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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 21, 2017 8:00pm-9:01pm GMT

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the day that robert mugabe resign. he led zimbabwe for 37 years, but with parliament about to impeach him, did the presidentjump before he was pushed? and joyous celebrations followed. people are chancing out on the streets tonight, releasing years of pent—up frustration at robert mugabe's increasingly autocratic rule. it is a happy day today, independence is finally here. this is the man likely to take over. two weeks ago, emmerson mnangagwa was sacked as vice president. in the next 48 hours, we expect him to become president. alas, the long—time opposition leader morgan sang the reich tells the bbc what should happen for the man he has fought for years. these were his last days, i don't feel any guilt or ill will at all. robert mugabe's presidency is
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history. as member of zimbabwe's parliament began debating whether to impeach the president, the speaker of the parliament interrupted. he had a letter of resignation to read. i hereby tender my resignation as president of the republic of zimbabwe with immediate effect. well, mr mugabe's letter said his decision was taken to allow smooth transition of power, and that it was volu nta ry. transition of power, and that it was voluntary. well, voluntary is one word for it, unavoidable is another. he refused to resign last week after a military takeover and refused to resign after mass protests at the
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weekend. he refused to resign when he was sacked by his own party on sunday, and he ignored a deadline to go on monday. he even called his normal cabinet meeting for today, tuesday, but there was nothing normal about this tuesday. the pressure has told, his 37 years as president has ended. look at these pictures we have seen in harare today. this is inside the parliament as the news was announced. you can see men and womenjumping, punching the air. while that happened inside parliament, this is what we were saying outside on the streets. police and army celebrating with those who were delighted the president had decided to go. remember, the army's involvement in this story is crucial, it was that military takeover last week that heralded the end of robert mugabe's time in power. in terms of what may happen next, a newswire from the reuters news agency, who have been speaking to the ruling zanu—pf‘s
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legal secretary. we are told that emmerson mnangagwa will be sworn in on wednesday or thursday. we are also told he will serve the rest of president mugabe's time, which will ta ke president mugabe's time, which will take us to the next election, which is due in september 20 i8. take us to the next election, which is due in september 20 18. let's be clear, robert mugabe had his supporters in zimbabwe and across africa. here is one of his party's mps. it came as a surprise, but it was also quite certain. when the letter was read out, only half of the house was actually celebrating. almost every zanu—pf mp was nearly in tears. many were crying because we did not want this for our leader. we still love our leader and we did not wanting to go out this way. it felt like things could have been donein felt like things could have been done ina felt like things could have been done in a much better way. ben brown is out on a street in harare. let's bring him in life. you have witnessed many extraordinary things, right tells what is happening now is to mark yes, this is really
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extraordinary. amazing to be here, i have to say, a great privilege to be here on this momentous, historic day. the crowds are still going crazy here in the centre of harare. we are right outside the parliament. this is one of the military vehicles that has been here ever since the military takeover that has precipitated the resignation of robert mugabe. you can see crowds still on the streets, and they have been here ever since the news came through that robert mugabe was resigning. that letter read out by the speaker of the parliament, and ever since there have been extraordinary scenes. what has precipitated this resignation in the end was the impeachment process that began today here in this parliament building behind me. what had preceded it was pressure on robert mugabe from the army, with that ta keover mugabe from the army, with that takeover in initially, and also, of course, with the ball power, the
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huge demonstration over the weekend, and his own party stripping him of the party leadership. there are people shouting "we are free". let's just talk to some of the people who have been on the streets. how do you feel to be here on this day?” have been on the streets. how do you feelto be here on this day? i feel amazing, i feel ecstatic. feelto be here on this day? i feel amazing, ifeel ecstatic. this feelto be here on this day? i feel amazing, i feel ecstatic. this is a new thing for ourselves. we were hoping for this, it is a dream that has finally come true. we are so grateful, you know, to everybody, we are grateful. we had kept the faith and now it is possible that we are going to have a new zimbabwe, we are going to have a new zimbabwe, we are going to have a new zimbabwe, we are going to be free and we are going to bea going to be free and we are going to be a great nation. did you ever think he would resign of his own free will? well, we used to think that, but we had run out of options.
