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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 23, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello — this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. all the reaction to the budget — will the chancellor's boost for first—time buyers help the housing market? the uk economy will shrink more than expected — but phillip hammond says he's making britain fit for the future. he'lljoin us to tell us how. and steph is out—and—about throughout the morning — talking to businesses, workers and young voters to find out whether they feel that they're among the winners or losers. good morning — it's thursday 23rd november. also this morning, the christmas con — police warn shoppers to beware after an increase in fraud. why drinking three or four cups of coffee a day could be good for your health. and it's day one of the men's ashes series in australia. after all of the talk in the build
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up, it's england who've made the best start of the two teams in brisbane. and carol has the weather. with hats and snowfall across parts of scotla nd with hats and snowfall across parts of scotland overnight. —— we have had. and many of us, dry day with sunny spells but some ship —— showers around. still quite windy. i will have more in 15 minutes. first, our main story. conservative mps have rallied around the chancellor after his budget was overshadowed by a gloomier than expected forecast for economic growth. philip hammond had been under pressure from some sections of his party ahead of his speech but he announced extra money for the nhs, housebuilding and brexit. we'll get the latest analysis from our political correspondent eleanor garnier in westminster but first, we can hearfrom steph who's just around the corner in salford quays. steph what were the headlines from this budget? good morning to you. i think the first thing that came out of the speech from philip hammond is that
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it's gone from 2% to one and a half %, how growth. that might not sound like much but if you think about it, in money, it's about £20 billion. that is about half the money we spend. the other thing we heard about as well is the brexit bill, asked leading the european union. about £3 billion. we have already spent £700 million so far so this extra $3 billion —— £3 billion. extra measures the government wants to do to keep the economy going so we heard about. first time buyers won't have to pay stamp duty. that will make a substantial difference to people buying houses after that
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point. if they are buying them to the first time. we also heard about more houses being built. 300,000 extra new homes. what's different measures. some have gained but who's missed out? well, we didn't hear anything really about public sector pgy- anything really about public sector pay. yesterday, i was talking about that, saying there are 5 million people who work in the public sector. they would love to hear about wages going up more than inflation. for a long time, they have been facing a cut in real terms because the cost of living has been growing faster than their pay has. we didn't get anything on that. nurses and teachers disappointed. also, social care. a massive problem froze. certainly quite a few bits missing. i will be chatting to people here throughout the morning. we will hear from you throughout the
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morning. let's talk to our political correspondent‘s. eleanor, the chancellor was expected to be under some pressure but colleagues are rallying. he's managed to silence some of those critics, at least in the short—term, a bit like walking away from political danger. he is conservative colleagues verdict has been not massively glowing but not massively derogatory and damaging as well. it wasn't the radical reboot that some had hoped for but equally, not the disaster some had been fearing. there were cheers the vat cut in stamp duty. and the extra cash for the nhs. he seemed to stave offa cash for the nhs. he seemed to stave off a tory rebellion. also, that £3 billion for brexit. he seemed to appease some of his harshest critics. the labour party are saying
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there wasn't enough on social care oi’ wages there wasn't enough on social care or wages and don page. they say ordinary people are being left behind once again. those rather gloomy economic forecasts the growth in productivity suggest the country is going to be feeling poorer for longer. families and businesses will be feeling the pinch. philip hammond has managed to keep his fractured party onside for now that the future is certainly challenging. we will be talking to the chancellor, philip hammond, after that. and thenjohn mcdonald. an raf aircraft has landed in argentina for the first time since the falklands war to help search for a submarine missing in the south atlantic. there are concerns the crew could be
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running short on oxygen. the new leader of zimbabwe, emmerson mnangagwa has urged the country to unite. he will be sworn in tomorrow and has set that the country is experiencing a new democracy and he is helping to build the economy. more than 70 people had to be rescued overnight after flooding across lancashire. the fire service said it received more than 400 calls. 20 horses had become trapped and were evacuated. there are currently nine flood warnings in force across lancashire, and 18 in neighbouring cumbria. four flood warnings are in place in north wales. christmas shoppers are being urged not to rush into buying gifts from unknown sellers as new figures show victims lost nearly 16—million pounds to fraudsters last year. police have launched a campaign warning buyers that they could be playing into the hands of scammers in their attempts to snap up seasonal bargains. jon ironmonger reports. christmas is coming, which means,
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for many, the pressure is on to start shopping. in a big rush to buy presents, it not unusual to spend first and think second but police are warning of a sharp increase in shopping fraud over the christmas period. the fraud unit of city of london police says more than 15,000 victims across all age groups came forward to report crimes last year. from identity theft and card cloning to dodgy on line ads, costing shoppers a total of nearly £16 million. compare to this time last year, we've had a 25% increase in overall fraud and have also seen this year 65% increase in auction fraud, on line fraud and marketplace fraud. mobile phones continue to be the most likely products to be bought from fraudsters but clothing and footwear are high on the list as well. also make up, drones and fit
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but watches. the growing problem has prompted a police video campaign showing the many scams targeting christmas shoppers and what people can do to avoid them, like making sure a good deal is the real deal. jon ironmonger, bbc news in central london. home broadband providers must ensure that 50% of their customers can achieve advertised speeds at peak time under a crackdown on misleading claims. at the moment, firms are allowed to advertise "up to" speeds as long as they are available to a minimum of ten—percent of customers. the committee of advertising practice says it's toughening up standards, following research that showed upto three—quarters of households are paying for advertised broadband speeds they have never received. drinking three orfour drinking three or four cups of coffee a day may have some health benefits. research published in the british medicaljournal appeared to show a low risk of having a stroke and some cancers. a morning caffeine fix.
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for many of us, the only way to start the day. but it has long been debated whether that cup of coffee is good or bad for you. i think any more than two cups of coffee kind of accelerated the stress a bit more so i draw the line at two. i feel like most things are good in moderation and if you drink good coffee, then it should be good for your health. i can sometimes drink about six cups and then i can't sleep at night. so it's learning what that balance is. to try to find the answer, as doctors at the university of southampton sifted through 200 studies, looking at how coffee affects the body. they say the benefits of drinking 3—4 cups a day outweigh the risks for most people and could lead to a lower likelihood of developing heart disease, diabetes and some cancers. although pregnant women and those at risk of fractures are still advised to steer clear. and researchers say further studies are required before drinking coffee to fight disease can be
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recommended, not least because it's often accompanied by cream, sugary syrup or cake. you may dread bank holiday travel but do spare a thought to those in the united states were trying to get away for thanksgiving. have a look at these pictures. bumper—to—bumper gridlock. this is los angeles. 51 million americans —— americans made journeys away from home for today's celebrations. that does look grim. every year, i would imagine i am not going for eve ryo ne would imagine i am not going for everyone is coming to us. that is the trick. have the family come to you? how are we? we have a bit of a game on. have the family come to you? how are we? we have a bit of a game onm started, after all the talk. the australians have been ramping things up. they wanted to open up old
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wounds. they don't call it the gabba 12 to nothing. england have made it look like a playground. midnight? it will finish around seven a.m.. they are at tea at the moment. england are at tea at the moment. england a re two are at tea at the moment. england are two wickets down so far. they have had the best run of it so far this morning. despite losing an early wicket this morning. their second wicket fell just early wicket this morning. their second wicket felljust before tea. he moved fastest half—century. clean bowled at the pat cummins. the captain,joe bowled at the pat cummins. the captain, joe root, is at the crease. england going fairly well. last night, manchester united were made to wait to book their place in the next round of the champions league. an 89th minute goal from swiss side basel there. there was nothing
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romantic about celtic‘s trip to paris. they were hammered by psg. it is psg's largest win in the champions league. but chelsea after through —— but chelsea are through after a 4— mil victory over fk qarabag in azerbaijan last night. was it warm there? there was a bit of rain earlier. a bit of a surprise. things have picked up. slightly better than here. always better than here. carol can tell us. how are we doing? we've got it all ona how are we doing? we've got it all on a forecast today, naga, we have rain and wind and sunshine and over the next few days, it will turn much colder. from the north, for all of us. colder. from the north, for all of us. this morning, what we've got is still some snow. we are looking at
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the back edge of it now. that will tend to push away in the next few hours with a rush of showers coming in from behind. 0r northern ireland, some showers this morning. some showers coming in across northern england. we have been talking in the last few days about how mild it has been. this morning, we are looking at temperatures much lower than that as we watched the back edge of the rain move away from the south—east accompanied by gusty winds. today, it's going to be a windy day, not as windy as it was yesterday but a band of smallish showers moving across the central swathes of the uk and is still a rash of wintry showers with some rain, sleet and snow. look at the temperatures once again. three degrees in aberdeen. eight degrees in manchester. in the next couple of hours, temperatures in the south—east, around 14 celsius. the
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temperatures will be lower than 14 degrees. through this evening and overnight, we continue with some showers in the north. it's going to be cold. have also got a weather front introducing some rain. tonight, again, colder, particularly in the south. and that coles continues as we head through the weekend. denoted by the blue in the chart. right through the british isles. if we take a look at friday, we start off on a cold note. again, some frost around. a lot of dry weather and a lot of sunshine. the re m na nts of weather and a lot of sunshine. the remnants of the rain pushing into the south—east. again, a peppering of showers coming in, some of which will be wintry in nature, a mixture of rain, sleet and snow and temperatures by friday coming all the way down. by that time we get
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through tomorrow, it's going to be nine degrees. into the weekend, frosty nights. chilly wind. also some sunshine. still, those wintry showers across the north—west. 0n saturday, the pressure is to the north—east. some rain coming in across the north of scotland. also some showers, still blustery, still cold. a quick look at sunday shows that keen wind coming in from the north—west but is still a lot of dry weather but when we have a westerly wind, we are not immune to those showers. quite unsettled, turning colderfor all showers. quite unsettled, turning colder for all of showers. quite unsettled, turning colderfor all of us. you certainly did have everything as you promised. the main stories this morning: conservative mps have rallied around the chancellor despite his budget being overshadowed by gloomy future
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growth prospects for the uk. christmas shoppers beware. in warning from police after an increase in fraud. £16 million was lost last year to bogus gifts. not surprisingly, in today's papers, the budget. it is all over the front pages. examining whether philip hammond has given us a boost or not. the daily telegraph has 17 pages of coverage. at helping hand to first—time buyers. the abortion of stamp duty for first time buyers. philip hammond offered an optimistic vision for britain's future. 0n the front page of the daily mail, this is the story really leading all the papers, talking about the chancellor's delivery, but also picking up on the scene about first—time buyers. 1,000,001st—time buyers, they say, offered a lifeline. —— 1 million first—time buyers. interesting how the papers
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are taking different views. some people are saying it is effectively the end of austerity. 0thers people are saying it is effectively the end of austerity. others are just focusing on that gloomy economic forecast from the office of a jittery responsibility. we will be speaking city chancellor later on. yes, just after seven o'clock. the times has 20 pages of analysis. it says it is at the £5 billion giveaway. so what it has picked up on is that the economy, over the next five years, growth will be below 2%, housing for first—time buyers. an injection into the nhs. 2.8 early in pounds. in brexit, £3 billion, to prepare for the uk leaving the eu. 0n the front page of the mirror, thanks to nothing. they we re the mirror, thanks to nothing. they were looking for pay rises for the public sector, and they were not on offer. drawing attention to this story. front page of the mirror. jack maynard, you have probably
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heard this story about him withdrawing from vine they are excellent, in combination with old social media messages. —— i'm a celebrity. we will be discussing that, to what extent things that you put on social media many years ago should be held against you and you should be held against you and you should be held responsible for them as many as have passed. 0ne story on the sun. not leaving on the budget. it is taking a look at the killer of jamie bolger, saying thatjon ve na bles jamie bolger, saying thatjon venables is back in prison again after he was caught with child abuse images on his computerfor the second time. the 35—year—old was arrested last week, the sun says. john, what you have for us? i think this is a great story. the wigan forward who heard his wife had gone into labour, but decided to stay on the horsfield, as he endeavoured to try to score a hat—trick. he scored one, heard his wife had drawn into labour at half—time. he scored again, then he got a nod from his
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dad in the crowd saying, i think you need to get going. so he raced off to hospital and arrived in time. birds... was it pretty sharpish? yes, i think within half an hour he arrived in the baby was born. so he could have stayed and chased a hat—trick, but risked missing the birth of his child. you don't get those moments back. you don't. you are talking about a hat—trick? any others for us? well, you can always rely on the sun. united is the topic of barcelona last night, and that means they have not as yet secured their place in the knockout stage. —— united slipped up against barcelona. so what is the headline? basel faulty. and you will be keeping an eye on the scene in australia? yes, it was action are reining in brisbane. england have made a good start. this place is notoriously difficult to win in. australia have not lost a test at
