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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  November 21, 2017 9:00pm-10:00pm GMT

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source on the day robert mugabe resigned. he's led zimbabwe for 37 years — but with parliament about to impeach him, the president jumped before he was pushed. and joyous celebrations followed. they are dancing in the streets of harare tonight — releasing years of pent up frustration at mugabe's increasingly autocratic rule. this is the man likely to take over. two weeks ago emmerson mnangagwa was sacked as vice president. in the next 48 hours we expect him to become president. plus the long—time opposition leader morgan tsvangirai tells the bbc what should happen to the man he's fought for years. i think let him go and rest will stop i do not feel any ill will. robert mugabe's
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presidency is history. as members of zimbabwe's parliament began debating whether to impeach the president — the speaker of parliament interrupted — he had a letter of resignation to read. i. i, robert mugabe, underthe constitution of section one in zimbabwe, tender my resignation as the president of the republic of zimbabwe with immediate effect. mr mugabe's letter said his decision was taken to allow a smooth transition of power — and that it was voluntary. voluntary‘s one word for it — unavoidable is another. mr mugabe refused to resign after last week's military takeover. he refused to resign after mass protests at the weekend. he refused to resign when he was sacked by his own party on sunday.
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and he ignored a deadline to go on monday. he even called his normal cabinet meeting for tuesday. but there's nothing normal about this tuesday. the pressure told and his 37 years as president ended. and look at these pictures from harare as the news started to spread. this was inside the parliament. you can see people punching the air, clapping and singing. some people even started dancing. this was outside. people poured out onto the streets to celebrate the departure of a man. and on streets all over the city — and the country. people have been celebrating. the tanks are hugely significant, we don't know if we would go to this point if they had not intervened last week. reuters news agency reports that
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mr emmerson mnangagwa — the former and briefly exiled vice—president — will be sworn in as president on either wednesday or thursday, they say he will serve until the next election due by september 2018. let's be clear — robert mugabe has his supporters in zimbabwe — and across africa. here's one of his party's mps. it came as a surprise, but it was also quite sudden. what was interesting that when the letter was read out, only half of the house was actually celebrating. almost every zanu—pf mp was actually in tears. a lot of people were crying. we still love our leader and we did not want oui’ love our leader and we did not want our leader to go out this way because it felt like things could have been done in a much better way. ben brown has been covering this story all day. then, is the party
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still going? it is still going! i think it will be going on all night. let's just paint a quick picture of where we are. he can see lots of people singing and dancing and they had pain been since that announcement. —— they have been. this was a day they never thought they would see. let's just talk to one of the crowd. what is your reaction? how do you feel about the news that robert mugabe has resigned? to be honest with you we are too excited. i think we should only get excited with the answer to change. yes, he has resigned, but inaudible may they not be selfish so that we
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as zimbabweans can get a better economy, social and economic change. can we change together? url happy man? i am very happy. in fact all the days of my life i have been waiting for this day. it helps us to keep zimbabwe precious and i think we are the best. thank you. what an incredible day here in harare. an incredible day here in harare. an incredible moment in zimbabwean history. after 37 years, no one thought robert mugabe would just resign. he was under intensifying pressure ever since that military takeover. he was under pressure from the army. he was under pressure from
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his own political party. zanu—pf. and he was under pressure from the people here. but it was only when those impeachment proceedings began in the parliament behind me that he finally decided to throw in the towel, give up and resign. back to you in the studio. thank you. hundreds and hundreds of people still out on the streets. let's consider what has happened. nancy kacungira is the presenter of focus in africa. it has been a curious affair. a coup d'etat that wasn't quite a coup d'etat. a political compulsion of a president but not his party. what you make of it? cheery as is the word and already there are suggested movie post is going around to this saga. because it does play out like a movie. this isa it does play out like a movie. this is a reign of 37 years that has unfolded in two weeks. this all started when emmerson mnangagwa was
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fired as vice president and that was that when we got the first wind that something was afoot. a warning was sent to president mugabe that he was going down the wrong path. of course, now we know that this can all be down to the move grace mugabe was making to become his successor. that is when things began to unravel. even when the military stepped in, they were very categorical saying this is not a two—day car, we're asking him to do the right thing and step aside. —— coup d'etat. and he does not resign. he actually says he will have a cabinet meeting to address some of the things that have been brought to his attention. so, it has not unfolded in the way anyone expected. many thought that he would only leave when he died. had we understand that a man who is an all these years building a power structures suddenly looked around