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we had to wait for the natural course of life. and what about the future now? it looks like emmerson mnangagwa will take over. do you think you can trust him? as a more democratic leader? well, you know, things are changing and actually, i think if we give him a chance, he has to prove himself. it is a useful continent, africa, so many are hoping the economy is changing. if he can change the economy, key is the better man for us. you have lived all your life under robert mugabe because he has run this country for 37 years, and now he has gone. yes, now he has gone, he is history. we are looking forward to the future. are you grateful for the military in the end for launching the takeover? yes, we are grateful
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to them. they initiated a chemical reaction, that is the change that was to come. we want to keep this a democratic zimbabwe. great to talk to you will stop you can hardly hear yourself think here, to be absolutely honest with you. let's just show you these scenes of wild jubilation here tonight. these zimbabweans can hardly believe what has happened here today. they knew that robert mugabe was under real pressure, but they were not sure either that he would ever resign, or that the impeachment process would ever work, that they would get a majority of mps. in the end, they did not need that impeachment process , did not need that impeachment process, he went, reluctantly, of course, but the generals here had tried to persuade him to go for
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days, and retain some dignity. whether he has retained any dignity, it is hard to tell, but his 37 rule of zimbabwe, which has been so disastrous, is over. it has been disastrous, is over. it has been disastrous in terms of the economy, zimbabweans are now on average 15% poorer than when he came in in 1980, there is 90% unemployment here, which is why these people are so happy. they want jobs, which is why these people are so happy. they wantjobs, they want which is why these people are so happy. they want jobs, they want a functioning economy, and they want democracy and freedom. freedom to demonstrate, as they have been in the last few days, and of course they will be watching very catholic they will be watching very catholic the new man, emmerson mnangagwa, when he is sworn in on wednesday or thursday, to make sure that he does not slip back into the ways of robert mugabe. he was one of robert mugabe's henchman, so people are not 100% sure they can trust him. from a jubilant harare, back to the studio. my jubilant harare, back to the studio. my goodness, what a scene, a scene that many, many people would never —— foot they would never see. nancy,
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this matters well beyond zimbabwe's borders, doesn't it? absolutely, and when we were preparing for the programme today, we were surely would talk about an impeachment process that could take months. but robert mugabe if nothing else is consistent, and he surprised us once again. we got this resignation notice, and this is something the whole of africa is paying attention to. but will africa's leaders and accept what has happened here, an intervention by the military, a vice president going into exile and now coming back as president. it is not exactly a democratic process as we know it. not as we know it, and the military has been very careful throughout the whole process to make sure they say this is not a coup, this is military intervention, we are only stepping in because we are concerned. you are only stepping in because we are concerned. you can see are only stepping in because we are concerned. you can see the fruits of that because many people today have said action, this has been done by
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the book. robert mugabe has been respected as much as possible, and we are going the democratic route. is there resistant to the proposed plan with emmerson mnangagwa taking over, elections next year? i have not found anyone inside or outside zimbabwe who seems to be actively resisting that suggestion. the mood at the moment does seem to be, give us at the moment does seem to be, give usa at the moment does seem to be, give us a break, let us rejoice for now, let us pause and take in this moment and we will think about the rest later. so, it does seem that emmerson mnangagwa will continue to rule until the elections next year, and that is where people's heads are mostly pinned, the next election will be a democratic one, and they will, by then, be able to exercise their democratic rights in a freak, and hopefully sarah, election. —— free and fair. if you have questions about zimbabwe, we will get nancy to help us out. a lot of you will be asking what will happen now, let's work this
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through. this political crisis was sparked by the sacking of this man. the dendrites president emmerson mnangagwa. he fled the country after he was sacked, but is now expected to come back and be president, perhaps as soon as wednesday. he knows plenty of other that need replacing, he is as robert mugabe's bodyguard. he also served as security minister. at the moment we are not worried, as long as it is not robert mugabe. we wa nt long as it is not robert mugabe. we want these elections next year. but robert mugabe is gone for ever. it looks like the jubilation everyone is having, everyone in zimbabwe is very happy, everyone wants to think he will be a great leader. we will push the democrat aviation agenda ——
