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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  November 21, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at eleven. zimbabwe mugabe is warned his impeachment is imminent — his former vice—president tells him to resign orface humiliation. albiol reporting live from harare, where some people are saying the impeachment of robert mugabe could be completed within days, ending his 37 year rule. more money on offerfor the eu — cabinet members agree to increase the divorce bill, if trade talks begin next month. the british explorer benedict allen, who was flown out of a remote part of papua new guinea, says he did not get lost and didn't need rescuing. i calculate risk all the time. did
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you miscalculate this time? maybe i did, buti you miscalculate this time? maybe i did, but i wasn't i might last leg. also this hour: detecting lung cancer earlier. mobile screening in shopping centres and supermarkets is to be rolled out to thousands more patients in england. and how automated checkout machines and a lack of seats are making life miserable for elderly shoppers. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. robert mugabe is accused of failing
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to uphold the constitution and of giving his wife grace too much power. some bubbly‘s former vice president has warned into design immediately after his humiliation by zimbabweans. let's get the very latest from harare. it is because robert mugabe hasjust from harare. it is because robert mugabe has just refused and refused to resign that those impeachment proceedings are beginning here today. he had an opportunity when he went on television on sunday night to resign. he did not go. yesterday, there was a deadline for him to resign and it came and went and he is still in office. the key is still technically president of the country this morning. he even chaired a meeting of his cabinet. right now, in the parliament behind me, they are going to begin impeachment proceedings in just over an
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are going to begin impeachment proceedings injust over an hour's time. there are a lot of demonstrators outside the parliament. they are having what they call an impeachment party. let me take you through the process. there will be a vote initially from both houses of the parliament on whether he should be a pizza. if they agree, they will set up and investigating committee to consider by that he is guilty of breaching the constitution, and if they say that he is, it is paid to another vote. edward made it two thirds majority in both houses of the parliament, the national assembly and the senate to impeach him and end his 37 general. while it's happening? well it happen quickly, we're not sure? zanu—pf, the ruling party, say it could be completed tomorrow i'll on thursday. let's get their support on today's events so far. within days, the era of president robert mugabe could finally be over. zanu—pf already has the two—thirds majority required to remove him, but loyalty is not guaranteed here, and they've courted
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the opposition to support the motion just in case. the charges are so clear, we expect by wednesday we should be able to vote in parliament. the military, which took over the country last week, appears to have a parallel process under way. they say the long—time leader is holding talks with his sacked vice—president, emmerson mnangagwa, to map out an amicable way forward. the sacking of mnangagwa, a military ally, ignited the takeover. on sunday, zanu—pf fired mugabe as its leader and installed mnangagwa in his place. the zimbabwean defence and security services are encouraged by new developments which include contact between the president and the former vice—president, comrade emmerson mnangagwa, who is expected in the country shortly. thereafter, the nation will be advised of the outcome
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of the talks between the two. but the president remains in charge, even though he is still under military guard. whatever the outcomes of the two processes, his leadership is not likely to last much longer. shingai nyoka, bbc news, harare. why of the reasons many people in zimbabwe are hoping that these impeachment proceedings here today bobby successful is that the rule of robert mugabe, this 37 year rule, has been tainted by terrible political repression and brutality against human rights activist, anybody who wanted to demonstrate against him, until very recently. on saturday, we saw huge demonstrations that were allowed on the streets of hanratty. leicester led to a given rise activist who was hospitalised, beating, arrested by the police
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simply for allegedly insulting robert mugabe. and yesterday, the case against her was dropped. thank you very much indeed for being with us. you very much indeed for being with us. just describe what it has been like to up close robert mugabe in yea rs like to up close robert mugabe in years gone by here. opposing robert mugabe was something that was not had. the moment you spoke the words mugabe, even in public, everyone would just be silent. you could see the nfa says. the just cannot talk about this. robert mugabe, just that word brought so much fear in a person, so word brought so much fear in a person, so much terror because of what used to happen in the streets of hanratty and that it sells and bubbly. it was a police state. every corner of the state was filled with policemen, state agents, everywhere, shops, schools. it wasjust a reign of terror. and now, we're feeling free. we are feeling the badness has been taken away from us. for
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example, i had been beating, thoroughly abused by the police and military before. and, for the first time, ican military before. and, for the first time, i can actually work freely without anyone telling me. and you say, is this going to go on? is this the new zimbabwe? i visited fort robert mugabe to maintain legitimacy. the vice president, who was a pretty ruthless henchmen of robert mugabe is the favourite candidate of the military did take over. do you think the freedom that there is knight, do you think that will continue and ham? obviously, thatis will continue and ham? obviously, that is your hot, but you think it will happen? that is my hot. i think it is going to try and act as he has reformed, maybe he will try and do from so that will get the legitimacy that he wants to be the president of this country. there's a lot at stake right now, and it is really a catch—22 situation, and as an activist, and i know the sentiments
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of activist, we want to hold on to account, and heavy city is granted a farm, we want to follow the constitution and for us to be able to have free, fair, credible elections. he has to prove to us that he can do that, and the first thing he will have to do if he is 92, from robert mugabe is to make sure those farms are done. do you think is impeachment process bobby successful? do you think parliament will be able to impeach him? as it stands, ica been successful. there is no other way out. everyone whatever gone yesterday. for the people down there, demonstrating outside the parliament, that is an amazing site just to see people be to demonstrate. it is amazing. personally, i have been beating up in the street forjust protesting and speaking out and saying that robert mugabe to step down. now, we
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can do this. we have waited for a very long time to be able to freely express herself and say this is not the leader that we want. as you go back to teddington eight, he has wrecked elections before. he has never been a legitimate president. we have finally found a voice, and we are saying we bought support the military to ensure that robert mugabe has been taken from power. thank you very much indeed. all along, after this military takeover but said journals have been trying very ha rd but said journals have been trying very hard not to allow the impression that has been a coup d'etat, the old african sense of a cave they do is force out a leader, they want this to the constitution, and that is why they have been trying to persuade robert mugabe to design of his own free will. he stubbornly has refused to do that, and that is why they are hopping, and that is why they are hopping, andi and that is why they are hopping, and i think millions of people across this country and also hoping that that impeachment process will
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now be successful. senior cabinet ministers have agreed that britain should increase its financial offer to the european union — but only if member states agree next month to move on to talks about trade and an implementation period. ministers — including the prominent brexiters, michael gove and borisjohnson — approved the move last night let's speak now to our assistant political editor norman smith. there have been no cries of betrayal yet, but there is a marked contrast between tony brexiteers on the backbenches to an increased divorce bill and brexiteers in the cabinet. last night mr gove and borisjohnson rallied behind theresa may to give the go—ahead for a larger divorce bill on the backbenches there is near mutiny, with claims that they government is preparing to pay a ransom to leave the eu. i enjoyed by
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the labour mp chris leslie, a prominent campaigner against beck said. for you, it prominent campaigner against beck said. foryou, it must prominent campaigner against beck said. for you, it must be good news that the brexiteers and now reconciled to the fact that we will have to pay settlement to leave the eu. it is not quite what they vote the campaign were saying before the referendum. remember, they were saying they are going to get a great windfall of money, £350 million a week on the side of the big red bus. it now turns out, of course, we are going to have to stump up maybe 40 billion, maybe more, in orderto get some sort of trade deal. i think it is time to hold vote on leave and those who are far a hard brexit's to account for the public money that is actually going to be pouring out britain because of this whole mess. as an theresa may driving quite a ha rd as an theresa may driving quite a hard bargain? she started off at 18 billion, they were talking about 100 by ian in brussels, note the arabs 40. we just know. we have got to
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secure a 40. we just know. we have got to secure a transition agreement because there is a lot of friends who are going to be looking at their watches and saying, without a transition, we might have to relocate into the rest of europe, into dublin, frankfurt, paris. a deal does have to be done and we have to make sure that that transition is secure. of course, with germany and the german chance that not any ticket possession of there, to what extent are begun to get that. it is a very hard situation. meanwhile, confusing and labour ranks because last night we saw a machine to keep as in the customs union. new baghdad, jonny may carbon and many frontbenchers abstinence, john mcdonnell voted with the tories. we have no idea where labour is an brexit. most of the labour mps who voted for tip any pro—customs union break, to keep
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tariff free access to your. there was a slow number of labour mps who voted with the government on that. ultimately, i think the labour party's possession, i am told by their fabrics, is that we are in favour of eight customs union in transition. i want to keep that can carry afraid —— bad tariff free trade going permanently. that is better of internal work that we have two press our colleagues to agree to. so far theresa may is banning vote after vote after foot. isn't the likelihood that at the end of the likelihood that at the end of the day she is going to get this legislation, and people like you who have tried to put amendments, you will not succeed. we will only succeed with cross— party will not succeed. we will only succeed with cross—party coalition. that means getting some conservatives devote weathers as
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well. this is about fundamental rights. for those who aren't familiar with it, it is about protecting equality of rights, rights for anfield in dismissal. it isa rights for anfield in dismissal. it is a whole series of things. theresa may is trying to give a scalp to the ha rd may is trying to give a scalp to the hard brexiteers by chucking it overboard even when the bill was supposed to be a copy and paste exercise. we are going to argue today that we have to keep those fundamental rights. it is very relevant, it protects the public, and that is the sort of agenda that we are going to try and get working and parliament today. thank you for your time. that brexit bill. the next at for that is on friday when it theresa may will meet donald task and will have to gently float the idea that we are prepared to pay more without actually saying how much more. some years has just come into us at
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the bbc from the national police chief ‘s cancer. it is in doubt and investigating it has conducted into alleged data manipulation by individuals at a forensic laboratory in manchester has identified more than 10,000 cases which may have been affected by alleged data manipulation. i'm afraid i don't have any more details at the moment, but we will of course bring you them when we get them. as i say, an investigation into alleged data manipulation by individuals working at this forensics laboratory and manchester has identified more than 10,000 cases which may have been affected. more on that as we get it. the german chancellor, angela merkel, has insisted she will lead her party into a new election — if one's called following her failure to agree a coalition. mrs merkel has indicated she does not want to lead a minority government because they are too unstable.
