, which could impact upon millions of agency staff across the uk. workers at the outsourcing company, cordant, want the right to be able to negotiate better terms and conditions with the university itself. but the university says it doesn't actually employ any of the staff. let's have a look at the travel situation now.
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0n the tubes, the district line has no service between turnham green and earl's court because of a track fault at acton town. and the piccadilly line has severe delays for the same reason. and on the roads, in wood green, bounds green road is closed westbound because of a fire. let's have a check on the weather now with kate. good morning. well, the temperature overnight last night didn't drop down too far at all, so we start the day on a very mild note. it is, however, staying rather grey and rather cloudy. not, it should stay mostly dry today. there is the chance of the spotlight rain, maybe a bit of drizzle, but most places avoid it. that strengthening south—westerly wind as well. but the temperature unaffected. we're looking at a maximum of 13, maybe even 1a degrees, so very mild for november. 0vernight we still have all of this cloud, the chance again of light
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rain and drizzle. but the wind, that's going to continue to strengthen overnight. and it helps keep up the temperature. it stays very mild. a minimum of 13 degrees means tomorrow morning it is going to be another mild start. on wednesday, the breeze continues to strengthen. that south—westerly—westerly wind. some brighter spells tomorrow. the temperature up to 1a, maybe even 15 degrees. now, as we head through thursday and into friday, low pressure remains in charge, and that flings towards us various weather fronts, so becoming quite wet, especially as we go through friday. some heavier bursts of rain. but you will notice into the weekend the wind starts to shift direction and things get much colder as we head through saturday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. theresa may looks set to offer the eu a bigger divorce bill payment in return for trade talks. the bbc understands the move was given the go—ahead during a meeting of senior cabinet ministers yesterday. the prime minister is
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expected to put the offer to the eu later this week. britain had been told it must make more progress, if talks are to move on to the next phase. angela merkel has said she would prefer angela merkel has said she would p refer to angela merkel has said she would prefer to call a snap election and run undera prefer to call a snap election and run under a minority government. robert mugabe faces being impeached after refusing to step down as president of zimbabwe. the country's ruling party, zanu—pf, could ask parliament to begin the process today. the 93—year old, who remains under armed guard in the presidential palace, is accused of allowing his wife to seize power illegally and many believe mr mugabe is now incapable of governing. last night, the military suggested a plan was emerging for the transfer of power. we have made further consultation with the president to agree on a roadmap on the prevailing
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situation in the country. the zimbabwe defence and security services are encouraged by new developments which include conduct between the president and the former vice—president, comrade emmerson mnangagwa, who is expected in the country shortly. lung cancer screening will be offered at supermarkets and shopping centres in some areas of england, as part of a drive to speed up diagnosis. a pilot scheme, which targeted smokers and former smokers in greater manchester, saw a significant rise in early detection rates. there was a four—fold increase in the number of cases found at stage one or two when the disease is more easily treated. president trump has re—declared north korea as a state sponsor of terrorism nine years after it was removed from the list. mr trump said the move would trigger very large additional sanctions, which will be announced in the future.
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he blamed the country's nuclear programme, as well as its support for what he called international acts of terrorism. south korea has welcomed the move. tv presenter paul hollywood has accused his former bake 0ff colleagues — including fellowjudge mary berry — of abandoning the show. mary berry, along with presenters mel and sue, left the programme when it moved to channel a. in an interview with the radio times, he said the criticism he received after his decision to stay with the show was not fun and that he felt he became the most hated man in the country. coming up in the programme, carol will have the weather in around 10 minutes. she is staring down regent street which we have learnt was the first st to have christmas lights back in 195a, 19 56. in the 505! carol
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knows, thankfully. i'm talking about mike ashley this morning and rumblings coming out of newcastle about the potential sale of the club. he is not particularly happy about the amount of money being offered. there is a suggestion it is around £300 million but he suggests the figure could be much lower. mike ashley's time as owner of newcastle united could be coming to an end. a financial firm led by british businesswoman amanda staveley has launched a takeover bid in the region of £300 million. newcastle are yet to comment publicly on the news. brighton twice came from behind to deny stoke all three points at the amex stadium in the premier league last night. stoke took the lead through choupo—moting — his third goal of the season. jose izquierdo got the final goal of the night to earn chris hughton's side a point — brighton are now unbeaten in five league matches. we would have liked more, certainly,
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probably the overall performance wasn't good enough to get all three points and i thought we showed great credit and character to come back twice from being behind but overall, i think the draw was a fair result. west bromwich albion are looking for a new manager after sacking tony pulis. (00v) a four nil home defeat to chelsea left the club one point above the relegation zone and ended pulis's reign after less than three years in charge. he is the fifth premier league manager to be dismissed this season. gary megson has been put in temporary charge. australia head coach michael cheika is being investigated for his comments and conduct during saturday's match against england at twickenham. the disciplinary authorities are investigating with an update expected later. cheika reacted strongly to a series of decisions that went against his side in the 30 points to 6 defeat, while he also was involved in an exchange with a supporter.
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staying with rugby union and sarah hunter will win her hundredth cap for england women later. she'll lead the red roses out against canada for the second match in their autumn series. the 201a world cup winner was named world player of the year last year. david haye's heavyweight rematch with tony bellew has been postponed after a freak training accident. the fight was due to take place next month, but haye slipped during a stair conditioning session and tore his bicep when he grabbed a bannister to stop himself falling. he's had surgery and it's now hoped the fight will go ahead next march or may. he's had lots of trouble in the past with all sorts of injuries. not a nice thing. you can imagine, trying not to fall over. the first thing you do is reach out.