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democratisation. the constitution will be amended so those superpowers that the president had in the cost is used will be limited. that is what we need going forward. we need a leader, not a ruler. barack concerns “— a leader, not a ruler. barack concerns —— there are concerns about the process going forward. a bbc show made this point, president mugabe resigns to finally make clear a new error of corruption and vicious power struggles. also, worth noting that mr mnangagwa played a controversial role as the country's spymaster during the internal conflict of the 1980s. he's accused of being responsible for the deaths of thousands of civilians in a part of zimbabwe called matabeleland, that's a claim he's always denied. it is not a clean break, is it? no,
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it isn't, tend to macro has been in government since the 80s, he has been a part of the system —— emmerson mnangagwa. people remember him for accusations of rigging the elections, of ensuring that robert mugabe stayed in power. the question people are asking is, it took 37 yea rs people are asking is, it took 37 years for you to realise that people are suffering. so, is this really about liberating people, or is it about liberating people, or is it about ensuring the continuance of a particular system? that about ensuring the continuance of a particular system ? that is about ensuring the continuance of a particular system? that is a serious question people are asking. for the moment, they arejust question people are asking. for the moment, they are just so happy to have any kind of change. it feels like at least change is possible. it may not come in the form they want now, but perhaps later they can start to create a kind of system that they will be more happy to see. in terms of the problems faced by zimbabwe, they are undoubtedly
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significant, but in the context of africa, you could argue that when the eu sits and looks at the listed need to worry about, the security situation in somalia, the democratic republic of congo, they are far greater than what we see in zimbabwe. there is a sense of that, and we must not forget that president mugabe is still loved and respected by many people. we spoke to an mp that said action when the announcement was made in parliament, announcement was made in parliament, a lot of the zanu—pf mps were crying. for many africans, he does represent a stand, he does represent a confidence, a resilience that they are unhappy to see crumble in this way. in many ways, it seems that the actions of mugabe, and robert mugabe himself, are things that people appreciate different parts of. it is not always about the man, sometimes it is about what he did and what he represented. nancy, thank you for the moment. still to come: we will
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look back over robert mugabe's extraordinary political career. he is the only leader zimbabwe has known and is independent in 1980. 150 firemen have been battling the braves blaze which has caused the yea rs of braves blaze which has caused the years of pounds of damage. 0ur lead story, robert mugabe has resigned as president of zimbabwe. he led the country for 37 years, but with parliament about to impeach him, he took the matter into his own hands and a letter of resignation was read out. robert mugabe is the only leaders in berkeley has known since its independence in 1980. he was a hero of the anti—colonial struggle, but during almost 40 years in power he began to brutally repressed dissenters. repress dissenters — and then presided over economic
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collapse, hyperinflation — and the seizure of land without compensation. by the end he was reviled by many as a tyrant. in this report, andrew harding considers his political career. he could have left power a hiro, instead he made the classic mistake and overstayed his welcome, many would say by decade. there was a deceptive calm in salisbury... robert mugabe had grown up in a world of white privilege and british colonial rule. as a young man, hejoined the liberation struggle, spending ten years in prison and then joining his guerillas in the bush. when finally independence came in 1980, mugabe took control. the early signs of trouble, his political rivals silenced, thousands massacred in violence across the country. but zimbabwe prospered, and its population seemed well—educated. in the 1990s, economic shocks and growing political opposition
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prompted mugabe to lash out. his supporters seized white— owned farms. violently. the ripples shuddered through the country and the economy. to stay in power, mugabe's zanu—pf party began rigging elections and terrorising opponents. sanctions followed and then hyperinflation, the currency collapsing spectacularly. then came the race. an ageing mugabe remarried, but the public never warmed to her. she spent lavishly, but it was when she began to show political ambition that things changed dramatically. zimbabweans were in no mood for a dynasty, nor was the military, with political tensions rising, it was the prospect of president grace that helped force the generals' hand last week when they seized power in a coup d'etat. today, we went in
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search of more clues. 0utside harare, one of her huge mansions. i'm andrew. i'm dennis. we weren't allowed in, but nearby, we got a taste of why she is so despised here. this woman said the police had destroyed her home and dozens more because grace wanted to seize the land for herself. they came here and started demolishing my house. all over. they pulled down my house. they said, you must go away because this place is being taken by the first lady. by the first lady, grace mugabe? yes. here, the law meant nothing to the first family. they were emperors. mugabe was so long in power, he behaved as if zimbabwe belong to him, his family. today, at long last, a man who could have left office an african icon was forced out,