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the gabba in years. you just don't wa nt to the gabba in years. you just don't want to lose. i wasjust looking at a couple of stories. riveted. i am. it isa a couple of stories. riveted. i am. it is a tiny story in the times, i wasn't sure what to make of it. your journey to work, commuters should wear protection to avoid going deaf. scientists claim that noise levels from public transport the same as a rock concert. the screeching of carriages? yeah. cyclists, pedestrians? i think they are talking about the tube. it is a study from toronto, they say that normal noise, trams and buses, that is safe. but the risk comes from loud bursts. i'm trying to think of what i have heard loud bursts. on the tube commute gabbro loud screeching noises. do you know what idid screeching noises. do you know what i did yesterday? this might surprise you to hear that i'm quite intolerant of people who make unnecessary noise on public trust bought. for example? without headphones? yes. i was on the tram,
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i could hear this beeping, there we re i could hear this beeping, there were people on their phones in the carriage, i was wondering why they hadn't turned it is silent. i got off and asked this gentleman, politely, if he would mind turning his phone on silent, and i realised it was actually the train. train was squeaking. and he was, like, fumbling around, very nice, and i realise it was the trains i had to apologise to him. since when did the noise of a train sound like... it was a beeping. a constant, annoying beeping. there you go. he was very nice. you can drive you crazy. commuter tales. although there may have been a slight easing of the purse strings, yesterday's budget didn't signal the end of austerity. leyla moran is from the liberal democrats, the party who was in coalition with the conservatives when the policy was introduced. good morning. in q4 your time. good morning. in q4 yourtime. ——
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thank you for your time. could you give us your take on what the chancellor said yesterday?” give us your take on what the chancellor said yesterday? i went into the chamber expecting to be underwhelmed, but i have to say, i just left disappointed. the fact that we have downgraded growth, the last time we saw figures this bad was 34 years ago. so for me, this just struck home how bad the situation is. the thing that is most worrying is how low productivity has gone. i think this morning people are waking up to their cornflakes and they are thinking, what is in it for me in this budget? u nfortu nately, for me in this budget? unfortunately, the answer is, not much. it is certainly not the end of austerity. when the policy was introduced, it. that was the way to balance the books by 2015. that has now been blown out of the water by brexit. beeping i cared about the most was education. where was this extra money? we have marches on parliament, parents coming together across the country, hoping for more
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money for schools. the public sector pay cap has not been lifted. as a result, the average teacher in this country, and started teacher, by 2020, will be about $3000 worse off. so, the liberal democrats, they are now saying that this is the time to spend on a major scale? it depends on what. firstly, the nhs, the story was that we are now spending more on this budget on brexit and preparing for this hard brexit and we are on the nhs, £3 billion versus £2.8 billion. what we have said is that we wa nt billion. what we have said is that we want to be honest with people about where the money from the nhs is coming from. we suggested a penny on the pound on income tax to do that, generating the $6 billion, more than the $4 billion the nhs wanted. the other thing we think we should be doing as a country, and there does seem to be some cross— party there does seem to be some cross—party support for this, is to borrow at very low rates at the moment to paper infrastructure projects, in particular housing. i'm sorry to say that the stamp duty gimmick that was introduced is just
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a gimmick. the obeah, the independent office for budgetary responsibility, says that will help rarely anybody. —— the 0br. three and a half thousand first—time home buyers or so, but what about everybody else, people who cannot save for a deposit? when wages are also stagnating, we know that wages will not catch up inflation for at least another four years. this will not catch up inflation for at least anotherfour years. this is not a budget, least anotherfour years. this is nota budget, i'm least anotherfour years. this is not a budget, i'm afraid to say, that we would have been proud of.“ i may, can i pick you up on a couple of things? housing is an important issue. a lot of people will reflect now, especially with the lib dems, that it now, especially with the lib dems, thatitis now, especially with the lib dems, that it is easy to sit on the sidelines and criticise. you are no longer part of a coalition government. not when you were part ofa government. not when you were part of a coalition government you didn't make those strides into curing the problems in housing that exist. and thatis problems in housing that exist. and that is partly why we are in the mess we are in now. successive governments have not been able to make any tangible difference. it is
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easy to be on the sidelines now and say that this is what he should be doing. you had your chance and it didn't change things for a generation of people. so, actually, i disagreed with a number of policies. i should i disagreed with a number of policies. ishould mention i disagreed with a number of policies. i should mention i was not a there, i was elected five months ago... iam a there, i was elected five months ago... i am not blaming you personally. but people are tired of political parties coming in and saying, this is what you should be doing, and when you have the chance, you didn't do it. this is why, even in coalition we were calling for this, on things like the nhs we need a long—term funding settlement that is cross—party. the same for brexit. this is one of the biggest issues. the underlying reason for this downgrade, by the way, worldwide, among similar nations, we are doing far, far worse than them, and the reason for why this downgrade has happened is brexit. and the mishandling, by the government, of the negotiations. yes, but my point is, ifi the negotiations. yes, but my point is, if i may say, my point is that on housing specifically, it helps if we talk about one particular thing,
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and on housing, you didn't build enough houses when you were in power. so, you know, you can say forever that you wanted to make more, but you didn't do it. that was then. this is now. that was a while ago. we also now have a situation where, the reason i keep mentioning brexit, we are in a different situation economic league. back then we desperately needed to balance the books after the mess that was created when labour left power, whether it was their fault or not, i know that is still under debate, nonetheless that is what we needed to do and that is what the country wa nted to do and that is what the country wanted us to do. now, seven years later, the situation has changed. what we are suggesting is that we borrow £100 billion to inject some lifeblood into the economy. that would create jobs. that lifeblood into the economy. that would createjobs. that would lifeblood into the economy. that would create jobs. that would create some supply into the housing market. if you are just going to fuel the buying, that isn't going to affect anything. it will raise house prices. it will make the matter worse. and now we are in a position
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so ourjob is to hold that government to account. we know what we suggested them, and certainly we we re we suggested them, and certainly we were on the side of saying, actually, we must make sure austerity doesn't bite the most vulnerable in society. 0ne bit of good news, ifi vulnerable in society. 0ne bit of good news, if i may, i know this is not usual for a politician, good news, if i may, i know this is not usualfor a politician, but good news, if i may, i know this is not usual for a politician, but i welcome what the chancellor has done on universal credit. it does show he is listening. local groups on it is not quite enough, but at least he is listening. thank you for your time this morning. that was to free mac from the lib dems, and will be speaking to chancellor philip hammond just past seven o'clock. —— that was leila moran. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning, steph‘s hosting her own breakfast just across the shipping canal to find out who are the winners and losers from the budget. it looks lovely and cosy there. not quite. hopefully you can see me. i am over here, about a couple of hundreds of yards away from our studios. i next to a yellow boat. hello. there you are. charlie and
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naga kuroda there in that building. we have come out here to talk to lots of people about their thoughts on the budget. we are not inspecting the economy to do as well as we originally thought. the chancellor has announced lots of different measures to try and get the economy moving a little bit more. there was an announcement around housing, building more houses, help for first—time buyers. also, money from education in terms of getting more maths teachers. lots of different things. we have lots of people here this morning. good morning. good morning. they will be giving us their reactions. we have another group here, eating croissants. it is a bit cold. they haven't warmed up yet. they certainly will by the time we are back with you. first, let's get the news can travel and weather where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara 0rchard. it is 600 days since nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was first imprisoned in iran. that's according to the campaign to free the londoner. she's been held in tehran since april 2016 after being accused
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of spying, charges she denies. it also means she become elligble for early release from her first sentence. the introduction of new thameslink rail services to ease north to south travel through central london has been delayed by up to a year. the new timetable of 24 trains an hour at peak times on the bedford to brighton line was meant to be in place by december 2018 but it has been put back. the national audit office said adequate arrangements hadn't yet been made to manage the launch of the new services. music legend engelbert humperdinck is celebrating his 50th year in showbiz, he is about to release his first album in over 10 years. the album is a love letter to his wife patricia, of 53 years, who is suffering from alzheimer's disease. written especially for her, and of course, my daughter wrote the duet, nine glad i'd danced with you. those
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other songs are really proud of. a lot of the songs on there, especially the title of the album, it depicts exactly what a man thinks about his or her better half. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is a partial closure on the london 0verground there is a partial closure on the london 0verg round at there is a partial closure on the london 0verground at the moment. 0n the trains, greater anglia services in and out of liverpool street by southminster and whitford are running at reduced speeds thanks to poor rail conditions. 0n the roads, northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is also slow from blackwall lane. the a13 is building westbound, handing out of dagenham into barking. and at dewsbury park, seven sisters rd is closed southbound from blackstock road defence breitbart station for emergency waterworks. diversions are in place. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth ritzzini. good morning. it was a wet and squally night, with gusts of wind across the london area of 40— 50
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miles an hour. still rather windy today. a particularly windy start, in fact. that rain has now pushed its waste. a fewjigs and drive through the morning rush—hour, very early on. —— dribs and drabs. it should stay dry for most of the day and there will be some sunshine around as well. we are seeing today's eyes to purchase through this morning and then they will gradually drop. —— highest temperatures. 9— 12 celsius, still rather windy but not unpleasant. lots of sunshine through the day and we should stay dry, or mostly dry, with the smallest of one or two showers in western areas as we head towards end of the day. for the first half of the night, it should stay dry, but we will see more cloud edging up from the south and we may well get some rain in southern areas as well. some of that could possibly be quite heavy. the further north you are, the less likely you are to see this rain. and the colder it is likely to be as well. in fact, we are entering much cooler as we head into tomorrow. and much drier day. we will see some brightness and sunshine around, dealing cold over
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the weekend, but there will be some sunshine, staying quite windy. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello — this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: he was a chancellor under pressure to deliver — so did he? we'll speak to philip hammond just after seven -- 7:00. and also this morning. are you addicted to twitter, like posting your nights out on facebook? we'll hear how social media can affect your chance of getting a job. and the astronaut who came back from a year in space younger than his identical twin. good morning. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: conservative mps have rallied around the chancellor after it was
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overshadowed by a gloomier than expected forecast. a series of spending and tax measures amounting to £25 billion were announced. he'd been under pressure from party collea g u es been under pressure from party colleagues but providing extra money for the nhs, housebuilding and brea ks for the nhs, housebuilding and breaks it helped. but critics say he failed to address the squeeze on household incomes. more than 70 people had to be rescued in lancashire. people in lancaster and morecambe were among those affected. the fire service said it received more than 400 calls and even helped evacuate 20 horses that had become trapped. there are currently nine flood warnings in force across lancashire, and 18 in neighbouring cumbria. four flood warnings are in place in north wales. maggie wilde is on the outskirts of lancaster. i came home, i thought was pretty high, still going to keep raining all night. started moving some stuff out of the way and it came in faster and faster and came toa
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came in faster and faster and came to a point where we were bucketing about, it came a point where it was bucket versus river and the river one. it's now like this. i lifted as much as i can from the ground floor but there are bikes down there, my cooker has gone, my boiler, my dishwasher, everything. an raf aircraft has landed in argentina for the first time since the falklands war to help search for a submarine missing in the south atlantic. the argentine navy says the mission to find the sanjuan has reached a "critical phase". there are concerns that the 44 crew on board could be running low on oxygen. police have launched a campaign warning buyers of a christmas that they could be falling into the hands of scammers. they say on line auction and marketplace fraud has increased by 65% compared to this time last year. home broadband providers must soon
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ensure that at least 50% of their customers can achieve advertised speeds at peak time, under a crackdown to prevent misleading claims. at the moment, firms are allowed to advertise "up to" speeds as long as they are available to a minimum of ten—percent of customers. the committee of advertising practice says it's toughening up standards, following research that showed upto three—quarters of households are paying for advertised broadband speeds they have never received. —— up to. light pollution from lamp posts, buildings and cars is getting work than scientists are worried about the health effects. satellite images show the planets‘s artificially lit area has grown by more than 2% each year since 2012. as the sun goes down on towns and cities, the lights go on. and those lights are getting brighter all the time. these images, gathered by a sensor on a nasa satellite show that more and more of our planet is now artificially lit. in developing nations, including india, the increase was dramatic.
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from this in 2012 to this in 2016. the researchers expected that most developed nations would actually darken as they changed the type of street lighting they use from older orange glaring lamps to more energy—efficient led bulbs. but that hasn't happened. urban bright spots in the uk and other nations in europe continue to glow even more intensely as towns and cities increased their outdoor lighting. that orangey glow in the sky above the city is all too familiar to so many of us. it stops many of us from seeing a natural night sky. it also has an impact on our health. night—time light can interrupt our sleep patterns. in the environment, it can disrupt cues that nocturnal animals like bats rely on. it has even been found to shift some fundamental seasonal clockwork, influencing the timing of plant flowering and bird migration. scientists say that images like these are evidence we are losing our natural nighttime.
