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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 24, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello — this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. a new era for zimbabwe — in the next few hours, a new leader will be sworn in. tens of thousands of people are expected to witness the official end of 37 years of rule by robert mugabe. good morning. it's friday 2a november. also this morning, it's black friday, when we're expected to spend more than a billion pounds online. ben has more. todayis today is black friday, like it or loathe it. does it live up to the hype? home at amazon's new warehouse in sx. ——i am at amazon's new
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warehouse in sx. britain offers its condolences as hopes fade for the crew of a missing argentinian submarine. in sport, england get on top, down under. after davvide malan, made a half—century for england, in the opening ashes test, the bowlers are now having an impact — they've taken four wickets already. and nick has the weather. it may be black friday that this weekend's weather is brought to you by the colour blue. it's going to be a cold one. the bully on wintry showers but quite of the blue sky. it is colder this morning. some icy patches to watch out for. more coming up. good morning. first, our main story. in the next few hours, zimbabwe is preparing to swear in a new president, after ten days of extraordinary drama that culminated in the resignation of robert mugabe after 37 years in power. 60,000 people will gather at a sports stadium in harare to witness emmerson mnangagwa taking control of the country. the opposition is urging him to end the culture of corruption. tom burridge has this report. the reaction when robert mugabe
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resigned shows how high expectations are about what comes next in zimbabwe. with a crumbling economy, most people wantjobs. zimbabwe. with a crumbling economy, most people want jobs. we have degrees but we don't have jobs. we are looking forjobs. the other day, we we re are looking forjobs. the other day, we were sending cds but we don't have jobs at all. the man who will be inaugurated as president today and is tasked with changing that is emmerson mnangagwa, hailed as a hero by supporters when he returned two days ago. here, being sworn in as vice president, he was once mugabe's right—hand man but when mugabe sacked him, the army stepped in and carried out what was, in the end, a peaceful and popular coup. a crocodile... mnangagwa's support is
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caught in the crocodile for his political cunning. his opponents question whether he represents real change. the first thing that needs to be transformed is the culture. the culture of violence, the culture of corruption. we need to change that culture. so a new president today. hope that life you can improve. but the challenge is vast for zimbabwe improve. but the challenge is vast forzimbabwe ina improve. but the challenge is vast for zimbabwe in a new political era. shoppers are expected to spend more than one billion pounds online during black friday. it is the custom that originated in america a few years ago but there is evidence that shoppers are tiring with the annual event. ben is at an amazon centre in essex for us this morning. some people don't like bail —— black friday that it's become a phenomenon on? you're right, love it or loathe it, it is a discount shopping day
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before christmas and as you said, an american import, traditionally coming after thanksgiving in the united states but something we have adopted. black friday and cyber monday. we do a lot of shopping on line. let me run you through some of the numbers. statistics show how popular it's become. we are expected to spend about £1.3 million at all sorts of retailers but it's become an on line phenomenon on. more people going on line to shop. about one in five of us expected to take pa rt one in five of us expected to take part in the discounts on offer today, down a bit on last year but nonetheless, it shows how much it has grown. but falling popularity, in some respects, and that is a bit of cynicism. more than a quarter of us of cynicism. more than a quarter of us think the deals on offer aren't maybe all they are made out to be. the discounts aren't that great, it's a way of getting us to shop more but over the course of the
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morning, we will find out what it means the places like this. this is amazon's new facility in essex. you will be able to see all these robots doing amazing things, all sorts of products you can buy on line and it stops staff having to walk around, they don't have to go to the shelves. the robots bring the shelves. the robots bring the shelves. they managed not to crash into each other. i want to give you a sense of where we are. we will show you over the course of the day. iam the show you over the course of the day. i am the green blob. giving you a sense of the scale, this is the warehouse and all of the blue squares, they are shelves. there are two of these on every floor and there are three floors. 3a football pitches worth of storage. we'll have a look around and show you how it works. very interesting. speculator. we were waiting for those to crash and they didn't. theresa may will