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let's speak to our berlin correspondent. this is an unprecedented situation. political gridlock in germany. what happens next? today, the german president is meeting political leaders, the leaders of all the different parties involved in this coalition talks over the past four weeks as well as other parties in government because his view is that fresh elections but just government because his view is that fresh elections butjust lead to political instability, and a peed our political limbo for months because of the constitutional arrangement in germany. it wouldn't be until months into next year that the elections would actually be held, and it could well be that we would end up with very much the same sort of situation even after the elections because there is no sign that the polls have changed
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particularly, so we could end up with the situation where parties find it hard to come together any complicated coalition government. that is why it right now the president is talking to these party leaders and trying to, as he would put it, knock some sense into them, because he has accused them of not acting responsibly. he has said it is important to think about the whole country because in his eyes, you can't just hand whole country because in his eyes, you can'tjust hand back responsibility to the voters by calling a fashion election. chancellor merkel has said that she would be prepared for a fresh election, and she would rather have that than a minority government, but affect most of the mainstream parties would agree that their ideal alternative would be to form some sort of coalition government that would avoid both of those options. it really depends how the public mood she is the breakdown in talks, because as pressure mounts on particular party leaders to back
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down, b could see a change in situation. it is unlikely but possible that the situation could change over the next few days. within the last few minutes, a spokesman for theresa may has said that britain has a good constructive relationship with germany, and this was one imagines that would continue, but that is me onto my next question. what are the implications of love this for europe andindeed implications of love this for europe and indeed for the brexit negotiations? that is a good question. there is no direct impact on brexit as such with the situation in germany right now. that is because german politicians agree with the line that brussels is taking on brexit, so whenever pro—brexit mps have tried to negotiate with politicians here in germany, they have been rebuffed and sent back to brussels effectively, because the german line is that it is up to brussels to negotiate it. there would be any direct impact of better toss because belling sees that it better toss because belling sees thatitis better toss because belling sees that it is its role to engage in
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those tarts. but there could well be an and direct impact if there is a prolonged period of radical uncertainty here in germany, because that would obviously affect the largest economy and country in the u, and that would make the eu itself feel weaker. pro—brexit mps will say that that would mean that britain would be at an advantage, but many a nalysts would be at an advantage, but many analysts believe it could be the opposite, because a weaker eu did make them feel less secure and less willing to be lenient towards the uk. there could be an indirect impact on brexit negotiations, but right now we are not quite there. we are still in the process of after this breakdown of talks on sunday, the dust is still settling, and it isa the dust is still settling, and it is a very constructive mood right now in bellerin by political leaders are trying to cobble together some
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sort of solution which would avoid a long period of political uncertainty. the uk government borrowed an extra £500 million more than expected last month. the office for national statistics said the main measure of public borrowing hit £8 billion in october. economists had been expecting borrowing to come in lower — at £7.5 billion. analysts say the main reason behind the increase in borrowing is higher inflation, which makes it more expensive for the government to borrow money. the headlines and bbc news online.
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the headlines and bbc news online. the ruling party are expected to start the impeachment process of robert mugabe within the hour. senior cabinet members agree uk should offer to paper money to the eu as it leaves if ted cox begin next month. the british explorer benedict allen who has fallen out of it, but pa pa benedict allen who has fallen out of it, but papa new guinea says he did not get lost and he did not need rescuing. and sport, the women's ashes series has beenjohn. so you had already retain the ashes, but england won the final t20 by four wicket with the highest successful run chase in history. the men's as is starts on thursday. alistair cooke says england have pretty much accepted that ben stokes will not play a part in the series after the
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police investigation and has part in a fight outside a nightclub. writing are unbeaten in five premier league is. they came from behind twice against stoke and are in the top half of the table. algae back with a full update and about ten minutes. vladimir putin has called for a political settlement in syria, during an unannounced visit to russia by the syrian president bashar al—assad. the meeting, at the russian black sea resort of sochi, came two years after russia began a military campaign in syria in support of mr assad's forces. speaking to russian television after the meeting on monday evening, mr putin said he intended to talk with us president donald trump and the emir of qatar about a resolution to the conflict let's speak to our moscow correspondent, sarah rainsford. president putin certainly give
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president putin certainly give president assad a warm welcome. what is the significance of this and announced meeting? it is extremely significant, even the symbolism of it is important. this was president putin welcoming president assad for the first time in a two years, and essentially declaring an almost ended to military operations within syria. mr putin said that the defeat of terrorist groups, as he pitted was very close and no inevitable. but he and president assad went on to meet military leaders here can to congratulate them for their role in that, but both of them said both absolutely pivotal. they talked about the russian military having maintained syria's territorial integrity, and president putin said the russian military had saved the silly instead. a lot of
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congratulations for the military role, and a message for the leaders to push forward with the political solution. just by the fact that these two member standing side by side in russia and saying that suggest that certainly mr assad very firmly sees himself as part of the political future in syria firmly sees himself as part of the politicalfuture in syria going forward. a very complex to go shooting process, which is already underway, i think the idea that that would not excel in it. it is the first time in two years that president putin has welcomed president putin has welcomed president assad. what should be read into the timing of this meeting?” think there is key timing it in terms of the conflict in syria and also the domestic political agenda in russia. on that note, i would say it is almost the beginning of election campaigning here in russia for the presidential election and
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roundabouts ah months' time. mr putin is expected to run for that, and to be able to announce a russian victory in syria is an important plank of that campaign, so i think thatis plank of that campaign, so i think that is part of what is going on. it is part of russia's grandstanding, pitching itself as a global peacemaker and it is a pivotal figure in terms of the middle east broadly, but specifically in terms of syria. in terms of the peace process , of syria. in terms of the peace process, it is an important meeting which will taper tomorrow when president putin will host both attackers and the iranian leaders here in russia, and they will be discussing syria. these countries have different ends there. he is going to them with a message from president assad, and he is now positioning himself as the man who can bring all sides together and try to work out sometimes das some kind of political solution for syria. let's look at some of today's
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other developing stories: young persons railcards — which provide discounted rail travel to people between the ages of 16 and 25 — are to be extended to 30—year—olds. the chancellor, philip hammond, is set to announce the change in wednesday's budget. the security firm g4s has commissioned an independent inquiry to review the "attitude and behaviour" of staff at an immigration removal centre it runs near gatwick airport. staff at brook house were allegedly caught "mocking, abusing and assaulting" people being held there in covert footage filmed for bbc panorama. the company has appointed an outside consultancy to conduct the inquiry but has not said whether the findings will be published. britain is to lose its seat on the international court ofjustice in the hague for the first time since the un's principal legal body was founded in 1946 the uk's current judge, sir christopher greenwood,
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was hoping to be elected for a second, nine—year term. but the government withdrew him from the race after un members backed his rival indian candidate. for a full summary of the news, you can go to our website where you'll be able to get more details on all of those stories. a scheme aimed at detecting lung cancer earlier, is to be extended to thousands more patients. nhs england says the use of mobile scanners at supermarkets and shopping centres in greater manchester proved so successful, similar schemes will now be rolled out to other parts of the country. caroline rigby has more. it has saved my life, definitely saved my life, because i could have gone maybe two or three years and it could have spread everywhere. michael brady was diagnosed with lung cancer thanks to a project which offered extra screening to smokers and former smokers in some of the poorest
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manchester areas. in an effort to boost early detection, patients thought to be most at risk were given ct scans in mobile trucks and supermarkets at shopping centres. lung cancer is the biggest cancer killer in the uk, claiming 35,000 lives year. nhs england says during the manchester pilot, one case was detected every 33 people screened and four out of five cases were diagnosed early when the disease is easier to treat. we have screening programmes are ready, it isjust that people are relu cta nt, ready, it isjust that people are reluctant, because they are frightened by the c word, to come forward. they say, if i don't know anything, i will be all right, but it is actually the opposite of that. the more they get tested appropriately, that gets us a better chance of survival. similar schemes are being rolled out in london and the north of england. many have welcomed it
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but cancer research uk warns there will need to be extra staff needed if more lives are to be saved. we are gone to cross to westminster with david davis is addressing a conference. i want to talk to you today about the state of the negotiations and a critical role that the european parliament, vcr, and conservative politicians on both sides of the channel can play on making both sides work. before we get onto talking about brexit properly, ijust get onto talking about brexit properly, i just wanted get onto talking about brexit properly, ijust wanted say get onto talking about brexit properly, i just wanted say a get onto talking about brexit properly, ijust wanted say a word of thanks to ecr and the rocket is. as we negotiate exit, we remain a film member of the european union, and until we leave our citizens will be affected each and every day by the policies being discussed and
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voted on in brussels. luckily, they are represented by some of the finest and most public spirited representatives this country has. it cannot be easy being a british mvp in brussels right now, but whether it is the leadership roles in parliament are the work promoting free and fair trade, are the persecution are persecuted people. it is clear that anyone who pays any attention at all that you are doing an outstanding job standing up for britain. that work is vital because the european parliament has an important role in the brexit process. the parliament of course has the right to scrutinise and vote on the deals negotiated, but equally it has a role on an influencing those in go shooting is by setting the context and principal and with