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time to talk sport and time to talk ashes. if you are waking up this morning and thinking how it is going, better—than—expected, especially if you stayed up late la st especially if you stayed up late last night. england were 2/1 at one point which wasn't too rosy. if you decided to turn up your phone, waking up now, it is looking a lot better. 0n the opening day, it is good going. sleeping? that would be foolish at this time of day. australia got off to the better start. alistair cooke was caught behind by mitchell starc. england we re behind by mitchell starc. england were a little worried it that point. james spence helped england recover.
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great work from him. mark sturman was also the second wicket to fall before tea. —— mark stoneman. they are into the last session of the day in brisbane. let us look at how things are shaping up. some fans have been in the company of that special little earn this morning, enjoying a sleepover at the home of english cricket at lords. very good, very good. to get through with a loss of one wicket, i think we are ahead. that session was certainly one to the purists but it's the start that england would have ta ken at it's the start that england would have taken at the start of the day,
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pershore. 0n quite a big cricket fan. i've been out to watch the ashes in australia about series actually so coming here has made the not going —— made up not going this time. really good opportunity to come down to lords, a long way from where we live, we don't get the chance very often. it's good here because every time —— every time something interesting happens, people go... if you are nodding off, you've got to wake up.|j people go... if you are nodding off, you've got to wake up. i love cricket. i always loved cricket. this is a once—in—a—lifetime opportunity to come here. and what better venue for us to take on the old enemy? and that is what it's all about, that little earn. they were camping out. why not do it at the home of english cricket at lords? they enjoyed themselves. we will be
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speaking to the former england cricketer matthew hoggard who was watching alongside them. united needed a point to go through but the hosts grabbed the winner in the 89th minute. their fate wikll be decided in their final group game. i think we play a match like this ten times and out of nine, we win co mforta bly ten times and out of nine, we win comfortably and the one was not. i came here a few years ago with chelsea and we lost 1— nil in the last minute but in that match, i don't think we had one shot on target, we played really bad. today was not the case. no such problems for chelsea. they beat qarabag 4— nil. celtic opened
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the scoring against paris st germain and if you thought there was an upset on the cards, you would be wrong. 7—1, they lost. dani alves with the pick of their goals. and you wonder if we are looking at the champions after a performance like that. your professional pride are certain people don't watch the game to see a score like that, 7—1, and what i can ta ke score like that, 7—1, and what i can take from the game is enough positive moments and i can say we have been together now for a period of time and i'm realistic enough and humble enough, you have to be honest when you lose and then you move on to your next game. george north is making return home after being dashed into the season after being dashed into the season after a contract with the welsh rugby union. it's not decided which region he will play for but it
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brings to the end his time at northampton. johanna konta could turn to maria sharapova's former coach in a bid to revive herfortunes. five consecutive defeats saw her miss out on the wta finals in singapore, and could turn to the american michaeljoyce. in their time together, they won two grand slam titles and sharapova became the world number one. you can see why konta wants to tap into that experience and of the relationship is anything to go pie __ go relationship is anything to go pie —— go by, it could be successful. would you love a cup of copy? i would. ijust drink one in the morning. you are very disciplined. i try to be. if you have your second or third, there is some good news. scientists from the university of southampton found drinking three above got a long day, i can
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sometimes maybe drink about six cups and then i can't sleep at night so it is learning what that balances.|j it is learning what that balances.” work in quite a stressful environment. i think any more than two cups of copy kind of accelerates the stress a little bit more so i draw the line at two. i feel like most things are good in moderation and if you drink good copy, it should be good your help and it depends exactly what you put in your copy. if you put a lot of syrups and extra shots, it is not going to be as healthy. it's a kind of caffei nated as healthy. it's a kind of caffeinated crutch for some to get through the day really. it keeps you alert, it keeps you awake, it tastes nice. dr robin poole from the university of southampton is the lead researcher and hejoins us now. many will be quite pleased by these findings because you hear more often than not that you should steer clear. the important message from
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our findings clear. the important message from ourfindings are clear. the important message from our findings are that people already enjoying mordey —— moderate copy drinking, around 3—4 cups, can be fairly reassured that it's more likely to benefit their health than to be harming it but the important thing is, we can't say people who don't think any coffee should stop, nor should people try to reach a certain target. it's people who are already drinking coffee. we can't extrapolate on findings to give specific coffee drinking advice. what are existing drinkers benefiting from? existing copy -- coffee drinkers are benefiting from a lower risk of a number of conditions. it would be a lower risk of dying from any cause, heart disease or developing heart disease, there is a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, gallstones, doubt, a number of neurological conditions that one of the strongest conditions we found
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was associated in a number of chronic liver diseases such as fibrosis, cirrhosis and cancer of the liver. why? that's a very good question. there are lots of biological reasons why it coffee might be good for and especially for the liver. caffeine can have some benefits to the way liver cells put down collagen in some of those conditions. it reduces the risk of fibrosis. it's also full of antioxidants. some of that effect will be responsible for some of the things we found. how can you measure what is a good amount for a person to have. ——? three orfour cups, how many shots, how strong, instant or fresh? i think you've hit the nail on the head. difficult to accurately classify copy consumption and most of the studies included in the review, we brought together 200 meta—analyses and a number of
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different studies and each would have captured copy drinking in different ways and a lot of detail was missing from the type of copy people are drinking, even the size of cup. there is no standard measure. we have to remember that. but more importantly, the necessary cup size, most of the research we brought together comes from observational studies and those at risk of other factors that are associated with drinking copy and possibly associated with the outcome we are looking at which is why we can't give actual advice this doctrine can copy or reach certain targets because these findings would still be potentially caused by other factors. so, you cannot give advice from the research, my understanding is that his observational, not concrete evidence. is that what you are saying? that's right, we can not say there
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is causation. there are associations, but we need more trials. at the university of southampton, in our academic unit, we are southampton, in our academic unit, we a re interested southampton, in our academic unit, we are interested in these liver diseases. 0ur we are interested in these liver diseases. our plan in the to a randomised control trial to see if coffey given as a treatment can beneficially affect those conditions and reduce the risk of them progressing. thank you to speaking to this morning. nobody wants a big cup of coffee. i don't like those big cups of coffee. you don't want a huge one. a bucket. but you do want a substantial cup. what do you think, carol?” but you do want a substantial cup. what do you think, carol? i think the bigger, the better. i love a big mug of coffee in the morning. four ina day, mug of coffee in the morning. four in a day, i can have for making now, which i know isn't good view, but it keeps me awake. today is a colder start to the day. we have seen temperatures drop a good 5— eight celsius. as we go through the next
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few days, for everybody it will be turning colder. across east anglia and the south—east the temperature is currently between 11 and 13 degrees. that will be going down in the next few hours. at the moment there is no across eastern parts of aberdeenshire, moving away, leaving behind ita aberdeenshire, moving away, leaving behind it a cold start the day with a peppering of wintry showers. northern ireland will also have a cold start, colder than yesterday. a fair few showers around. we also have showers crossing the pennines of northern england. south are more dry weather. lots of sunshine. most of us feeling colder than we were this time yesterday. apart from the south—east. when we lose the rain and the windy conditions from the south—east this morning, what you will find is that the temperature will find is that the temperature will go down. lots of dry weather around. lots of sunshine. through the day we will see squally showers moving across north wales and northern england. wintry in the hills. today, generally, it is going to bea hills. today, generally, it is going to be a windy day, just not quite as windy as yesterday. look at is temperatures. three degrees will be the top temperature in aberdeen this
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afternoon. eight degrees in manchester. currently13— afternoon. eight degrees in manchester. currently 13— 14 in the south—east. that will be going down to about ten or 11 degrees. as we had on through the evening and overnight, we have got pressure not to far from the south. there is a weather front taking a swipe at southern counties, introducing rain. lots of clear skies. it will be a cold night, colder than the one just gone. again, a peppering of entry showers across the north and the west. there is the risk of ice on untreated surfaces. it will also be a frosty night, more or less, across the board. the cold theme continues as we have driven rest of the weekend. the blue indicates weather colder is likely to be. you can see that it colder is likely to be. you can see thatitis colder is likely to be. you can see that it is across the whole of the uk, but also across northern ireland western parts of europe as well. as western parts of europe as well. as we head through tomorrow, at that frosty start, we see the remnants of the rain clearing away from the south—east. lots of dry weather, lots of sunshine. not quite as windy, but it is a westerly wind. so with the westerly wind, you will find lots of showers being blown in across western areas, and again,
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some of those will be wintry. it is go to feel cold. as for the weekend, we are looking at frosty nights and chilly winds. there will be some sunshine. we will also see some wintry showers coming in across the north—west as well. carol, thank you. go and have another really big cup of coffee. charlie isjust jealous because he hasn't had one yet. it is on the way. carol, thank you. the budget‘s gained mixed reaction across the headlines today and from you watching at home. we've sent steph out to throw something of a budget breakfastjust round the corner from the studio, with a panel of experts, charities, students and businesses. good morning. good morning. you guys arejust a good morning. good morning. you guys are just a couple of 100 yards away over there, in that building, in the warm. iam over there, in that building, in the warm. i am outside lots of people that we want to talk to. we are getting their reaction to the budget. about the different policies
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being announced, and the chancellor's thoughts on the economy. let's find out what people think about it. we got lots of guests think about it. we got lots of gu ests to think about it. we got lots of guests to talk to about it. that morning, lucy. you are a nurse. you're an intensive—care nurse. tell us what you thought of the budget. well, it is really disappointing not to hear that we are going to have our pay increase at all at this point, because we've been campaigning all summer and we have a pay cap and stood it in —— since 2010, rising costs of living like everybody else, and nursesjust 2010, rising costs of living like everybody else, and nurses just work in the public sector, obviously. so, it is under review, but it is the fa ct it is under review, but it is the fact that you still don't know yet? yes. at the moment we are reaching a crisis point in nursing wear more nurses are leaving then entering the profession. and from my experience and many other people's experiences, that i have talked to, i think people are leaving, thinking about leaving, they are feeling completely burned out and it isn't worth it.
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they just burned out and it isn't worth it. theyjust can't burned out and it isn't worth it. they just can't live burned out and it isn't worth it. theyjust can't live on that wage. what is life like you? it is stressful, very stressful. the job, every single moment of the shift, and the shifts are 12 hours, you need to be completely focused. you are doing so many things throughout the shift. your multitasking the whole time. you canjust sit back. you cannot sit on your laurels and expect to be more per. —— be productive. this is whatjeremy hunt is asking, for a pay increase, to wa nt is asking, for a pay increase, to want a pay increase. it isjust insulting. the reality is, i know nurses who are going off live real stress problems and not to pay for their families. yeah. and in terms of your cost of living, have you really felt the fact that you haven't had your pay go up as much as we have seen the cost of living go up? yeah, absolutely. our wages are static. i'm 33 years old and
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renting in london. i don't know i will be able to even begin to think about putting a deposit on a house. let alone start a family. it is just... it is quite depressing, really, to think we are in a profession, a graduate profession, thatis profession, a graduate profession, that is so skilled and so needed. yeah. that people are feeling like that. we will be speaking to the chancellor later. what would you ask him, if you had the chance? what i wa nt him, if you had the chance? what i want to ask is, is he prepared to push nurses to strike? because what lam hearing push nurses to strike? because what i am hearing right now is that more and more nurses are feeling that that has got to be an option that we consider now, because we are really pushed into a corner. we need action. we need something to change. we will put that to him when he is on the programme later. i'm going to bring richard in, we heard lisa about first—time buyers, not eating able to afford a home. you are in a similar position as a first—time buyer. there was the announcement
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yesterday from the chancellor about damp duty being axed by houses up to £3000. what do you make about that? you cannot grumble at anything being given to you. i think it is great. stamp duty up to £300,000, i think, if he is looking at young people getting on the market, £300,000 is a massive figure that young people do not consider. certainly most first—time buyers. £300,000 would be well out of their budget. if i could ask, how will buy you, and have you been saving up for a long time for a house? i'm 26 years old. i've been trying to save, but with rent prices as high as they are, and as unfair as high as they are, and as unfair as they are, it becomes physically impossible to be able to save anywhere near the sort of money you are looking at. what would you want to ask the chancellor? what else can you do to help? what other policies could you bring in? because getting rid of stamp duty, although it is
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good, it is minute in comparison to what you need. let me bring in helen, from the joseph what you need. let me bring in helen, from thejoseph rowntree foundation. we have very specific views about this, but what will your thoughts on the budget?” views about this, but what will your thoughts on the budget? i would agree it was very disappointing. there are millions of families struggling with the rising cost of living, falling real wages, and a freeze on working age but it is and tax credits. yesterday was a chance for the chancellor to ease the pressure, but sadly he didn't really ta ke pressure, but sadly he didn't really take that chance. his big spending commitments were tax cuts, which mainly benefit the richest half of the country, and stamp duty, which benefits people who are already in a position to be able to buy. there was not a commitment to more truly affordable housing, and he didn't ease the freeze on benefits and tax credits, which for many working people is making it incredibly hard just to get to the end of the month. interesting. we will put your questions to the chancellor when he is here later this morning. we will also be getting lots more thoughts
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as well from other people here. lots of different situations, because of course the budget effects are many people in different ways. more from me later on. you can explore the impact of today's budget on households by going to our budget calculator. just go to bbc.co.uk/budget and follow the links. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning. it's one of the most talked about films of the year. the florida project explores hidden homelessness in the shadow of disneyland. director sean baker will be herejust after 9:00. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara 0rchard. it is 600 days since nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was first imprisoned in iran. that's according to the campaign to free the londoner. she's been held in tehran since april 2016 after being accused of spying, charges she denies. it also means she become elligble for early release from her first sentence.