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tearing a bicep is really painful. march or may for a full recovery. after retiring from football, former liverpool and manchester united striker michael owen turned his attention horse racing. and ownership in particular. from football, former liverpool and manchester united striker michael owen turned his attention horse racing. and ownership in particular. but now for the first time he'll compete as a jockey — his first race will be at ascot in aid of the prince's countryside fund. 0wen will be the only novice in the race. he first sat on a horse less than a year ago and started riding for the first time in april. we tried to put the on the nice horses to start with, ones that aren't keen to spin and spin around so i've had a gentle introduction but there is no hiding place, you have to go and do it and the ups and downs, the weight loss, getting dumped on the floor, the pain. it's all been a massive learning
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curve and way harder than i thought. he said he thought he'd give it a go because he wanted to lose weight. he wanted something to do. he wanted the challenge. the horsey will be riding at ascot i think is the technical term, a little more feisty. skittish. very good luck to him. he absolutely loves horseracing. he will happily talk you about football but if you talk about horses, is off. why hasn't he done this before? he couldn't. he wasn't allowed. he was allowed to sit on a horse. but that jockey thing now, sleeping on a hot bath, wearing a massive towel. that's woody said. he is eating nothing. poor man. the first major wave of
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caribbean immigrants is being celebrated by dense company. colin patterson has been to meet them. the empire windrush brings to britain many jamaicans. they served this country well. history being turned into dance. next year is the 70th anniversary of the empire windrush bringing the first large group of post—war caribbean immigrants to the uk. swing, swing. don't go too soon. sharon watson is the artistic dance director of phoenix dance company in leeds, inspired by her own mother's journey from jamaica in 19605 and decided to create a piece about windrush. it resonates with our family in leaving a home and place.
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relocating somewhere new, somewhere different. i picked her brain considerably. her mum had come along to see the work in progress and it was bringing back memories of own arrival in the uk. you could see icicles hanging down from the windows which you don't see now. i had a big coat on a big boat and we had never seen them before. it was a bit unusual for me. members of leeds' caribbean community had also been invited so they could give feedback based on their own voyages. that windrush, it reminds me so much, like sardines packed in that boat. and they are thrilled the story will be on stage next february. when the younger people come and see what's going on, they understand what the old ladies and old gentleman had to go through. so this is leeds, 19a0... 19a8.
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phoenix dance company has also made an old discovery they hope they can show. alford gardiner is 91, lives in leeds and came over on windrush. he's agreed to share his memories to help shape the production. he was a mechanic in the raf in britain during the second world war and a lack of work at home made him want to come back. injamaica at the time, if you haven't got a job, you are a nobody. what was it like on windrush? we had six ex—army boys who wanted to commandeer our money. between us, we got them on the boat. we were busy hiding them. three men in a toilet hiding. that is what happened. what can i say, it's part of history now. it is history. and 70 years on, alford, who worked in factories and had nine children,
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thinks getting on windrush was a great decision. i have family, music. —— i live on three principles — family, music and sport. after them three things, good luck for everything else. you strike me as a man who has enjoyed life. and i am still enjoying it. and i will always be enjoying it. what a charming man. it will premiere in yorkshire in february and then will tour the country. women spend an average of 1,600 pounds on tampons and sanitary towels during their lifetime and that includes more than 160 pounds of vat. the government has promised to scrap the so—called tampon tax by next year, but does that go far enough? the bbc‘s devised an online calculator so women can work out how much they're likely to spend
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on sanitary products. the bbc‘s christinejeavans was behind that tool and she joins us now from london. here in the studio we have chella quint, who's the founder of the period positive campaign. they give adjoining ours. tell us about why you have come up with this idea. our team decided to put together this calculator because we felt it was an issue that affects most women and it's something that people will be really interested in and it's been five different vat rates on sanitary products since vat was introduced in 1973. it is difficult to work out how much you have spent yourself. vat is meant to be on luxury goods, isn't it? currently, sanitary products are taxed at the reduced rate of 5% but
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prior to 2001, they were at the full standard rate of vat which was 17.5%. i know you have had a go at the calculator. what do you think?” have spent about three months of mortgage on menstrual products. i think the calculator is fascinating. it would be great to use. i'm amazed at how many menstrual products i have brought. from your point of view, removing the vat would be the first step? not necessarily. it's been decreasing over the years. it's currently around the rate of things that we throw away. it's important to look at the sustainability. if we use around 11,000 menstrual products, there will be more menstruate is in parliament in 1973,
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it would never have been taxed in the first place. —— if there were more people who menstruated. you are hoping to make the city a period positive place. what is that mean? period positive came out of my research, my masters of education. i worked with young people who wanted a symbol oran worked with young people who wanted a symbol or an emblem that would show teachers were 0k to talk about periods and they could get on menstrual product on the spot. it is a symbol with a smiley face and it would be a charter mark. a citywide charter. challenging taboos. making sure managing menstruation is appropriate and helpful. so that kids aren't worried. the whole city is on board with that. schools are