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the context and principal and with the european union ranks as priorities. ido i do not know a single person who voted to iam i am pleased with the progress that we have made, towards the single aim, giving both british citizens the greatest possible certainty about the future. we have agreed to protect the rights of workers, european citizens in the united kingdom and british across the european union. protecting contributions made before and after
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the exit. and we have secured the rights of british citizens in the eu 27. we are now in touching distance, the prime minister's phrase, of an overarching agreement. one that is going to enable european citizens and british people across europe, continuing to live as they do now. i know that potato of this conference is deal or no deal. i do want to explain i sit that completely and unambiguously on the deal side of this particular equation. reaching a deal with the european union is not only the most likely a is also the best. a good deal means we can grasp opportunities of independent trade, giving stability for business and
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people they employ, and the economy they support. as fellow politicians, used to debate, brexit talks have been tough. both sides have got positions to defend, aims to achieve, brexit could be an important democratic moment for the united kingdom, it is potentially serious disruption for the european union. as was referred to earlier, the attitudes that go with that. the commission and parliament are naturally concerned about what britain's exit is going to mean for the european project. despite this, iam the european project. despite this, i am confident we will reach an outcome that works for the united kingdom and european union. why? it is in the interests of both sides to
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do so. 3 million european citizens in the united kingdom, billions of pounds of trade, hundreds of billions of trade done every year between the united kingdom and european union. trade supports millions ofjobs. achieving a deal that works for the united kingdom and european union is the best way of ensuring continued prosperity. the institutions of the european union, taking back control of borders, laws, money, we are not leaving europe. we want closest friends, allies to succeed politically and economic life. having a strong united partner on the doorstep can only be good for the doorstep can only be good for the united kingdom. it is in this spirit we have approached negotiations with the commission. the hind the headlines screaming of deadlock, in reality we have made
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tangible progress. on top of citizen rights, constructive conversations about the northern ireland border. agreeing joint principles on the common travel area. so that people can continue to live, work and study as freely across the two as they do now. both sides steadfast and the commitment to uphold the good friday agreement. and we have agreed that we wa nt agreement. and we have agreed that we want to avoid any physical infrastructure at the border. huge, hugely welcome move. one other issues, goods, privilege, all of those technical things that actually make the union work we have reached agreement on the core issues. all the technical detail is going to underpin the deal, a special partnership with neighbours and allies, committed trading
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partnerships. it is becoming clearer that we must start talking about a future relationship. the northern ireland border cannot be fully addressed if we are not taking into account the future of the partnership with the european union. final resolutions and financial settle m e nts final resolutions and financial settlements depend on that because nothing is agreed until everything is agreed. that could be familiar to some of you. the future of europe needs a satisfactory resolution. we are ready to begin that conversation as soon as the european union are. we have got a clear vision, bold and ambitious relationship with european friends, unique and comprehensive trade agreement at the heart, going beyond anything the european union has signed to date. after brexit, britain is going to be a third country partner like no other, closer than canada, better than ——
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bigger than norway. i know that today you are going to discuss various reactions. but i think we need to be ambitious. and challenge ourselves. we think of it what agreement we can strike. an agreement we can strike. an agreement that is completely new, not copy and paste, because we have already unprecedented cooperation. the partnership that we should strike should reflect that. we do not only need talks to move to the future relationship but also to the implementation period we want, and we have made the importance of such a period very clear. either way, both british businesses and european businesses. only going to have to prepare for one set of changes between the united kingdom and the union after brexit. that is as true
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for businesses in europe as it is for businesses in europe as it is for british companies. it is our view we should access markets on the same terms as now. businesses get the confidence that they need to invest, not by guessing what the future partnership may look like. i wa nt to future partnership may look like. i want to stress, this is not the united kingdom stealing and european union in perpetuity. we will act as a third country. that should mean the right to negotiate and sign trade deals, so that they can be enacted once implementation period is over. this is good to have a strict time limit. in accordance with the prime minister's double lock. we can deliver on that historic referendum result, leaving the european union but making sure the european union but making sure the exit is done in a smooth and
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orderly manner. i said i am confident we can get a deal with the european union, the alternative is possible. not probable, possible. the department i run, it is not called the department for getting a deal come what may, it is exiting the european union. whatever happens, we are delivering on the instruction of the british people. i do not think it would be an interest of either side to get no deal. when iam of either side to get no deal. when i am sitting across the table from michel barnier, i know that he is just as determined. but as a responsible government, it is correct that we make every plan for every eventuality. over the past year, every eventuality. over the past yea r, every every eventuality. over the past year, every department across whitehall has been working at pace, covering a range of scenarios. these plans have been well developed and
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designed to provide flexibility to respond to negotiated agreements. as well as preparing us for the chance well as preparing us for the chance we leave without a deal. and parliament were discussing the european union withdrawal bill today. ensuring we have a fully functioning statute book. we will bring forward for the legislation. we will also produce new systems, new staff when necessary to ensure we will be ready. meanwhile, we are continuing to negotiate in good faith with the european union. i do not want any discussion of contingency planning to be interpreted as a sign that the negotiations will fail, we want them to fail... of those are not true. this is a contingency planning exercise, now... as we look to the future partnership, with the backing
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and support of everyone in this room, we can achieve a deal that works for in britain and europe. i have simple objectives. short—term, long—term, medium—term. you must move the negotiations to the future relationship. the december council will be crucial. then strike a deal that works for both. finally, we must use brexit to deliver change that the people voted for. no bystanders. all of you have got a role to play. everybody who wants these negotiations to succeed needs to work together to make this happen. thank you for coming here today. making progress is very clear. so are the objectives. together, you can help us make them
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happen. thank you and good luck for the rest of the conference. the brexit secretary, addressing a conference of the european conservatives and reformers group. the conservative group. he did not say anything new. updated everyone on the current state of negotiations he said reaching a deal with the eu is the most likely and best outcome of the current negotiations. and he said we have reached agreement on the corner shoes. in some ways, upbeat assessment. it was also interesting he said we must talking the future relationship which would not be like anything that has gone before. it would be closer than the relationship with canada, bigger than norway, in other words it would be completely new. not copy and
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paste. but he also raised the possibility that the united kingdom does not get a deal. and said preparations are being made on that basis. he stressed it was contingency planning, nothing more than that. that was the brexit secretary, david davis, and the current assessment of the negotiations between the united kingdom and european union. more analysis of that speech later. british explorer benedict allen is back in britain. a search was mounted last week after he went missing in a remote area of papua new guinea. he has denied the rescue was a publicity stunt. he has been talking to the security correspondent about why he was not taking any means of communication. i am known as an explorer. i am a specialist. i go to
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very re m ote explorer. i am a specialist. i go to very remote places. i have been spending three decades doing this. i know papa spending three decades doing this. i know pa pa new spending three decades doing this. i know papa new guinea very well. you still won't, went missing? many circumstances going against me. one of the bridges we had to cross, swept away by floods. as we climbed higher and higher... i swept away by floods. as we climbed higherand higher... iwas swept away by floods. as we climbed higher and higher... i was trying to track down some people i used to love with, i was contracting chills, i knew i may well have malaria. had it five times. almost died twice. them, a war going ahead between different communities. just to be clear, you were very well looked after by everybody you were with. never threatened? always. you asked
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why go without a phone? my back up is not to summon a helicopter... it is not to summon a helicopter... it is to use the local resources. the forest to them is not a threat. the local people, always friendly without exception. i was passing through different groups. it was great until the malaria kicked in. fall was your worst moment? the realisation that this time it really was not looking good. i was dropping into fifa. i had to make a statement. farewell video message to your family. i had never gone on an expedition like this, while a parent. now, three children. ten, seven, two. iwas parent. now, three children. ten, seven, two. i was talking to the camera about how i was still aiming
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to get out, don't worry, but in my heart i thought i might fail them. if anybody finds this, please take this to the high commission, i could be dead. i said, maybe you have a family, i was speaking in the local language. just trying to make myself human. saw at least my wife would know. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour, but first the headlines on bbc newsroom live: zimbabwe's former vice—president urges robert mugabe to resign immediately orface humiliation as the ruling zanu—pf party prepares to begin impeachment proceedings. senior cabinet members agree the uk should offer to pay more money to the eu as it leaves, if trade talks begin next month. the british explorer benedict allen — who was flown out of a remote part
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of papua new guinea says he did not get lost and didn't need rescuing. in the business news... public sector net borrowing excluding public sector banks increased by £0.5 billion pounds to £8 billion in october, compared with the same month last year, the office for national statistics has said. we'll have more on this shortly. the competition and markets authority says the drugs company, concordia, abused its position. it was accused of overcharging the nhs by tens of millions of pounds a year for a thyroid medicine. a decade ago, that medicine cost £4.46 a packet. it has since risen to £258 a packet — an increase of almost 6,000 per cent. easyjet's profits have fallen during what the airline called a "difficult year for the aviation industry".