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the introduction of new thameslink rail services to ease north to south travel through central london has been delayed by up to a year. the new timetable of 24 trains an hour at peak times on the bedford to brighton line was meant to be in place by december 2018 but it has been put back. the national audit office said adequate arrangements hadn't yet been made to manage the launch of the new services. music legend engelbert humperdinck is celebrating his 50th year in showbiz, he is about to release his first album in over 10 years. the album is a love letter to his wife patricia, of 53 years, who is suffering from alzheimer's disease. just like the first time was written especially for her, and of course, my daughter wrote the duet, i'm glad i danced with you. those are the songs i'm really proud of. a lot of the songs on there, especially the title of the album, it depicts exactly what a man thinks about his or her better half. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is a partial closure on the london 0verground at the moment. 0n the trains, greater anglia services in and out of liverpool street by southminster
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and whitford are running at reduced speeds thanks to poor rail conditions. 0n the roads, northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is also slow from blackwall lane. the a13 is building westbound, handing out of dagenham into barking. and at dewsbury park, seven sisters rd is closed southbound from blackstock road defence breitbart station for emergency waterworks. diversions are in place. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth ritzzini. good morning. it was a wet and squally night, with gusts of wind across the london area of 40—50 miles an hour. still rather windy today. a particularly windy start, in fact. that rain has now pushed away. a few dribs and drabs through the morning rush hour, very early on. it should stay dry for most of the day and there will be some sunshine around as well. we are seeing today's highest temperatures through this morning and then they will gradually drop. 9—12 celsius, still rather windy but not unpleasant. lots of sunshine through the day and we should stay dry, or mostly dry, with the smallest
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of one or two showers in western areas as we head towards end of the day. for the first half of the night, it should stay dry, but we will see more cloud edging up from the south and we may well get some rain in southern areas as well. some of that could possibly be quite heavy. the further north you are, the less likely you are to see this rain. and the colder it is likely to be as well. in fact, we are entering much cooler as we head into tomorrow. and much drier day. we will see some brightness and sunshine around, dealing cold over the weekend, but there will be some sunshine, staying quite windy. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello — this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. all the reaction to the budget — will the chancellor's boost for first—time buyers help the housing market? the uk economy will shrink more than expected — but phillip hammond says he's making britain fit for the future. he'lljoin us to tell us how
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in the next few minutes. and steph is out—and—about throughout the morning — talking to businesses, workers and young voters to find out good morning — it's thursday 23rd november. also this morning, the christmas con — police warn shoppers to beware after an increase in fraud. why drinking three or four cups of coffee a day could be good for your health. and its day one of the men's ashes series in australia. and carol has the weather. a cold start to the day. some sunshine. and we are looking at
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some blustery showers, some of which will be wintry. more details soon. first, our main story. conservative mps have rallied around the chancellor after his budget was overshadowed by a gloomier than expected forecast for economic growth. philip hammond had been under pressure from some sections of his party ahead of his speech but he announced extra money for the nhs, housebuilding and brexit. we'll get the latest analysis from our political correspondent eleanor garnier in westminster but first, we can hearfrom steph who's just around the corner in salford quays. steph what were the headlines from this budget? good morning to you. i think the first thing that came out of the speech —— he's not expecting it to grow as fast as it is done. it is down from 296 fast as it is done. it is down from
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2% toi.5% fast as it is done. it is down from 2% to 1.5% which might not sound like much but that works out about £20 billion less for the economy than we originally thought. that is about half of the money we spend on education. that was a big number to come out. also interesting, the brexit bill bigger. the £3 billion which will be set aside to pay for leaving the european union. we gave at $700 million has been spent. that extra £3 billion, in case more money is needed. to try to keep the economy going and help people, a number of measurement —— measures announced. example, increasing the number of houses we build to 300,000 a year. about £44 billion. also helpful first time buyers. a year. about £44 billion. also helpfulfirst time buyers. a a year. about £44 billion. also helpful first time buyers. a cutting of stamp duty that anyone buying now
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home to the first time. lots of different measures. talking to people throughout the morning about whether it will make a difference to their lives. some people could benefit but there were some losers. their work. a number of things we didn't hear anything about. public sector pay. about 5 million people who work in the public sector. nurses, teachers, lots of people working in really importantjobs that we need. we didn't hear anything about benefits of social care. we know that is a massive problem. schools as well. a bit of money for more maths teachers. but not the money that head teachers have been asking for. we will be finding out what people think about that little bit later. let us go to eleanor. budgets are about what it
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feels like an people's pockets. it can be opportunity to make political statements. what do we read? yesterday, we were talking about philip hammond's job being yesterday, we were talking about philip hammond'sjob being on the line. but he has managed to silence most of his critics. the verdict from some of his conservative collea g u es from some of his conservative colleagues has been neither massively glowing or massively disparaging. it certainly wasn't that radical reboot some in the party had been hoping for. neither was it that disaster that some had been fearing. there were cheers that stamp duty cut. also that extra cash in the nhs. he seemed to stave off a potential rebellion. it is also managed to appease some of his harshest critics. those conservative brexit here's. by putting those £3
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billion aside by preparing the brexit. labour has said not enough was done on social care or wages. they are saying ordinary people's misery will be continuing and with those gloomy economic forecasts for growth and productivity, the country is going to be feeling poorer for longer. the chancellor has managed to keep the fractured conservative party on his side but the feature is challenging. we will be speaking to the chancellor in about ten minutes. an raf aircraft has landed in argentina for the first time since the falklands war to help search for a submarine missing in the south atlantic. the argentinian navy says the mission has reached a critical phase. there are concerns the crew could be running short on oxygen. the new leader of zimbabwe, emmerson mnangagwa has urged the country to unite. he will be sworn in tomorrow and has
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set that the country is experiencing a new democracy and he is helping to build the economy. more than 70 people had to be rescued overnight after flooding across lancashire. the fire service said it received more than 400 calls. 400 calls were received. 20 horses had become trapped and were evacuated. there are currently nine flood warnings in force across lancashire, and 18 in neighbouring cumbria. four flood warnings are in place in north wales. we came home, thought nothing of it. let's start moving some stuff out of the way. it just let's start moving some stuff out of the way. itjust came in faster and faster and faster and there came a point where we were bucketing it out, bailing it out. we had pumps going. there came a point where it
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was buckets versus river and the river one. it is now like this. i've lifted as much as i can from the ground floor but there are bikes down there. the cooker has gone, the boiler, the dishwasher, everything. christmas shoppers are being urged not to rush into buying gifts from unknown sellers as new figures show victims lost nearly £16 million pounds to fraudsters last year. police have launched a campaign warning buyers that they could be playing into the hands of scammers in their attempts to snap up seasonal bargains. jon ironmonger reports. christmas is coming, which means, for many, the pressure is on to start shopping. in the big rush to buy presents, it's not unusual to spend first and think second but police are warning of a sharp increase in shopping fraud over the christmas period. the fraud unit of city of london police says more than 15,000 victims across all age groups came forward to report crimes last year, from identity theft and card cloning to dodgy online ads, costing shoppers a total of nearly £16 million. compared to this time last year,
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we've had a 25% increase in overall fraud and have also seen this year a 65% increase in auction fraud, online fraud and marketplace fraud. mobile phones continue to be the most likely products to be bought from fraudsters but clothing and footwear are high on the list too, as well as make—up, drones and fitbit watches. the growing problem has prompted a police video campaign showing the many scams targeting christmas shoppers and what people can do to avoid them, like making sure a good deal is the real deal. jon ironmonger, bbc news in central london. home broadband providers must ensure that 50% of their customers can achieve advertised speeds at peak time under a crackdown on misleading claims. at the moment, firms are allowed
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to advertise "up to" speeds as long as they are available to a minimum of ten—percent of customers. the committee of advertising practice says it's toughening up standards, following research that showed upto three—quarters of households are paying for advertised broadband speeds they have never received. drinking three or four cups of coffee a day may have some health benefits. research published in the british medicaljournal appeared to show a low risk of having a stroke and some cancers. a morning caffeine fix. for many of us, the only way to start the day. but it has long been debated whether that cup of coffee is good or bad for you. i think any more than two cups of coffee kind of accelerates the stress a bit more so i draw the line at two. i feel like most things are good in moderation and if you drink
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good coffee, then it should be good for your health. to try to find the answer, doctors at the university of southampton sifted through 200 studies, looking at how coffee affects the body. they say the benefits of drinking 3—4 cups a day outweigh the risks for most people and could lead to a lower likelihood of developing heart disease, diabetes and some cancers. although pregnant women and those at risk of fractures are still advised to steer clear. and researchers say further studies are required before drinking coffee to fight disease can be recommended, not least because it's an important point is that we can't see anybody who should start thinking copy or should try to reach a certain target. and researchers say further studies are required before drinking coffee to fight disease can be recommended, not least because it's often accompanied by cream, sugary syrup or cake.