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and found it wasn't there any more? there are different theories about that. one is the power structure that. one is the power structure that held in place in the first place and they only removed him because it wasn't suitable for them any more to continue having him in power. that is one theory. but the other theory is that no one saw this coming. that the military didn't intend to stage a coup, theyjust intended to stage a warning. really? like i say, isjust a intended to stage a warning. really? like i say, is just a theory that is out there. but no one is really quite sure how we got to this point. but a lot of people are happy that it got to this point and that changes come to zimbabwe. what do the other african nations in the african union make of all this? after all, it is not the most obvious of democratic transitions. i'm willing to bet my socks, and i'm not wearing any! every group in africa is talking about this in some
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shape orform. africa is talking about this in some shape or form. there are some africa is talking about this in some shape orform. there are some in uganda and kenya, all over the place, everyone is talking about this. in so many dimensions, this is historic. people are drawing comparisons with their own countries andi comparisons with their own countries and i am leaders. lessons are being drawn about the trajectory that the continent is taking. coming on the heels of so many long serving leaders in one way or another leading power, many people feel that a wave of change, is maybe not sweeping across the continent, but at least lapping on the shores. nettie, stay with us. —— nancy. send questions our way and she will help as answer them. so what happens now? the political crisis was sparked by the sacking of this man — vice president emmerson mnangagwa. he fled the country — but he's now expected to become president — perhaps as soon as tomorrow. he knows plenty about the man he's replacing. he was once mr mugabe's bodyguard.
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he's also served as security minister. here are some zimbabweans on the prospect of him taking over. at the moment we are not worried, as long as it is not mugabe. we will see what is to come for us. we are going to vote next year, we want elections. from there we will choose what we want. mugabe is gone forever. we are free, great kudos to general chiwenga. these are great people that did a greatjob general chiwenga. these are great people that did a great job to see and make sure that he went. we have to ensure that from this day forward we will push the democratisation agenda. we will push our constitution and it will be amended so constitution and it will be amended so that those superpowers that the president has in the constitution will be limited. that is what we need going forward. we need a leader not a ruler. there are concerns about what will follow. the british satirical show have i got news for you makes a point many have raised.
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a tweet from @haveigotnews "president mugabe resigns in order to finally clear the way for a new era of corruption and vicious power struggles. " and this is from the south african online news site the daily maverick — "beware crocodile mnangagwa — zanu—pf is not renewing, it is a snake shedding its old skin." also, worth noting that mr mnangagwa played a controversial role as the country's spy master during the internal conflict of the 1980s. he's accused of being responsible for the deaths of thousands of civilians in a part of zimbabwe called matabeleland — that's a claim he's always denied. the point is we can't say this guy isa the point is we can't say this guy is a clean break. know we can't. he has been at his side since the beginning. he is been a minister since the 19805 in some shape or
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form. some of the things he is accused of doing, aside5 matabeleland, i5 accused of doing, aside5 matabeleland, is being very involved in reading elections in favour of mugabe. thi5 in reading elections in favour of mugabe. this is the kind of chequered history that people are very concerned about. helping understand why no one seems to be focusing on the fact that he is about to become president and that potentially could not be the euphoric moment that zimbabweans mark? as one of the zimbabwean journali5t5 followed treated, he 5aid give us a break and give us a moment, let usjust 5aid give us a break and give us a moment, let us just enjoy this moment, let us just enjoy this moment that many of us thought we would never see. mugabe i5 famou5ly known for saying that only divine intervention will remove him from power. that is he would only leave when he died will stop it turned out that it was military intervention and a lot of people are processing that still. they never thought this moment would come. so they are enjoying that before they think about what is next. i guess the fact
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that there are already elections scheduled for september next year helps, because it is not too long until everyone gets a say in what is happening. there is an end in sight. a lot of people are happy to say we will take emmerson mnangagwa until we can get stability and an election, hopefully a free, fair and democratic election in 2018. that is what people are hoping for. they hope will be enough pressure on emmerson mnangagwa to not be robert mugabe. thank you. nancy presents focus on africa. in a few minutes we will turn away from zimbabwe because we will hear about the syrian leader visit to vladimir putin and how tho5e visit to vladimir putin and how those efforts are close to be done. we will look at that. northern ireland's border is being used as a bargaining chip in the
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brexit negotiations according to the leader of the dup, arlene fo5ter. she has accused ireland and the rest of the eu are being callous and that this —— ca rele55 of the eu are being callous and that this —— carele55 and reckle55. she 5ay5 this —— carele55 and reckle55. she says she is ready to move the talks forward. i am accusing them of being reckless, because if you listen to some of the rhetoric, nobody understands negotiations probably better than i. people come out and try and push agendas forward and we do recognise that we are a critical phase because i certainly want to see the negotiations moved to the second phase so that we can talk about those issues of trade and the i55ues about those issues of trade and the issues that will make a difference in relation to the border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland. it is almost a false battle because the detail will come about when we're talking about the trade issues.