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pre—tax profits in the year to 30 september fell 17.3% to £408 million, in line with guidance given last month. however passenger numbers rose 9.7%. uk public sector borrowing rose to £8 billion in october, officialfigures show — that's up 6.9% from a year earlier. the deficit, which excludes state—run banks, was bigger than economists had predicted and increased debt costs, linked to the uk's higher inflation since the brexit vote, were a factor in the shortfall and the office for national statistics said borrowing for the financial year to date has reached £38.5 billion, down £4.1 billion from the same period last year. we can speak to a senior economist. the borrowing has increased sharply, is the chancellor still on target to
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reduce the deficit? it is likely the deficit is going to come in under 3% this year, down from 8%. definite progress. we should probably have a balanced budget by the early next decade. a lot is going to depend if inflation sticks around 3% or has peaked, falls back? a lot of this is to do with increased borrowing, the 2596 in to do with increased borrowing, the 25% in october. that is because it is all index linked bonds? 25% in october. that is because it is all index linked bond57m 25% in october. that is because it is all index linked bonds? it is likely that inflation has peaked. it is going to go down to about 2.5% next year. is going to go down to about 2.5% next yea r. after is going to go down to about 2.5% next year. after that it is difficult to consider what the implications of brexit are going to be, we do not know the details yet. brexit could increase borrowing costs. what implications could this
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have for what chancellor philip hammond can unveil tomorrow? less room for another? it is likely that it will predict that the uk economy is growing slaw in the long run than thought over march. 2%, to 1.5%. philip hammond is going to have to find more taxes somewhere. thank you. easyjet has blamed a weaker pound for a 17% fall in annual pre—tax profits. the budget carrier's profits for the year ending in september came in at four million pounds. however there was a positive gloss to the figures because passenger numbers rose by by nine point seven percent to eighty million — and revenues were up by over 8 per cent. easyjet‘s fortunes will have been aided by the collapse of rival
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monarch earlier in the year and of course its main rival ryanair is dealing with the fallout of a disastrous scheduling malfunction that led to mass flight cancellations. this will be the last time chief executive carolyn mccall reports earnings for the airline, she is taking up a new role as ceo of itv television here in london and she told the bbc about her decision to leave. i think we have turned the into a really great airline. i am leaving with sadness but i would rather be leaving when things are starting to look positive, and that is why i am leaving. 7.5 years, the right time. it has been flat for the ftse. we just heard from the chief
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executive. among the biggest faller, compass. one of the biggest caterers. a lot of trends had been factored in. here is the pound. political uncertainty in jeremy factored in. here is the pound. political uncertainty injeremy has been keeping the single currency under pressure. the american talk show host, charlie rose, has apologised for what he called ‘inappropriate behaviour‘ after allegations of sexual harassment. his various shows have been suspended, following a piece in the washington post in which eight women accused him of harassment. in a statement, rose said he did not believe all the accusations against him were accurate. now — when you're out shopping
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it can be nice to find a seat for a quick rest and to take the load off your feet. but for some, the availability of seating can be the deciding factor in whether it's possible to go out at all. new research suggests around a quarter of older people feel excluded from our high streets, as john maguire reports. will you walk around sainsbury‘s, or sit down? sit down. clive and margaret enjoy getting out and about in their local town of fleet in hampshire. if you're tired, sit down. it's ok. they like exercise, fresh air and the chance to see what they're buying. that looks nice, that lemon cake, doesn't it... it's nice to choose your own fruit and vegetables, rather than have them delivered and get the wrong number or the wrong variety. but, also very important, somewhere to sit down and take the weight off their feet. would you choose a supermarket that had seating over one that didn't? yes, we would, because we wouldn't want to stand for half an hour.
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some you have to wander around and stand forever, you know. the anchor trust, which houses older people, says access to the high street is a real concern and, as the population ages, also a growing one. potentially, retailers are missing out on 4.5 billion pounds a year by 2030 by not providing adequate seating, so this talk about the high streets kind of dying, and the death of the high street, is premature. and, actually, there is a really big opportunity for retailers to provide seats for shoppers of the future. the charity asked 1,000 over—70s for their views on going shopping. almost a quarter of the people questioned by the survey, 23%, in fact, said they felt excluded from the modern high street. "unexpected item in the bagging area." around 24% people are put off with these self—scan machines. and are there enough places to sit
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down in towns and cities centres? 60% of people thought not, so the charity has launched this idea... standing up for sitting down. it's backed by large chains, including sainsburys, morrisons and debenhams, and more than 200 independent shops. so, this is our chair, and we have it for anybody that comes into the shop, used often for our older guests and customers if they want to sit down and have a break when they are shopping — even if it is a tiny thing, it is really important so they can take a break if they want to. and the campaign says it benefits both older shoppers and retailers, aiming to see some of the grey pounds spent online coming back into high—street tills. things didn't go according to plan for one unfortunate cameraman waiting to capture the moment the old georgia dome sports stadium in atlanta, georgia was demolished.
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he was all set up for the money shot, when this happened... a bus pulled right in front of the camera, completely obscuring his view. needless to say he wasn't too happy — we've bleeped out what he says. you would be upset as well. first we leave you with for a look at the weather. no restricted view. lots of cloud. but despite that, and some outbreaks of rain, affecting the north of england and scotland, incredibly mild. seven, 12 celsius. that is typicalfor mild. seven, 12 celsius. that is typical for the mild. seven, 12 celsius. that is typicalfor the maximum mild. seven, 12 celsius. that is typical for the maximum temperature in november. very mild. a lot of us are going to have scenes like this.