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light pollution from lamp posts, buildings and cars is getting work than scientists are worried about the health effects. satellite images show the planets‘s artificially lit area has grown by more than 2% each year since 2012. as the sun goes down on towns and cities, the lights go on. and those lights are getting brighter all the time. these images, gathered by a sensor on a nasa satellite show that more and more of our planet is now artificially lit. in developing nations, including india, the increase was dramatic. from this in 2012 to this in 2016. the researchers expected that most developed nations would actually darken as they changed the type of street lighting they use from older orange glaring lamps to more energy—efficient led bulbs. but that hasn't happened. urban bright spots in the uk
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and other nations in europe continue to glow even more intensely as towns and cities increased their outdoor lighting. that orangey glow in the sky above the city is all too familiar to so many of us. it stops many of us from seeing a natural night sky. it also has an impact on our health. night—time light can interrupt our sleep patterns. in the environment, it can disrupt cues that nocturnal animals like bats rely on. it has even been found to shift some fundamental seasonal clockwork, influencing the timing of plant flowering and bird migration. scientists say that images like these are evidence we are losing our natural night—time. let's go back to our lead story. we are talking about yesterday's budget. we speak to the chancellor injust the moment budget. we speak to the chancellor in just the moment but some of the front pages this morning. the
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financial times. that is about what many people are calling the gloomy economic forecast for growth which has changed quite dramatically. the mail has picked up on the word gloomy, saying these to dub him eeyore but after its optimism, they say they rescind the nickname. the daily telegraph, picking up on specific issues. stamp duty on one of the announcements in the budget yesterday. the times is saying that philip hammond is easing off all spirited. and that a page of the daily mirror, thanks for nothing. for an attention to know pay rises to the public sector. a pretty grim review from the daily newspaper. we can speak to the daily newspaper. we can speak to the chancellor who joins us from leeds. thank you for your time this morning. the last paper we saw, thanks for nothing. the overall
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feeling we get. people don't feel that got as much as they wanted. the daily will never thank a conservative chancellor for anything we do. what we've delivered yesterday is a package for britain. it isa yesterday is a package for britain. it is a package for families who are feeling the pressure on household budgets with big pay rises the people on minimum wage at national living wage, big increases in the amount you can earn before you start paying income tax more money for the national health service and the cut in stamp duty and of the package to get house building again. the nhs. 0ur get house building again. the nhs. our business correspondence is out and about talking to people today about how they feel the budget is going to affect their income and expenditure. we spoke to lucy, who is 33 and a nurse. she says she is
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desperate. she says her and her collea g u es desperate. she says her and her colleagues are considering strike action because morale is so low. he says she feels pushed into a corner and asa says she feels pushed into a corner and as a result of no pay rise and no prospect, she has no deposit for a house, let alone to start a family. she feels statement in life because of the way the economy is and there have been no significant pay rises for public sector workers like her. let me first of all tell you the facts. last year, nurses on average received pay rises of 3.3% across the board. some got more, somewhat less but we have removed the old blankets pay from the public sector and what we are doing across the board is looking at individual workforces, looking at recruited —— recruitment and retention. the health secretary is in negotiation with the health unions about a new
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pay structure and i said yesterday that if those negotiations are successful, and out of them comes a multi— new pay deal, we will find that over and above the announcement made yesterday about additional money for the nhs. that means that nurses pay rises will not be further pressure on the nhs, they will be taken care pressure on the nhs, they will be ta ken care of pressure on the nhs, they will be taken care of separately. you have announced the abolition of stamp duty on first—time homebuyers on homes up to £300,000 in england and wales, as well as plans to build more houses as well. we spoke to richard, a 26—year—old, who says that at the moment rent is so high he cannot actually even think about saving for a house, let alone a property that costs £3000. he says thatis property that costs £3000. he says that is way out of reach for most first—time homebuyers. that is way out of reach for most first-time homebuyers. well, the average first—time homebuyer price
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is below £300,000. that is absolutely right. if somebody buys a property to less than £300,000 they will pay no stamp duty on it, and i think that is a very helpful additional incentive to people who are saving up to buy a property. when you buy your first time you need to kuwait quite a bit of cash to pay for the deposit, to pay for the stamp duty on the legal fees. —— accumulate quite a bit. hopefully, by abolishing stamp duty, which will save the average first—time homebuyer about £1700, that will be a help and an incentive to focus on getting the deposit together, getting the deposit together, getting the deposit together, getting the money together, to get on the housing ladder. and we hope that many more young people will be able to get on the housing ladder. the office the budgetary response abilities is because of this decision to scrap stamp duty, who will do that? 0nly decision to scrap stamp duty, who will do that? only an extra 3500 homes will be sold. is it worth it? well, the office for budgetary responsibility looked at a particular, narrow question. if you
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reduce stamp duty and don't do anything else, what happens? but we haven't done nothing else. we have introduced a very big package, £15 billion of extra money going in on top of the billions that were already being spent on housing. that will increase the number of houses that we build in this country. so that we build in this country. so thatis that we build in this country. so that is not the situation that we will have. we will have many more homes available. the important thing here is that over the next five yea rs, here is that over the next five yea rs , over here is that over the next five years, over the life of this parliament, 1,000,001st—time home buyers will make an average saving of just buyers will make an average saving ofjust under £1700 when they buy their first ofjust under £1700 when they buy theirfirst time. i think ofjust under £1700 when they buy their first time. i think that is a good news story. let's talk about growth in the uk economy. it has been downgraded for the next five yea rs. been downgraded for the next five years. surely you cannot pack yourself on the back about that. what the office for budgetary responsibility did yesterday was acknowledged forecasts they've been using for the last eight years, showing proactivity growth returning to about 2%, were overoptimistic.
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throughout that period we never actually achieved that level and now they have reset their forecast for they have reset their forecast for the coming years. that feeds through into a lower forecast of growth. the challenge for us as a nation is to prove them wrong. the challenge for us is to deliver that higher productivity that will feed through into higher economic growth, and it is about training our workforce with more skills, it is about investing more skills, it is about investing more capital in our businesses, it is about building more infrastructure, more roads, more railways, and of course it is about ensuring that we have business confidence so that businesses will invest. that means getting more certainty about what our future relationship with the european union is going to look like, which we hope we will be able to do very soon. it means getting consumers feeling more confident about the future so that they go out and spend. all these things we have to do over the coming months and years, and get those forecasts upgraded again. that is the challenge ahead of us.”
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forecasts upgraded again. that is the challenge ahead of us. i don't understand how you can say proactivity is going to help you through, or help the uk through, in terms of economic growth, when you cannot guarantee stability and cannot guarantee stability and cannot guarantee stability and cannot guarantee productivity, one we have no idea what the outcome of brexit is going to be. well, productivity is about the skills that we deploy, the capital that we deploy, making sure that our productivity feeds back through into the growth numbers. you are right that underpinned in all of this, there is a sense of confidence and certainty about the future. of course, we always understood that as we went through this process of negotiation with the european union, there would be some uncertainty about the outcome. when you are in a negotiation, you never know exactly what the outcome is going to be. as we move forward into 2018, i hope we will get increasing clarity about how these negotiations are going to move forward, and an increasing
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sense of what we are doing with brexit, and as we get that sense of clarity and sense of movement, i think confidence will return, certainty about the future will return, businesses will start investing, consumers will start buying big—ticket consumer items against on and that will help get our economy growing faster again. against on and that will help get our economy growing faster againm what do you say to the gas we spoke to earlier, lucy and richmond —— richard, who feel that they are stuck in limbo at the moment? just wait and see? what we are trying to do is create opportunities for young people for the future. there are lots of strong fundamentals in the uk economy. we have fast growing industries in the uk, engaged in technology sectors which will be a growing very fast over the coming yea rs. we growing very fast over the coming years. we will have exporting services around the world. we have
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to build on our strengths. of course, certainty and clarity about the future will return in the coming months, and that is what will lead to faster growth in the future. there's been lots speculation about whether you have the support of your collea g u es whether you have the support of your colleagues in the cabinet. do you feel safe in yourjob after this budget? it isn't about my job. it is about the future prospects of the uk, and the budget has been designed to secure britain's future, to invest for the next generation, to offer them a chance to get on the housing ladder, to give them confidence that there will be the high skilled, high—paying jobs available for them. the economy and the nation... yourjob is about offering stability in a time of uncertainty. we are not sure how the eu will safely exit the eu. are you safe in yourjob? i'm sorry, i didn't hear the question. the question is not about yourjob in
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particular, it is about stability, and by having a chancellor at the helm, a regular chancellor at the helm, a regular chancellor at the helm, a regular chancellor at the helm, a steady chancellor at the helm, a steady chancellor at the helm, you are offering some stability. that is why i ask if you feel safe in yourjob after this budget. look, i'm just feel safe in yourjob after this budget. look, i'mjust getting on with the job that i'm doing, which is to steer the economy through this period, prepare it for growth in the future in britain's post—brexit future, set out a vision of how our economy is going to work once we leave the eu, how we are going to earn our living in the world, where the growth points are going to be, making sure that we are investing in them, making sure that we have the infrastructure that we need, making sure we have the skills that we need for the industries of tomorrow. working with the prime minister and the rest of my colleagues, that is the rest of my colleagues, that is the plan we will deliver. chancellor philip hammond, thank you very much. and steph is without guests this
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morning, interested parties watching the chancellor as he tries to outline more about what he said yesterday. we will talk to some of those people in a moment, just across the water from us this morning sunlight comes into the sky. for that, carol will bring us up to date with the weather. good morning. a cold start to the day today. called in some areas than yesterday. —— day today. called in some areas than yesterday. — — colder. day today. called in some areas than yesterday. —— colder. forthe day today. called in some areas than yesterday. —— colder. for the next few days the forecast is one that is turning colder still. you will really feel the drafts. this morning we still have some snow around across parts of eastern aberdeenshire. in the next couple of hours that will be pushing away, leaving behind a table of cloud. some bright skies, but also a peppering of showers. some of those will be wintry, especially in the hills. wintry showers across northern ireland, showers across northern england. in between, brighter skies. much colder as we push down towards the midlands and wales, compare to yesterday. in south—west england can purchase will be much lower, but lots of sunshine.
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we still have the remnants of rain in the south—east, which will clear away. a windy day today, wherever you are. what you will find is that it will not be quite as windy as it was yesterday. there will be lots of sunshine. a band of squally showers moving across north wales, northern ireland, and the north midlands through the day. temperature wise, we are looking at three degrees in the north, to highs of 11 in the south. at the moment in the south—eastern pitches are between 12 and 13. that picture will come down in the next couple of hours as the rain pushes away. as we had on through the evening and overnight, the rain will swipe at the southern counties of england. wintry showers across the north and west. in between, again, a lot of clear skies, a widespread frost. there is also the risk of ice. that will be on untreated services across the north. as we go through friday and into the weekend, you can see how the cold air penetrates all of the uk and parts of northern europe. that will stay with us right the way through to sunday. the forecast, as
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we go through the next few days, a frosty start tomorrow morning, lots of dry and bright weather, lots of sunshine around. rain moving away. still a peppering of showers in the north and west, coming in on the north—westerly and westerly wind. by then, it is only the channel islands in double figures, so the cold air will filter further south. for the weekend, we are looking at frosty nights. it will be a chilly wind and we are seeing some sunshine as well. there will also be some showers. here is saturday's forecast. lots of dry weather. wind will strengthen across the far north—west of scotland. showers coming in. as we had on into sunday, a ridge of high pressure builds across us. things will settle down a touch. lots of dry weather, fewer showers. still windy in the north—west and it will still feel cold with highs between seven and 11. thank you. so, we were speaking to
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the chancellor a couple of minutes ago, listening carefully to what he was saying to us. steph and a team of people who were interested parties. i don't know what you made of it over there. the chancellor seemed to use the phrase good news in relation to quite a few issues. stamp duty, nurses‘ pay, which might surprise some people. did you make of that? good morning. yes, we were listening to that. i think there were a few sighs and various different reactions from people here. lucy, of course, is in intensive care nurse who was listening to that. i know you specifically have a question. you‘re like the essential, was put to philip hammond. do you think he understood your problems? no, it sound like he really hurt my situation, which is common. lots of nurses feel like this, and there are some in more desperate situations. it didn‘t feel like he acknowledged the situation that nurses are in at
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that point. he has left us with further uncertainty. he hasn‘t given usa further uncertainty. he hasn‘t given us a statement that he is going to change it. the key thing is paid, isn‘t it? is suggested you are getting a pay rise, but from what you hear, it is still under review and you don‘t know what it isn‘t in the meantime you are struggling. exactly. we don‘t know how long for. 0ne exactly. we don‘t know how long for. one is that review going to take place? it feels stalling tactic to me and my colleagues. and in the meantime it means like you are still tough? yeah. it is getting worse. nurses are leaving every week, another colleague is leaving. that seems to be the case across the board. well, we'll chat you again later on. thank you, lucy. first, let‘s get the news control and weather where you are this morning. —— news, travel. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m sara 0rchard. it is 600 days since nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was first imprisoned in iran.
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that‘s according to the campaign to free the londoner. she‘s been held in tehran since april 2016 after being accused of spying, charges she denies. it also means she become elligble for early release from her first sentence. the introduction of new thameslink rail services to ease north to south travel through central london has been delayed by up to a year. the new timetable of 24 trains an hour at peak times on the bedford to brighton line was meant to be in place by december 2018 but it has been put back. the national audit office said adequate arrangements hadn‘t yet been made to manage the launch of the new services. music legend engelbert humperdinck is celebrating his 50th year in showbiz, he is about to release his first album in over 10 years. the album is a love letter to his wife patricia, of 53 years, who is suffering from alzheimer‘s disease. written especially for her, and of course, my daughter wrote the duet, nine glad i‘d danced with you. those other songs are really proud of. a lot of the songs on there,
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especially the title of the album, it depicts exactly what a man thinks about his or her better half. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. there is a partial closure on the london 0verground at the moment. 0n the trains, greater anglia services in and out of liverpool street by southminster and whitford are running at reduced speeds thanks to poor rail conditions. 0n the roads, northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is also slow from blackwall lane. services from blackwall lane. from rating to waterloo are running services from rating to waterloo are running at reduced services are to track problems. let‘s have a check on the weather now with elizabeth ritzzini. good morning. it was a wet and squally night, with gusts of wind across the london area of 40— 50 miles an hour. still rather windy today. a particularly windy start, in fact. that rain has now pushed its waste.
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a few dribs and drabs through the morning rush—hour, very early on. it should stay dry for most of the day and there will be some sunshine around as well. we are seeing today‘s highest temperatures through this morning and then they will gradually drop. 9—12 celsius, still rather windy but not unpleasant. lots of sunshine through the day and we should stay dry, or mostly dry, with the smallest of one or two showers in western areas as we head towards end of the day. for the first half of the night, it should stay dry, but we will see more cloud edging up from the south and we may well get some rain in southern areas as well. some of that could possibly be quite heavy. the further north you are, the less likely you are to see this rain. and the colder it is likely to be as well. in fact, we are entering much cooler as we head into tomorrow. and a much drier day. we will see some brightness and sunshine around, dealing cold over the weekend, but there will be some sunshine, staying quite windy.