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putin and assad has had a meeting. it is the first time they have seen each other since 2015 and a lot of happened since then. in particular, russia's military intervention in syria on the heart of the syrian government. mr putin says he does wa nt government. mr putin says he does want a political solution to the war. he is also talking about russia's main mi55ion being almost accomplished. heels are added, things to the russian army, syria has been saved as a state. not eve ryo ne has been saved as a state. not everyone would agree with that
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analysis. assad spent four hours on russian 5oil analysis. assad spent four hours on russian soil and this image has been widely 5hared of them sharing and embrace. vladimir putin almost looking eternal a5 embrace. vladimir putin almost looking eternal as he holds president assad. to analyse this we have ten to two outside source regulars. unfortunately we don't know what is happening in vladimir putin's head. that is the skill that i5 putin's head. that is the skill that is needed and wanted by many people around the world. ru55ia, is needed and wanted by many people around the world. russia, and especially cu ban want around the world. russia, and especially cuban want to show russian progress in syria. —— vladimir putin. many analysts say he wa nts to vladimir putin. many analysts say he wants to finish this campaign before the next presidential elections in march next year. and also to remind assad how crucial he is to the syrian government. judging by the photo we have all seen, assad knows
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how much he owes vladimir putin. it i5 how much he owes vladimir putin. it is what they discussed on ricin social media as well in other countries. —— ru55ian. no one on the official syrian side di5pute5 countries. —— ru55ian. no one on the official syrian side disputes the role that russia has played in that conflict. sebastian, russia has undoubtedly change the situation in syria. would you agree with the analy5is syria. would you agree with the analysis that it is safe the syrian state ? analysis that it is safe the syrian state? your not as the conflict started, as it mutated and went on and became essentially a series of battlefields without a clear plan or structure from the opposition rebel side. when islamic state entered. it almost follow the lines that president assad said right at the start, that without him, terrorism will come in. there are also the reason why that happened. president assad himself with instrument when that, quite possibly. what the russians did saved him. it prevented
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the other outcome which might have been that the rebels would have defeated him or at least have enough ofa defeated him or at least have enough of a territory to put him in a very difficult position. that has been changed. that narrative essentially has proved to be true but it is truth in a way that has been manipulated to be true. but you can't say it now, the us, france, the western world are very much onlookers in the way russia has mulled this, the iranians have more than this. —— moulded this. president assad has shown how beholden he is to president putin. he doesn't look as though she is going anywhere. will the us and france still be demanding that he does not continue. if russia were to draw back sebastian, that would leave president assad with some significant enemies within syria. his problem in military terms has
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aways been that his army is not strong enough. not strong enough to hold onto the places he took. now, there is not a strong enough opposition against him, not strong enough rebel groups to challenge. there are areas the south of the country where there are attempts, through the russians, there is a summit for example which is happening tomorrow. president putin with the turkish and iranians attending it and they can discuss these deconstruction zones to stop fighting in each area. that would dent allow the russians... —— d you have occurred, what will happen to them? backed by the us, will they pull back of a league syrian government go after them. the russians had to fight for once
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again, so the syrian army is definitely entirely motivated. again, so the syrian army is definitely entirely motivatedm again, so the syrian army is definitely entirely motivated. it is not strong enough, but it islamic state has no ability to hold onto towns and villages in the country, they are not able to challenge the syrian government in that way, it was only really islamic state that could mount a challenge to the syrian government troops. and their allies. back to the resignation of zimbabwe leader. this article runs down the arguments are him being a hero or villain. if you take the later view, one of the things set me that he is blamed for is ruining them but i's economy. this is a tweet from the financial times... let's look at some of those grass from the financial times. this one
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interesting, it shows the gdp per capita of a lot of african countries and then the same countries in 2016. the obvious example thatjumps out here is zimbabwe. look at the figures from 1997 and look at the degree to which the economy has shrunk in those intervening years. we also have a lot of statistics to tell you. in 2011, 201% of people we re tell you. in 2011, 201% of people were estimated to be living in extreme poverty, less than $2 a day. 4796 extreme poverty, less than $2 a day. 47% were living on less than $3 a day. and on and on the statistics go. they are from the world bank by the way. also, zimbabwe's biggest trade union said that unemployment is around 90%. this is the view of one economist today who says that zimbabwe is running out of the money it needs to pay its debts. as we speak, the zimbabwean economy only has less than one month of import