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brighter skies to the pennines. and temperatures could be as high as 15, 16. more rain spreading to central areas. across scotland, it is going to continue. heavy at times, the north west. increasingly easterly wind. northern ireland, some spots of rain. towards central and eastern and southern areas, probably going to stay dry. brighter spells developing. 13, 14. mild for the time of year. this evening, some gales here. more rain to wales, the midlands, northern ireland by the end of the evening. temperatures at double figures, chillier further
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north for scotland. this is how wednesday is looking. particularly cumbria. some winds. strengthening down to the south east, it is going to stay dry and bright, mild really. temperatures up to 16. through the evening, complicated mixture of weather fronts. wins the going into thursday. at these weather fronts we have got some mild air, going to gradually edge south once as the colder air comes in. all of those weather fronts, the risk colder air comes in. all of those weatherfronts, the risk of colder air comes in. all of those weather fronts, the risk of snow on costly morning. some of that to low levels. elsewhere on thursday, brighter skies, more rain for the south, but holding onto mild air. the 11, 14. north, colder. that comes down to most of us on freely,
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to the weekend, with wintry showers. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at midday. impeachment proceedings against president mugabe are about to get underway in zimba bwe's parliament. police say more than 10,000 cases may have been tampered with, following an investigation into a forensics lab in manchester. more money on offerfor the eu — senior cabinet members agree to increase the divorce bill, if trade talks begin next month. also, the british explorer who was flown out of a remote part of papua new guinea says he did not get lost and didn't need rescuing. i'm nota i'm not a risk taker. i am i'm nota risk taker. iam a calculator. i calculate risk all the time. did you miscalculate this time? maybe i did but i wasn't on my
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last legs. maybe i did but i wasn't on my last legs. and detecting lung cancer earlier — mobile screening in shopping centres is to be rolled out to thousands more patients. good afternoon. it's tuesday, 21st november. welcome to bbc newsroom live. empeachment proceedings are about to start in zimbabwe against president robert mugabe, who is defying demands to stand down. mr mugabe called a regular cabinet meeting this morning, but only a handful of ministers are thought to have turned up. let'sjoin ben brown in harare. yes, demonstrators are gathering
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outside the parliament as it begins to sit this afternoon to impeach robert mugabe after 37 years of rule. the way it will work is that the motion will be put before both houses of parliament. if they agree with a majority vote they will set up with a majority vote they will set upa with a majority vote they will set up a committee to investigate the charges against him, essentially that he has been acting unconstitutionally. then it will be put to another vote, a two thirds majority needed to impeach him, to end his rule of zimbabwe. it could happen within a couple of days. others say it could take longer, maybe several weeks. robert mugabe is clinging to power. he held a cabinet meeting this morning, but only a handful of ministers turned up. now we have this was brought from our zimbabwe correspondent. we
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come to that report in a moment. let's talk to you more about the situation here in zimbabwe. robert mugabe has been clinging on. i will talk to my guess about that in a moment. because he refused to resign, on national television, moment. because he refused to resign, on nationaltelevision, he was asked to resign, he didn't. then, because he was... refusing to resign there was increasing pressure. people have been out on the streets demanding he resigned. they have set a deadline and he has again refused to resign. there was now increasing pressure on him to go. you can probably see some of the crowds. they are gathering outside. they are having a prayer
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meeting down there in unity square, that would have been unthinkable in yea rs that would have been unthinkable in years gone by. there are also an impeachment party beginning to get underway around the parliament. i'm joined now by a representative from the opposition, mdc. thank you for being with us. you worry minister here, you are now an opposition leader. tell us what you think will happen in this process?” leader. tell us what you think will happen in this process? i think the parliament should drizzly find the numbers, the 50% of the joint sitting to a set the motion of impeachment, allegations against the president that he has failed to uphold the constitution and govern. the next stage would be the appointment of the 9—member committee, by the standing orders,
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which i guess should happen before the close of business today. then the close of business today. then the committee will investigate the allegations against the president. i presume the president would want a right to be heard, and so there may be some days of interaction between the president's legal team and the committee before they finally present its report. it will be presented to parliament. this time parliament requires a two thirds majority of both houses to pass the motion. how quickly could it happen? some people say maybe tomorrow, is it going to be that quick?” some people say maybe tomorrow, is it going to be that quick? i think if due processes to be done, if the rule of majority has to be respected it can't possibly take two days. if it can't possibly take two days. if it will be a roughshod process where people are approaching the issue with a predetermined mindset, then,
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yes, it could be over by tonight. i hope the constitution is respected and rules are respected. i hope mugabe has given his chance to say his defence. i want him to go, but the constitution is the supreme law of the land. and opposition mps will support this motion? because it is obviously a two thirds majority, so is an upf can't do this by themselves. they do have a constitutional majority, but that is besides the point. the people of zimbabwe want mugabe to go, he should have gone years ago. what will it mean for zimbabwe if he is pushed out of power like this? although there has been a military takeover, it will be constitutional, it won't be a barrel of a gun? takeover, it will be constitutional, it won't be a barrel of a gumm will set a precedent. it will set a precedent that things can be done in
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a constitutional manner. it will be a constitutional manner. it will be a first for africa. more importantly, the question is what is next after mugabe's departure. we require a redefinition of democracy, legitimacy, we've acquired a negotiation over the transition of authority that will govern zimbabwe between his departure and we will hold the next election. we need to look out for critical things, number one, the issue of peace and stability. number two, political and institutional reform. number three, theissue institutional reform. number three, the issue of economy and number four, the engagement of zimbabwe. rejoining membership including the symbolic rejoining of the commonwealth. thank you very much
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indeed forjoining us. that's the latest from here in harare. a dramatic day, really. we've got the start of these impeachment proceedings, we don't know when it will end. some saying it could be tomorrow or thursday. others say it could be several weeks. it does look like the writing is on the wall for robert mugabe, as it has been for some time, the army and air his own party against him and the people clearly against him as well. senior cabinet ministers have agreed that britain should increase its financial offer to the european union. but only if member states agree next month to move on to talks about trade and an implementation period. ministers, including the prominent brexiteers, michael gove and boris johnson approved the move last night. today the brexit seat to nicaragua
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secretary has been speaking at a conference where he repeated his intention. conference where he repeated his intention. let's speak now to our assistant political editor norman smith. some surprise amongst tory backbenchers, borisjohnson and michael gove have agreed to an increase in the divorce bill. no figure, but significantly above the £18 billion so far suggested by mrs may. one tory backbencher said this morning that we have to be able to look voters in the eye at a time when public spending is constrained, and there might also be a very difficult budget. meanwhile, david davis has, in a speech this morning, suggested that the possibility of getting a trade deal is now the most likely outcome of the brexit negotiations. let's listen.” likely outcome of the brexit negotiations. let's listen. i say com pletely negotiations. let's listen. i say completely and unambiguously on the
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deal side of this equation. reaching a deal with the european union is not only the most likely outcome, it is also the best outcome for our country. a good deal means we can grasp the opportunities of independent trade policy, while at the same time giving stability for our business and for the people they employ and the economy we support. upon which our prosperity depends. hopefully it wasn't a metaphor for the talks are likely to go. at the end of the speech mr davies seemed to have a bit of a stumble as he got off the platform. it's never a great look, is it! elsewhere strong words from the dup leader, arlene foster, over the possibility of a hard border in
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northern ireland. she was in downing street to see the prime minister. in an interview afterwards she accused bt shock of being reckless by floating the idea of an all ireland solution. in other words, floating the idea of an all ireland solution. in otherwords, no floating the idea of an all ireland solution. in other words, no border between northern ireland and ireland, instead the border would be the irish sea. she reacted angrily to that, saying he was playing political games. that could emerge as one of the other stumbling blocks before we move onto trade talks. the next key moment will be on friday when theresa may meets the president of the european council, donald tusk, when she will gently suggest we are prepared to pay more money, without putting a figure on it hope, despite the difficulties in reaching a clear solution of a hard border in northern ireland, that it will then be possible to move on to those crucial trade talks. thanks, norman. thanks, norman. the uk government borrowed an extra £500 million more
