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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 21, 2017 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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our correspondent ben brown is in the capital, harare, and has the latest. another momentous day in zimbabwe and robert mugabe who has since this crisis refused to resign despite the pressure on him from the military, from the people as well with demonstration, he resisted the calls for him to stand down as president after 37 years, but now parliament behind me is considering another way of getting him out of office, impeaching him. a motion was presented to parliament. the speaker said it was unprecedented in the had istry of post colonial zimbabwe. it will need a two—thirds majority of the senate and the national assembly if the impeachment motion is to be approved and mr mugabe is to be fors forced out of office. some mps say it could be as oon as tomorrow. others say it needs to be a fair
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process and seen to be legitimate and that means it may take weeks to get through the impeachment and finally to get rid of robert mugabe as the president of zimbabwe. let's get the report from tom burridge. a call for the mugabe era to end. they gathered near zimba bwe's parliament, where a move to impeach their leader of nearly four decades is under way. the army overseeing the process, but still no sign from robert mugabe himself that he's ready to resign. he's very stubborn. i think in a way it is a very painful process. zimbabwe was mugabe, mugabe was zimbabwe. now a remarkable claim from the man once mugabe's deputy, the former vice president here being sworn in but sacked two weeks ago, a move which precipitated the current crisis. in a statement sent from an undisclosed location, emmerson mnangagwa almost mugabe
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of planning to have him killed. plans were under to eliminate me, he wrote. mr mnangagwa said he would not return until mugabe was out of power because he did not trust his life in president mugabe's hands. in rural zimbabwe where robert mugabe's controversial land reforms hit productivity, there also seems to be a consensus that it is time for the president to step down. that call mirrored by veterans — once his allies in war against colonial rule. we are saying to mugabe smell the coffee, your time is gone. use your dignity, you have ruled long enough. throw in the towel, let the country be given a clear signal that it can start on a new page. you are the biggest hindrance to the country moving on. inside the parliament,
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a motion now under way to unseat the president. outside and across this country people wait. they have the army and all main political groups on their side. robert mugabe's days feel numbered, but for now at least still no recognition from the man himself that his time is up. beg demonstrations outside the parliament, people on the streets saying mr mugabe should resign or he should be impeached. they have adjourned from the ordinary parliament building. they've gone to a bigger building because there are
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so many member of parliaments in thisjoint session who so many member of parliaments in this joint session who have to meet so they've had to move to a bigger building. the former prime minister and leader of the opposition, morgan tsvangirai has been outside parliament addressing the crowds saying mr mugabe needs to resign now and also saying all parties here in zimbabwe, not only zanu—pf but the opposition mdc and other parties need to come together now for the future of this country. a democratic zimbabwe is not going to be build by another undemocratic process. zanu-pf‘s zanu—pf‘s policies, zanu—pf‘s culture must end. its violence and human rights, the violence, it must stop. morgan tsvangirai, the opposition leader. let's talk to the
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head of the zimbabwe national stu d e nts head of the zimbabwe national students union. you have been demonstrating down there at the parliament. you have just come to talk to us. how important do you think it is that robert mugabe is impeached? robert mugabe is represents all the evils and the deep corruption. robert mugabe has been the main person of abuses and has been the main person. his wife and kids can afford to display and to buy horse races s, expensive watches and display them. while children can't go to school.
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15 billion disappeared and yet we see him buying expensive properties, putting his money abroad. we see his wife living a lavish lifestyle. so now the impeachment process has started, do you think the parliament will impeach him and, how quickly will impeach him and, how quickly will it do it? yes, the parliament is impeaching him. they've instructed the impeachment. morgan tsvangirai has been saying the parliamentarians should impeach him. how long might it take? do you think it will be very quick or weeks oi’ think it will be very quick or weeks or months? the process we actually think could take a couple of weeks which is for us the students of zimbabwe too long. why are the
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parliament focussing tonne processes , parliament focussing tonne processes, also going to put political operation, increase the political operation, increase the political cost of him refusing to move out. you are also taking this opportunity... he refuse to do things and mugabe is the same. he hasn't resigned. do you think there is still time for him to resign before he's humiliated by an impeachment vote. he's mad, that quy- impeachment vote. he's mad, that guy. what he needs is humiliation. actually he's already humiliated. the military, the party now the people and the parliament impeach him. that's enough humiliation one person can face in the world. thank you very much indeed for being with us. that parliamentary session
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continuing and we are also hearing that the leader of south africa, president zuma and the angolan president are on their way here to try to mediate in this crisis. it may be too late for robert mugabe now, these impeachment proceedings well under way. thank you very much. senior cabinet ministers have agreed that britain should increase its financial offer to the european union — but only if member states agree next month to move on to talks about trade and an implementation period. ministers — including the prominent brexiters, michael gove and borisjohnson — approved the move last night. here's our political correspondent alex forsyth how much is what you want worth? the uk is preparing to increase the amount it will pay to the eu to settle its accounts, but only if in return brexit talks move on to trade. we are ready to move on phase two, to see those talks about a deep and special partnership with the eu for the future. a comprehensive trade agreement with the eu for the future which is in the interests of the uk and the remaining eu 27.
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while there is no officialfigure, it is thought senior ministers agreed to increase the offer last night, including some brexiteers in the cabinet although some on the backbenches warned agreeing too much too early would give the eu an advantage. it's as if they want us to pay the ransom money but still be hostage to the european union. michel barnier must recognise we are leaving the european union and will only pay what we are due. for others, the priority is getting things moving. you don't go into a pub, order a round of drinks, decide you don't want them, walk out and not pay for it so it's important we accept that as a principal, hopefully get a formula to express that but then move on. eu leaders wanted sufficient progress in three areas before agreeing to talk trade. the so—called divorce bill, the question of the irish border, and citizens' rights.