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i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it‘s back to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello — this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. the chancellor, philip hammond, has says —— said he delivered a package for britain. he said he was providing big pay rises are those on the national living wage and increase the threshold —— fresh before paying tax. but critics say he failed to address the squeeze on household incomes. it's notjust my job, the future prospects of britain and its been designed to invest in the next generation. so that they
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can prosper in the future. and we can prosper in the future. and we can pass on an economy and a nation in good shape. we will be getting more reaction to the budget with the shadow chancellor. more than 70 people had to be rescued overnight after flooding across lancashire. people in lancaster and morecambe were among those affected. the fire service said it received more than 400 calls and even helped evacuate 20 horses that had become trapped. there are currently nine flood warnings in force across lancashire, and 18 in neighbouring cumbria. four flood warnings are in place in north wales. an raf aircraft has landed in argentina for the first time since the falklands war to help search for a submarine missing in the south atlantic. the argentine navy says the mission to find the sanjuan has reached a "critical phase". there are concerns that the 44 crew on board could be running low on oxygen. christmas shoppers are being urged
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not to rush into buying gifts from unknown sellers as new figures show victims lost nearly £16 million pounds to fraudsters last year. police have launched a campaign warning buyers that they could be playing into the hands of scammers in their attempts to snap up seasonal bargains. they say on line fraud is increased to 65%. good news if you are starting your daily with a couple of copy. drinking three or four cups could have health benefits. a review in the british medicaljournal shows a lower risk of having/ and some cancers although pregnant women and those at risk of fractures are still advised to steer clear. —— having strokes. if you stayed up all night to watch the cricket, numerous cups of copy would have been drunk. to.
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if you don't know, it hasjust begun. play was due to finish. a little drizzle. a bit of rain unfortunately. the ashes are ramped up. the weeks and the lead—up, it all starts. for england, it was about getting up to good start. they don't call it the gabbattoir do nothing, because you barely come out alive. australia got off to the better start. alistair cooke was caught behind by mitchell starc. england were a little worried it that point. james vince helped england recover. he moved past 50. mark stoneman was also the second wicket to fall before tea. just when vince was closing in on to
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a first test century, he was run out by nathan lyon. a direct hit in the field which took the bails off. three wickets down. i think we have lost a fourth wicket. unfortunately, england are currently 163/ four. so for wickets down. australia edging back into it. doing so well. just seconds before. it is all your fault. let's chat to matthew hoggard now who‘s been watching the day‘s play. it was all going so well until england lost the fourth wicket. it's bad. i was watching the cricket but you pulled me out here. i don‘t know who is out. a bit of a disappointment. better safe the key thing is, the gabba is notoriously
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difficult for any test team. they haven‘t won there since 1986. the key thing is that england to get up toa key thing is that england to get up to a good start. 0bviously, to a good start. obviously, a lot of talk before the test match. the early loss of alistair cooke. vince and stoneman played very well. very impressed with the way they handled their business. australia bowled well. australia has just got back into the test match. 160/ three. we have got a lot of power in the lower order. they can take the game away from australia. you are part of that successful tea m australia. you are part of that successful team which won in 2005. you then made the return trip a few yea rs later you then made the return trip a few years later that were part of a whitewash when england lost 5— nil. just tellers, what is it like
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playing in australia? how intense would be per the players there in the gabba as we were talking about. so much talk starts in the lead—up? how tough is it playing in australia? it is varied tough. you are playing everybody in australia. the first day i was there, we went into a little cafe and we were abused by a 90—year—old in the call of they saying we had no chance and we we re of they saying we had no chance and we were useless and he could still beat us. a lot of war of words to start with. you are almost relieved when the cricket starts. not getting carried away with all the hype and all the war of the words and losing the focused —— the focus is on its nice to see the action. joe route has gone for lbw. what are your predictions? if england can put up all the sledging, and they can hold
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their own, what is your take on how this series will go? it's going to be even. their batting frailties, if you take david warner and steve smith out, they have a lot of experience. their bowling attack was supposed to blow us away. that hasn‘t happened in the first test match. if we can make sure they are nullified, i think it is going to be an intriguing test match series. i‘m hoping it is going to be 3—2 to england. we like that prediction. i‘m sure you prefer to be out in brisbane as i‘m sure we all would. that was probably a welcome break. why would you want to see joe that was probably a welcome break. why would you want to seejoe root out? a crushing blow this morning. still plenty more to come.
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manchester united needed a draw last night against basel. their fate will be decided in their final night against basel. their fate will be decided in theirfinal game. i think we play a match like this ten times and out of nine, we win comfortably and the one was not. i came here a few years ago with chelsea and we lost 1—0 in the last minute but in that match, i don‘t think we had one shot on target, we played really bad. today was not the case. no such problems for chelsea. they beat qarabag 4— nil. celtic opened the scoring against paris st germain and if you thought there was an upset on the cards, you would be wrong.
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7—1, they lost. dani alves with the pick of their goals. and you wonder if we are looking at the champions after a performance like that. what a performance that is from paris st germain. you feel for celtic. they have this incredible run domestic wheat. that step up to the champions league is very difficult, isn't it? sadly, they are on the receiving end of a big defeat. not long to go now. disappointing. even stevens, really. they have had tea. the rapper stormzy is one of the latest of public figures who have had to apologise for old posts on social media. it‘s not just apologise for old posts on social media. it‘s notjust famous people. more than half of uk employers admit
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that a candid‘s on line profile influences theirjob prospects. how do we wipe the virtual slate clean? good morning to you all. let‘s start with you, a lease. are you surprised to see how many celebrities are being caught out at the moment? yes and no. we don‘t think at the time what we are posting, especially young people now, who are growing up with social media. i have been on it since i was 12 and 13. my entire teenage life is social media. you are 19 hour? are you thinking actively now. you are a freelance journalist. a actively thinking, what i do before? i've gone through
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my entire profile but i added them to list on facebook and changed all my settings. but this stuff still exists. this is a problem, isn‘t it? it is what you put on social media. there are some basic rules. i would never put anything on the bbc account that i would not say on air. and i wouldn‘t put private stuff and want people thinking, is it appropriate? you have to make a judgement call.” think we need to recognise that we are living in a very public space. while there were certain assumptions about privacy. essentially, if you live on line and you put everything on it, will people be able to look
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over and see what you have. people need to be very careful and very savvy what they put on line. david, from the point of view of people who are going to employ someone, is this are going to employ someone, is this a real curse of the moment or do you think employers are going to have to get used to this notion that people have had a light, they were young once, they‘ve made mistakes. the m ista kes once, they‘ve made mistakes. the mistakes that might have meant something happen that nobody knew about, they are out there. we would like to see employers be restrained. not everybody has a perfect life the entire time. it‘s a uniquely modern problem. we hide our mistakes. at the same time, understanding that people do look on line and a search that information and in individual has a responsibility about what they
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will be prepared to show. a prospective employer will asking if somebody is sensible. as a basic standard qualification. it isn‘t sensible to post pictures of you in a state of undress or drunk and out of control on social media. you wouldn‘t want people to see that generally. why put that on social media? people are far more used to sharing on line. the second comes down to that issue that was raised at the start around privacy. compartmentalised in your life, there are things that you might be able and willing to share. it‘s understanding technology can be a friend, connecting with people effectively. it was creating an opponent record. what is your experience of people of
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your generation? are they rethinking of their attitudes to social media? yes, they have separate accounts of private accounts. i think they filter much more. the issue is going back. what is your advice to students? well, with the students union and the universities, when it comes to employment services, we will often be talking to people about social media management, making sure that looking at things like your privacy settings, looking at separate accounts, but also being careful and being sensible. is it ever an optionjust careful and being sensible. is it ever an option just not be on social media? i think right now, social media? i think right now, social media has a lot of assets. from being able to network with people, and having a presence, it is an
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inherently valuable thing. while it can be, it is a very, you need to be careful, but... iwould say can be, it is a very, you need to be careful, but... i would say you would be using a lot of rings if you stay out. can i ask one last thing? as an employer, would you not now be a bit suspicious of somebody who social media profile is incredible is quick and clean? 0r social media profile is incredible is quick and clean? or that means is that they‘ve gone through it, trying to get good of stuff, which is almost more suspicious than having a few dodgy pitches up there in the first place. i obviously have no dodgy pitches. what i think what most employers would expect to see isa most employers would expect to see is a degree of restraint and social media usage. i would expect people to have, as you say, photos of their normal lives, but i respect those in a private space rather than being shared online. anything you would not want an employer to see as part of the recruitment process should not really be available online.
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david, thinking are much. —— thank you very much. carol would never have anything dodgy on her social media, would you? i hardly do it, to be honest. good morning, everybody. a cold start to the day this morning. for some of us, eight degrees colder than yesterday. yesterday torrential rain brought flooding across north—west england. as we go through the next few days it will be turning colder. last of the snow is moving away from aberdeenshire fairly soon now. some of them will be wintry in nature, meaning rain and sleet across lower levels of northern ireland. into the afternoon, that scenario holds true. 20 of sunshine across scotland. the maximum temperature in indus, only three celsius. in northern ireland, a cold start. wintry showers with sunshine. in the afternoon, a band of squally showers moving across north wales,
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northern england, and also the north midlands. they are showers, not all of us will see them, but you will notice the wind. south of that, lots of dry weather and sunshine. to which is lower than yesterday. in fa ct, which is lower than yesterday. in fact, the temperatures across east anglia and the south—east will be going down in the next few hours. it will be a windy day, not as windy as yesterday, and the wind will continue to ease in the night. as another band of rain comes in and ta kes a another band of rain comes in and takes a swipe at southern england, are showers will persist in the north and west. still wintry in nature. a cold night. colder everywhere than the nightjust gone. particularly so in the south—east. we are looking at a widespread frost, a risk of ice on untreated surfaces across the north of the country. friday and on the weekend, the cold array of penetrating the whole of the uk, across parts of north—west in europe as well. temperatures are going to tumble. you will really feel the draft. starting with the forecast on friday, remember, we begin with a widespread frost and the risk of some ice. lots of dry weather. this band of rain and channel islands and the south—east is pushing way onto the south—east is pushing way onto
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the near continent. still showers peppering the north and the west, coming in on a north—westerly or westerly wind. temperature wise, at best, three degrees in glasgow. eight degrees in cardiff. nine degrees in london and for degrees in belfast. as we move through the weekend, we will continue with some frosty nights. there will be a chilly wind and there will also be some sunshine. as well as that, there will also be wintry showers. especially across the north and west of the uk. 0n especially across the north and west of the uk. on saturday, low pressure will be anchored to the north—east of the northern isles. here it is going to be wet. strong winds touching gale force with exposure. showers coming in from the west, but lots of dry weather around as well. 0n lots of dry weather around as well. on sunday average of high pressure builds across us. this will be the quieter days of the weekend. a bit of dry weather again. some showers in the west and some rain in the north. so there is lots of action in the weather in the next few days. love a bit of action. thank you, carol. we can give you the view from where we are now, across the water.