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meet the president of the european council as eu leaders gatherfor a summit. alan fleming is in brussels. —— adam fleming. good morning. summit. alan fleming is in brussels. -- adam fleming. good morning. what should we expect? the reason this summit is happening in brussels todayis summit is happening in brussels today is the eu leaders are meeting six leaders from other countries outside the eu to the east, azerbaijan and ukraine and georgia, places like that, and a big focus on security and regional stability and thatis security and regional stability and that is where the uk will send the message that even after brexit, the uk is still unconditionally committed to europe's security and its stability and they think they have a strong card to play there. example, we will hear the prime minister talking about a fund worth £100 million to be spent over five yea rs £100 million to be spent over five years to fight this information, they can use and propaganda coming from russia. in other words, the uk being very involved, even after
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brexit. brexit is not on the official agenda but it will come up a bit later on when the prime minister meets donald tusk, the chairman of the council. he will chairman of the council. he will chair the summits chairman of the council. he will chairthe summits in chairman of the council. he will chair the summits in the middle of december make a crucial ——a crucial decision. moving on from the divorce related issues to the big stuff about trade and the future relationship and the transition deal. families of the 44 crew on a missing submarine in the south atlantic say they've given up hope. the statement comes after the argentine navy said there was a suspected explosion hours after the sanjuan was last seen nine days ago. the defence secretary, gavin williamson has offered britain's "sincerest condolences" a huge international search effort has been taking place to find the vessel that disappeared almost two weeks ago. jonathan beale reports. it's known as the silent service but
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there's been no communication from there's been no communication from the san juan there's been no communication from the sanjuan and her 44 crew for more than a week. the search had already reached a critical phase with peers this submarine would soon be running out of air. now, more worrying news, scientists confirm detected an abnormal —— an abnormal soundin detected an abnormal —— an abnormal sound in the water in her last known location. an argentine navy spokesman said it was a short single violent event, consistent with an explosion. it's a bitter blow for relatives. just a few days ago, they had been wrongly told them they have been attempts by the submarine to make contact. now feel betrayed. translation: i feel cheated. they are swine. they manipulated us. the sanjuan are swine. they manipulated us. the san juan left the southern are swine. they manipulated us. the sanjuan left the southern tip of argentina almost two weeks ago. she was on a 2000 mile journey back to
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mar del plata when she reported an electrical failure. last communication home was last wednesday, the same day they have identified that sound like an explosion. it now seems unlikely their prayers will be answered. for their prayers will be answered. for the families of the 44 crew, hopes ofa the families of the 44 crew, hopes of a miraculous rescue have all but disappeared. a bbc investigation has been told of a flaw with one of the ways youtube deals with inappropriate comments aimed at children on the site. volunteers who monitor and report the comments say the issue means potentially predatory behaviour has not been removed — even after it has been reported to moderators. the site has denied any technical failure, and says content that endangers children is abhorrent and unacceptable. andy burrows, from the nspcc, is calling on ministers to act. we think it's really important the government now steps in to require all social media firms to take
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consistent steps to make children's sake. what should that look like? that children have the highest literacy settings established as default. that should mean the social network employs specialist people to moderate reports that come through from children and that those reports are prioritised. they shouldn't sit at the queue. let us return to laptops derek —— the top story, the inauguration of the top story, the inauguration of the zimbabwean president. ben brown is there. what is the mood there in terms of building up to this and in terms of building up to this and in terms of building up to this and in terms of a new leader? 0ther —— are they expecting a new era? they really are. whether they will get one, we don't know but emmerson mnangagwa is promising what he called a new and unfolding democracy. let us show you the stadium where he is about to be inaugurated in the next few hours. it's empty now that is already