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his humiliation complete. andrew harding, bbc news, harare. robert mugabe is one of the post—colonial heroes, or was one of those heroes, you could say. this is why it is so disappointing for so many people, to see the way he has left power. it has left a lot of people wondering what it hears that happens to these revolutionary leaders who do the right things, but then don't quite do the right things with what they get after that. he has provided inspiration, especially when it comes to conversations about land, and land ownership. you can look at south africa, the economic freedom fighters, and their leader, they do take quite a lot of inspiration from mugabe, especially when they compare him with nelson mandela and say well, he didn't
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really do much about land reform, but perhaps robert mugabe was brave enough to do so. thank you for the moment. you will be back with us in our late edition. next, we will talk about this man. back in 2008, the opposition leader morgan tsvangirai won more votes than robert mugabe in the first round of the presidential election. in fact his party claimed he'd got the 50% of votes that would have secured victory. but the result was disputed — a second round was called — and mr tsvangirai pulled out after violence against his supporters. mr tsvangirai has continued as a vocal critic of robert mugabe. here he is talking to emily maitlis for the bbc‘s newsnight. i'm hoping that the next leadership, even during the transition, must set in a new trajectory where people are respected and that the rule of law is restored. have you spoken yet to the vice
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president, emmerson mnangagwa? will you endorse him now as president?” have not spoken to him yet. my hope is that if we are to correct the past, the principles, myself and others, has to sit down and define a new chapter. back in 2007, morgan tsvangirai was arrested and beaten on his way to a prayer rally. this is him in hospital in harare. the matter drew worldwide commendation. for this and many other things you might expect hostility towards mugabe. but here is mr tsvangirai on what should happen to the departing president. a futile exercise. i think in let
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him go and rest in his last days. so you bear him no ill will question mark no, i don't bear him any ill will at all. my call for him has a lwa ys will at all. my call for him has always been, why don't you take a dignified exit? and will you stand in the elections in august 2018? you wa nt to in the elections in august 2018? you want to be zimbabwe's next president? well, it is too early to tell, but definitely, my party will decide, and my alliance partners will decide whether i will be a candidate or not. lots of reaction to this as you'd imagine. the uk prime minister theresa may just released this statement saying this provides zimbabwe with an opportunity to forge a new path free of the oppression that characterised his rule. as zimbabwe's oldest friend we will do all we can to support this, to help the country achieve
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the brighterfuture it deserves. and this is british foreign minister borisjohnson. of course, we have to wait and see exactly how this on false, but at first sight, this is a moment of hope for zimbabwe —— houthis on false. for 37 years, they have been languishing under the rules of a despot who has impoverished their country. what we hope now is that this will be a turning point, a moment when they can go forwards to free, fair democratic elections next year, and that is what we will be in courage in, together with the rest of our friends and partners in the region. there are around 3 million of zimbabweans living in south africa. milton nkosi has been speaking to them. iam in i am in the centre ofjohannesburg.
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this place is known to be occupied by zimbabweans. there are many others. people are celebrating here, just look at them. these people are dancing on the cars. these people are celebrating. these are historic themes. the people you are seeing here came here looking forjob opportunities, and tonight, they are celebrating and they hope they will be able to go home. these are historic themes. summer breaks of rain affecting many
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parts of the uk through this evening, it may ease for a time but wetter and windier weather under way tomorrow. plenty of cloud around today, and this is one weather watchers view in cambridge. hard pressed to find sunshine again tomorrow. the wind is picking up, so a blustery night and stronger into the day tomorrow in some areas. this next batch coming into parts of wales and north—west england, just fringing and northern ireland, and that becomes significant during tomorrow. another mild start with temperatures in two double figures. but windy. plenty of cloud around, many places dry, and that rain edging into western and northern parts of wales and north—west england. it will be persistent to the day into snowdonia and cumbria, where 100 the day into snowdonia and cumbria, where100 millimetres of rain could fall. a wet start in belfast dry across parts of scotland, and hill snow in the far north. the rain