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coverfor has less than one month of import cover for international reserves. the international benchmark is 3—4 months of import cover, bit of the severe liquidity crisis that has faced the economy, it is up to the point that there is virtually no money to support the payment coming in. you have had people who ordinarily would have transacted business stepping back a little bit because they are just not too sure when they will get paid and they are not too sure if they will get paid at all and they can take the money outside of the economy. nancy is still here. robert mugabe and his collea g u es still here. robert mugabe and his colleagues would say part of these problems would be down to how we we re problems would be down to how we were treated by the international community. that is one big argument of theirs. that, if everybody had not abandoned us, if sanctions were not abandoned us, if sanctions were not imposed, if we were able to trade freely and continue to do business, we would not have these
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problems without currency, with unemployment, with being able to export and trade. again, this is what they used to lend credence to their actions in terms of giving land back to the people, the way they put it. and taking back the country, so to speak. in that way, they can make arguments that their economic performance has been linked to the way they have been sanctioned against. whatever the rights and wrongs of what has happened, to be blunt about the future, they'll be some countries and companies that see today as part of a big economic opportunity. that is absolutely true. already we have seen government saying that we are willing to support zimbabwe and work with a new zimbabwe. this is when the rubber hits the road, because we'll will start to see in the coming days, weeks, months and years how much of this is a systemic problem. people on the street are saying now i can get a job and have
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an opportunity. but it will take more than getting rid of president mugabe to fix a system that might be com pletely mugabe to fix a system that might be completely broken all very broken. it will be up to the next leader to fulfil those very high expectations on the street with this very realistic world that deals with hard currency that zimbabwe does not have enough of. lest we forget that robert mugabe's party remains in power, it has a president and majority in the lower and upper house. it has tried to put distance between itself and mr mugabe. but in reality, how much was mr mugabe dictating what zanu—pf stood for? this is the very question. he perhaps the situation in the last two days might tell us about that. the economic situation is not new to zimbabwe. we have been talking about this a very long time. in 2008 hyperinflation hit... it did not
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make zanu—pf say wait a minute, we need to disarming about this. many said though that they could not take grace mugabe is the successor. that will give a lot of people pause to think, is this going to be a change or is thisjust think, is this going to be a change or is this just about a palace coup? iv factions in zanu—pf now fighting against each other only to continue the same system. it is a sobering thought but a thought in many minds as the celebrations go one. thought but a thought in many minds as the celebrations go onem thought but a thought in many minds as the celebrations go one. it has been quite a day. yes it has. remember, much more information on zimbabwe coming up in the second half of outside source, and on the bbc news app, i will be back in a few minutes time. it is time we updated you on a
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number of stories from right across the world, and we will start off in canada and the usa. two areas of low pressure will provide different conditions over the next few days. one in the west, wet and mild, conditions over the next few days. one in the west, wetand mild, and one of the hudson bay, something its way towards eastern canada will eventually produce a real taste of winter. but in the short—term, wednesday again looks to be another wet and windy affair for the western side of canada and the pacific northwest of the usa. several hundred millimetres of rain could fall here before this event goes away it will be around for one or two days yet. it is a radical ahead of that low pressure on the eastern side of canada as the cold air comes down. there will be some la ke air comes down. there will be some lake effect snow and we will keep a close eye on that. after a quiet start to the week in florida it could end on a wet night. also in south america, but across this
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diagonal to the western side of colombia, and again anywhere along that route could see 50—100 millimetres of rain falling in 2a hours. no problems across the new zealand, high—pressure selling things of the rest of the week, one of two showers around. there will be showers from the start of the test match, england versus australia, the start of the ashes in brisbane could be affected by the showers. we have already seen more than showers across indonesia. there is an enhancement of this monsoon that has caused real issues. the frontal system has worked throughjapan by thursday, letting in cold air which is already there across the korean peninsula and widely across china. these temperatures, many should be several degrees higher. rain has been a real issue across south—east asia since the weekend. 200 millimetres falling on vietnamese coast and widely through malaysia down towards singapore, we're expecting more rain to come after a bright spell. some of that came from near india. it moved through
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south—east asia across the bay bangle and maybe become another storm. we will keep you posted on that. by our eyes those temperatures look higher, but the north—western corner of india and across the board into pakistan is on the cold side for the time of year both by day and night. we are about to see a drop in temperatures across the northern areas of the middle east. these northerly winds will follow one behind this feature in the gulf that will put a dent in these temperatures, quite widely across the north of the middle east. no such problems in the short term here in the british isles for most of us. we picking up our hair way down in the atlantic, mild and moist to say the atlantic, mild and moist to say the very least. —— air. more on that injusta the very least. —— air. more on that injust a few the very least. —— air. more on that in just a few minutes. hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source, on the day robert mugabe resigned. he's led zimbabwe for 37 years — but with parliament about to impeach him, the president jumped before he was pushed.