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beginning to fill. a few hours before, he swears that both of allegiance and becomes only the second leader of zimbabwe 37 years. he has promised not only a new era of democracy but also huge economic reforms. he has said his central policy will bejobs, reforms. he has said his central policy will be jobs, jobs, jobs because this is a country where there is economic devastation, frankly, after four decades of robert mugabe rule and 90% unemployment. then, lets you a little bit more about emmerson mnangagwa. i struggle to say his name. apologies. what is how much of a change? to be honest, not known as a change? to be honest, not known as a champion of and human rights. he was nicknamed the crocodile, a pretty ruthless henchmen under robert mugabe, accused of complicity
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in massacres in 1980 in matebeleland, where people were killed. the opposition say he was complicit in that survey will cast a wary, ——a wary, beady eye on him. people wonder if he will bring out —— bring about a whole new rule, open up zimbabwe to the international community, bring investment and allow free and fair elections next year but we will have to wait and see. 0k, good to talk to you. thank you very much. time to look at all the sport. yes, that is what they are going for down under. the gabba in brisbane is where australia expect to win. they are so confident. they have not lost for over 30 years but england's young players don't know the meaning of fear. it has been england's day so
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far. the bowlers have been doing damage. england have shocked australia's batsmen with early wickets on the second day of the opening ashes test. they had been 76/ forward with its spring in the months the england attack. -- 76/4. a dreadful night for everton — already out of the europa league, they were thrashed 5—1 at home by atalanta, with the stands less than half full and they still have no permanent manager. arsenal "got the job done" according to manager arsene wenger — despite a one—nil defeat at cologne, they still finished top of their group because of results elsewhere. nd there's a new adventure for former england striker michael owen — he became a successful racehorse breeder and owner after retiring from football. today, he'll be the jockey in a charity race at ascot. we all know how difficult that is.
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well, you do. ifilmed my colleagues with him. getting ready. speak to you soon. good morning. the much advertised cold spell is about to arrive, even in southern and eastern parts of england, temperatures five to ten lower than they were compared to this time yesterday, close to freezing in scotland, northern ireland and northern england and icy patches around where we have frost and wintry showers bawling in places. let's look at things over the next few hours, at 8am, showers coming into scotland tend to be rain, sleet and hill snow, northern ireland as well but cold air moving in the night so these will start to turn to smoke even at lower levels but parts of scotland, northern ireland, north—west england, icy
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patches so be aware of that on untreated surfaces. a lot of sunshine to come when the sun is up in england and wales but a clutch of showers in parts of south—west england to start the day, rain showers, and they will run east along the south coast through the day, a bit more cloud into southern england compare that to further north where we see the sunshine. lighter winds but still breezy in scotland, into the northern isles in particular, and we will see more showers in scotland and northern ireland and northern england and north wales through the day, rain, sleet and hill snow out of these with temperatures getting up to ten, few up to double figures, even fewer by the weekend, in fact nobody i would imagine. as we go through the night, some showers southwards, rain, sleet and hill snow again but those coming in across scotland, northern ireland and north—west england as the night goes on will studd to see snow at lower levels even mixed in with these and in towns and cities with temperatures like this, in the country seed it
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will be even lower dashcam preside. a widespread frost on the weekend. caught between —— countryside. there isa caught between —— countryside. there is a stronger wind as well, which adds an extra chilled for the weekend. the frost to begin with, icy patches again where we've had overnight showers and further wintry showers —— extra chill. the rain, sleet and snow into northern scotland, north—west england, and some into wales. southern and eastern parts stay dry with sunshine, this is what it will feel like when you factor in the wind. a definite chill enhanced by the wind, another frost on sunday morning, plenty of sunshine down the eastern side on sunday, a few showers in the west, more of rain and hill snow by day and increasing cloud here, perhaps a little bit less chilly in the west by the end of sunday. that's how your weekend is shaping up, the coldest of the autumn so far. thanks, i'm glad you're tie matches the weather colour today.|j