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edging further north, pulling eastwards from northern ireland, pushing into northern england and southern scotland, again very wet here, and into the southern uplands. the wind strengthening especially into england and wales, with gales developing, maybe up to 70 mph around exposed coasts. coolerfor scotla nd around exposed coasts. coolerfor scotland and northern ireland. things may be ok travel wise in the morning, but coming home in the evening, with either rain, flooding in places, strong and destructive winds, there could be some problems. firstly, be aware, snow in northern scotla nd firstly, be aware, snow in northern scotland to even quite low levels to begin with. a drier day for many of us on thursday, a few bands of wet weather around, but still miles for england and wales, especially where we get some sunshine. cold air is beginning to push south at the end of the week. another area of low pressure comes in, some uncertainty about the web the rain will go, but some will have a wet day on friday
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night. as apples away, cold air com plete night. as apples away, cold air complete its journey south across the uk in time for the weekend. fine, dry and sunny weather, but there will also be some wintry showers around during saturday, especially in the north and west. welcome to bbc news, i am ben brown, in ferrari where there are scenes, as you can see, ofjubilation around one of the military vehicles. —— herare. people have been celebrating the resignation of robert mugabe, which people hadn't been expecting. it was a huge surprise and they've been celebrating ever since they heard the news that he has decided to resign, after all the pressure there was on him, pressure from his own party, zanu—pf, pressure from the military who launched their ta keover the military who launched their takeover here in harare last wednesday and pressure from the
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people. we've had huge demonstrations here, on saturday in particular. at first he stubbornly seemed to refuse to resign, he made atv seemed to refuse to resign, he made a tv address where he did not resign, he set a deadline but now he has resigned. the news was asked in parliament by the speaker of the parliament and that was applauded and cheered by members of the parliament who had begun a process of impeaching the president. in the end they don't need to impeach him because he has resigned of his own free will after 37 years in power in zimbabwe. the world's boldest leader, 93 years old, finally stepping down. this report on the dave's tumultuous events —— oldest leader. a country had been waiting for this moment for over 30 years. the announcement was hard to hear. notice of resignation...
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cheering but this is what the speaker said. my colleague, the bbc africa editor, fergal keane, was in the chamber when the announcement was made. we're here, right at the moment that they've heard that robert mugabe has resigned from the presidency, and you can hear it — cheering from zanu—pf mps, from opposition mps and from members of the public who've come here to witness what's happening. they didn't expect it and thought that this could be a potentially elongated process of impeachment, but it hasn't happened. he's gone, it's over. scenes of wild celebration... inaudible
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after 37 years and a promising start, it's an embarrassing end for one of africa's last inaudible. this is a good day for zimbabwe, a new era for our nation. 37 years with one president, it doesn't make any sense. i'm very happy. i don't have anything to say, but i'm happy with this. mugabe was... i don't have any words to say now. there was an air of expectation earlier. parliament had resolved that, if he wouldn't resign, he would be impeached. this is a people's project, we are a people's party. we believe in people's resolutions. and let it go. and what if it fails? it will never fail. the people have neverfailed. waiting in the wings now is emmerson mnangagwa, a long—time assistant and vice president whom robert mugabe sacked just last week. the weight of the expectation is now on him to fix this broken country.
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for now, zimbabweans are savouring the moment they thought would never come. mr mugabe is no longer the president of zimbabwe. a lot of people here never thought they would hear that sentence, that robert mugabe is no longer the president of zimbabwe but that is the truth tonight. let's talk to some of the people who have come to celebrate. i think you've travelled quite a few miles to get here. why did you want to come to harare?” wa nted did you want to come to harare?” wanted to come here to celebrate because he has been bad for zimbabwe for 37 years i wanted to come here and enjoy the moment with the people of zimbabwe as a whole. why did you wa nt to
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of zimbabwe as a whole. why did you want to be here? it's like a great moment for zimbabwe, zimbabweans all over the world, in america and south africa, they are all excited. they wish they are here but they couldn't get here. we're all excited. do you think it's going to be a better country, a better zimbabwe?” think it's going to be a better country, a better zimbabwe? i think so country, a better zimbabwe? i think so because they will be freedom, no dictatorship. no dictatorship, is that right, do you trust that the new president is going to the emmerson mnangagwa? new president is going to the emmerson mnangagwa ?” new president is going to the emmerson mnangagwa? i trust the new president, some of the things he has done over the last few years for zimbabwe. he is going to bring in finance. he will bring in a lock to zimbabwe. is that what you need now, jobs? —— he will bring in a lot of