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than expected last month. the office for national statistics said the main measure of public borrowing hit £8 billion in october. economists had been expecting borrowing to come in lower — at £7.5bn. analysts say the main reason behind the increase in borrowing is higher inflation, which makes it more expensive for the government to borrow money. let's look at some of today's other developing stories: young persons railcards,which provide discounted rail travel to people between the ages of 16 and 25, are to be extended to 30 year olds. the chancellor, philip hammond, is set to announce the change in wednesday's budget. the security firm g4s has commissioned an independent inquiry to review the "attitude and behaviour" of staff at an immigration removal centre it runs near gatwick airport. staff at brook house were allegedly caught "mocking, abusing and assaulting" people
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being held there in covert footage filmed for bbc panorama. the company has appointed an outside consultancy to conduct the inquiry but has not said whether the findings will be published. britain is to lose its seat on the international court ofjustice in the hague for the first time since the un's principal legal body was founded in 1946. the uk's current judge, sir christopher greenwood, was hoping to be elected for a second, nine—year term. but the government withdrew him from the race after un members backed his rival indian candidate. for a full summary of the news you can go to our website where you'll be able to get more details on all those stories. the drug company concorde has been
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accused of overcharging the nhs for a thyroid medicine. the competition and markets authority says the company abused its dominant position by vastly increasing the cost of liothyronine. concordia says it's invested significantly in the drug over the past decade. our business correspondent emma simpson joins me now. so tell us about this drug, emma. liothyronine is a specific thyroid treatment. back in a few years ago it was £4.96 a park. that has now shot up byjuly last year. that is why you get that increase of 6000%. the overall bill for the nhs went up from £600,000, £234 million
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a year. what bcma have said today is these are provisional findings, a year. what bcma have said today is these are provisionalfindings, it believes the canadian firm, concordia, has abused its dominant position. until earlier this year concordia was the only supplier of the drug. there were alternatives. the head of the cma has said that pharmaceutical companies that abuse their position and overcharge for drugs of forcing the nhs and the uk taxpayer to pay over the odds for an important medical treatments. we alleged concordia used its market dominance in the supply of these drugs to do exactly that. he stressed that these findings are still provisional. concordia say we don't believe the competition law has been infringed, we will review the findings and respond in detail. the rise you have described seems extraordinary. how unusual is that? it's not the first case the cma have looked at. they have been ramping up
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the pressure. last year it levelled a huge fine against pfizer for u nfa i rly a huge fine against pfizer for unfairly raising the price of a drug used to treat epilepsy. it's looking at seven investigations into drug pricing and pharmaceutical competition issues. so very much a work in progress. thank you. data liberation could have occurred in the lab in manchester, suspected manipulation by employees emerged earlier this year when a data anomaly in a drink—driving case was reported. two men have been arrested and five interviewed under caution by greater manchester police. our home affairs correspondentjoins us now from millbank. what can you tell us about this? the cases is
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developing fast. it's emerging as one of the most serious forensic science failures in recent times. that is the way the forensic science regulator has described it. she compared it to the 80s and 90s, concerns which resulted in miscarriages ofjustice. the problems started at running dogs testing services in greater manchester towards the end of 2013. between then and this year, the problems were uncovered, around 10,000 samples of drug tests, which the company undertook now have to be re—examined in some way. it's not so much the testing, but the validation of results. that's where potential irregularities have been found. police are prioritising cases which are going to trial, going through the criminal justice are going to trial, going through the criminaljustice system, and particularly serious cases. they
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have so far found 50 cases involving drug driving, people are being prosecuted for alleged drug driving, they have been discontinued. stopped, and the prosecution will not go any further because of concerns about irregularities. there are also many hundreds of other cases involving violent offences, so far, no irregularities have been uncovered on there. two people, two defendants, people convicted of causing death by drug driving, while certainly cases in which someone died asa certainly cases in which someone died as a result of drug driving, they have been referred to the court of appeal. first of all, what happens next? is there any sense this issue might be more widespread? it is certainly more widespread, concerns have now been raised about another company, which was carrying
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out tests going back to 2010. involving cases that resulted in child custody issues being settled, employment cases being settled. someone, let's say, who was dismissed because they tested positive for a drug, the sample would have been analysed at the lab and now there are concerns about the way the results were validated. there may also be cases in which children were removed from someone's care, based on positive drug test results. now there are potentially thousands of cases there that will have to be re—examined. you can imagine the implications of that are extremely far—reaching. the process now is really retesting samples, where they still exist, looking at the results, seeing if they compare to the original results, and where there are problems all the samples don't exist for retesting, where
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someone has been convicted or the cases going through the justice system, the conviction would have to be quashed, while the case will be stopped. thank you. now let's look at the latest on the decision to increase the amount of money for the so—called divorce bill. the prime minister had this to say a short time ago. i had a good meeting with the irish leader at an informal summit last friday. we want to move onto more detailed discussions about what that trade relationship will be for the future. the eu has made clear that is an issue and we want to move on. theresa may speaking in the last few moments. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. crowds gather as the impeachment
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proceedings against robert mugabe are expected to get under way. tampered with, following an investigation into a forensics lab in manchester. senior cabinet members agree the uk should offer to pay more money to the eu as it leaves trade talks begin next month. time to catch up with the sport now. hello. lots of cricket news today. australia's women had already retain the ashes, but the series has ended ina the ashes, but the series has ended in a drawer. england won the final match in camera. it hadn't looked likely, beth mooney looked unbeaten on 117 after just 70 likely, beth mooney looked unbeaten on 117 afterjust 70 deliveries. australia finish with 178 for two. danny
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australia finish with 178 for two. da n ny wyatt australia finish with 178 for two. danny wyatt scored a scintillating century, the first by an englishwoman in t20. it was a bit nervy towards the end. but fran wilson steered them home with an over to spare to complete the most successful chase in the history of women's t20. the series finishing eight points all. alistair cooke says they have pretty much accepted that ben stokes is going to play no pa rt that ben stokes is going to play no part in the ashes series, the all—rounder is awaiting the results ofa all—rounder is awaiting the results of a police investigation into a fight in september. he was arrested for causing actual bodily harm. that same posting pictures on insta gram yesterday. keeping in shape, in durham, bowling and batting, seemingly ready tojoin durham, bowling and batting, seemingly ready to join his team—mates if he is cleared. england have been training in brisbane where australia haven't lost a test in almost 30 years. the first test sta rts almost 30 years. the first test starts there on thursday. england
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hold the ashes, but last time they we re hold the ashes, but last time they were in australia they lost five nil. they are certainly a weaker side without stokes. it's been a while, so certainly has a player and a couple of weeks after it was what everybody was talking about. we accepted it would be unlikely that ben would be in. you can't pin your hopes on one guy. if there is a bonus of him making the trip that would be great, but it hasn't been spoken about in the changing room. it's no good for us to talk about that. england's women's hockey team have beaten china for one in their last match in new zealand. after two successive defeats it means they avoid a quarterfinal against the world number one side, the netherlands. the and a third—place finish in the group and will face the usa in the quarterfinals.
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three—time olympian tania couch has resigned from diving. she won three medals including gold and a 12 year senior career. she also claimed a ten metre synchronised silver. she competed at world championships in july but will now take up a coaching role in plymouth. as obese portfolio. —— that the sport for now. ijust want i just want to take you straight to harare, where impeachment proceedings against president mugabe have started. you will remember that he is defying demands to stand down, these are live pictures, from harare. impeachment proceedings have just started. it's worth saying that
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mr mugabe called a cabinet meeting this morning, but only a handful of ministers are thought to have turned up, emmerson mnangagwa, the vice president to mr mugabe sacked last week triggering the current situation, he is the man widely expected to take over from robert mugabe. he has issued a statement calling on the president to resign immediately. he says he should accept the will of the people or face humiliation. these scenes on the streets of harare, the capital of zimbabwe as impeachment proceedings against robert mugabe begin. a scheme aimed at detecting lung cancer earlier, is to be extended to thousands more patients. nhs england says the use of mobile scanners at supermarkets and shopping centres in greater manchester
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proved so successful, similar schemes will now be rolled out to other parts of the country. caroline rigby has more. definitely saved my life because i could have gone maybe two or three years. it would then have spread everywhere. michael brady was diagnosed with lung cancer thanks to a project which offered extra screening to smokers and former smokers in some of the poorest areas of manchester. in an effort to boost early detection, patients thought to be most at risk were given ct scans in mobile trucks at supermarkets and shopping centres. lung cancer is the uk's biggest cancer killer, claiming 35,000 lives a year. nhs england says during the manchester pilot, one case was detected every 33 people screened and four out of five cases were diagnosed early, when the disease is easier to treat. we have screening programmes already but people are reluctant because they are frightened by the c word to come forward, and lots of people think