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being offered free training and support from me and period positive, the children's hospital staff who are involved. it's a citywide initiative. i hope other cities will ta ke initiative. i hope other cities will take part. you are saying menstrual products rather than sanitary products. it is not unsanitary. they are either all gross or they'll all fine. it's personal choice. you don't need to keep it secret. periods are no more less unsanitary than any other bodily functions. some retailers treat these products differently? off the back of interest in the tampon tax, morrisons, tesco, co—op and waitrose decided to shoulder the 5%. if and
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when we go to zero rated vat on these products, we will pass on the price cut to customers. do you think they should be free? absolutely not, because companies are profiting from them, so someone is paying and for last 100 years corporations have used shame and secrecy to get us up in arms about periods without challenging this early or often enough. education is a good long—term solution to period poverty. supporting communities and not being afraid to ask, and looking at sustainability in future. not everybody likes reusable products. teaching people about all of them out there, and teaching boys and other kids is the most available way to make it free in future. thank you very much. it was good to talk to you. if you want to do the sums, it is all set up for you. visit: and it
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will tell you how much you spend and also the vat on that. it is quite a difficult calculation. it has changed over the years. good morning. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. we have paloma faith on the programme later on. and carol was telling us earlier that she watched as the lights were switched on this morning. and behind her, the aforementioned lights switched on by the aforementioned guest this morning. good morning. are they not gorgeous? they are twinkling down on regent street, 300,000 leds creating that beautiful spectacle. now, wejust heard recently that the term "fairy lights" came from 1882 at the production of the gilbert and sullivan yola nthe, and
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production of the gilbert and sullivan yolanthe, and they became stuck. not as many as the 300,000 as we can see behind us. it is breezy ahead of us and some of us will see some rain at times. some of us already have the rain. temperatures currently in flintshire and northern ireland are resting at 1a celsius. so we have the rain across northern england and scotland. there is a lot of dry weather, cloud and some of the cloud is thick enough for the odd spot of drizzle. through the day more rain will come in from the west. it won't be particular heavy at this stage. so by mid afternoon the rain will migrate north across scotland. it will be north of the central belt by then. for the southern uplands, it will be cloudy, as it will be across northern england. look at the temperatures. across the pennines there will be some rain. bright skies for
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north—east england. all points south and east, it is cloudy. as we move to the south—west, it is also cloudy. it is thick enough for some spots of rain. we will have rain in wales this afternoon. when it is not raining it will be fairly cloudy. the rain isjust south raining it will be fairly cloudy. the rain is just south of northern ireland by three o'clock and still it will be thick enough for the odd spot. bright skies across the north of northern ireland. through this evening and overnight you can see two distinctive dance of rain on the chart. the heaviest and persistent across northern scotland. the wind is going to strengthen. it will be a cold easterly. showers across the northern isles will be wintry in nature. and here it is going to be cold. for most of the uk tonight it is going to be unseasonably mild. so, tomorrow we start with the rain across the north and the west of the uk. some of that will be heavy and persistent, particularly with height, for example, snowdonia and
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the cumbrian fels. the other feature of tomorrow's whether it is it will be windy, continuing to strengthen through the day in the west with gusty wind in the south. but the further east you are, the drier it will be, with highs in london up to 15 celsius. then for thursday the rain continues to push to the east, clearing the south—east through the morning, with a dry and cloudy spell and bright breaks and then another band of rain comes in from the south—west. we will have rain from the word go across scotland and some of that will be falling as snow down to road level across the highlands and the grampians. but by then you will notice the cooler conditions filtering that bit further south. the far south of england hangs on to temperatures in double figures. thank you very much indeed. we have been having so much fun hearing all of the history about the lights. we will be back with you in about half an hour. we will have paloma faith a little bit later. she switched on the christmas lights on regent street. she is here to talk about
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the new album. what time is it on? i don't know. nine o'clock. and then the whole —— low crosses —— globetrotters coming on shortly.” love that you have been told we are not allowed to do that and i haven't been told. you are the naughty one. well, it is since the world's strongest man came in, it has changed things. steph is going to come over here. yes, we are just waiting for our guest, the easyjet ceo, obviously a very busy woman. we just have the latest results from them. they have said this morning it made a profit of £480 million, which is down 17% on last year. and that is down 17% on last year. and that is mainly because of what's been
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going on in the currency market. so, obviously, with the fall in the valley of the pound, it has pressured the airline industry. it has been really tough for all of them. we had air italia, air berlin, and all of the problems with ryanair, with pilot issues and cancellations of flights and various things, so the chief executive, hopefully we will speak to her shortly. she can hear us, so we are getting there. a couple of moments. are we nearly ready?” getting there. a couple of moments. are we nearly ready? i love live tv. good morning. thank you for bearing with us with those technical issues. cani with us with those technical issues. can i ask you this morning, you have described this in your results as a robust performance by easyjet and yet profits are falling. tell us about why. yes, of course, it is a strong performance if you think about it. the underlying profit is actually up 3%. the entire headwind