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and celebrations followed. they are dancing in the streets of harare tonight — releasing years of pent up frustration at mugabe's increasingly autocratic rule. this is the man likely to take over. two weeks ago emmerson mnangagwa was sacked as vice president. in the next 48 hours we expect him to become president. plus the long—time opposition leader morgan tsvangirai tells the bbc what should happen to the man he's fought for years. i don't have any ill will at all. lots of reaction to this as you'd imagine.
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the uk prime minister theresa may released this statement. and this is british foreign minister. of course, we have to wait and see exactly how this unfolds. but at first sight, this is a moment of hope for zimbabwe. for 37 years, they have been languishing under the rules of a despot who has impoverished their country. what we hope now is that this will be a turning point, a moment when they can go forwards to free, fair, democratic elections next year, and that is what we will be encouraging, together with the rest of our friends and partners in the region. that was the foreign
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minister of britain — britain has a long history with zimbabwe, it was the colonial power. in terms of the country investing at the moment, it is china. here's the analysis of an expert from the chatham house think tank on how events are being seen in beijing and how the two nations became so closely linked in the first place. it comes from the liberation war for the independence of zimbabwe from rhodesia. zanu—pf, the party of mr mugabe tried to cosy up with the soviets at the tail end of the cold war, but they weren't interested so in 1979 they went to china, who supported the gorilla warfare of mugabe's rebels. why did china do that? there was cold war wive already with the soviets too —— wive already. —— rivalry.
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already with the soviets too —— wive already. -- rivalry. it was initially about ideology and mature progress but as the years went by it became more about the economy. it's not about ideology at all now. a little bit about why worry with the west because the european union and the west imposed sanctions on zimbabwe so the chinese in response stepped up their engagement with mr mugabe —— a little bit about rivalry. it is about a fundamentally and the extraction of natural resources . and the extraction of natural resources. the main export of zimbabwe is tobacco but also diamonds and there is a mining industry in zimbabwe, platinum and other things which i think in the long term the chinese will be interested in. is it part of china's wider plan to expand its influence
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in china? yes, it's part of that but that's not overestimate the importance of zimbabwe for china. it isn't like angola, the second or third largest source of oil, it isn't like others, it isn't a strategic country for china and i think some of the reporting has been misplaced in making it seem so. will it be poring over every detail of what happens after mr mugabe or will china be relaxed ? what happens after mr mugabe or will china be relaxed? not at all, there has been a convergence of what the british and chinese government wants in zimbabwe, the rule of law, stability, enabling business environment for investment. diversions would be the government and human rights but the rule of law and human rights but the rule of law and predictability of institutions is common ground for both, both want to see commercial progress which is what the people within zanu—pf want
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too. they want progress, the economy is in an appalling situation and drastic measures need to be taken, hence the pressure for mugabe to leave. there is a sense that the chinese are making more progress than the americans in expanding their influence in africa, is that accurate? over the last 15 years the chinese have significantly scaled up. there are between one and two chinese on the continent, a significant number and over the last 6-8 significant number and over the last 6—8 months, the chinese have increased their military footprint including significantly at the end of last year they are opening a military base in the horn of africa in djibouti. the base is now open. who would have imagined a couple of yea rs who would have imagined a couple of years ago they would have that? now they do. a number of zimbabweans contacting us, one watching on bbc news assay that the majority of zimbabweans do not like china. we can't say that is
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a scientific assessment of public opinion but there is evidence that many zimbabweans have reservations about how close the chinese got to the mugabe government. there is a tweet about the issue of sanctions. before that, a statement from the us embassy in harare. "the path forward must lead to free, fair, and inclusive elections, in which the people of zimbabwe choose their own leaders". barbara plett usher is our correspondent in the state department. forgive me for being bland, but i wonder how interested the state department is in zimbabwe —— for being blunt. i spoke to officials from the african department and they we re very from the african department and they were very interested, quite excited actually, saying that we must seize the opportunity. for those who have been watching africa for years, we