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it remains to be seen whether any offer number ten has on payment will be enough, but the government is clear — it is prepared to move but only if the eu does too. the brexit secretary said today it is not possible to agree all aspects of the so—called separation without discussing future relations. the northern irish border cannot be addressed if we cannot take into account the shape of our future partnership with the european union. financial settlement depends on it because nothing is agreed until everything is agreed. the way forward is still uncertain and today there was a warning to some not to use the delicate issue of the irish border as a negotiating tool. you don't play around with northern ireland to effect change in other places, and actually i would like to see the irish government working with northern ireland and the westminster government
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to bring about a brexit that works for northern ireland but also for the republic of ireland. getting a deal is what all sides want. it seems someone is going to have to give a little, but no one is prepared to pay any price. let's talk to our chief political correspondent about this now. vicki young, you know that moment when ministers arrive at downing street and someone always shouts a question, someone shouted to david davis yesterday, have you got your cheque book and he said no, yours and he's right of course, we are all going to be paying for this, but it seems we are going to be paying a bit my honourable friend than some hoped? yes. i mean that is the point isn't it, this is in the end taxpayers' money. ithink isn't it, this is in the end taxpayers' money. i think people like him and others who were very much leave campaigners would make the point that we are paying every single year £10 billion net contribution to the european union so in that sense, although it feels like a huge amount of money
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obviously, it is in line, i suppose, with what we are paying every single year over quite a few years. but yes, there is no doubt that there are many around that cabinet table yesterday who would have preferred to pay absolutely nothing, particularly those going around the country on a bus saying we are going to get money back. that is the situation we'll be in in the long—term. this is a divorce bill, the days of handing over billions to the days of handing over billions to the eu for years and years have now ended. nevertheless, this is quite a significant move. there are no numbers put on it, downing street refusing to do that, saying it's a matter of negotiation. of course don't forget we haven't paid the money oaf yet. it's not like they've signed a cheque and it's been cashed by the european union. importantly, the cabinet ministering making clear this has to be tied to something, there'll be conditions set on this money and, at the moment, the condition is that come december, we move on to trade talks and nothing is agreed until everything is agreed
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which means that money is on the table for now but we will want something in return. we have heard from nigel evans today and was talking tojohn redwood yesterday and it's clear they'll not be happy if we are talking about a lot more in terms of their payment in that divorce settlement. so what will happen within the conservative party or within parliament over this?” think that is important to remember. of course, those who were on the brexit side of the argument, you know, they are often out there making their case, but if you look at the conservative party more broadly, i think most of them would have told you a few months ago last year that this was slightly inevitable, that yes it is a concession to the european union giving over extra money but it's one that they were expecting, so i don't think because they have their eye on the bigger prize that they are going to decide to collapse all of this and risk brexit maybe falling out without a deal. there might be a few who want that but i don't think that is the majority in the house of commons. it all comes down to their
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vision of what they want afterwards and we do not know that yet. the british government talks about trade talks but they haven't given much indication to the public about what exactly they see as the relationship, apart from it being a deep and special relationship, trade being as frictionless as possible. whereoned that, we can't be sure what they want. that is another argument for another day that theresa may is going to have to sort out. there is another argument of course and we heard in that report very strong words from arlene foster? yes, pretty striking actually what she's had to say, she went even further with a direct attack on the irish government, particularly on the taoiseach leo voradka and she was saying, not just the taoiseach leo voradka and she was saying, notjust that the taoiseach leo voradka and she was saying, not just that the the taoiseach leo voradka and she was saying, notjust that the irish government should know better than to use security in northern ireland asa bargaining to use security in northern ireland as a bargaining chip but she also went tonne say some people are taking their moment in the sun, saying the new irish taoiseach should know better than anybody, you don't play around with northern ireland. she accused the island and the rest of the eu of being
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reckless. the political sensitive anies in northern ireland and and ireland over this, of possibly the trourn a hard border between them is incredibly difficult to resolve and i have to say i haven't heard anyone who's come up with a suggestion that e#24er side is willing —— either side to willing to look at at the moment. the taoiseach will be saying he's willing to block that move to trade talks if the british government is saying we won't trourn a hard borer. we will have to see hoy that works owl. one suggestion is northern ireland could stay much more aligned to the european union even maybe with regulations staying closer to a customs union. that's not going to wash with many in northern ireland —— hard border. they don't want to have some kind of border with the rest of the uk, so find ago way through this will be predifficult. —— pretty difficult. the headlines: crowds gather outside
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zimbabwe's the headlines: crowds gather outside zimba bwe's parliament as the headlines: crowds gather outside zimbabwe's parliament as impeachment from seedings against president robert mugabe get under way. more money on offer for the robert mugabe get under way. more money on offerfor the eu, theresa may agrees to increase the brexit divorce bill if trade talks begin next month. thousands of criminal cases may have been affected by alleged manipulation of data at a foreign zix laboratory in manchester. ina zix laboratory in manchester. in a moment, a drug company providing thyroid treatment is accused of overcharging the nhs by tens of millions. and in sport, australia might have retained the women's ashes but england finish their tour with a victory, levelling their tour with a victory, levelling the series of a record run chase in canberra in the final t20 match. england batsman alastair cook says they've accepted ben stoke also play no part in the ashes series which sta rts no part in the ashes series which starts in brisbane tomorrow night. everton's niasse has become the first premier league player to be retrospectively charged with diving. he won a penalty in the draw against crystal palace at the weekend. more in15 crystal palace at the weekend. more in 15 minutes. more than 10,000 cases may have been
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affected by alleged data manipulation at a forensics laboratory in manchester. so far about fifty prosecutions have been stopped but there are fears there could be many more. the suspected manipulation by employees emerged earlier this year, when a data anomaly in a drug driving case was reported. let's talk to our correspondent danny shaw. so, we are saying tens of thousands, this potentially could be massively serious? i think this is the biggest scandal to affect forensic science testing in decades. it's not because 10,000 cases necessarily will see people having all their convictions overturned because, in many of these cases, the drugs tests may not have been a significant factor in the criminal case, but nevertheless, already just months into
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criminal case, but nevertheless, alreadyjust months into the retesti ng process, 50 alreadyjust months into the retesting process, 50 people who we re retesting process, 50 people who were going to court accused of drug—driving offences have had their prosecutions stopped. they will not be prosecuted any more. the potential convictions of those people, that is not going to happen. and we have still got many, many tests, many test results to be reexamined and rea nalysed. tests, many test results to be reexamined and reanalysed. in two cases, which resulted in road deaths asa cases, which resulted in road deaths as a result or possibly where drugs we re as a result or possibly where drugs were a factor, in those cases, the court of appeal is being asked to have a look at those convictions to see whether they are unsafe. so the potential ramifications here are huge. it does raise many questions about the processes used by the testing services to ensure that the results of the analysis they conducted on samples to see whether the drugs were there, to see whether those processes were correct. because it's not about the testingof the samples themselves, as we
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understand it, it's about the results being validated. that is where the irregularities occurred. that word "anomaly "ing with, what does that mean, what's happened here? what appears to have happened is that samples have come into the laboratory to be tested to see whether drugs were in the samples. those tests have been conducted a p pa re ntly those tests have been conducted apparently properly. the results of those tests then have to go through a separate process, a validation process and it's there that things have gone wrong, that the data has been changed. now, the company is telling us that the changes weren't made in order to give a negative result where there'd be a positive result where there'd be a positive result or a positive result where there'd be a negative result, but for some other reason, changes were a p pa re ntly for some other reason, changes were apparently made. two people, employers, have been arrested and are still under investigation. there are still under investigation. there are five others who've been interviewed under caution. the
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criminal inquiry which was described to us today as very complex is still ongoing. in addition, it has emerged that another company, also based in manchester, their processes are also under investigation from 2010 onwards because some of the people who worked at the first company work here. they carried out toxicology tests carried out in civil cases, they were determining child custody issues, so for example, it's possible a child was removed from the care of a parent who tested positive for drugs. that's a theoretical possibility, the kind of case that they would have been involved in. now, that clearly has very, very serious implications and so results there are being looked at to see if there are any irregularities. news in from winchester crown court,
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our correspondent is covering a trial there, and she's saying the jury trial there, and she's saying the jury has been given a majority direction by thejudge, they have been deliberating forjust over 22 hours ina been deliberating forjust over 22 hours in a trial that's lasted seven weeks, the prosecution alleging emile cilliers tampered with the parachute that his wife used in a jump. she suffered horrendous injuries but survived. he's also accused of tampering with gas. he denies the charging. the jury have just had a majority direction. we'll get more from our correspondent a little later on. a drugs company has been accused of overcharging the nhs by millions of pounds a year for a key thyroid treatment. the competition and markets authority claims that concordia abused its position. it says the nhs spent £34 million on a thyroid drug last year, up from around six hundred thousand pounds in 2006. concordia says it "does not believe competition law has been infringed".