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has been 100 million on foreign exchange as you pointed out. and it is the top range of guidance, so there are no surprises for the market, no surprises for anybody. we started the year knowing that was going to be the outcome and in fact we have exceeded the expectations. soi we have exceeded the expectations. so i think that's what's happened. the reason for that is the devaluation of the pound. we buy fuel in dollars. there is nothing you can do about that. it is a very hefty headwind. we have done very well. passenger numbers are up to 80 million. more pleasing is 60 million passengers are returning passengers. very loyal passengers. which is showing customer service, the product offering is all strong. the brand is in very good health. and load brand is in very good health. and loa d fa cto rs brand is in very good health. and load factors a re brand is in very good health. and load factors are very high. and the revenue is up. revenue is over £5 billion, it is up 8%. when you look forward , billion, it is up 8%. when you look forward, actually, that is really
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where you see the dislocation, the effect. as of october, the new financial year, you will see the fa ct financial year, you will see the fact that capacity comes out of the market, whether that is ryanair, monarch, air berlin, air italia, feeding into the first half of the financial year. you have done well off the back of that? we have done very well. we are a good airline that does great customer service and i think that does great customer service and ithinka that does great customer service and i think a lot of passengers have rebooked with easyjet and that is working very well for us. capacity coming out of the market is of course very coming out of the market is of course very helpful. capacity drives revenue. and that's what's happening. so actually, when you look at the first six months of the year, without the air berlin transaction and the costs associated, it would be profit upgraded to 12% and as you pointed out we have actually taken advantage of the weakness in the market and we have actually bought part of air berlin, which gives us a clear number one position in the berlin
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market from two airports. and he mentions the weakness in the market and you described in your resort a difficult yearfor and you described in your resort a difficult year for the aviation industry. how tough is it to be in the airline industry at the moment and white? look, it is tough anyway —— why? it is a tough business and it is 2a/7, relentless. you are co nsta ntly it is 2a/7, relentless. you are constantly looking at everything going on. there are a lot of external factors. it has going on. there are a lot of externalfactors. it has been extremely tough in the last two yea rs. extremely tough in the last two years. a combination of events, you know, brexit, devaluing pound, we buy fuel in dollars, it is a huge hit and it will have been an important factor in monarch not being able to survive that storm, because, as a uk airline, they would have been affected by that, they have been affected by that, they have stated that. external factors are well—known in 2016, and of external impacts, that has been going on, and in addition there has been capacity in the market in 2016-17, which
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been capacity in the market in 2016—17, which has now come out of the market, so that is what will start to drive more discipline in the market and that means things look very good for people that are strong. so if you have a strong balance sheet you can take advantage of the market as easyjet can and thatis of the market as easyjet can and that is what has happened with air berlin and that will happen quickly. iam berlin and that will happen quickly. i am conscious of the time and i know that you have been at easyjet for seven years and you are about to leave to be the boss of itv. to a lot of viewers that sounds magical. how do you make that transition? seventh seven how do you make that transition? seven and a half years has been fantastic. i love the people at easyj et fantastic. i love the people at easyjet and i am proud of what we have achieved. and all of them are amazing. and we have turned the company into a really great airline. soi company into a really great airline. so i leave with sadness but i also think there is always a time to leave and i would rather be leaving when things are starting to look very positive and that is why i am
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leaving. i think seven and a half yea rs leaving. i think seven and a half years is the right time. thank you very much. lovely. thank you. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: with extreme stunts and slam dunks, the harlem globetrotters have entertained fans for almost a century. just a moment ago, they were doing brilliantly. you are live on the tv. that is it, start bouncing. here we go. that is moves and dizzy. that is great. excellent. they will be here later. just warming up outside. 0ne of them might be in the great big brea kfast of them might be in the great big breakfast mug. there you go. laughter 0h, they are fantastic. if you forget the first ten seconds, that was working perfectly. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning.
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i'm asad ahmad. a woman has died in a fire in a block of flats in hampstead. around 60 firefighters have been tackling the blaze since the early hours of this morning. 20 people managed to escape, but the woman died at the scene. the fire is now under control. following, the grenfell trower injune, bbc london has found that councils in london say they're spending over £350 million in order to make social housing safer. around half of them have asked for financial help from government, but have yet to receive any cash. that's left councils unhappy. it seems to me entirely unfair that that amount of money is coming from the repair fund. we have a problem with damp in council flats. there are many kitchens have not been replaced in 30 or a0 years. there are always works to be done on the grounds and the external of the building. this is a vast amount of money which could do an enormous amount of good and it seems only fair that the rather than the tenants paying for that it should come
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from general taxation. the government says it "will consider financial flexibilities for councils who need to undertake essential fire safety work. but building owners are responsible for ensuring their buildings are safe." receptionists and porters are among support staff launching a legal challenge over pay and conditions at the university of london, which could impact upon millions of agency staff across the uk. workers at the outsourcing company, cordant, want the right to be able to negotiate better terms and conditions with the university itself. but the university says it doesn't actually employ any of the staff. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes, the district line has no service between turnham green and earl's court because of a track fault at acton town. and the piccadilly line has severe delays for the same reason. minor delays on the central line. 0n the roads, the a1 has delays because of an accident.