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didn't get dressed in the dark, did i?i didn't get dressed in the dark, did i? i certainly didn't, we've been accused of that many times before on here! let's look at the front pages. the daily telegraph leads with theresa may on her way to brussels for another meeting today, the question is really how close they are two that december deadline about moving talks on the big picture. a thanksgiving gathering of the 0bama family. you know why they're saying awkward conversation? she had been kissing her boyfriend in another forecast. mali, her boyfriend, there was a picture knocking around last week of her kissing her boyfriend. she is 19! the times, the picture is of emily cilliers, emile cilliers, to face a retrial for the attempted murder of his wife, victoria, her
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parachute failed when she fell 4000 feet on a skydive. this is because tojuror is have been feet on a skydive. this is because to juror is have been discharged with stress—related illness in that case. the main story, some of the well‘s biggest brands advertising on youtube showing scantily clad children —— the world's —— twojuror is. looking at the budget yesterday and the statistic showing we are losing two decades of wage growth —— twojuror is. the losing two decades of wage growth —— two juror is. the sun losing two decades of wage growth —— twojuror is. the sun is losing two decades of wage growth —— two juror is. the sun is speculating about whether or not prince harry has popped the question, the reason it says it like that is because meghan markle has moved her dogs to the uk. what have you got? one of the uk. what have you got? one of the most iconic sporting venues these days, 320 metres up in the year on top of that big hotel in dubai, remember roger federer and rafa nadal had a game up there? anthonyjoshua has rafa nadal had a game up there? anthony joshua has been rafa nadal had a game up there?
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anthonyjoshua has been up there, as speculation grows he will be fighting in march, a unification fighting in march, a unification fight againstjoseph parker, they will use this setting to make the announcement. having a bit of ace barring match. tennis is more difficult because it goes out of play. meet the new formula 1 sensation, only 19, but play. meet the new formula 1 sensation, only19, but unusually george russell is six foot two. how does he get in the car? a good question. he's very light, just over te nst, question. he's very light, just over tenst, incredible, he is driving for force india today in practice at abu dhabi but he's been signed up by mercedes. have you been in a formula 1car? it mercedes. have you been in a formula 1 car? it was an adapted one where two people go in. i sat in a normal one but i couldn't drive it but i've beenin one but i couldn't drive it but i've been ina one but i couldn't drive it but i've been in a two seater one. it is pretty cramped ? been in a two seater one. it is pretty cramped? even for me. they made everything to fit the drivers. but again, you are taking weight into consideration. he's only tends
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to when he is six but to. but his legs will be squashed. —— ten stone when he is six foot to. you know you find something in yourjacket pocket, you find some money? this is a bit like that, years ago you go to a bit like that, years ago you go to a cashpoint and you asked for some money, £10, £20, and you didn't take it away, you didn't take it away. it seems unlikely but lots of people do. now it seems lloyds bank has admitted there are all sorts of glitches going back a long time, nine or ten years, going back to 2008. people who didn't take the money away from the cash machines out of the blue now are getting checks saying here's the £20 you didn't take in 2009. checks saying here's the £20 you didn't take in 2009]: checks saying here's the £20 you didn't take in 2009. i thought they automatically refunded the money, i thought it was taken back into the machine. they're saying that didn't
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happen, it should have happened. even after all this time people are getting these letters saying this is some money with a bit of interest, someone got £20 after £6 80 interest from 2008. there you go. someone asked in my ear, what happened if the person behind you took the money? then it is taken. you are doing this and the cash comes out, but no one takes it, it goes back in. i've done that probably three times in the last year. have you got more money than sense?” times in the last year. have you got more money than sense? i get distracted by someone talking to me, i forget distracted by someone talking to me, iforget and distracted by someone talking to me, i forget and it goes back in. distracted by someone talking to me, iforget and it goes back in. on every occasion i have contacted the banks and remembered six hours later and they have checked and it's gone back in. the next time mike is at the cashpoint there will be a massive queue of people. the cashpoint there will be a massive queue of peoplelj the cashpoint there will be a massive queue of people. i did it when i was doing a crime story and drove off! we will have another sport bulletin with mike later on
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and all the weather coming up and looking ahead to the weekend. the charity wonen's aid has told this programme that on just one day this year almost 100 women and children were turned away from refuges because there weren't enough beds to meet demand. the latest crime survey for england and wales shows 1.2 million women and more than 700,000 men reported some form of domestic abuse in the last year. fiona lamden reports. when people say, why didn't you just leave, i want them to understand that it's just not that simple. how could i leave this man, he was going to kill me. it's so complex and people just don't understand. for that person to have so much power over you makes it impossible. that person to have so much power over you makes it impossiblem took charlotte nine years to find the courage to leave her husband and finally report him to the police. she and her children went first to a