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our health editor hugh pym, gave us this update. the way the drugs industry works, if you have the patent to a drug, it's your exclusive product and you can set the price, although patented drugs, the price is capped within an agreement with the government here in the uk, when it goes generic and off patent, in other words anyone can make that drug, it's assumed that the price will fall. but what seems to have happened in a certain number of cases for quits niche drugs like this one is a company comes in, buys the rite to market it, nobody else bothers to compete so it ends up with the power to push up so it ends up with the power to push up the price. that is allegedly what found here, the finding is that concordia used market dominance in supply and this was an abuse of position and a 6,000% price increase over ten yea rs position and a 6,000% price increase over ten years to the nhs. one co nsulta nt over ten years to the nhs. one consultant i spoke to earlier
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explained the big difference in prices when he went elsewhere in the european union. historically the drug was probably a cost to the nhs of about £20—£30 a month. the new cost was over £300 a month. the patients were telling me that they could go to a foreign capital and buy it for £5 a month. so there was a massive difference in what the nhs was being charged to what people we re was being charged to what people were accessing it for. concordia says it doesn't breach there was any breach of competition law, it's been open with the department of health, it points out it only bought the rights to the drug two years ago, there were other companies involved before. the competition commission are looking at a number of cases like this in the pharmaceutical companies. the security company, gas, has commissioned an independent inquiry into the "attitude and behaviour" of staff at one
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of its immigration removal centres. detainees at brook house, near gatwick airport, were filmed by the bbc‘s panorama programme apparently being mocked, abused and assaulted. let us have a lack at the weather now. a very grey start to the week but it's been mild. temperatures at around 17 in nantwich and cheshire. 17! ? around 17 in nantwich and cheshire. 17!?a around 17 in nantwich and cheshire. 17! ? a really mild start to the week this week. there is a warning though in the long—term, you are talking about getting cold, very cold this sgheeked yes, it's going to get colder as we go into the weekend and also not quite as warm today. we have some mild air, but what we need for that warm temperature is some sunshine and it's in really limited supply. it's not looking like we are going to see quite as warm temperatures today. not beach weather. as you have been hearing, plenty of cloud around today. that cloud is coming in off the atlantic, we have also got some outbreaks of rain as
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well, particularly in the north. but well, particularly in the north. but we are firmly in this mild air mass and it's that warm air that is bringing the mild temperatures, despite all the cloud and outbreaks of rain. so here we are this afternoon, some rain in the north, some rain pushing into wales and northern england as well. temperatures round about 1k, but we could see perhaps 15 as we move through the rest of the day today. through the evening, it stays cloudy with outbreaks of rain throughout scotla nd with outbreaks of rain throughout scotland into northern ireland, wales, the mitt lands as well. we'll start to see the next block of rain pushing into northern ireland, northern england and southern scotland. the winds picking up as well in scotland —— the midlands. it's a touch cooler in the north. tomorrow morning, here is rush hour, some rain in the far north but a lot of dry weather for north and central scotla nd of dry weather for north and central scotland to begin with. we will start to see some rain push
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into scotland, northern ireland, north—west england and the far north of wales. heavy bursts in there. in england and wales, fairly cloudy, apse a few spits and spots of rain where the cloud is thick enough. temperatures largely in double figures at 8 in the morning. a windy start as well. tomorrow, windy across england and wales, gusts of up to 60, perhaps 70 on exposed coasts. heavy rain for some areas and tricky driving conditions. the best of the brightness in the south and east. more in the way of rain pushing into the west. temperatures tomorrow still in double figures in the south, round about six or seven in the north. as we move into the early hours of thursday, we will drag in this colder airfrom the hours of thursday, we will drag in this colder air from the north. that isa sign this colder air from the north. that is a sign of things to come as we move through the second half of the week. a cool start on thursday in north. snow in the north of scotland over the hills and perhaps even to lower levels. we'll keep you up—to—date on that. largely dry and
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bright in england and wales but we'll see some rain push into the south—west later in the day. friday sta rts south—west later in the day. friday starts to see temperatures dropping down from the north perhaps holding on to double figures in the south. by on to double figures in the south. by the time we get to the weekend, everybody in that cooler air mass. this is bbc news, our latest headlines: impeachment proceedings are under way against zimbabwe's leader, robert mugabe. crowds gather on the streets of harare as mr mugabe's former vice—president tells him to stand down. the government agree that britain should increase its financial offer to the eu, the so—called brexit divorce bill, but only if trade talks begin next month. police say 10,000 criminal cases may have been affected by alleged tampering of forensic evidence at a laboratory in manchester. a drug company providing medicine for a thyroid condition is accused of overcharging the nhs by tens of millions of pounds. the company says it hasn't broken the law. sport now on afternoon live with olly foster. plenty going on in australia. what
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else is going on? we will talk about the cricket in the moment. the end of one ashes series and the start of another. plenty of other bits and bobs. there was iffy rev refrg the weekend. lots of fans wishing that var weekend. lots of fans wishing that va r syste m weekend. lots of fans wishing that var system was in place right now, video assistant referees. what we have had though in the last couple of hours is a retrospective charge for diving over the weekend. details of that coming up. staying with diving, proper diving, as injumping off from a great height and doing a couple of somersaults, one of great britain's top talents has retired and england's hockey team have got themselves a win. we have been fairly busy. you have described a couple of forwards on a couple of teams that would still, a couple of somersaults is nothing! exactly. let's talk about australia. they are
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not bringing home the ashes, but england's women have done us proud? well, sort of. that time of year when we get very jealous looking at the australian sunshine. there are back to back ashes series there at the moment we already knew that england's women had failed to regain the ashes but they have finished their tour on a high after levelling the series. they did it with a record run chase in the final t20 match in canberra. tim hague reports. other as she is already looking, no wonder australia looked so happy. under the sky, idea looked almost impossible. a huge victory target of 179 was set. it would have to be the highest t20 chase in history and when
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england lost three early wickets the game was surely up, but no. a mixture of catching and brilliant batting gave england hope. dani wyatt so impressive and would become the first english woman to score three figure ins a t20 match. while she went after, her team—mates made sure the impossible chase became possible. no urn to go home maybe, but plenty of pride after this. the england batsman alastair cook say they "have pretty much accepted" that ben stokes will play no part in their ashes series. he was arrested on suspicion of causing actual bodily harm after a fight outside a nightclub but the police investigation is ongoing. stokes posted this on social media yesterday, keeping in shape in the nets in durham. bowling and batting. seemingly ready to join up
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with his teamates if he is cleared. england have been training at the gabba in brisbane where australia haven't lost a test in almost 30 years. england do hold the ashes but the last time they were in australia, almost four years ago, they lost 5—nil. they will certainly be a weaker side without stokes. it is disappointing for the england team. i would love for him to be out here. he is a world—class player. but at the end of the we have got another 11 guys that will take the field come thursday and we're excited. we respect our opposition. they have picked the best team that they feel is going to be here to try and beat us. wales have will have to take on the rugby world champions
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new zealand on saturday without liam williams and alex cuthbert. williams suffered an abdominal injury during their victory over georgia last weekend. the back was always going to miss the final autumn test against south africa because he has to return to club side saracens. wing alex cuthbert is also out with a calf problem. everton's oumar niasse has become the first to be retrospectivel charged with diving or as the fa put it "successful deception of a match official". he won a controversial penalty, after minimal contact from scott dann, in saturday's match against crystal palace, with leighton baines converting. niasse went on to score the equaliser in a 2—all draw. new laws introduced in the summer allowing players to be charged after a game for simulation. england women's hockey team have
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beaten china 4—1 in their last world league pool match in new zealand. that sees them finish third in their group and avoid a quarterfinal clash with world number one side the netherlands. goals from sophie bray, alex danson, hannah martin and sarah haycroft sets up a last eight clash with the usa. the three—time olympian tonia couch has retired from diving. couch won three european medals including gold in a 12 year senior career and claimed 10 metre synchronised silver at the 2014 commonwealth games. she competed at the world championships injuly but will now take up a coaching role in her home city of plymouth. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. thank you very much. donald trump will later speak with the russian president on the issue of syria after vladimir putin said the defeat of the so—called islamic state is close.