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let's have a check on the weather now with kate. good morning. well, the temperature overnight last night didn't drop down too far at all, so we start the day on a very mild note. it is, however, staying rather grey and rather cloudy. not, it should stay mostly dry today. there is the chance of the spotlight rain, maybe a bit of drizzle, but most places avoid it. that strengthening south—westerly wind as well. but the temperature unaffected. we're looking at a maximum of 13, maybe even 1a degrees, so very mild for november. 0vernight we still have all of this cloud, the chance again of light rain and drizzle. but the wind, that's going to continue to strengthen overnight. and it helps keep up the temperature. it stays very mild. a minimum of 13 degrees means tomorrow morning it is going to be another mild start. on wednesday, the breeze continues to strengthen. that south—westerly—westerly wind. some brighter spells tomorrow. the temperature up to 1a, maybe even 15 degrees. now, as we head through thursday and into friday, low pressure remains in charge, and that flings towards us various weather fronts, so becoming quite wet, especially as we go through friday. some heavier bursts of rain there. but you will notice into the weekend
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the wind starts to shift direction and things get much colder as we head through saturday. rain heading hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. theresa may gets the backing of her cabinet to offer a bigger brexit payout. senior ministers have agreed that britain should offer more money to the eu, if it clears the path for trade talks to begin. but the prime minister is facing anger from some of her own mps who are accusing the eu of holding the uk to ransom. good morning. it's tuesday the 21st of november. also this morning. zimba bwe's parliament prepares
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to take legal action to force robert mugabe from power. early screening for lung cancer. doctors say a trial using mobile scanners in supermarket car parks has proved a huge success. good morning, easyjet has said it made a profit of £408 million, a fall when compared to the previous year. i've been talking to the boss, carolyn mccall, about why. could mike ashley's days at newcastle be numbered following a formal bid for the football club? # cry, baby # cry, baby # who's you don't have to keep it inside. # she is on course for her first uk number one album this week, up against taylor swift as well, paloma faith will be here to tell us all about it. and carol is out and about. good morning from the roof of the bbc in london overlooking the
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fabulous christmas lights on regent street. it is a mild start to the day here and across most of the uk except for scotland. it is also cloudy and some of us will see some rain, more particularly in the north and west. more details in 15 minutes. we will see you then. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may looks set to offer the eu a bigger divorce bill payment in return for starting trade talks next month. the bbc understands the move was approved at a meeting of senior cabinet ministers yesterday. the uk had been told it must make more progress on its financial offer, if talks are to move into the next phase. but political uncertainty in the eu's most powerful member, germany, has complicated the picture. there could be new elections there, following chancellor angela merkel‘s failure to form a coalition government. we'll speak to damien mcguinness in berlin in a moment. but first, let's speak to our political correspondent alex forsyth in westminster. alex, what else came out of yesterday's meeting? we know that money has been a
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problem in these negotiations. the eu, put simply, wants the uk to commit to more. yesterday, theresa may gathered some senior figures to try to thrash out a negotiating position and we understand there was broad agreement that the uk should up broad agreement that the uk should up its financial offer but only if the eu agrees to move on, to talk trade and transition when eu leaders next meet in december and we understand there were no specific figures discussed. that may be in pa rt figures discussed. that may be in part deliberate because the government does not want to paint things down too soon but also, they are concerned they might anger some on the conservative backbenches who don't think the uk should be paying the eu too much. no doubt number ten will hope the agreement that has been reached will help move things forward in negotiations but as you say, there is another element now, the political instability in germany. angela merkel, the
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chancellor, a key voice around the negotiating table and try to get a brexit deal, and some think the instability there may make it harder foran instability there may make it harder for an agreement to be reached but others suggest this could be an opportunity and any instability amongst the eu 27 could be a strength for the uk. thank you. our correspondent, damien mcguinness, is in berlin. listening to what alex was saying, there. what is happening in germany at the moment, as people will read in the papers this morning, has a real impact on the brexit negotiations, doesn't it? yes, potentially. at the moment in germany, it is political stalemate, the coalition talks have broken down and today, the president is going to try to bash some heads together, of the political leaders and say they have do get together to form an agreement and if that does not happen, we could potentially see fresh elections which would mean months of political uncertainty. there is no guarantee it would have a direct impact on brexit because actually, berlin has always been of the opinion that brussels deals with
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london on this. any attempts by pro—brexit mps to talk directly with berlin have always been rebuffed and german politicians are completely united in their position on brexit. whatever colour the government ends up whatever colour the government ends up does not really have a direct impact on the eu stance on britain but of course, as alex correctly pointed out, any instability within the eu largest economy —— eu's largest economy could potentially mean there's a certain amount of uncertainty in the eu in general because the leading country is in a state of political limbo so it could have an indirect impact on the brexit talks, certainly. thank you. we'll speak to conservative mp nigel evans and green party co—leader caroline lucas about this in a few minutes' time. in other news, a scheme aimed at detecting lung cancer early is to be extended to thousands more patients. aand extended to thousands more patients. a and nothing views of mobile scanners in supermarkets and
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shopping centres in greater manchester was so successful they are going to try to roll it out for other parts of the country. caroline rigby has the details. definitely saved my life because i could have gone maybe two or three years. it would then have spread everywhere. michael brady was diagnosed with lung cancer thanks to a project which offered extra screening to smokers and former smokers in some of the poorest areas of manchester. in an effort to boost early detection, patients thought to be most at risk were given ct scan timo boll trucks at supermarkets and shopping centres. lung cancer is the uk's biggest cancer killer, claiming 35,000 lives a year. nhs england says during the manchester pilot, one case was detected every 33 people screamed and four out of five cases were diagnosed early when the disease is easier to treat. we have screening programmes are ready but people are reluctant because they are frightened by the c word to come forward ,