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think wow we must move forward otherwise the historic opportunity will be lost. you had statements from the secretary of state talking about an historic opportunity, saying whatever the short—term arrangements, they want this to be changed and a transition to democracy, so there must be political and economic reform. not just manipulation by zanu—pf and a rush to elections but a proper process over the long—term. it is not the main focus of the state department or policy as we've seen over the last years but there is a strong african contingent looking at it with great interest and hoping it will be a door opening to real change. this question has come in from a zimbabwean watching on the bbc news channel, asking what reforms the west will be interested in seeing before they lift the sanctions? can you help on that one? they say that to lift the sanctions
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there must be a free and fair election, freedom of expression, face for people to exercise political freedoms and various points of respect for human rights, rolling back on those violations. they are the kind of things they are looking for in order to lift the sanctions. it must be said that the us gives a fair amount of money to zimbabwe anyway in humanitarian aid, $220 million a year, but that is given to ngos and community groups. officials say that if they could have government to government relations, they could make a big difference because they could get involved in education and helping to train young zimbabweans for the job market. that involves government to government interactions which aren't possible when the sanctions are in place. if the americans were minded to change their policy, how quickly could they move on their position on
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zimbabwe? it would have to be with regards to what happens on the ground politically. i don't think they would move before the election, they would move before the election, they would move before the election, they would want to see what kind of government was in place and whether it met their standards. thank you for joining it met their standards. thank you forjoining us. elections are scheduled for 2018. a lot of coverage of the resignation. there is full coverage on the latest developments in zimbabwe. just head to bbc.com/news. there is a plethora of analysis. through his 37 years in power robert mugabe was accused of human rights abuses and oppression. in 2001, the human rights activist peter tatchell attempted a citizens arrest of mr mugabe. he did that when he was
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visiting brussels. this is what happened. you are under arrest on charges of torture and the united nations convention against torture. peter tatchell is with us here on outside source. only a short clip, what happened after that?|j outside source. only a short clip, what happened after that? i was beaten unconscious by president mugabe's bodyguards which i think exemplifies the brutality of his regime. his bodyguards did that to me in broad daylight in the heart of the european capital city in front of the world's media. everyone said to themselves, if he does that in those circumstances, imagine what he's doing to his own people when no one is watching? what were the consequences in terms of the countries hosting mr mugabe reacting? neither the british nor the belgian governments were willing to ta ke the belgian governments were willing to take any action against mugabe's
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agents. they claimed diplomatic immunity and that was accepted. i'm left with permanent brain and eye damage. nothing major but of course thousands and thousands of zimbabweans have been murdered by his regime. political prisoners were tortured and subjected to mass rape of male and female political prisoners and of course many were assassinated and killed extrajudicially. the price for zimbabweans has been far greater than anybody like me has ever indian word. do you feel like your activism and the activism of others was a success ? and the activism of others was a success? his fall appears in the short—term to have from internal pressure. that's right, when i had him under arrest in london in 1999, when i ambushed his motorcade, we had all the legal papers for his arrest and prosecution under charges of torture, specifically the torture
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of torture, specifically the torture of two blackjournalists in harare. sadly the british foreign minister and attorney general agreed to allow mugabe to go free. that was a shocking thing to do. if he'd been arrested and put on trial and convicted in 1999, much of the terror that followed may not have happened. you would have been a rare when trying to arrest him that if any british government allowed a citizen to arrest a leader it would have set a precedent that wouldn't be popular —— would have been aware. under british law, a private citizen has the legal right to arrest someone if they have evidence they've committed a crime. of course i handed over president mugabe to the british police. we were arrested, myself and my colleagues and president mcgarvey was given a police escort to go christmas shopping at harrods. —— president mugabe. you've been campaigning for
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a long time, what are your emotions? i feel the joy of zimbabweans, having supported them for over 30 yea rs having supported them for over 30 years in this trouble for democracy. but i'm very uncertain about the future. we don't know who's going to replace mugabe. we know who will probably do it. all of these zanu—pf leaders, almost all of them have been implicated in the corruption and human rights abuses of the mugabe regime. there is a fear that this could be the continuation of the regime under a different leader. i hope that's not the case but that's certainly a possibility and a fear. a5 everyone is saying, as zimbabweans are saying, the true test will be free and fair elections. having said that, also today i feel joy and elections. having said that, also today i feeljoy and sorrow because i remember the thousands and thousands of zimbabweans murdered by his regime, thousands. i was