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the russian president was speaking in sochi where he met syria's president assad, who was on an unannounced visit. mr putin said he wanted to hear the syrian leader's views on the peace process. president trump has declared north korea a state sponsor of terrorism — nine years after it was removed from the list. mr trump said the move would trigger "very large" additional sanctions, and blamed the country's nuclear programme, and support for what he called international acts of terrorism. today, the united states is designating north korea as a state sponsor of terrorism. it should have happened a long time ago. it should have happened years ago. in addition to threatening the world by nuclear devastation, north korea has repeatedly supported acts of international terrorism, including assassinations on foreign soil. our correspondent paul adams is in seoul and he told us their response. this was not a great surprise. donald trump said he was going to do it and put it off a couple of times
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so people were ready for this move. among his allies, japan's shinzo abe, probably his best friend in the region was supportive. the government here in south korea more nuanced and said it hoped it would promote the deknew collarisation of the peninsula, but said it was clinging to the idea with dialogue with north korea hint k at the tensions that exist between the approach of donald trump and the more softly, softly approach of this south korean government. china, it sounded a warning, saying that countries should avoid doing things that raised tensions in the region. of course, from north korea, we had some colourful rhetoric, those who are working to thwart north korean progress we re are working to thwart north korean progress were making north korea stronger and that the result would bea stronger and that the result would be a great miracle that would startle the world. of course, it has been a couple of months since the world was last startled by a north korean missile test and people have
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begun to wonder if we might be moving into a phase of dialogue and all eyes over the week were on a chinese envoy who went to north korea for four days of talks. he seems to have left yesterday without meeting the north korean leader, kim jong—un and most people in the region took that to be a rather negative sign. paul adams reporting from seoul. a scheme aimed at detecting lung cancer earlier, is to be extended to thousands more patients. nhs england says the use of mobile scanners at supermarkets and shopping centres in greater manchester proved so successful, similar schemes will now be rolled out to other parts of the country. caroline rigby has more. it has definitely saved my life because i could have gone maybe two or three years. it could have spread everywhere. michael brady was diagnosed with lung cancer thanks to a project which offered extra screening to smokers and former smokers in some of the poorest areas of manchester. in an effort to boost early detection, patients thought to be most at risk were given ct scans in mobile trucks at supermarkets and shopping centres.
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lung cancer is the uk's biggest cancer killer, claiming 35,000 lives a year. nhs england says during the manchester pilot, one case was detected every 33 people screened and four out of five cases were diagnosed early, when the disease is easier to treat. we have screening programmes already, but people are reluctant because they are frightened by the c word to come forward, and lots of people think "if i don't do anything, i'll be all right", when actually it is the opposite. actually, the more we get tested appropriately, then that gives us a better chance of survival. similar schemes are now being rolled out in london and other parts of the north of england. many have welcomed the plans, but cancer research uk warns that the nhs will need extra staff to carry out the tests, if thousands more lives are to be saved. britain is to lose its seat on the international court
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ofjustice in the hague for the first time since the un's principal legal body was founded in 19116. the uk's current judge, sir christopher greenwood, was hoping to be elected for a second, nine—year term. but the government withdrew him from the race after un members backed his rival indian candidate. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has congratulated him on his appointment. the argentine navy says sounds picked up on sonar equipment did not come from a missing submarine in the south atlantic as was earlier thought. the vessel, with 44 crew on board, had reported an electrical breakdown before it disappeared five days ago. russell trott reports. still hoping and praying. the home naval base, it is fast becoming a shrine to the missing 44 crew members of the argentinian submarine as family and friends post messages of support to loved ones. translation: the mood is generally good.
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clearly, some people doing better than others but generally, positive spirit. we hope we will soon get some indication of finding them. the german built submarine had been returning from a routine mission on south america when it surfaced and signalled it had developed electrical problems. a multi—national search is focusing on an ocean patch of 300km, radiating from the last point of contact. the navy revealed that several signals from the region were not from the missing satellite. the footprint could not correspond to the subs. it could have been a noise from a living thing. although submarines are designed to be difficult to detect and can stay at sea for months, the search is becoming
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a race against time. most of the crew live in this city. on them, south america's first female submariner. the families are hoping for positive news soon. workers at the university of london, including porters and receptionists, are going to a tribunal to try to win more rights. they're contracted by an outsourcing company, and don't receive the same benefits as those employed directly by the university. if the case is successful, it could affect more than three million similar workers in the uk. our legal correspondent clive coleman reports. henry's day starts early with the first of his two jobs. i woke up at 4am this morning, i travelled one hour to southwark and here to do my two hours of cleaning. henry is one of many workers who are outsourced, in other words, henry is one of many workers who are outsourced, in otherwords, he henry is one of many workers who are outsourced, in other words, he is employed by a facilities company that then provides his services to another company or organisation.-
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7.30ami another company or organisation.- 7.30am i am at the university of london, i'm here to do myjob as a porter. many big organisations outsource which means that instead of employing cleaners, security guards, and other often low paid staff, they pay a facilities company to provide these workers. so, while maintaining control over the way people work, and often setting their pay and conditions, they can avoid some of the legal responsibilities of being an employer. that can mean far worse pensions, holiday and sick pay for the outsourced workers. now a group including henry, employed by the facilities company cordent and supplied to london university are seeking a tribunal ruling that the university is recognised along with cordent as theirjoint employer. uk law has never recognised the concept
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that workers could have joint employers for the purpose of negotiating their terms and conditions. if it did, the consequences could be huge. conditions. if it did, the consequences could be hugem conditions. if it did, the consequences could be huge. it would be enormous. there would be 3.5 million employees outsourced employees whose terms and conditions would improve because now they would be on the same terms and conditions as the people they work with every day. for employers, there would be an impact because it would be more expensive to improve the terms and conditions. henry says that for him it could be a game changer.m conditions. henry says that for him it could be a game changer. if the law would recognise the university of london as my employer, my life would change massively because i wouldn't have to do two jobs. in terms of pensions i would be able to retire with a good pension. in a statement the dwrofrt of london said, "the university does not employ any of these workers and does not accept that the relevant legislation recognises the concept ofjoint employment."