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are frightened by the c word to come forward, and lots of people think "if i don't really think i'll be all right", when actually it is the opposite, actually, the more we get tested appropriately, then that gives us a chance of survival. similar schemes are now being rolled out in london and other parts of the north of england. many have welcomed the plans but cancer research uk warns that the nhs will need extra staff to carry out the tests, a thousands more lives are to be saved. caroline rigby, bbc news. robert mugabe faces no action after refusing to step down as the resident of zimbabwe. the country's ruling party, zanu—pf, could ask parliament to begin legal proceedings as early as today. 0ur correspondent ben brown is in harare, zimbabwe's capital. we talk to you yesterday at this time so where are we now and is it clear what is happening with robert mugabe? welcome it is clear that he is not resigning, that is for sure, he refused to resign in the tv address yesterday, there was a deadline of midday local time for
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him to resign and hejust deadline of midday local time for him to resign and he just refused once again to resign. so what is going to happen today is that in the parliament just going to happen today is that in the parliamentjust behind going to happen today is that in the parliament just behind me going to happen today is that in the parliamentjust behind me in harare is that in about four hours' time, they will start proceedings to impeach him, launched by zanu—pf, his own party, who want to impeach him. what will happen if there will bea him. what will happen if there will be a vote in parliament on whether to launch proceedings. if they agree to launch proceedings. if they agree to do that, they will set up a committee to investigate mr mugabe. there are various charges under the constitution under which he can be impeached, serious misconduct in office, incapacity, violation of the constitution and so on. if that committee recommends you should be impeached, they take a vote on it, it would need a two thirds majority in both houses of parliament. at the moment, it is not clear that zanu—pf and the people who want to get rid of mr mugabe would have a clear majority. zanu—pf would have to work with opposition parties and at the moment they are saying they would wa nt to moment they are saying they would want to extract a price, concessions from zanu—pf in terms of free and fair elections next year. it isn't
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by any means certain that he will be impeached but those who think he could be say it could all be over in a couple of days. ok, ben brown, thank you for your analysis. staff employed by an outsourcing company are asking a tribunal to rule that they have the right to negotiate better terms and conditions with the university of london where they work. the landmark case has implications for more than three million workers in the uk's business services industry. they are hired through facilities companies. the university says it doesn't employ any of the workers and doesn't accept their concept of "joint employment". young persons railcards, which provide discounted rail travel to people between the ages of 16 and 25, are to be extended to 30—year—olds. the chancellor, philip hammond, is set to announce the change in wednesday's budget. does that mean 30 is classed as a young person these days? yes! that is good news! it is! things didn't go according to plan for one unfortunate cameraman
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waiting to capture the moment the old georgia dome sports stadium in atlanta, georgia was demolished. he was all set up for the shot, when this happened. it isa it is a great setup. good shot, he has framed it nicely. that is the stadium and the explosion, it's about to implode. but we're not going to watch it. a bus pulled right in front of the camera, completely obscuring his view. needless to say he wasn't too happy — we've bleeped out what he says. i really think he has not set that up i really think he has not set that up well enough. surely he knows he is on up well enough. surely he knows he isona up well enough. surely he knows he is on a thoroughfare, there's a possibility of bus. but what are the chances of the bus coming to an old at that exact moment? and there it is, the moment lost, the stadium was gone. when any long—term relationship comes to an end, it can be a rather complicated process to divide up the assets. and it seems the brexit divorce bill is no different. the bbc understands there's broad agreement among
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ministers that britain should increase its financial offer to the eu. but it seems that everyone is happy about that. joining us from westminster are the conservative mp and brexit supporter nigel evans, and green party co—leader and remainer caroline lucas. thank you forjoining us. to bring people up to date, apparently an agreement in principle last night with senior cabinet figures to increase what we believe the £20 billion divorce payment up somewhere, not entirely sure what the figure might be, but i'm assuming both of you are not happy about this but for slightly different reasons. nigel, let's start with you. it's not that i'm unhappy. it was only a month ago thatjeremy corbyn was marching towards brussels with cap in hand to see michel barnier, and the cap was full of british taxpayers money and he was prepared to pay anything in order to access the single market.
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what we have got is a negotiation about what our contractual obligations happen to be. the 20 billion that was referred to a few weeks ago which was agreed by the british cabinet refers to a traditional arrangement over two yea rs traditional arrangement over two years and 20 billion is roughly what we would be putting in. the amount above that would then relate to any contractual obligations leading to pensions, projects we have signed up to, that will last way beyond when we leave the european union. i don't think anyone has got a problem with that. what we do have a problem with his paying any ransom money that michel barnier is asking for, simply for us to exit the eu. we have got the budget tomorrow and phillip hammond will no doubt be telling us how economic league and —— are economically constrained years by what he can do but he can't then be shovelling shed. money towards brussels while ignoring that money could be going towards british public services in schools and hospitals throughout the uk. it's
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got to relate to what our contractual obligations happened to be and yes it is about 20 billion. are we being held to ransom?” be and yes it is about 20 billion. are we being held to ransom? i don't think we are being held to ransom, i think we are being held to ransom, i think the language about shovelling shed loads of money is pretty intemperate and let's not forget that nigel his fellow band of brexit campaigners never told us during the referendum campaign that this money would need to be paid. 0f referendum campaign that this money would need to be paid. of course, it was always clear that it would need to be paid but i don't think the british public was ever really told about that. it has to be about the contractual obligations. in any real divorce, what happens is you have to look at who owns what and you separate it out. i must say, i'm very glad that if anyone was in a real divorce with nigel, they would have a pretty hard time grabbing hold of his record collection and not letting any bits ago. not my record collection! the bottom line is, if you go in the pub and you order around and then you decide you don't want them and walk out, you still have to pay to them. that is