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jobs. we actually need jobs and freedom, above all, freedom of expression, freedom to be who we wa nt expression, freedom to be who we want to be. sol expression, freedom to be who we want to be. so i think he has seen what the zimbabwean people are capable of. we will have freedom. if we don't have the freedom then we will take to the streets because this is our nation. this is our future, we want this moment. will you keep demonstrating if you don't get the freedom you want, will you keep coming to the streets? definitely, we will keep doing that, if they don't provide what we want. because we've been suffering. we just decided to run here and celebrate with everyone. this is a new dawn in zimbabwe. we've been surprised in many things. we're not allowed to do what we want as the
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barbarians. —— as zimbabweans. you come here and people think that you are like robert mugabe. i thank god because i think the new government which is going to come with emmerson mnangagwa is going to bring new changes. did you ever think he would resign, that he would go voluntarily? well, i think it was out of the options, to tell the truth. we were hoping and praying that the natural course of life would take place at any moment in time and we hoped it would be sooner. time and we hoped it would be sooner. and it's a happy day? he has resigned freely and we are free. the 18th of april may be the day of independence. lovely to talk to you all, thank you so much for being
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with us. some of the people who have come onto the streets of harare. earlier i spoke to a woman who has been arrested, imprisoned beaten up by the security forces, an activist who dared to criticise robert mugabe. her name is vimbaishe musvaburi and she told me her reaction to the news that he was gone. it's an amazing feeling, i had mixed emotions, i was running into the crowd running and screaming because it's an emotional feeling. i crowd running and screaming because it's an emotionalfeeling. i can't explain how i feel. i left zimbabwe when i was 17 and i lived in the uk for ten years, i've been back here for ten years, i've been back here for eight years and i've seen nothing but the worst in our country. we didn't want mugabe at all. he's the one who engineered
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things. we are so glad he's gone. we don't want him any more. yes, today is victory, victory in our hearts and for our children. i'm so sorry. it's ok, we understand. i think you're allowed to cry on a day like this. pretty much everybody in zimbabwe is crying at the moment. did you ever think you would live to see this day, it has been so long in coming. i never thought i would. i'm an activist and i've been fighting and speaking for the people and i've been saying to the people, if not for my generation then it is my children's generation. i have two children's generation. i have two children in school and every day you wa ke children in school and every day you wake up you don't know whether you are going to get food or the school fees. it has been the worst experience. people are scattered all over the world. the word family doesn't mean anything to us now
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because families are all over the world. they want to come back home and they only see each other on the internet. for us, this is what people ways wanted. —— what people a lwa ys people ways wanted. —— what people always wanted. we don't want him any more. 0ne activist with a veryjubilant reaction to the news that president mugabe has finally decided to step down. joining me via webcam is martin fletcher, formerforeign editor of the times, who has reportedly extensively on zimbabwe and who interviewed emmerson mnangagwa last year. we expect him to be sworn in as president in the next couple of days. thank you forjoining us. first of all, how surprised are you that finally robert mugabe has resigned? well, since the moment that grace persuaded him to get rid of mnangagwa it was inevitable that he was going to go. it was a
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terrible political miscalculation by him. i have to say, one of the things i do for the times is to write obituaries and i wrote mugabe's not long ago and i didn't foresee him going this way. i thought he would follow the die in office. —— would probably die. thought he would follow the die in office. -- would probably die. tell us about emmerson mnangagwa. in snc isn't that new because he's been pa rt isn't that new because he's been part of the region, one of mugabe's henchman, so not necessarily a great champion of human rights and freedom —— part of the regime. champion of human rights and freedom -- part of the regime. i had to stand why is it barbie and sasa lukic in and in many ways i rejoice with them —— i understand why zimbabweans are rejoicing. mnangagwa has been by mugabe for many years, he has been associated with the worst excesses of the mugabe regime, the massacre, the land seizures the violent election rigging. he isn't a
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model democrat, he is a zanu—pf hardliner, and old revolutionary. he isn't going to willingly relax zanu—pf‘s grip on power although he made for parents's sake try and form some kind of government of national unity. where he will differfrom mugabe is in this respect, he is more of a pragmatist, he isn't an ideologue and he is economically literate, he understands that he must revive the economy. not only to pay the security forces on whom he may well depend but also so that he has a narrative to take into the next election, which is due next year although i think it's conceivable that he may try and delay it for a year or two. and do you think the fact that we've got all these people who have been demonstrating over the weekend to demand mugabe go and now on the