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for henry, for now at least, the early mornings and the long days continue. in a moment the business news. thousands of cases maybe affected by alleged manipulation of da at that timea alleged manipulation of da at that time a forensic lacktry in manchester. uk public sector borrowing rose last month and higher than expected. competition authorities say the drugs company con cordia abused his
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market position and overcharged the nhs by millions of pounds. its thyroid medication cost £11.50 per packet ten yea rs thyroid medication cost £11.50 per packet ten years ago and it now costs £258 a packet. easyj et‘s costs £258 a packet. easyjet‘s profits costs £258 a packet. easyj et‘s profits have costs £258 a packet. easyjet‘s profits have fallen. that figure came in at £408 million. that's down over 17%. let's get more on the easyjet story. it is quite a fall in profits? almost 20% to £408 million. the company says that lot of this, most of this is down to the weakness of sterling we have seen over the last few months. it says that about £100 million worth of profits has been wiped off because of sterling. so a really dramatic impact there by sterling. because it buys its fuel in dollars? exactly. of course, you know, the pound isn't worth as much against it. not all bad news though? nop against it. not all bad news though? none against it. not all bad news though? no p we have seen, if you look at the way the company has been
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performing. it has been performing well. so passenger numbers up by about 10% to about £80 million, revenues, the amount of money flowing through its coffers is up by 8%. don't forget, what happened to its competition, monarch airlines, has gone bust. you know, so the company will profit from that and ryanair had the unfortunate problem of having to cancel hundreds of flights because of a rotaing issue with its pilots. these are the last results under its current boss who is carolyn mccall. back to easyjet now. she is going to join itv. now, we've asked her why she is choosing this moment to step down. i think we have turned the company into a really great airline. so, i leave with sadness, but i also think there is always a time to leave and i would rather be leaving when things are starting to look very positive and that's why i'm leaving. i think seven—and—a—half years is about the right time. now, on the other side of the
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atlantic, the justice now, on the other side of the atlantic, thejustice department getting involved in what a huge deal with ramifications, president trump's rumoured to be involved in this as well, isn't he? well, you can't get away from the donald, can you? this can't get away from the donald, can you ? this is can't get away from the donald, can you? this is about at&t it wants to buy time warner which owns hbo, but it owns cnn and it may have come to your attention that it has attracted the ire of donald trump. it is not his favourite channel. we are not high on his list, but cnn very high. he does not like them and he has not been back keep wards in coming forward and saying that. the department ofjustice is choosing at this point to inver convenient in the deal. so, let's cross to new york and talk to samira to find out what's going on. what is the
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department ofjustice doing now? what's going on. what is the department ofjustice doing now? so the department of justice department ofjustice doing now? so the department ofjustice is filing a lawsuit to reallyjust prevent, from this at&t time warner deal going through. now, if you look back to when the deal was first announced in 2016, most people thought it was really just in 2016, most people thought it was reallyjust going to go through because this is what you're calling a vertical merger. neither of the two companies really have any enat this time chris that compete with each other and there was a precedent set when you saw that comcast merged with nbc. most thought it was going to go through. well, enter donald trump slam then he was campaigning to become president and he said if i become elected i will not let this deal go through. fast forward to now and we see that the justice department had earlier this month had asked at&t and said if you want this to go through without any regulatory difficulties you are
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going to have to dump some of the entities. why don't you dump cnn. at&t won't do that because cnn is the big money maker. fast forward a few weeks and there will be a lawsuit filed by the department of justice to prevent this happening. it is impossible to disentangle politics from business absolutely. ata politics from business absolutely. at a press conference late on wednesday, tuesday, monday, sorry, i've forgot what day of the week it was! we heard from the ceo of at&t speaking really forcefully about this issue and addressing that whether or not this has anything to do with politics and he said, "look, i don't know but what i will tell you for sure is we are absolutely going to fight this." they are going to take this to court. samira. hang on, before you go, when
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the people walk in front of you, do you go out and sort them out later? how does it work? there is another one! no, itry how does it work? there is another one! no, i try to how does it work? there is another one! no, itry to use how does it work? there is another one! no, i try to use my canadian charm and i gently remind them before i go to air, i'm live, but it isa before i go to air, i'm live, but it is a busy floor of the stock exchange. that's the diplomatic samira talking. nice to see you, sometimes! laughter let's look at the markets. 0k, let's look at the markets. ok, marred underal gains on the ftse. we were talking about easyjet and their profits being down, but perversely the, the share price is going up. that's because as we were discussing passenger numbers are up and trouble for the competition. it's the kind of reverse story of compass group, the largest catering group, their profits were up 17% and its share price is down. that's because people had priced all the
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good news they had been hearing from the company. the pound is benefiting from the political discord going on in germany at the moment. 0k. from the political discord going on in germany at the moment. ok. we will have more from you later. thank you very much. next year marks the 70th anniversary of the ss empire windrush, which brought the first major wave of post—war caribbean immigrants to the uk. to mark the occasion, a dance company in leeds is turning the voyage into a show. our entertainment correspondent, colin paterson, has been to rehearsals to find out more. the empire windrush brings to britain 500 jamaicans. many are ex—servicemen who know england. they served this country well. history being turned into dance. next year is the 70th anniversary of the empire windrush bringing the first large group of post—war caribbean immigrants to the uk. swing, swing. don't go too soon. sharon watson is the artistic director of phoenix dance company in leeds. she was inspired by her own mother's
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journey from jamaica in the ‘60s and decided to create a piece all about windrush. it really does resonate with our family, in terms of having to leave a home, a place, where you've got all yourfamily. relocating somewhere new, somewhere different. so i've picked her brain considerably. her mum had come along to see the work in progress and it was bringing back memories of her own arrival in the uk. you could see icicles hanging down from the windows which you don't see now. i didn't think i could manage the big coat and the big boots. we'd never seen them before. so it was a bit unusual for me. members of leeds' caribbean community had also been invited, so they could give feedback based on their own voyages. that windrush there, it reminds me so much. like sardines packed in that boat! and they are thrilled the story will be on stage next february. when the younger people come
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and see what's going on, they understand what we, the old ladies and old gentlemen, had to go through. so this is leeds, 1940... 1948. phoenix dance company has also made a discovery they hope will help the show. alfred gardiner is 91, lives in leeds, and actually came over on windrush. he's agreed to share his memories to help shape the production. he was a mechanic in the raf in britain during the second world war and a lack of work at home made him want to come back. the thing is, injamaica at the time, if you haven't got a job, you're a nobody. what was it like on windrush? we had six ex—army boys who wanted to commandeer our money. between us, we got them on the boat. so, we were busy hiding them when they're checking up. so, three men in a toilet hiding! well, that's it, it's
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part of history now. it is history. and 70 years on, alford, who worked in factories and had nine children, thinks getting on windrush was a great decision. you strike me as a man who has enjoyed life. and i'm still enjoying it. and i will always enjoy it. pity this poor cameraman who put his camera in place to catch the money shot. it begins and then this! (bleep). if you miss it, you're not alone. we have had to beep out a lot of the words. there is another one.
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(bleep). the bus did move off, but look what was left behind! yes. believe believe. there is more of those bleeps. we will pull out there. here is lucy martin with the weather. yesterday, re—recorded 17 celsius in cheshire. the average for the time of year is about nine celsius. but with that there has been cloud around. here is the satellite from earlier. the cloud feeding in off the atlantic, but we are fwh the warm air mass across—the—board now and we will continue to see some fairly mild temperatures particularly the further south you are. there has been rain across scotla nd are. there has been rain across scotland as we move through this evening and overnight. strong winds in the far north. some outbreaks of rain across wales and into the midlands to begin with before we see the next area of rain moving into
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wales and northern ireland and the north—west of england. mild in the south with temperatures staying in the double figures and cooler in the north. we will start to see the wind picking up across much of england and wales. a windier day to come as we move into tomorrow. so here we are during rush hour. some rain in the far north, but a drier picture for northern and central scotland. some rain feeding into southern scotla nd some rain feeding into southern scotland and northern ireland and north—west england too. temperatures as we come further south, fairly mild in the double figures. 13 celsius in in london. there could be a few spits and spots of rain where the cloud is thick enough, but you can see the win has picked up. so a windy, but mild start to the day tomorrow. as we move through the day, we will see the rain begin to edge its way north and east. heavy bursts for north wention and southern scotland and there could be localised flooding and tricky driving conditions. brighter intervals developing across england and wales before we start to see more rain pushing in from the west. withiny with some gales at times. highs of 15 celsius. as we move into
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thursday, we will start to drag in a bit more colder airfrom thursday, we will start to drag in a bit more colder air from the north. so we will start to see some cooler temperatures as we move through thursday and into the end of the week. so, where we have the rain in the north, that could fall as snow over the hills and even potentially to lower levels. stay tuned to the forecast and we will keep you update. dry and bright with rain pushing in later to the south—west of england. temperatures starting to come down with highs of 14 celsius. on friday, temperatures just come down with highs of 14 celsius. on friday, temperaturesjust in come down with highs of 14 celsius. on friday, temperatures just in the double figures in the south east with rain, but turning cooler by saturday. hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy, today at 3. crowds take to the streets of zimbabwe once again —
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as impeachment proceedings begin against robert mugabe. more money on offerfor the eu — theresa may agrees to increase the brexit divorce bill — if trade talks begin next month. question marks over thousands of criminal cases — after alleged manipulation of data at a forensics laboratory in manchester. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. and england win down under? absolutely. they are not coming home with the ashes but at least england's women finish the tour on a high after levelling the series. and lucy has the weather. changeable weather over the next few days. i'll be here with the details. also coming up, you're in the perfect place to film that once—in—a—lifetime moment when an iconic stadium is demolished. also, i'm on my knees, literally.