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campaign against the white minority regime in rhodesia, i supported the struggle against south african apartheid but robert mugabe killed more black africans and even the evil apartheid regime and that is a damning indictment of his regime. that will be one of his most shameful legacy is. thank you for joining us. back in 2008, the opposition leader morgan tsvangirai won more votes than robert mugabe in the first round of the presidential election. in fact, his party claimed he'd got the 50% of votes that would have secured victory. but the result was disputed, a second round was called, and mr tsvangirai pulled out after violence against his supporters. he didn't become president. mr tsvangirai has continued as a vocal critic of robert mugabe. here he is talking to emily maitlis for the bbc‘s newsnight. one would definitely hope that it
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opens a new trajectory for the country. other than the perpetuation of the mugabe culture. i hope that the next leadership during the transition will set a new trajectory where people are respected and that the rule of law is restored and that... have you spoken yet to the vice presidentjemerson mnangagwa and will you endorse him as president —— emmerson. and will you endorse him as president —— emmersonlj and will you endorse him as president -- emmerson. i haven't spoken to him yet but i hope that if we are to correct the past, the principles, myself and him and others must sit down. back in 2007, morgan tsvangirai
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was arrested and beaten on his way to a prayer rally. this is him in hospital in harare. the matter drew worldwide commendation. for this and many other things you might expect hostility towards mugabe. but here is mr tsvangirai on what should happen to the departing president. a futile exercise. i think, let him go and rest in his last days. so you bear him no ill will? no, i don't bear him any ill will at all. my call for him has always been, why don't you take a dignified exit? that's what the zimbabweans have been pressurising. and will you stand in the elections in august 2018? do you want to be zimba bwe's next president? well, it is too early to tell, but definitely, my party will decide, and my alliance partners will decide whether i will be a candidate or not. robert mugabe was in power for 37
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yea rs. andrew harding looks back at his political career. he could have left power a hero, instead he made the classic mistake and overstayed his welcome, many would say by decades. there was a deceptive calm in salisbury... robert mugabe had grown up in a world of white privilege and british colonial rule. as a young man, hejoined the liberation struggle, spending ten years in prison and then joining his guerillas in the bush. i. i, robert gabriel mugabe. when finally independence came in 1980, mugabe took control. the early signs of trouble, his political rivals silenced, thousands massacred in violence in the south of the country. but zimbabwe prospered,
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and its population seemed well—educated. in the 19905, economic shocks and growing political opposition prompted mugabe to lash out. his supporters seized white—owned farms. violently. the ripples shuddered through the country and the economy. to stay in power, mugabe's zanu—pf party began rigging elections and terrorising opponents. western sanctions followed and then hyperinflation, the currency collapsing spectacularly. then came grace. an ageing mugabe remarried, but the public never warmed to her. she spent lavishly, but it was when she began to show political ambition that things changed dramatically. zimbabweans were in no mood for a dynasty, nor was the military, with political tensions rising, it was the prospect of president grace that helped force the generals‘ hand last week when they seized power
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in a coup d'etat. was grace her husband's downfall? today, we went in search of more clues. outside harare, one of her huge mansions. i'm andrew. i'm dennis. we weren't allowed in, but nearby, we got a taste of why she is so despised here. this woman said the police had destroyed her home and dozens more because grace wanted to seize the land for herself. they came here and started demolishing my house. all over. they pulled down my house. they said, you must go away because this place is being taken by the first lady. by the first lady, grace mugabe? yes. here, the law meant nothing to the first family. they were emperors. mugabe was so long in power, he behaved as if zimbabwe belong to him, his family.
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today, at long last, a man who could have left office and african icon was forced out, his humiliation complete. andrew harding, bbc news, harare. next i want to hear from mary harper who has covered africa for the bbc for many years. she is now going to look at how it fitted into the politics of the 805. look at how it fitted into the politics of the 80s. mugabe came into politics quite late, he was hailed as a liberator and hero, leading a warof hailed as a liberator and hero, leading a war of independence, putting a priority on health and education. he wanted everybody to be healthy and educated to quite a high degree and he was successful so he was seen as a hero who stood up to the colonial powers of many other countries. he was really seen as a liberator number one for many years.