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"if i don't do anything, i'll be all right", when actually it is the opposite. actually, the more we get tested appropriately, then that gives us a better chance of survival. similar schemes are now being rolled out in london and other parts of the north of england. many have welcomed the plans but cancer research uk warns that the nhs will need extra staff to carry out the tests, if thousands more lives are to be saved. caroline rigby, bbc news. sarah macfayden is policy manager at the british lung foundation. she supports this scheme and joins me now. asi as i say, you support the scheme, so i'm assuming you welcome the fact it will be extended ? i'm assuming you welcome the fact it will be extended? absolutely. at the british lung foundation we are really pleased with the news this morning that the pilot scheme will be extended to more parts of the
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country. lung cancer is the biggest cancer killer in the uk. it is often diagnosed quite late, we know that around one third of cases aren't diagnosed until a patient ends up in a&e. programmes like this which can diagnose it much earlier, when it's easier to treat and there are more treatment options available is a good thing. we are positive about this. while he was diagnosed so late? what is currently available? the problem was diagnosing lung cancer is that symptoms often don't show until the disease is advanced. so people might have a persistent cough, oral breathlessness, they might seek medical attention at that stage. but they will often have had lung cancer for a long stage. but they will often have had lung cancerfor a long time stage. but they will often have had lung cancer for a long time without any symptoms, which means that by the time they get a diagnosis it is advanced, and there are fewer treatment options available. what is
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different about this programme? my understanding is that you wouldn't be able to see one of these boots and pop in if you happen to be in the supermarket. you need to be referred? you the supermarket. you need to be referred ? you have the supermarket. you need to be referred? you have to have been to yourgp to referred? you have to have been to your gp to say that you need to be referred? how it has been working so far is that it's been proactively going out to people who are living in parts of the country where there are high rates of lung cancer and people with a smoking history. they are most at risk. so rather than waiting for people to have symptoms and go to their gp, it's going out to people who may well not be having symptoms, but could be at risk. that's why it's been so successful and picked up so many cases at an early stage. can you briefly remind as how many cases there are each year? how big a problem is this? it's a huge problem. there are
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around 86,000 cases every year in the uk, it is the biggest cancer killerfor the uk, it is the biggest cancer killer for both the uk, it is the biggest cancer killerfor both men the uk, it is the biggest cancer killer for both men and women. outcomes for lung cancer aren't as good as some of the other big cancers. survival rates have been increasing, but people surviving beyond your five years is still relatively for lung cancer. we see these problems across other lung conditions as well. late diagnosis, not greater access to treatment options, that's why we think this news is fantastic. we think the government need to support a national plan for lung health which will improve care for patients of all conditions. sailor, thank you. good to talk to you. i want to take you back to the capital of zimbabwe. these are live pictures outside the parliament
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building. karge crowds have dabbled because the impeachment of robert mugabe, the president of zimbabwe for 37 years, it has just begun. mugabe, the president of zimbabwe for 37 years, it hasjust begun. he has been defying demands to stand down, and that is why these formal proceedings have just started. earlier, he called a regular cabinet meeting as though he was carrying on as normal. just a handful of ministers turned up. inside that parliament building, the speaker said that he wanted to inform parliament that proceeding officers had received a notice to remove the president. the speaker said that he wa nted president. the speaker said that he wanted to inform the house that he had received a formal notice to remove the president. and i am just
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looking to see what other lines we have got... the zimbabwe parliament speaker also said that the leader of the war veterans, who have opposed the war veterans, who have opposed the rule of robert mugabe had moved the rule of robert mugabe had moved the motion. it has been seconded. and the vice president, the man who robert mugabe fired last week, that is what triggered the situation, the vice president has released a statement, calling for robert mugabe to resign immediately. that has been formally moved in the parliament, impeaching robert mugabe. that is the formal process by which he would be removed from power. that motion has been moved by the leader of the
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war vetera ns, has been moved by the leader of the war veterans, seconded by an opposition legislator. these are life pictures, outside the parliament building. you can see the large crowds that have gathered. and the drama unfolding inside. we can catch up with the weather. hi lucy. mild day today. plenty of cloud. debt is going to move northwards and eastwards, some strong winds tonight. plenty of cloud throughout the night. we have seen the next boss of rain, pushing to northern ireland, mild in the south. windy day to come. rain pushes north and
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east. and it could also be falling as snow in the north. maximum temperatures, 15. the best of the greatness, the south east. going to be some small for scotland, perhaps over the hills and lower ground. brightness around. starting to get some green in the south later, highs of 14. this is bbc newsroom live. our latest headlines: failing to uphold the constitution and giving his wife too much power. impeachment proceedings against zimbabwe's robert mugabe are due to begin shortly. police say an investigation into the alleged tampering
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of forensic evidence at a laboratory in manchester has identified more than 10,000 cases which "may have been affected". the governtment agrees the uk should offer more money for its divorce from the eu, but only if trade talks begin next month. british explorer benedict allen is back in britain. a search was mounted last week after he went missing in a remote area of papua new guinea. the prime minister says she wants to see more talks next week with northern ireland's political leaders after separate meetings were held with both the dup and sinn fein in downing street over stormont‘s ongoing power—sharing crisis. northern ireland has been without a properly functioning powersharing administration since january. i have reiterated and emphasised the determination of this government to ensure that we see the rear stab as
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more of the fully functioning and inclusive devolved administration that works for everyone in northern ireland. i have also made clear the support for the belfast agreement and successor agreements and the leadership of dup and sinn fein have stated commitment to seeing stormont back up and running. i believe the differences between the parties, the issues that are still dividing them, are very small. culture, identity, legacy. the future stability of devolved institutions. i am not underestimating challenges but i believe a way forward can be found and reached. it is imperative that the parties come back together for talks and we resolve these differences, getting the executive reform for the interest of the people of northern ireland. speaking outside downing street, the dup leader arlene foster — whose party is propping up theresa may's government with 10 westminster mp — described the talks as useful. we had a very useful and detailed
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engagement with the prime minister around what was happening in northern ireland and of course i won't brexit as well. we were very encouraged in relation to the second issue, reiterating the fact no barriers to trade between northern ireland and the rest of the united kingdom. in relation to strand one, the devolved matter, it as a matter for the united kingdom government working with parties in northern ireland. it has been a very useful meeting. sinn fein leader, gerry adams, said his party was committed to the good friday agreement. we just had a very frank and robust exchange with the british prime ministerand exchange with the british prime minister and with the seconds survey, james brokenshire, and we
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wa nt survey, james brokenshire, and we want to make this very clear. i think martin mcguinness's example of leading the executive over all sorts of difficulties and controversies, it is proof of sinn fein's commitment to the good friday agreement. however... the talks without end, without meaning, rhyme or reason, are not the way to proceed. these have got to be meaningful, directed with a maximum possibility of achieving success. we are going to reflect on all of that. that was the sinn fein president gerry adams. failing to uphold the constitution and giving his wife too much power. impeachment proceedings against zimbabwe's robert mugabe are due to begin shortly. we can get the latest. ben... yes. the session of parliament just
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beginning behind me, at harare. going to be a session of both houses, being asked to consider that robert mugabe should be impeached because he has violated the constitution. if they agree, they vote by simple majority. that would set upa vote by simple majority. that would set up a committee, and if they think he has a case to answer, it would go to the senate and national assembly. some members of the parliament said this could be done quickly, effectively to get rid of robert mugabe as soon as possible. maybe even tomorrow. others have said it is going to take longer. due process has to be respected, the legitimate process. they said it should take a week, two, three. we
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are going to have to wait and see what happens. zanu—pf are pushing this hard. one mp called robert mugabe and animal. that is the sort of fierce language that these members of parliament have been using. meanwhile, crowds demonstrating outside the parliament and hoping he is going to be impeached. we are watching those huge crowds that have gathered. one of the noticeable things over the last few days has been khomeini people have been involved, but part is have been —— protests have been peaceful? they have. that has been so important. after this military ta keover last so important. after this military takeover last wednesday, that precipitated this crisis, people took to the streets. it was huge numbers on saturday and particular.