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we'll bring you exclusive new footage of the british explorer benedict allen of his trip to papua new guinea. we'll be hearing from him. good afternoon, this is afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. impeachment proceedings against president robert mugabe have begun in zimbabwe. the motion accuses mr mugabe of failing to uphold the constitution, and of giving his wife, grace, too much power. zimbabwe's former vice president, who was sacked by president mugabe, has warned him to resign immediately orface humiliation. while opposition leader, morgan tsvangirai, has called for fresh elections. our correspondent ben brown is in the capital, harare, and has the latest. robert mugabe has resisted all the
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pressure on him to resign, from his own people marching on the streets, his own military and his own party, zanu-pf his own military and his own party, zanu—pf who've already sacked him as party leader. now it's parliament which is trying to impeach him, to remove him from the presidency through constitutional means, a motion of impeachment has been introduced to the parliament. it will be voted on. the process will then go ahead. a committee will be set up to investigate mr mugabe and whether or not he has violated constitutional principles. if they find that he has got a case to answer, that will be put to both houses of parliament, a two thirds majority is needed. nobody seems to know how long it could take, some mps saying a couple of days, others say it needs to be a legitimate fair process and the president needs to be able to defend himself in the parliament and that it could take weeks. we'll have to wait and see. a
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big crowd in africa unity square here in harare. tom burridge has this report. a call for the mugabe era to end. they gathered near zimba bwe's parliament, where a move to impeach their leader of nearly four decades is under way. the army overseeing the process, but still no sign from robert mugabe himself that he's ready to resign. he's very stubborn. i think in a way it is a very painful process. zimbabwe was mugabe, mugabe was zimbabwe. now a remarkable claim from the man once mugabe's deputy, the former vice president here being sworn in but sacked two weeks ago, a move which precipitated the current crisis. in a statement sent from an undisclosed location, emmerson mnangagwa almost mugabe of planning to have him killed. plans were underfoot
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to eliminate me, he wrote. mr mnangagwa said he would not return until mugabe was out of power because he did not trust his life in president mugabe's hands. in rural zimbabwe where robert mugabe's controversial land reforms hit productivity, there also seems to be a consensus that it is time for the president to step down. that call mirrored by veterans — once his allies in war against colonial rule. we are saying to mugabe smell the coffee, your time is gone. use your dignity, you have ruled long enough. throw in the towel, let the country be given a clear signal that it can start on a new page. you are the biggest hindrance to the country moving on. inside the parliament,
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a motion now under way to unseat the president. outside and across this country people wait. they have the army and all main political groups on their side. robert mugabe's days feel numbered, but for now at least still no recognition from the man himself that his time is up. mr mugabe tried to hold a cabinet meeting earlier on today, only a handful of his ministers actually turned up, the vast majority refusing to attend that cabinet meeting. well, one of the opposition leaders here, morgan tsvangirai, of the mdc, has been addressing the crowds outside the parliament demanding that mr mugabe must either resign or be impeached, also saying all parties here in this country,
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zanu-pf the all parties here in this country, zanu—pf the ruling party and the opposition parties should come together now for the future of zimbabwe. a democratic zimbabwe is not going to be built by another undemocratic process. now, continuation of zanu-pf's process. now, continuation of zanu—pf's policies and zanu—pf's character must end. the violence, the abuses, the constitution must stop. that was morgan tsvangirai. all along, throughout this crisis since the military took over, they have been keen to stress that it's not been a coup d'etat, although it's looked like that to many observers outside, they are saying it's not an old—fashioned african coup where they force out the leader at gun point. that's why the
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generals have been very keen here to try to persuade mr mugabe to resign, which so far he's resisted, or through constitutional means, through constitutional means, through constitutional means, through constitutional proceedings, to force him out of office that way. let me show you pictures of the crowds demonstrates outside the parliament building here right in the heart of harare at africa unity square. they've been coming in a carnival atmosphere, just as they did over the weekend, to demand that mr mugabe resigns, or is it peached, putting pressure on those mps in the parliament to impeach him. they have been dancing. we saw a group of demonstrators carrying a mock coffin with robert mugabe's name on it. they believe the end of his 37—year rule is close, but exactly how close it's hard to tell because some people are saying that this impeachment process will not be that quick or that fast oh they ares believe it can be completed, maybe even by tomorrow. we'll have to wait and see. back to the studio.
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senior cabinet ministers have agreed that britain should increase its financial offer to the european union — but only if member states agree next month to move on to talks about trade and an implementation period. ministers — including the prominent brexiters, michael gove and borisjohnson — approved the move last night. here's our political correspondent alex forsyth how much is what you want worth? the uk is preparing to increase the amount it will pay to the eu to settle its accounts, but only if in return brexit talks move on to trade. we are ready to move on phase two, to see those talks about a deep and special partnership with the eu for the future. a comprehensive trade agreement with the eu for the future which is in the interests of the uk and the remaining eu 27. while there is no officialfigure, it is thought senior ministers agreed to increase the offer last night, including some brexiteers in the cabinet although some on the backbenches warned agreeing too much too early would give the eu an advantage.