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let‘s let the camera zoom in a little bit. let‘s go in as far as we can. you probably get the idea. can we see steph? showers waving, i can make out. showers just left of the light. she is picking up all the issues on the economy for us this morning. good morning! there you are. we are feeling the chill that carol mentioned out here. we wanted to go outside so we could talk to lots of people and get their reaction on the budget. i willjust come through here. thank you. first we will talk about business. a mix of different business leaders here this morning. angela spindler is chief executive ofan angela spindler is chief executive of an online retailer. what digit into the budget? that morning. i pick it was pleasing to see good news for business in the budget. 0ne thing in particular, as a retailer, it is good to see the adjustment to business rates. you know, one in ten stores have closed on the high street. costs a re
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stores have closed on the high street. costs are escalating. it is good to see that change to business rates will not affect us as an online retailer. great to see the focus on technology. investment in r&d, investment in skills training, investment in infrastructure. that is good. a step in the right direction, i would say. probably most importantly, to us as a retailer, it is consumers. putting money in consumers‘ pockets, getting consumers spending again. the retail segment. down 1% in october. worst numbers in brc records, in terms of the non—food growth. it is good to see that. listening to people this morning, chatting to lucy and hearing what she had to say, itjust isn‘t enough. i think consumers are still really feeling the pinch. to get the economy going again, we need some really good news. i think the growth projections coming down and the negativity associated with that in consumer confidence, i do not think that will shift significant as a result of this. interesting. and
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you have a plumbing business, lots of plumbers who work for you? we had a lot about housing, didn‘t we? what does that mean for your sector? very positive that there is going to be investment put into housing to help with the housing crisis. the main concern for people in the construction industry, operating businesses such as ourselves, is the labour skills shortage. i feel that was not addressed very well by the chancellor in the budget, in the commitment they have. that is going to bea commitment they have. that is going to be a big issue moving forward if they want to build as much as they do. and for you, as a manufacturer, you manufacture limousines. skills, was that an issue for you? skills are an issue. it is mainly investing in industry. so it was good that we have the 20 billion pounds of investment, he has recognised that industry will pull us out of our economic difficulties, but it isn't enough. we need to compete on a global market. against people who have lower wage costs, and less that
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they have to meet, less requirements. it is help being every to compete on that level. —— helping every manufacturer to compete. and your daughter is a nurse. so with your daughter is a nurse. so with your mother‘s out on, what you think of it? i guess that weighs -- that is why lucy‘s comments resonated. my daughter works at the manchester children‘s hospital. they are under an amazing amount of pressure and they do an amazing job. they do it because they love it. they are well educated, they are trained, and they do not get paid enough. people are leaving, and they are leaving, and we need more, not less. jacob and jess, i know that you are both students. you have your microphone skills going, i like it. both of you are studying at the moment. we heard about more money for further education. that is what you are in at the moment. what did you think of it? what we thought?” at the moment. what did you think of it? what we thought? i like the jobs
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coming infor it? what we thought? i like the jobs coming in for computer science teachers, however, i have concerns about how well trained some of those staff will be, and whether the education they will bring will be up—to—date. education they will bring will be up-to-date. the reason you have that worry as because in your own experiences? yeah, in high school, my computer science teacher, before that, he was actually the head of art. so he wasn‘t really... it wasn‘t his expertise. art. so he wasn‘t really... it wasn't his expertise. and you felt like that was rejected in the teaching? yeah, definitely. in school i was never a fan of computer science, is the honest. it wasn't until i went to college. in school, the teachers were not very good. i wasn't actually learning anything from them. it sort of comes on to the issue. there are going to be more jobs available in computer science, but are these teachers going to be well—equipped? are they going to be well—equipped? are they going to be well—equipped? are they going to know the up—to—date technology? it is easy for technology? it is easy for technology to become irrelevant in a couple of years. yes, and it is crucial to the future of the economy. great. 0n cue for your time. superb microphone skills.
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yeah, throughout the morning we will be here, getting more views from people from all different walks of life, different stages of their lives as well. first, let‘s get the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m sara 0rchard. it is 600 days since nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was first imprisoned in iran. that‘s according to the campaign to free the londoner. she‘s been held in tehran since april 2016 after being accused of spying, charges she denies. it also means she become elligble for early release from her first sentence. the introduction of new thameslink rail services to ease north to south travel through central london has been delayed by up to a year. the new timetable of 24 trains an hour at peak times on the bedford to brighton line was meant to be in place by december 2018 but it has been put back. the national audit office said adequate arrangements hadn‘t yet been made to manage the launch of the new services. music legend engelbert humperdinck
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is celebrating his 50th year in showbiz, he is about to release his first album in over 10 years. the album is a love letter to his wife patricia, of 53 years, who is suffering from alzheimer‘s disease. just like the first time was written especially for her, and of course, my daughter wrote the duet, i‘m glad i danced with you. those are the songs i‘m really proud of. a lot of the songs on there, especially the title of the album, it depicts exactly what a man thinks about his or her better half. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. there is a partial closure on the london 0verground at the moment. there are minor delays on the hammersmith & city line. 0n the trains, greater anglia services in and out of liverpool street by southminster and whitford are running at reduced speeds thanks to poor rail conditions. south—western railway services to
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aldershot from working either struck that, a tree is blocking the line. services from redding to waterloo are running at reduced speeds following track circuit problems. now let‘s check the weather. good morning. it was a wet and squally night, with gusts of wind across the london area of 40—50 miles an hour. still rather windy today. a particularly windy start, in fact. that rain has now pushed away. a few dribs and drabs through the morning rush hour, very early on. it should stay dry for most of the day and there will be some sunshine around as well. we are seeing today‘s highest temperatures through this morning and then they will gradually drop. 9—12 celsius, still rather windy but not unpleasant. lots of sunshine through the day and we should stay dry, or mostly dry, with the smallest of one or two showers in western areas as we head towards end of the day. for the first half of the night, it should stay dry, but we will see more cloud edging up from the south
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and we may well get some rain in southern areas as well. some of that could possibly be quite heavy. the further north you are, the less likely you are to see this rain. and the colder it is likely to be as well. in fact, we are entering much cooler as we head into tomorrow. and much drier day. we will see some brightness and sunshine around, dealing cold over the weekend, but there will be some sunshine, staying quite windy. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. all the reaction to the budget. will the chancellor‘s boost for first—time buyers help the housing market? the uk economy will shrink more than expected — but philip hammond tells breakfast he has delivered a package to help ha rd he has delivered a package to help hard pressed families. good morning,
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we have gathered a crowd of people from all walks of life and all stages of life to find out what they thought about the budget, good and bad. good morning it‘s thursday 23rd november. also this morning. the christmas con — police warn shoppers to beware after an increase in fraud. why drinking three or four cups of coffee a day could be good for your health. and it‘s day one of the men‘s ashes series in australia. the first test in brisbane is drawing to a close. after a good start england have lost key wickets including the wicket of captainjoe root. and carol has the weather. a cold start, a cold day ahead but many of us will have dry spells, in northern and western areas in particular they will be showers,
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some wintry and squally. more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the chancellor has told bbc breakfast his budget has delivered "a package for britain" and for families who are feeling under financial pressure. philip hammond said he was offering big pay rises for those on the national living wage and had increased the threshold before people start paying tax. mr hammond has been criticised for failing to address the squeeze on household incomes, but the chancellor defended his budget. it's it‘s not about myjob but the it‘s not about my job but the future prospects of britain and the budget is designed to secure britain‘s prospects for the next generation, to allow them to get on the housing ladder, to give them confidence that they will be highly skilled high—paying jobs available so they can prosper in the future, and we can prosper in the future, and we can pass on an economy and a nation in good shape to the next generation. we‘ll get the latest analysis from our political correspondent eleanor garnier in westminster. he was under pressure to deliver
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something that, wasn‘t he. it seemed that some of his colleagues were not fully backing. exactly right. this time yesterday we were saying that philip hammond might be out of a job by today. but he‘s managed to silence some of his critics, at least in the short term, he‘s tiptoed away from an immediate political disaster. the verdict from his tory colleagues has been neither massively glorious and celebratory but mather massively damaging either. it wasn‘t bad radical rebuild that some in the party had hoped for, equally it wasn‘t the disaster that some had feared. there we re disaster that some had feared. there were big cheers for that cut in stamp duty, abolishing it for most first—time buyers, the extra cash for the nhs, first—time buyers, the extra cash forthe nhs, and he first—time buyers, the extra cash for the nhs, and he swerved a potential tory rebellion on universal credit with more money there. he also calmed down some of his severest critics, tori
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brexiteers, with extra money, put aside £3 billion to help prepare for brexit. labour say that not enough was set on student loans, social ca re was set on student loans, social care and wages. they say that for ordinary people the misery will go on but this gloomy economic forecasts do seem to suggest that the country will be feeling poorer for longer. so philip hammond has managed to keep his fractured party onside for the moment but the future does look challenging. thank you. more than 70 people had to be rescued overnight after flooding across lancashire. people in lancaster and morecambe were among those affected. the fire service said it received more than 400 calls and even helped evacuate 20 horses that had become trapped. there are currently nine flood warnings in force across lancashire, 18 in neighbouring cumbria. four flood warnings are in place in north wales. maggie wild is in galgate on the outskirts of lancaster. went to work, thought little of it,
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came home, thought it is pretty high, it will be raining like, let‘s move some stuff out of the way. and it came in faster and faster and it came toa it came in faster and faster and it came to a point where we were bucketing it out, bailing it out, pumps going, came a point where it was bucket versus river and the river won and it is now like this. i‘ve lifted as much as i can from the ground floor but the are bikes down there, mike hookem has gone, the boiler, the washing machine, the dishwasher, everything. an raf aircraft has landed in argentina for the first time since the falklands war to help search for a submarine missing in the south atlantic. the argentine navy says the mission to find the sanjuan has reached a "critical phase". there are concerns that the 44 crew on board could be running low on oxygen. the new leader of zimbabwe, emmerson mnangagwa, has urged the country to unite. in a speech to a cheering crowd he praised the army for removing president robert mugabe peacefully. mr mnangagwa, who will be sworn in as president tomorrow, said zimbabwe was experiencing a new democracy — and his priority was to rebuild its economy.
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christmas shoppers are being urged not to rush into buying gifts from unknown sellers as new figures show victims lost nearly £16 million to fraudsters last year. police have launched a campaign warning buyers that they could be playing into the hands of scammers in their attempts to snap up seasonal bargains. jon ironmonger reports. christmas is coming, which means, for many, the pressure is on to start shopping. in the big rush to buy presents, it‘s not unusual to spend first and think second, but police are warning of a sharp increase in shopping fraud over the christmas period. the action fraud unit of city of london police says more than 15,000 victims across all age groups came forward to report crimes last year, from identity theft and card cloning to dodgy online ads, costing shoppers a total of nearly £16 million. compared to this time last year, we‘ve had a 25% increase in overall fraud and have
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also seen this year a 65% increase in auction fraud, online fraud and marketplace fraud. mobile phones continue to be the most likely products to be bought from fraudsters but clothing and footwear are high on the list too, as well as make—up, drones and fitbit watches. the growing problem has prompted a police video campaign showing the many scams targeting christmas shoppers and what people can do to avoid them, like making sure a good deal is the real deal. jon ironmonger, bbc news in central london. home broadband providers must soon ensure that at least 50% of their customers can achieve advertised speeds at peak time, under a crackdown to prevent misleading claims. at the moment, firms are allowed to advertise "up—to" speeds as long as they are available to a minimum of 10% of customers.