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common sense. it is all about the quantity of money at the end of the day, dan. ican quantity of money at the end of the day, dan. i can understand people like caroline being disappointed with the way the british people voted but i can't understand why they then take a position that they wouldn't be prepared to almost give brussels —— they would be prepared to give brussels any sum of money in order to access the single market. have i said that? you want access to the single market, don't you?” have i said that? you want access to the single market, don't you? i do but that is not about what this money is, nigel is confusing to things, we have to settle the bill for what is already contractually arranged, first, for things we have said we will pay for like pensions, staff in brussels, our own staff. there is a separate debate is now about access to the single market and the customs union and so on. those are two different things and as long as they keep muddling up it gets more confusing. we're not muddling them up, i've agreed that the contractual payments but then we move the contractual payments but then we m ove o nto the contractual payments but then we move onto exactly how much money then above that may be paid at i'm saying about that, absolutely
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nothing ought to be paid because we are leaving the single market. caroline wants to stay in the single market. but that is a separate debate. it is but you would be prepared to give taxpayers money to access the single market. 0ver prepared to give taxpayers money to access the single market. over and above. what i'm clear is that i want to stay inside the single market because the economic benefits also manifest. just this week we've already had another reporter telling us families are going to be £400 worse off this year already as a result of inflation caused by higher prices, caused by the pound going down, caused by the prospect of brexit. so families are going to be an awful lot less well off as a result of brexit already. add that to the way in which this government is negotiating. it is an absolute nightmare. we have seen 1000 jobs lost just yesterday... can nightmare. we have seen 1000 jobs lost just yesterday. .. can i get nightmare. we have seen 1000 jobs lostjust yesterday... can i get a word in? i'm enjoying listening to the pair of you. we were speaking to our correspondent in berlin this
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morning, talking about how the situation in germany might affect what's happening here. i wonder what your take is on that, nigel? well, i was in berlin over the weekend and clearly, it's always said that britain is standing on the cliff edge, now it is the chancellor of germany, angela merkel, that's standing on the cliff edge. three—quarters of a million jobs are dependant on the car industry. every year they send us mercedes—benz and they will want to carry on doing that. if we are going to go into another german election it doesn't give me anyjoy to look at the wea kness give me anyjoy to look at the weakness of what is happening in germany, but the fact is we are in a stronger position where we can say to germany, we want to carry on importing your cars into the uk and this will be no doubt part of the next german elections that are about to ta ke next german elections that are about to take place. you won't be surprised i disagree with that. the think the weakness of angela merkel is bad news in terms of us wanting to get a decent deal because it means her attention is going to be
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understandably diverted. up until now, she has been a pragmatic politician and wanted the uk to stay as close as possible and get a good deal, my worry is she will be diverted on to her own domestic issues and that means the timetable will slip more and the chances of us getting a good deal and the time frame is receding rapidly.” getting a good deal and the time frame is receding rapidly. i met a chap out in germany who was british. seven yea rs chap out in germany who was british. seven years he has been working in germany. and he wanted to know whether he will be able to stay there when we leave the european union. this is the one thing that i can't understand why michel barnier and juncker have not been able to come to a deal. we have held out the hands of friendship and said we want eu citizens to carry on working and living in the uk as long as british citizens working and living in the eu can do the same. you are on another planet, nigel. they should be able to say yes. our deal for the eu citizens in our country is less
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generous than the one which the eu offered us. it is us who have to move here. it is getting really tiresome to hear you blame brussels for everything. michel barnier's foot is on the brake and i'm cheering him on. i'm cheering on the british prime minister to get a good deal. no, you're undermining british families around the country who are going to see their pockets reduced. do you want to come back in, dan? do you want to go and have breakfast together you two? you're getting on so well! i will have a great british brea kfast i will have a great british breakfast whilst caroline no doubt has one of those german sausages! i'm a vegetarian you will be pleased to know! it isa to know! it is a really interesting debate to see the difference in opinion. i'm sure people are interested watching that at home as well. nigel evans and caroline lucas, thank you for your time. they will, i'm sure, and caroline lucas, thank you for yourtime. they will, i'm sure, go off and share a coffee together. they're smiling! we have been talking about the
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regent street christmas lights. here is how the switch on was reported in 1957. the mayor of westminster is ready to switch on one of the london's big christmas displays. the regent street decorations. things have changed a bit, haven't they? just a little. this is what it looks like this morning with carol kirkwood. the lights looked gorgeous earlier in the... in the dark... in the dark! they were twinkling away. they we re dark! they were twinkling away. they were gorgeous. they are come priced of 300,000led lights. it is the capital's largest festive display and they are on all night as well. as you said they were lit here, it was the first street to be lit in 1954 and then other streets followed on. now, what we have this morning isa mild on. now, what we have this morning is a mild start to the day. it is also a breezy one and the forecast for most of us is a cloudy and mild one with rain at times. some of us already have some rain. more notably
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at the moment across northern england and also scotland. as we go through the course of the day, we hang on to a lot of cloud and then a new band of rain will swing in from the west. that band won't be as heavy as the one we currently have. where we have got the cloud is thick enough for the odd spot. it is a grey start and into the afternoon you will notice that as the rain moves northwards, across scotland, it won't necessarily brighten up across the southern uplands, it will dry up and still be fairly cloudy. temperature wise in glasgow and edinburgh this afternoon, around about 11 to 13 celsius. for northern england, by then we will have the rain coming in from the west, crossing the pennines, not particularly heavy, brighter across the north—east. some of that rain extending into the north midlands, but becoming south of that for east anglia, essex and kent and the south midlands and into the south—west, again, a lot of cloud around, thick enough for the odd spot of light rain here and there. for wales, this afternoon, you'll have rain. when it's not raining it will be cloudy,