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it's as if they want us to pay the ransom money but still be hostage to the european union. michel barnier must recognise we are leaving the european union and will only pay what we are due. for others, the priority is getting things moving. you don't go into a pub, order a round of drinks, decide you don't want them, walk out and not pay for it so it's important we accept that as a principal, hopefully get a formula to express that but then move on. eu leaders wanted sufficient progress in three areas before agreeing to talk trade. the so—called divorce bill, the question of the irish border, and citizens' rights. it remains to be seen whether any offer number ten has on payment will be enough, but the government is clear — it is prepared to move but only if the eu does too. the brexit secretary said today
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it is not possible to agree all aspects of the so—called separation without discussing future relations. the northern irish border cannot be addressed if we cannot take into account the shape of our future partnership with the european union. financial settlement depends on it because nothing is agreed until everything is agreed. the way forward is still uncertain and today there was a warning to some not to use the delicate issue of the irish border as a negotiating tool. you don't play around with northern ireland to effect change in other places, and actually i would like to see the irish government working with northern ireland and the westminster government to bring about a brexit that works for northern ireland but also for the republic of ireland. getting a deal is what all sides want. it seems someone is going to have to give a little, but no one is prepared to pay any price. joining me now from our westminster
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studio is pawel swidlicki, brexit analyst at edelman which specialises in research and measurement for businesses. let's talk money. this figure of £40 billion. do you think that will be enough to make trade talks possible? well, we can't say anything for certain in these brexit talks, but i think it's now very likely that on the money side at least, this improved offer from the the money side at least, this improved offerfrom the uk should be in you have to persuade most other member states to proceed on to the next phase of talks which is transition and trade. it's a lot of money? it is a lot of money. but it's worth bearing in mind that this is money that the uk has already agreed to. it signed off on a seven—year eu spending programme in 2013 so this isn't really new money, as such, it's just the uk essentially saying that it will still honour those commitments. so if the money problem is solved, what
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about the other issues, and clearly the big one appears to be that border issue with northern ireland and ireland. that's right. the issue has emerged as the bone of contention in recent weeks, from the perspective of dublin this is understandable because this is the moment at which they feel they have the most leverage over the talks, they worry that if the talks are allowed to progress on to trade, suddenly their own unique interest in this situation will be overlooked. however, as understandable as their position is, because protheir perspective, there is no up side from brexit, the best they can hope for is damage limitation, it's also hard not to see how the uk government cannot give them that guarantee that they wa nt give them that guarantee that they want at this stage. they cannot say that, well, we accept that there won't be any regulatory divergence after brexit. that's something that
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isa after brexit. that's something that is a topic that naturally only can be discussed in the next brexit talks. you know much more about this as an analyst than i do, ijust wonder if you have optimism that everything will be on track and that we can still reach the deadline date with or without a transition period? we need to separate out a few issues here. i think that assuming that we can find some form of language on the irish border question that will persuade dublin not to impose a veto, i think at this stage that cannot be guaranteed. i also think if we do not move on to the next phase of talks in december, then a lot of people will be wondering well, are we ever going to move on to that phase and there are a lot of businesses that have put investment decisions on hold, a lot of brexit contingency planses that will start to be activated in the first half of next year if we do not have greater certainty over whether or not we will go into this roughly two—year transition period that both sides
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have talked about. i think that is not really in anyone's interests. that is when we start to get concern about there being a so—called cliff edge brexit where both sides really aren't ready for that, the customs procedures aren't in place, for example. i think we will see future trade talks kicking off in december. the question is what happens then. as we know, there are still big divides within the cabinet and the eu in fact as to what this new relationship would look like, what is the balance between rights and obligations because obviously the uk left the eu because it wasn't happy with the current balance. the question is, will it be possible to achieve a more optimal balance outside of the eu than it was possible within it. thank you very much. more than 10,000 cases may have been affected by alleged data manipulation at a forensics laboratory in manchester. so far about 50 prosecutions have been stopped, but there are fears there could be many more.
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the suspected manipulation by employees emerged earlier this year, when a data anomaly in a drug driving case was reported. our home affairs correspondent explained just how significant these developments are. i think this is the biggest scandal to affect forensic science testing in decades. it's not because 10,000 cases necessarily will see people having all their convictions overturned because, in many of these cases, the drugs tests may not have been a significant factor in the criminal case, but nevertheless, alreadyjust months into the retesting process, 50 people who were going to court accused of drug—driving offences have had their prosecutions stopped. they will not be prosecuted any more. the potential convictions of those people, that is not going to happen. and we have still got many, many tests, many test results to be reexamined and rea nalysed. in two cases, which resulted in road
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deaths as a result or possibly where drugs were a factor, in those cases, the court of appeal is being asked to have a look at those convictions to see whether they are unsafe. so the potential ramifications here are huge. it does raise many questions about the processes used by the testing services to ensure that the results of the analysis they conducted on samples to see whether the drugs were there, to see whether those processes were correct. because it's not about the testing of the samples themselves, as we understand it, it's about the results being validated. that is where the irregularities occurred. the headlines. crowds gather outside zimba bwe's parliament as impeachment proceedings against president robert mugabe get under way. more money on offerfor the eu, theresa may agrees to increase the brexit divorce bill if trade talks begin next month. thousands of criminal cases may have
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been affected by alleged manipulation of data at a foreign zix laboratory in manchester. in a moment, a drug company providing thyroid treatment is accused of overcharging the nhs by tens of millions. in sport, australia may have retained the women's ashes but england have finished their tour with a victory, levelling the series after completing a record run chase in canberra in the final t20 match. the men's ashes starts in brisbane tomorrow night. the england batsman alastair cook says they've pretty much accepted the all—rounder ben stokes will play no part. everton's niasse has become the first premier league play tore be charged with diving. he won a ten penalty in the draw against palace over the weekend. more in 15 minutes. a drugs company has been accused
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of overcharging the nhs by millions of pounds a year for a key thyroid treatment. the competition and markets authority claims that concordia abused its position. it says the nhs spent £34 million on a thyroid drug last year, up from around £600,000 in 2006. concordia says it "does not believe competition law has been infringed". our health editor hugh pym, gave us this update. the way the drugs industry works, if you have the patent to a drug, it's your exclusive product and you can set the price, although patented drugs, the price is capped within an agreement with the government here in the uk, when it goes generic and off patent, in other words anyone can make that drug, it's assumed that the price will fall. but what seems to have happened in a certain number of cases for quits niche drugs like this one is a company comes in, buys the rite to market it, nobody else bothers to compete so it ends up with the power to push up the price. that is allegedly what found here, the finding is that concordia used market dominance in supply
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and this was an abuse of position and a 6,000% price increase over ten years to the nhs. one consultant i spoke to earlier explained the big difference prices when he went elsewhere in the european union. historically the drug was probably a cost to the nhs of about £20—£30 a month. the new cost was over £300 a month. the patients were telling me that they could go to a foreign capital and buy it for £5 a month. so there was a massive difference in what the nhs was being charged to what people were accessing it for. concordia says it doesn't breach there was any breach of competition law, it's been open with the department of health, it points out it only bought the rights to the drug two years ago, there were other companies involved before. the competition commission are looking at a number of cases like this in the
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pharmaceutical companies. for the first time in 12 years, the bbc has been allowed to broadcast in uzbekistan. the man who killed eight people in new york last month is the most people in new york last month is the m ost rece nt people in new york last month is the most recent uzbek thought to be behind an attack. injanuary, a shooting at a nightclub in istanbul left 39 people dead, the gunman was from uzbekistan in. april, a vehicle was driven into shoppers at a department store in stockholm. four people were killed. us the uzbek national confessed to the attack. the bbc has been able to visit the neighbourhood the new york attacker came from. translation: we were shocked and anxious when we heard
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that he was involved in this business because, before he left uzbekistan, he was a completely different person. so i can't imagine what could have influenced him so much. at the local school, saipov is remembered fondly. he stayed after classes and he had extra lessons, maybe sometimes english lessons, but never he spoke about the religious things, that he's trying to go to some place because of religious purposes, i have never heard about it. the bbc was given permission to report from uzbekistan for the first time in 12 years. after decades of repressive rule, the country appears to be opening up. the vast majority of uzbeks are muslim. the government tightly controls religious life and all clerics must be registered with the authorities. terrorist attacks committed within uzbekistan are almost unheard of. but thousands of uzbeks are in prison for extremism. human rights groups say many