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streets, jubilant celebrating, it is people power, isn't it? but is it wishful thinking to say that everything has changed in zimbabwe? they can't turn back the clock towards dictatorship. what you've seen over towards dictatorship. what you've seen over the last couple of weeks is really an internal power struggle within zanu—pf between the faction of emmerson mnangagwa and the faction of grace mugabe. now we have a clear winner, mnangagwa takes over. but that isn't the same as inviting in the mdc. mnangagwa has been talking to morgan tsvangirai of the mdc and has been talking to joyce murray dureau and i wouldn't be surprised if he forms some kind
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of government of national unity but we had that 2009—2013 in zimbabwe and frankly the mdc were rolled over by mugabe. i think we are looking at a model more like china which actually mnangagwa cited when i interviewed him last year. 0r paul kagame in zimbabwe where you have an authoritarian government but one that delivers for its people in economic opportunity. that may be the best we can hope for and i guess that the west, china and south africa would probably settle for that. frankly the bulk of the zimbabwean people would. they've lived through appalling economic deprivation. 90% unemployed, many
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depending on food aid, one quarter of the population including most of the best and the brightest leaving for other countries because they can't survive in zimbabwe. so actually if he rebuilt the economy, that's something to bank and to be happy about. martin fletcher, thank you for being with us. celebrations continuing in harare. people are still dancing in the streets, very jubilant on the news that mugabe has gone. i spoke to lord peter hain who was an anti—apartheid activist and former minister, and asked for his reaction to the news that mugabe had resigned. the vice president will
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ta ke resigned. the vice president will take the country in a new direction, encourage international investment, adopt policies promoting new employment, promoting investment in the country rather than simply enriching the elite, the ruling elite with mugabe at the top. i hope he will but his own record as mugabe's henchmen and enforcer in some of the most violent of his activities mean that he will have to change as well. i think he will, he's a very intelligent leader himself. i met him some years ago. i think this is a moment in which zimbabwe can turn its back on the corrupt and murderous mugabe rule, betraying the values of the freedom struggle that he once though nobly lead come and take the country in a new direction and hopefully rebuild a shattered economy. get the agricultural sector working again,
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maybe exporting food again instead of importing food aid. mugabe destroyed so much. now there's a chance for a new start in zimbabwe's history. geoff hill, journalist and author of what happens after mugabe joins me now from warwickshire. a very pertinent? mac what happens after mugabe ratchanok i suggest that one of the first things ironically is that emmerson mnangagwa is going to purge the military. they put him in power, they got rid of mugabe and they can do the same to him so i suspect in shakespearean fashion they will woo the generals into civilian jobs, appoint the next ambassador to tokyo or paraguay. i suspect he will consolidate power and make sure the military can't do it again. tell us
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a bit more about this man, emmerson mnangagwa. some people here are worried that he was the henchmen of robert mugabe's regime. he isn't going to be much different. but we hear he is an economic reformer, a pragmatist. what kind of regime will it be? what we have to look act is somebody like mikhail gorbachev or fw de klerk who for years took part in these awful regimes in the former soviet union and apartheid south africa but it went —— when it came to thejob, they africa but it went —— when it came to the job, they were different. i'm not suggesting emmerson mnangagwa may be different. i'm surprised that peter hain criticised mugabe so much because during the massacre in matabeleland, peter hain remained silent. but mnangagwa is somebody who could take zimbabwe in a
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different direction. he is a pragmatist. it has been scenes of euphoria here it harare but does that mean that things have changed and that they can't go back to the brutal with russian —— brutal repression we saw under mugabe were you can't walk onto the streets and demonstrate or even criticise him without being beaten up by the police? is that wishful thinking? is it overly optimistic to think that things have changed because of the way people have come out onto the streets over the last few days? that's the best question i've heard all day. well done in asking it. it goes to the core of what we are thinking about. this is the berlin wall moment, it is like that. for me, emmerson mnangagwa, the pragmatist that i know, he'll be watching the tv clips. it would take
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a very brave ruler to try and put the genie back in the bottle. no, i is that —— i suspect emmerson knows that things have changed. and that if he did try repression in the mugabe style, he would face crowds on the street again. thank you for joining us. it has been black and white people in zimbabwe celebrating, young and old, people from all sorts of different factions. i've been speaking to a white farmer who lost his property and whose family was attacked during the land grab, years earlier on, a few years ago, under the mugabe regime. he is one of those who has been celebrating very hard the downfall of robert mugabe. what an incredible day this is. when i heard, what an incredible day this is. when iheard, i what an incredible day this is. when i heard, i gota what an incredible day this is. when i heard, i got a message from one of the senators and i couldn't believe