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tens of thousands marching through the streets. as i speak to you, lorries blaring horns. crowds on them. they believe that this is going to be another pivotal moment, not just that military takeover but then the huge demonstration demanding that he goes. his own party stripping him of the leadership. and now impeachment. crowds wa nt leadership. and now impeachment. crowds want it done quickly. the opposition leader is also down there as well. thank you for that update. we will be back with you shortly. tomorrow the chancellor of the exchequer, philip hammond, delivers his budget — the first since this summer's election. it comes amid a background of incomes being squeezed, tough brexit negotiations and a possibility that uk growth forecasts could be downgraded. at the same time, many of mr hammond's conservative colleagues are hoping that
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mr hammond delivers a budget that re—energises the government. so how much room for manoeuvre does the chancellor have? and what can we expect to hear in tomorrow's budget? joining me now is carl emerson, deputy director of the institute for fiscal studies. thank you so much forjoining us. broadly speaking, do you think this is going to be a budget where he gives money away or takes money away? it could be a budget when he announces some measures that are giveaways, possibly some tax cuts, public service spending, lightening up public service spending, lightening up on some of the welfare cuts. i think that is possible. we would see the forecast for borrowing worsen, adding to that with giveaways. happy to borrow more, but i still think it is important to remember that the bigger picture, even if we see some
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tax cuts, and spending increases, only going to offset a little. you'd still see net cuts, but not as big as those from march. can you talk us through the money that the chancellor has available? in some sense, he has not got any extra money. the figures this year, looking strong. he could stand up and say that borrowing is not going to be as big as march. but we also expect significant downgrades to how much the economy is going to grow over the next few years. downgrading productivity growth. lower wage growth. the exchequer getting less tax revenue. borrowing forecast, revised upwards. at least medium term. the starting point of the deficit is bigger than he wants, the outlook for borrowing would rise. in a different political context we
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could be talking about taxes going up, but given calls for giveaway, and difficult arithmetic, that is why those measures are likely. thank you. we have two to leave it there. we will be talking to you tomorrow. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: failing to uphold the constitution and giving his wife too much power. impeachment proceedings against zimbabwe's robert mugabe are due to begin shortly. police have said an investigation into alleged tampering in testing has revealed more than 10,000 cases that could have been affected. the governtment agrees the uk should offer more money for its divorce from the eu, but only if trade talks begin next month. you will remember, we were telling
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you about those talks taking place in downing street, between the leader of the accrued to arlene foster and sinn fein president gerry adams. both of them meeting theresa may separately, on the desire to try to solve the problem of power sharing in northern ireland. in the last human touch, arlene foster has been speaking. i am accusing them of being reckless. if you listen to some of the rhetoric, and nobody understands negotiations bit of than i... people come out and say things to push agendas. we recognise this isa to push agendas. we recognise this is a critical phase. we all, certainly i want to see negotiations moving to the second phase. the
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issues that are going to make a difference to the border between northern ireland and the republic. it is almost a full battle. actually, detailed issues will come about when talking about trade. do you think some of this is almost artificial rage? i think some people are taking the moment in the sun, trying to get the maximum for negotiations. i understand that but you should not play about with northern ireland, particularly when we're trying to get devolved government again. those issues are difficult. we trying to get over the line, get devolved government again. it would be a strong message if we we re it would be a strong message if we were able to do that. we could be pa rt were able to do that. we could be part of what is going on in relation to the exit from the european union. that was arlene foster, speaking to our political editor about how northern ireland can impact on brexit negotiations. it of course plays a key role. vladimir putin has called for a political settlement in syria,
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during an unannounced visit to russia by the syrian president bashar al—assad. the meeting, at the russian black sea resort of sochi, came two years after russia began a military campaign in syria in support of mr assad's forces. speaking on russian television after the meeting on monday evening, mr putin said he intended to talk with us president donald trump and the emir of qatar about a resolution to the conflict. earlier, our moscow correspondent, sarah rainsford, explained just how important this unannounced meeting was. it is certainly extremely significant. even the symbolism is important. this was president putin welcoming al—assad for the first time in two years. essentially declaring an almost end to military operations in syria. he said the defeat of these terrorist groups was
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close and inevitable. both he and al—assad went to meet military leaders, russian military leaders, and congratulate them. both of them said it was absolutely pivotal. talking about the russian military having maintained syria's territorial integrity. putin said the russian military had seized the syrian state. a lot of congratulations. —— saved. and the message from these two leaders, it is time to push forward with political solutions for syria. just by the fact those men were standing side by side in russia, saying that, that suggest that al—assad sees himself as part of the political future going forward. extremely complex negotiation already under way. i think the idea is that would
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accelerate. it is the first time in two years putin has welcomed al—assad to russia. what can we read into the taming? the conflict in syria, but also the domestic agenda. on that note, it is almost the beginning of the election campaign in russia for the presidential election in three months. putin expected to run. to be able to announce essentially russian victory in syria is an important plank. it is also part of the russian grandstanding, pushing itself as a global peacemaker, pivotal figure grandstanding, pushing itself as a global peacemaker, pivotalfigure in terms of the middle east but broadly syria. in terms of the peace process an important meeting as quantity placed tomorrow when putin hosts
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both the turkish and iranian leaders. going to be discussing salary. going to be meeting those countries that opposed each other. —— syria. going with the message from al—assad, after three hours of meeting al—assad, and putin positioning himself as the man who can bring everybody together and get political future for syria. a group of 75 workers, including porters and receptionists, are going to a tribunal to try to win more rights at work. as outsourced employees they don't receive the same benefits, such as pensions and holiday pay, as those employed directly. if the case is successful it could affect around 3.3 million outsourced workers in the uk. our legal affairs correspondent clive coleman has been finding out about the case. henry's day starts early, with the first of his two jobs. i woke up at 4am this morning, travelled one hour to southwick
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and here i am to do my two hours of cleaning. henry is one of many workers who are outsourced, in other words he's employed by a facilities company that then provides his services to another company or organisation. it's 7:30. i'm at the university of london. i'm here to do myjob as a porter. many big organisations outsource, which means instead of employing cleaners, security guards and other often low—paid staff, they pay a facilities company to provide these workers. so while maintaining control over the way people work, and often setting their pay and conditions, they can avoid some of the legal responsibilities of being an employer. that can mean far worse pensions, holiday and sick pay for the outsourced workers. now a group, including henry, employed by a facilities company and supplied to london university,
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is seeking a tribunal ruling that the university is recognised alongwith the facilities company as theirjoint employer. uk law has never recognised the concept that workers could have joint employers for the purpose of negotiating terms and conditions. if it did, the consequences could be huge. it would be enormous. about 3.5 million employees, outsourced employees, whose terms and conditions would improve because now they'd be on the same terms and conditions as the people they work alongside everyday but are directly employed. for the employers themselves, there would also be an impact because it would be more expensive to improve those terms and conditions. henry says for him it could be a game changer. if the law recognised the university of london as my employer, my life would change massively because i wouldn't have to do two jobs at the moment,
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where i have to wake up at 5am to make ends meets. in terms of pensions i could retire with a good pension. in a statement, the university of london said... for henry, for now at least, the early mornings and the long days continue. the british explorer benedict allen, who was rescued in a remote area of papua new guinea, has returned to the uk. he's been talking to the bbc‘s security correspondent frank gardner — who is also a friend of his— about why he didn't take any means of communication with him. i am known as an explorer.
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i am a specialist. i go to very remote places. i have been spending three decades doing this. i know papa new guinea very well. you still went missing? as we climbed higher and higher... i was trying to track down some people i used to live with, i was contracting chills, i knew i may well have malaria. had it five times. almost died twice. that was a problem. slowed me further. then, a war going ahead between different communities. just to be clear, you were very well looked after by everybody you were with? always. never threatened? you asked why go without a phone... my back up is not to summon a helicopter...
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it is to use the local resources. be friends with people. the forest to them is not a threat. it gives food, medicine, shelter. the local people, always friendly without exception. i was passing through different groups. it was great until the malaria kicked in. what was your worst moment? the realisation that this time it really was not looking good. i was dropping into fever. i had to make a statement. you made a farewell video message to your family? yeah. i had never gone on an expedition like this, while a parent. before, just me. now, three children. ten, seven, two. i was talking to the camera about, well...
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how i was still aiming to get out, don't worry, but in my heart i thought i might fail them. i said, if anybody finds this, please take this to the high commission, i could be dead. i showd my camera my children. i said, maybe you have a family, i was speaking in the local language. just trying to make myself human. so at least my wife would know. in a moment the news at one. first, the weather. some changeable and unsettled weather this week. but we have also started with some mild temperatures, 17 yesterday, the average is nine. but plenty of cloud around. this is
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the satellite from earlier, coming from the atlantic. largely under warm air mass. and going to continue to get some mild temperatures, particularly further south. rain across scotland and strong winds. some rain for the midlands, before the next area of rain moves to northern ireland. temperatures in the double figures, starting to get that wind picking up. during the rush hour... rain in the far north. dry for northern and central scotland. some feeding to northern ireland. temperatures of mild. ready 13 celsius for london. some spits
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and spots of rain. winds also pick up. windy but mild start tomorrow. rain moves north and east. could have some localised flooding and tricky driving conditions. at the east, before we start to get some rain pushing from the west. windy. gales at times. highs of 15. dusty, starting to drag in more cold air from the north. starting to get some cooler temperatures as we move through thursday and to the end of the week. when we have rain in the north, it could be snow over hills and low levels. stay tuned to the forecast, dry and bright, some rain forecast, dry and bright, some rain for the south west. temperatures just starting to come down, highs of
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14. everybody becoming cooler by saturday. impeachment proceedings are under way against zimba bwe's leader, robert mugabe. crowds are gathering on the streets of harare. mr mugabe's former vice—president tells him to heed the call of his people and stand down. i will be reporting live from harare at the start of an impeachment process that could finally see the end of robert mugabe's 37 year rule in zimbabwe. also this lunchtime... thousands of criminal cases may have been affected by alleged manipulation of data at a forensics laboratory in manchester. more money on offerfor the eu — theresa may agrees to increase the brexit divorce bill,
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if trade talks begin next month. we are ready to move on to phase two, to see those talks about a
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