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the committee of advertising practice says it‘s "toughening—up" standards, following research that showed up to three—quarters of households are paying for advertised broadband speeds they have never received. light pollution from lampposts, buildings and cars is getting worse and scientists are warning it‘s having a negative impact on our health and the environment. satellite images of the earth by night have revealed the planet‘s artificially lit area has grown by more than two percent each year since 2012. 0ur science reporter victoria gill reports. as the sun goes down on towns and cities, the lights go on. and those lights are getting brighter all the time. these images, gathered by a sensor on a nasa satellite, show that more and more of our planet is now artificially lit. in developing nations, including india, the increase was dramatic. from this in 2012 to this in 2016. the researchers expected that most developed nations would actually darken as they changed the type of street lighting they used
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from older orange glaring lamps to more energy—efficient led bulbs. but that hasn‘t happened. urban bright spots in the uk and other nations in europe continue to glow even more intensely as towns and cities increased their outdoor lighting. that orangey glow in the sky above the city is all too familiar to so many of us. it stops many of us from seeing a natural night sky. but it also has an impact on our health. night—time light can interrupt our sleep patterns. in the environment, it can disrupt cues that nocturnal animals like bats rely on. it has even been found to shift some fundamental seasonal clockwork, influencing the timing of plant flowering and bird migration. scientists say that images like these are evidence we are losing our natural night—time. victoria gill, bbc news. you saw how light pollution is spreading there, think of the light
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pollution of this mighty traffic jam in the usa. all these people trying to get away from thanksgiving. imagine the light bouncing off that. it looks awful, a bumper to bumper gridlock, in los angeles 51 million americans madejourneys gridlock, in los angeles 51 million americans made journeys away from home in time for today‘s celebrations come most of them in that particular queue. even though it looks quite pretty, just the pain of that outweighs the prettiness, doesn‘t it. it will be a long journey, it really well. it is nine minutes past eight o‘clock. we‘ll get the weather from carol in five minutes. we‘ve heard from the chancellor, let‘s get the reaction from labour shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell. thank you very much for your time, mr mcdonnell. the chancellor said that, his initial outlay of his position, he said clearly that his budget was a package for families
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feeling the pressure. what do you make of that. an extraordinary statement. i can‘t see where he has helped families at all. he‘s referring to universal credit, what he did yesterday is, he gave people £1 and £10 away from them. if he‘s referring to families concerned about the education of their children there was virtually nothing to tackle the budget cuts going through our schools. and if he met health, the chief executive of the health, the chief executive of the health service asked for £4 million and got half of that but nowhere near the amount he needs. so we are facing another winter crisis in the nhs. it demonstrates to me just tell cut off from the real lives of people the chancellor is. the backdrop to this, surely one you must realise on hearing those figures from the office for budget responsibility is that we have a new normal about what to expect from our economy. do you accept the outlying
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position which would affect you, if you were chancellor today you would have the same figures presented to you, the prospective growth figures for the uk economy, down significantly, down 1.6 from 2.5 or 296. significantly, down 1.6 from 2.5 or 2%. these are important figures and can‘t be ignored. 2%. these are important figures and can't be ignored. they can't but you must go behind them to find out why the economy is so fundamentally weak. and it is as a result of seven yea rs of not weak. and it is as a result of seven years of not investing in our economy and that is what i‘ve been calling for the so many years. the government has refused to invest. you refuse to invest especially in skills and infrastructure you have a productivity crisis building and you fall behind your international competitors. if you look at the rest of europe and other parts of the world, growth has returned and it‘s returned on the basis of investment over a long period of time. we have failed to invest, the productivity crisis has hit the wages will be
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kept. the resolution foundation says that between now and 2022 peoples wages will be about £1000 less than the government predicted in march. that‘s a failure of government to invest. it‘s exactly what i been criticising this government for, for so long. yes but you will be aware that all these things you mention, infrastructure, productivity, investment, those are long—term goals. and the reality is that even if there were a labour government, there was a snap election and you became chancellor immediately, you wouldn‘t be able to cure those things straightaway. he would have the same problems in office today that the chancellor has.” the same problems in office today that the chancellor has. i wouldn't dig the hole deeper. that is what this government has done, sadly. cuts in education is the last thing to do when you want to raise skills and tackled the productivity crisis. what i would do immediately, as we said in our manifesto, is stuck that
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investment off. bring together a new investment off. bring together a new investment board with the bank of england, the treasury, business leaders, union leaders commit investing in the productive economy rather than property speculation that has gone under this government. and that would have fairly quick returns as well. because immediately you are putting people back to work, immediately they are paying taxes, and then you have a fair tax system that would pay for our public services. i am worried that the government has not learned any lessons from what the 0br and others say about this failure to invest and the failure to tackle our productivity crisis. so those who criticise your approach, witches, spend more, possibly borrow more, spend more, possibly borrow more, spend more, possibly borrow more, spend more, they query whether you will do what say. we‘ve been speaking this morning to a nurse who has outlined clearly all the issues that affect specifically. to do with housing problems and they specifically. fully qualified nurses
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start, i have the figures, on £22,128. if there was a labour government in power, what would their salary be, they‘re starting salary? you have constantly said their salaries are not high enough, what would be the difference. this is what it boils down to, what people have in their pockets. ok. we have said we will scrap the pay cap altogether. i have budgeted that every year from here altogether. i have budgeted that every yearfrom here in altogether. i have budgeted that every year from here in there would be an increase in pay above the rate of inflation that was predicted by the 0br, and in that way people get a decent wage. we also said the level of pay would be negotiated, the government would not interfere in those negotiations. mr hammond said he would follow the advice of the review body, if they said nurses should get more he would follow that. we've looked at the detail and
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discover that any pay award would be based upon renegotiation of what they call the agenda for change which was the proposal, the introduction of the system introduced under labour which started giving nurses are proper wage, so it looks as though what they are going to do is cut the terms and conditions of nurses.” think that is really sneaky. it certainly wasn‘t explained properly by philip hammond yesterday. this isn‘t just about nurses. by philip hammond yesterday. this isn‘tjust about nurses. this is right the way across the public sector as well because he‘s not lifted the break—up of them. there was no commitment to them yesterday —— not lifted the pay cap. nurses are going to food banks. in the sixth richest country in the world that can‘t be right. it‘s the same for other public sector workers. and theissue for other public sector workers. and the issue around universal credit yesterday was a disgrace. an absolute disgrace. when he is giving tax cuts to corporations and rich people, how much, £76 billion over
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the next figures. the abolition of stamp duty for first—time buyers, you believe that there is a good thing, do you? what we‘ve said consistently, unless you build homes on a significant scale it will result in house price increases. what the government has failed to do is the introduction of the stamp duty cut, fine, but if you don‘t build, they are failing to build on the scale needed, it will result in increased prices and i looked at the 0br report to see how many new householders, homeowners will this create and three and a half thousand. i think one of the think tanks says it will cost 900,000 per household for a new homeowner. you raise the issue of house—building, again, iasked homeowner. you raise the issue of house—building, again, i asked the question that there was a labour election and you were chancellor, the figure conservatives have done
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either mid 2020s will be 300,000 new homes built every year, that‘s a long way ahead, if you are looking for a property ahead, let‘s talk about immediately. you are chancellor. how many homes would be built in 2019 or 2020, the figures that matter to those looking out. built in 2019 or 2020, the figures that matter to those looking outm course they do and in our manifesto we we re very course they do and in our manifesto we were very clear. course they do and in our manifesto we were very clear. in the lifetime ofa we were very clear. in the lifetime of a parliament, five years, we will build a minimum of a of a parliament, five years, we will build a minimum ofa million of a parliament, five years, we will build a minimum of a million new homes and half of them will be social homes, council houses, basically, and we put that forward in our manifesto and we costed at and we think that‘s realistic. so therefore when you are cutting stamp duty or when you are reducing yet that means house prices do not go up because she were increasing housing supply and in some ways, if we can increase housing supply in that way we wa nt increase housing supply in that way we want just stabilise increase housing supply in that way we wantjust stabilise house prices we wantjust stabilise house prices we may be able to reduce them. john on all, i appreciate your time.
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thank you. thank you. we are going to get reaction to what the shadow chancellor was saying. well steph and her panel of experts and voters were listening to that. she is over the canal in salford. we will be talking to them in just a moment. here‘s carol with a look at this morning‘s weather. it's it‘s been a bad night that‘s right, charlie. it was mild yesterday, temperatures today some 8 degrees lower, the temperatures continuing to tumble. rain pushing to the south—east, moving across northern england producing snow across the highlands and the grampians. this book, snow at the moment could come back into inverness before pushing in the next
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couple of hours. away from there, a pepper of showers across western and northern scotland, northern ireland, some of that wintry on the hills, gusty winds. windy day, not quite so much as yesterday but you will notice it. the wintry showers continuing in the north and west of scotland, dry weather and sunshine around, feeling cold. the same across northern ireland, wintry showers mostly on the hills but in between sunshine. a band of squally showers moving across northern england, the midlands, north wales, in between those sunshine. south—west england, southern counties, the south—east, sunshine and a band of clearing showers, temperatures decreasing. showers sweeping across southern counties tonight. the cold air filtering south overnight. this morning in
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east anglia and the south—east, temperatures between 10—13, tomorrow 5-6. temperatures between 10—13, tomorrow 5—6. widespread frost starting the day tomorrow. and the cool on friday, into saturday and sunday. for friday, frosty start, bright and sparkly. losing the rain coming across the south—east from the south—east, clearing to the compliment. a pepper showers in the north and west of the uk coming in ona north and west of the uk coming in on a north—west west wind, some of those wintry, feeling cold. for the weekend, chilly wind, frosty nights, some sunshine, still wintry showers in the north and west. carol, thank dry to gauge some reaction on what
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the chancellor and the shadow chancellor said this morning. steph joins us with her panel of guests. 0ne one of my guests here this morning is lucy, we‘ve heard the chancellor and the shadow chancellor, lucy, what do you think? it sounds like he‘s listening and there‘s more insight, acknowledging the position but i want to know what would labour to differently to help us? what‘s their proposal if they get into power, we want a strategy. the devil is in the detail, isn‘t it? angela, i know as a businesswoman we‘ve heard a lot about labour talking about how they would fondness and of it involves corporation tax going up, what does that mean for business? businesses are going to ta ke business? businesses are going to take a part in rebuilding the economy and confidence, reviewed
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flexible to to invest in people, technology, expansion into global markets, hamstringing business by increasing corporation tax will not help. jake, labour have been after your vote, the young vote, i know your vote, the young vote, i know you could not vote in the last election but they will want you to vote next time. what did you think about what you heard from john mcdonnell? education, i‘m not too sure... you want to hear about more investment in teachers, tell us about teaching quality. the quality of teaching in computer science is not what it should, especially if the future is technology. that is what you are doing. amanda is the principle of a college, for your view, it‘s about the future people like him. if we don't invest in them we won‘t be ready for the future and a post—brexit economy. we won‘t be ready for the future and a post— brexit economy.” we won‘t be ready for the future and a post-brexit economy. i will be talking to all of you a little bit
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more later. back to the studio but for now, thank you. you can explore the impact of the budget on households by going to our budget calculator. just go to bbc.co.uk/budget and follow the links. the time is 23 minutes past eight. if you are reaching for your second or even your third cup of coffee this morning, there‘s good news. what are you one? this is copy two. research shows it can be good for you. scientists from the university of southampton found drinking three to four cups a day seemed to reduce the risk of a range of health problems, except during pregnancy. we asked some of you how much you drink. if i‘ve got a long day, i can sometimes maybe drink about six cups and then i can‘t sleep at night so it is learning what that balance is. i work in quite a stressful environment. i think any more than two cups of coffee kind of accelerates the stress a little bit more so i draw the line at two. i feel like most things
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are good in moderation and if you drink good coffee, it should be good for your health and it depends exactly what you put in your coffee. if you put a lot of syrups and extra shots and things, it is not going to be as healthy. it‘s a kind of a caffeinated crutch for some to get through the day, really. it keeps you alert, it keeps you awake, it tastes nice. gp dr barbara murrayjoins us in the studio now. it's it‘s interesting hearing people reason about the coffee intake, for some, it‘s getting through the day, giving you a lift, what do you make about this research? it's quite interesting myself, i don‘t drink a lot of coffee so in fact, my risk of death is higher than somebody who drinks three cups a day from the research. they compare at 200 studies of people who drink an average three cups, a moderate
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amount of coffee a day with those who don‘t drink any coffee at all and there was a lower risk of death from all causes, heart disease, cancer, liver disease, so that‘s really interesting that somebody like thyself has got according to that study a higher risk of death. look at the nitty—gritty, we spoke to the lead author earlier, 200 people looked at. 200 studies. thousands of people. so it‘s valid, it‘s an observational study so they haven‘t looked at the sort of science behind it and so they need to do something a bit more radical like a random control trial and compare and look at what the actual cause of it is on is that caffeine or some other ingredient like the antioxidants? it‘s been a long—standing debate in medicine about the benefits of caffeine, a lot of people drink coffee but decaffeinated but they think it‘s
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not good for them individually. well, it‘s quite light, the research and so we are not quite sure whether for example having too much coffee can induce a cardiac arrhythmia, if you have a tendency towards a very fast heart rate is the caffeine stimulates that making it worse? we would probably advise someone prone to having an abnormal heart rhythm to having an abnormal heart rhythm to avoid having coffee and drink decaffeinated coffee but we don‘t know whether it‘s the caffeine or some other element in the coffee thatis some other element in the coffee that is inducing that. we know caffeine is a nervous system stimulant so if you have a tendency to anxiety or anything that is made worse by stimulant, we do advise you to reduce. all things in moderation. all things in moderation. doctor barbara murray. thank you. that is
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my cue to have a big slurp. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, heavy rain in northern and western parts of the uk especially in lancashire, with flooding that over the next few days we will lose the rain, although it will turn colder, that cold air already over scotland with some snow this morning falling to even lower levels. that could cause disruption. those snow showers, they should fade away as we go into afternoon, as early morning rain clears the sale
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to the mac southeast, for many it is dry and bright, some showers will move through north—west wales into the midlands and the southern areas. with that flooding in the north—west yesterday that‘s not good news although it won‘t be as bad as it was yesterday, sunny spells and showers over scotland although feeling cold, that calder continues to move further south across the uk and as we go into the weekend, this is how it will look and feel for many of us to the next few days. back to friday. dry weather, sunny spells, scattered showers in the north and the west, wintry at times across western scotland, northern ireland, north—west england and wales, snow over the higher ground come maximum temperatures 4—7dc. this weekend it will be cold, they will be frosty nights, a biting north, north—westerly wind but for many of us dry with sunshine. the best such an always in central
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areas, around the coasts, it‘s where we are more likely to see showers throughout saturday, many dry, temperatures 5—8dc. sunday, very similar, lots of places dry with sunshine, a frosty start, some showers around the south—west coast of england and the irish sea coast in general but to bridge is only in single figures. more details on the website. —— temperatures only in single figures. that‘s all from me. bye bye. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and ben thompson.
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a number of uses on the table as we assess switzerland and the eu squaring up over cash. very warm welcome to the programme. we are at the mercy of the robots today with a few glitches! will talk you through what‘s

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