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are simply political opponents. but uzbek migrants have been responsible for several deadly terrorist attacks in the west in the last few years. officials in tashkent tell us the men involved in these killings were all radicalised abroad. translation: uzbek migrants living abroad still feel like strangers in a foreign land. here, we have strong traditions of community. in the case of saipov, someone must have approached him and told him what to do. the authorities say that they're working with uzbeks abroad in order to combat those feelings of alienation. in the hope that others will not succumb to extremism. with often tragic consequences. a suicide killer has killed more
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than 50 in morning prayers in nigeria in the town of mubi. president trump has declared north korea a state sponsor of terrorism nine years after it was removed from the list. mr trump said the move will trigger very large additional sanctions and blamed the country's nuclear programme and support for what he called international acts of terrorism. today the united states is designating north korea as a state—sponsor of terrorism. it should have happened a long time ago, years ago. in addition to threatening the world by nuclear devastation, north korea has repeatedly supported acts of international terrorism, including assassinations on foreign soil. paul adams is in seoul and told south
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korea's response. this was not a surprise. donald trump said he was going to put it off, so people were ready for this move. japan's shin zoe abbey, probably his best friend in the region was very supportive. the government in north korea more nuanced. they said it was clinging to the idea of dialogue with north korea, hinting at the tensions that exist a little bit between the rather implacable approach of donald trump and the slightly more softly—softly approach of this south korean government. china sounded a warning saying countries should avoid doing things that raise tensions in the region. of course, from north korea, we had some colourful rhetoric. those who're working to thwart north korean progress, it said, were simply making north korea stronger and that the result would be a great miracle that would startle the world. of course it's been a couple of months since the world was last startled by a north korean missile test. people
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have begun to wonder whether we might be moving into a phase of dialogue and all eyes over the weekend were obvious a chinese envoy who went to north korea for four days of talks. he seems to have left yesterday without meetling the north korean leader kim jong yesterday without meetling the north korean leader kimjong un, most people in the region took that to be a rather negative sign. a fatal accident inquiry in scotland has ruled that the deaths of three people killed in a rally in the borders could have been avoided if people had been clearly banned from standing in the area where the crash took place. the inquiry was held into the deaths of the rally in 2014 and a fourth fatality at a rally in inveriness in 2013. you may find some of the following images distressing. crowds gathered. this footage from
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inside one of the cars was taken shortly before the vehicle behind left the road. the images screamed at the inquiry showed what happened next —— screened. a carcrossing a bridge skidded off the route and collided with a group of people. elizabeth allen, len stone and ian provin died. theirfriend, donald martin, who was with them at the time, didn't realise he'd been hit. the car took off over the humpback bridge and veered slightly left and right into where we were standing, thenit right into where we were standing, then it appears to be, i heard a rushing sound as the car came round. i was running at that stage and all i felt was a bump and i was flat, faced down into the field. i managed to get myself up slightly and collapsed after that. the inquiry looked into the death ofjoy robson,
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a spectator at the inverness rally. she was at a wooded part of the route when one of the cars struck some stones at the side of the road and left the track, hitting trees. among the inquiry‘s reck men dayses for improving safety that marshals should be clearly identified, spectators should be discouraged from entering potentially dangerous areas and records made of the areas where spectators could be at risk. rally driving is a popular sport. these findings aim to increase the protection afforded to those watching cars at high speeds on challenging courses. don't forget you can tweet us on any of the stories we have shown this afternoon. the details of how to get in contact on the screen. now time for a look at the weather. another mild and cloudy day today with outbreaks of rain. through the rest of the day and tonight, the
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rain in scotland will work its way north—east. strong winds associated with that. cloudy elsewhere with outbreaks of rain. the next area of rain pushing into northern ireland, wales and north—west england. temperatures in the south staying in double figures. cooler in the north. for england and wales, into the early hours, we start to see the wind picking up. tomorrow a windy day, gales on exposed high coasts. there will be some brightness over in the south—east. temperatures tomorrow a maximum of 15. as we move into thursday, a chillier start in the north with some snow over high ground and perhaps to lower levels. stay tuned to the forecast. sun write spells for england and wales with rain pushing into the south later and highs of around 14. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. impeachment proceedings are under way against zimba bwe's leader, robert mugabe. crowds gather on the streets of harare as mr mugabe's former vice—president tells
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him to stand down. the government agreee that britain should increase its financial offer to the eu, the so called brexit divorce bill, but only if trade talks begin next month. police say ten thousand criminal cases may have been affected by alleged tampering of forensic evidence at a laboratory in manchester. a drug company providing medicine for a thyroid condition is accused of overcharging the nhs by tens of millions of pounds. the company says it hasn't broken the law. just in case you missed it. you're in the perfect place to film that once—in—a—lifetime moment when an iconic stadium is demolished. and this happens. well, at least the bus driver got a good view! sport now on afternoon live with olly. ifi
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if i was a crystal palace supporter andi if i was a crystal palace supporter and i heard that an everton player had been charged with diving, i would wonder if the goal resulted from that and that the game should be replayed. the fa brought in new laws. they spotted something from the match between everton and crystal palace over the weekend. diving, between everton and crystal palace overthe weekend. diving, it between everton and crystal palace over the weekend. diving, it is within of those things that managers are irate, opposition, players and the fans and the palace fans will be sha appeased to hear that the fa are taking the everton to player to task over this. he kidded the referee and appears to win a penalty. that was scored for everton. ittened in a draw. he has got an appeal against the charge of simulation. so that's one of those stories that we have been keeping an eye on this afternoon. they are not going to
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have the match replayed or points given to them, but certainly if they go ahead and charge him, it will be a big, big deterrent that the fa will have to play with. i know they haven't retained the ashes, but the england women's team well? they failed to regain the ashes. it is a points—based system. they had a test which was drawn, but australia, they only had to draw this test series to retain the ashes. they have done that, but it was a draw the series. england won their last match, it was a t20 in canberra. australia made a formidable 178 runs for two wickets off their 20 overs. beth mooney scoring 115. wyatt scored england's
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first twe nty20 scoring 115. wyatt scored england's first twenty20 half century. that left the sides on eight points each. england finishing their tour on a high, but australia keeping the ashes. it was exceptional. beth mooney's 100 and england 30—3 and then the partnership of wyatt and knight and wyatt getting her maiden 100. it was outstanding, but it was the dropped catches. it was that kind of for australia was the disappointing way to end the series. 8-8 disappointing way to end the series. 8—8 and they will be pleased to leave australia, but sad to leave without the ashes. the england batsman alastair cook say they ‘have pretty much accepted' that ben stokes will play no part in their ashes series. he was arrested on suspicion
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of causing actual bodily harm after a fight outside a nightclub but the police investigation is ongoing. stokes posted this on social media yesterday, keeping in shape in the nets in durham. bowling and batting. seemingly ready to join up with his teamates if he is cleared. england have been training at the gabba in brisbane, where australia haven't lost a test in almost 30 years. the first test starts on thursday. i think it is disappointing for the england team and the country. he has let a lot of people down. i would loved for him to be out here. i know what a competitor he is on the field and he is a world—class player, but at the end of the day, we have got another 11 guy that is will take the field come thursday and we are excited. we respect our opposition. they have picked the best team they feel is going to be here to try and
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beat us. wales have will have to take on the rugby world champions new zealand on saturday without liam williams and alex cuthbert. williams suffered an abdominal injury during thier victory over georgia last weekend. the back was always going to miss the final autumn test against south africa because he has to return to club side saracens. wing alex cuthbert is also out with a calf problem everton's oumar niasse has become the first premier league to be retrospectivel charged with diving or as the fa put it "successful deception of a match official". he won a controversial penalty after minimal contact against crystal palace, with leighton baines converting. niasse went on to score the equaliser in a 2—all draw. new laws introduced in the summer allowing
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players to be charged after a game for simulation. it's a champions league night, manchester city are at home to feyenoord, spurs are away in germany playing dortmund. both of those have alrewady qulaified for the last 16, but liverpool haven't yet, they are in spain knowing that a win against sevilla will also see them progress.
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