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it. i phoned him and suddenly my heart started to swell, i couldn't believe what was happening. i actually broke down. i went into the supermarket and i bought a bottle of bubbly and as i was coming out i just broke down in tears, laughing and just the absolute relief of the fa ct and just the absolute relief of the fact that finally, after all these yea rs, fact that finally, after all these years, the man who has suppressed so many people in zimbabwe has gone, is out, finished. it's over. just tell us, if you would, what his regime has done to you and your family. well, we had such a terribly hard time, us and all of ourfarm well, we had such a terribly hard time, us and all of our farm workers we re time, us and all of our farm workers were tortured, we were beaten, we had all sorts of all full things happening to us, broken bones,
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abduction, taken to the darkest places. my mother—in—law, burning sticks thrust into her mouth to get us to withdraw from a court case taking mugabe to court. we suffered under mugabe. what we're seeing out here on the streets today is an end to that suffering. people are so relieved that the suffering is over, we believe, the oppression is gone. black, white, farmers, town people, rich and poor people, we are celebrating and hugging each other, we're so excited about what's happened. you know, my wifejust heard the announcement, the army started chanting. there was such excitement in the army. everyone is here together celebrating. that was a white farmer here in
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zimbabwe with his reaction to the news of the resignation. people here as you can see are very happy here tonight. cheering just an indication of how happy people are, jubilant. it has been an extraordinary and momentous day here in zimbabwe. let's just take a look at some of the events leading up to the resignation of robert mugabe today. what the zimbabwe defence forces are doing is to pacify a degenerating political, social and economic situation. the game is up, finished. done. the people of zimbabwe have spoken
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and the people of zimbabwe have said you and your husband should go today, and not tomorrow. i, robert mugabe, under section one of the constitution of zimbabwe, is hereby formally tendered my resignation as president of the republic of zimbabwe with immediate effect. todayis today is victory, victory in our hearts, victory for our children!” can't even believe what i'm seeing. it was a happy day today,
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independence is finally here. time for the latest update from bbc weather on a day that has produced some rain, very mild for some of us but we've noticed the wind picking up. rain and wind will be the significant features as we go on the wednesday and snow on thursday. just wa nted wednesday and snow on thursday. just wanted to show you a picture from today, a cow standing up in the rain! still some rain around although the south is dry overnight. a windy night for most of us. a little bit cold in northern scotland, the chance of some snow in the higher hills but many of us getting off to a mild start. concerned about the next area of
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rain coming in which made produce light rain in the south of england. later in the afternoon will be dry across parts of central and eastern england. rather cloudy, dry and windy but very wet in north wales, north—west england and running into southern scotland, some outbreaks of rain and skill snow in the far north. this area of rain moves north but stays with us for much of the day, parts of northern england especially in cumbria and lancashire, reaching to the central belt, outbreaks of rain in northern ireland. with rain we may get some disruption come up to 100 millimetres in the fills and gales developing. there may be some travel disruption. the day may start quiet. wednesday night, very windy, squally downpours in southern areas, the
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wind easing on thursday morning but thenit wind easing on thursday morning but then it is now in northern scotland, colder air pushing south across the uk. that could be disruptive, accumulations to even lower levels in scotland. temperatures coming down in northern ireland into northern england. across the south and east, likely to have double figures again and maybe some sunny spells on thursday. some rain across the south of the uk on friday, some uncertainty how far north it will go. keeping warm for one more day but elsewhere, the cold air is there. strong to go force wind. many of us on saturday will get some sunshine, it will stay dry but some wintry showers. some will see rain but more likely to seek sleet, hail or snow out of the cold air for the weekend. hello, i'm ros atkins, this is 0utside source on the day robert mugabe resigned. he's led zimbabwe for 37 years — but with parliament about to impeach him, the president jumped
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before he was pushed. and joyous celebrations followed. they are dancing in the streets of harare tonight — releasing years of pent up frustration at mugabe's increasingly autocratic rule. this is the man likely to take over. two weeks ago emmerson mnangagwa was sacked as vice president. in the next 48 hours we expect him to become president. plus the long—time opposition leader morgan tsvangirai tells the bbc what should happen to the man he's fought for years.
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