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that reputation will have gone beyond southern africa? yes, in southern and he was seen, that feeling was particularly strong but it was across the continent and other new countries across the world. mugabe was a kind of super star for world. mugabe was a kind of super starfor his first world. mugabe was a kind of super star for his first years in power. and how far he has managed to sink since then. we have forecast a lot on bbc world service radio which has big audiences in africa. i was taken the back by the number of listeners who called in and said that he's an inspiration they love him. absolutely, that has carried an almost until the present day partly because robert mugabe was the most vocal at one of the smartest, bravest critics of the west. he used to taunt the western powers again and again and take them on as an equal and many people in africa even though they wouldn't have liked the governments he was imposing on the people of zimbabwe, they liked how
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he stood up to the western powers. they saw him as someone who was brave. that went on for decades after he started to bring zimbabwe down, to its knees. more recently, within the context of the african union, was the one of the most influential voices? know, union, was the one of the most influentialvoices? know, over the last decade he become more of a figure of ridicule and embarrassment, even amongst most african leaders. in southern africa, especially south africa, he was still seen as somebody who should be respected by other leaders, seen as an elder statesman, even if he were saying things and doing things that we re saying things and doing things that were inappropriate. it has been difficult for many leaders in africa to let go of that residual respect they had for him. interesting that since he's resigned, we haven't
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really heard from african countries. we've heard from western countries praising this but african countries are taking their time. they have to be very careful, how are they play this. some other long-standing rulers are going to be watching what is happening in zimbabwe and will have concerns. absolutely, some of those people who have been in power for a long time, like the president of cameroon, will be looking over their shoulders and saying they hope that the people of their country don't do a zimbabwe on them. what about the african context, do other african countries see zimbabwe as a priority or would they look at eritrea and congo and think they have more pressing issues?|j eritrea and congo and think they have more pressing issues? i think zimbabwe is almost like a film show that they are watching but in terms of how it impacts south africa beyond its neighbours... in south africa and it is a big deal because
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many zimbabweans went there because they couldn't survive economically and politically at home but beyond that the rest of africa will see that the rest of africa will see that it has massive problems. for instance, nigeria and somalia with islamist insurgents, so it is a bit ofa islamist insurgents, so it is a bit of a sideshow when you look at the continent. but robert mugabe is such a huge figure, it is going to make a big impact on the continent and worldwide. that's it on the day robert mugabe ‘5 presidency became history. goodbye. snow. there, isaid it! there's snow. there, i said it! there's no going back now. more of us will be seeing our first snow of the season by the weekend even if it is a passing winter we shower. we have
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mild air now but by the end of the week and will have gone. last to clear in the south but by saturday the bit will be pushed away as the cold air comes back of the coldest of the season so far and a cold wind with wintry showers. right now it is the mild air across us. we are more concerned about rain and strengthening wind during wednesday as we see these frontal systems coming from the uk. the heaviest rain in northern wales, north—west england and into scotland, up to 100 millimetres of rain and gale is developing in england and wales, whiteley 50 mph and into wednesday night. the kind of day where you go out in the morning and it seems fine but there may be some travel disruption. staying windy on
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wednesday night into thursday morning. but look at this, snow, northern scotland, snow coming in and even on lower levels we could see accumulations. much more coming down on the hills. generally turning for many of us on thursday, some sunshine around. cold air coming in but there is a fly in the ointment, this low—pressure stuffing it but a lot of uncertainty about where the rain from this will be. it may look like this on friday, it may be further south. scotland and northern ireland will seek sunny spells and maybe a few showers. when the latest system has gone, the cold air will com plete system has gone, the cold air will complete its journey south. system has gone, the cold air will complete itsjourney south. the system has gone, the cold air will complete its journey south. the cold feel, enhanced by strong wind. there
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will be some good sunny spells around but there will be wintry showers especially in northern and western parts of the uk. there may be some rain but we are more likely to get sleet, hail or snow out of these showers as they move through. similaron these showers as they move through. similar on sunday, showers may easily in the west later in the day. on the weekend more of us will see some snow, not disruptive, a passing shower but in the hills and mountains i think we will see some accumulating snow in places as these showers move through, especially if one comes after another. next week, starting with cold air in place but we will try to bring a less cold atla ntic we will try to bring a less cold atlantic weather system in but it may bring a risk of some snow. although atlantic systems may try to come in it looks like the cold air will always come back when they've moved through, keeping a cold theme. brief mild interludes with atlantic systems, some rain but a risk of
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snow but as they pull away, the cold air following on snow but as they pull away, the cold airfollowing on behind. next week, winter is coming although apparently it happens every year! it may not be breaking news... tonight at ten, celebrations into the night in zimbabwe after robert mugabe finally resigns as president after 37 years in power. tens of thousands of people poured into the streets after the man who'd had an iron grip on power was swept aside. i. i, robert mugabe... mugabe's resignation came as a complete surprise. his letter was read out in parliament. we're here right at the moment that they've heard that robert mugabe has resigned from the presidency. and you can hear it from zanu—pf mp5, from opposition mp5, from members of the public who've come here to witness what's happening. it happened as impeachment
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proceedings against 93—year—old mugabe were beginning after last week's military take over and days of protests.
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