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but we could see some brightness in the shelter of the hills. for northern ireland, the rainjust to the south of you, but the cloud is thick enough for the odd spot. the brightest skies will be in the north. but it is going to be another unseasonably mild day for the bulk of the uk, away from north—east scotland. now as we head through the evening and overnight, we have two bands of rain. the heaviest of which is across the north of scotland. that will produce wintry showers coming in on an easterly wind across the northern isles and here too the wind will strengthen, touching gales and even severe gales with exposure. for the rest of us, it is going to bea for the rest of us, it is going to be a largely mild night. temperatures staying in double figures. so tomorrow, we start off with the rain across the north and the west. through the day, that will be very slowly moving eastwards. but a feature of tomorrow's weather will be the win. it's going to be a windy day for most of us. the wind strengthening particularly in the we st strengthening particularly in the west and across southern counties and in some western areas, we are looking at gusts to gale force, possibly with exposure and severe
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gales, but where it remains dry, we are looking at highs of 15 celsius. by are looking at highs of 15 celsius. by the time we get to thursday, the rain will be careering down into the south east and clearing away. a new band later in the day will be coming up band later in the day will be coming up from the south—west. in between there will be a lot of dry weather, but if you are in scotland, again the highlands and the grampians, we have got rain from the word go and slow down to road level. so something to consider if you are travelling. if you note the temperatures the cooler weather is filtering that bit further south. it is the far south of england that hangs on to double figures. so lou and dan, change is a foot. thank you very much indeed. when you go out shopping, is there enough seats? a quarter of older people feel excluded from our high streets. john
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maguire has been to find out more. will you walk around sainsbury's, or sit down? sit down. clive and margaret enjoy getting out and about in their local town of fleet in hampshire. if you're tired, sit down. it's ok. they like exercise, the fresh air and the chance to see what they're buying. that looks nice, that lemon cake. it's nice to choose your own fruit and vegetables, rather than have them delivered and get the wrong number or the wrong variety. but, also very important, somewhere to sit down and take the weight off their feet. would you choose a supermarket that had seating over one that didn't? yes, we would, because we wouldn't want to stand for half an hour. some of them you have to wander around and stand forever, you know. the anchor trust, which houses older people, says access to the high street is a real concern and as the population ages, also a growing one. potentially retailers are missing
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out on £a.5 billion a year by 2030 by not providing adequate seating, so this talk about the high streets kind of dying, and the death of the high street, is premature. and, actually, there is a really big opportunity for retailers to provide seats for shoppers of the future. the charity asked 1,000 over—705 for their views on going shopping. almost a quarter of the people questioned by the survey, 23%, in fact, said that they felt excluded from the modern high street. "unexpected item in the bagging area." around 2a% people are put off with these self—scan machines. and are there enough places to sit down in towns and cities centres? well, 60% of people thought not. so the charity has launched this idea — standing up for sitting down. it's backed by large chains, including sainsburys, morrisons and debenhams, and more than 200 independent shops.
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so, this is our chair, and we have it for anybody that comes into the shop, used often for our older guests and customers if they want to sit down and have a break while they are shopping. even if it is a tiny thing, it is really important so they can take a break if they want to. and the campaign says it benefits both older shoppers and retailers, aiming to see some of the grey pounds spent online coming back into high street tills. i like ilike an i like an old sit down every now and again just i like an old sit down every now and againjust to i like an old sit down every now and again just to watch the world go by. my again just to watch the world go by. my purpose of going to the shops... is get in and get out. get what you need and get out of there. the british retail consortium says retailers have been working to bring in seating and other initiatives to make high streets accessible for people in all parts of the community. let us know what you think about
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that. you can get in contact about christmas decorations and putting them up earlier, does it make you happier? well, according to psychologists, it can make you feel happier. thank you for your views on that. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning. he was one of the quickest players on the football pitch, but will the now race—horse owner michael owen be fastest in the saddle too? we've been to his stables ahead of his first race as a jockey. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. it is a pretty mild start of the day for many, especially across england and wales, temperatures 12—1a already this morning. despite the milder weather, it is quite cloudy and for some of us, some outbreaks of rain. you can see from the pressure charts, some
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weather fronts across scotland, one dragging its heels down towards west wales, which will move gradually eastwards so lots of cloud and outbreaks of rain, particularly in western areas of scotland later. there will be brighter skies here and there, particularly eastern areas which is where temperatures can well reach 16 or 17. tonight it will turn quite windy, especially along the coasts of the english channel and further outbreaks of rain at times, particularly across wales, into northern ireland and the north west of england by the early hours of wednesday morning and again, another mild night, temperatures staying in double figures. wednesday sees rain spread from wales up into scotland, northern ireland, again, very windy conditions, especially western areas, with further rain spreading into the south and the west. further south and east, looking largely dry again on wednesday which is where we will have the highest temperatures. quite messy picture pressure wise as we through wednesday night into
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thursday with colder air is starting to move its way in from the north. you will notice we will start to see a bit of snow over the scottish mountains. 0n a bit of snow over the scottish mountains. on thursday, colderair will filter further south and we will filter further south and we will hold onto the milder air towards southern and eastern areas throughout the day on thursday. after some early morning rain which will clear away, there will be sunny spells breaking through. again, pretty windy conditions around coastal areas and temperatures across the south, 12—1a. further north, colder, snow at times across scotland, temperatures about 6—9. going into the weekend, we will keep the cold air from the north which will bring some frost. goodbye. this is business live from bbc news with david eades and susannah streeter. passengers are up but profits are down, as easyjet gives its latest numbers for the last year. live from london, that's our top story on tuesday the 21st of november. the low—cost carrier blamed
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a weaker pound for a 17% fall in pre—tax profits, just as the company is saying bon voyage to chief executive carolyn mccall, who leaves in december. also in the programme, the us government has filed a lawsuit to try to stop the multi—billion dollar takeover by the american telecoms giant at&t of the media group, time warner.
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