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refuge and later to a new home. shala's husband was convicted and given a seven—year prison sentence in. but her two daughters say the memories of what he did will stay with them for ever —— shala's. memories of what he did will stay with them for ever -- shala's. we ended up going into hiding while the court case was on “— ended up going into hiding while the court case was on —— charlotte's.|j was very confused because i grew up with this man and to me you was my dad. i've felt abandoned, it was sort of a loss for me. the latest crime survey for england and wales shows 1.2 million women and more than 700,000 men reported some form of domestic abuse in the last year. with one in ten women between 16 and 19 saying they've experienced abuse. charity women's aid says on one day this year they were helping more than 4500 women and children at refuges in england. but on that same day had to turn away almost 200 more because they didn't have enough
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room. years after the charity help her and her family, charlotte room. years after the charity help her and herfamily, charlotte now works for a women's aid refuge in surrey. there's always a waiting list here. the last family left an hour ago and list here. the last family left an hourago and i'm list here. the last family left an hour ago and i'm told a mother and her three children are on their way here now. it's expected they'll arrive with very little. so here are just a few basics to get them start their new life. women's lives are already at risk and i think this statistic is something like over to women a week are murdered in england and wales. if there weren't the refuges that there are now, that figure will go up. i already fear when we have to say to somebody, sorry, no, we're full, ialready fear, where's that woman going to go? the government has said it's committed £40 million until 2020 and is introducing a domestic violence and abuse bill to protect and support victims and their children. meanwhile, charlotte says do everything she can to help other
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women like her. i could sit here and not tell you my story, but if i gave into that and gave into that fear of thinking, is he watching, what's he going to do? then i've lost and he's won, and that's not going to happen. i'm continuing to speak out and that's why i'm talking to you, because it's really important and nobody‘s going to stop me doing that. very powerful stories. fiona lamdin with that report. details of organisations offering information and support with domestic violence are available at bbc.co.auk/actionline. or you can call for free at any time to hear recorded information on 0800 888 809. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup.
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the family of a teenage boy who was stabbed to death in wet london last weekend say they're living in a nightmare after his senseless murder. jason isaacs, who was 18, was chased by his attackers on two mopeds and repeatedly stabbed in northolt on saturday. detectives have announced a £20,000 reward for help in catching his killer. london's commuter belt has seen a spike in the number of homes left empty for at least six months despite a downward trend across the uk. in harrow, the number of empty homes has risen by more than 500% in a year, by far the largest increase in the country. in wednesday's budget, the government announced that local authorities will get new powers to charge a 100% council tax premium on empty homes. now, many of us will be shopping online in the run up to christmas, but instead of using a delivery van, one company is trialling
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a greener alternative. it's an electric trolley attached to a bike designed so the rider can't feel the weight of the trailer. there are more than 80,000 delivery vans on london's streets which contribute to pollution in the capital. what we have here today is a cycle solution that once its complete will allow us to eliminate one or even more vehicles completely from our operation. replacing diesel with cycles. travel now. signal failures mean the central line has minor delays between hainault to leytonstone via newbury park and grange hill and the piccadilly line has minor delays between hammersmith and heathrow all terminals. those works on the 0verground still going on, it's closed between gospel oak and barking. and we have a burst water main in kensington. here's how it looks there. there are lane closures on the high street at kensington church street. let's take a look at the weather now with lucy martin. hello, good morning. lots of dry and
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bright weather as we move to the weekend but with that it will be feeling cold. today we start off with a bit more in the way of cloud but good sunny spells developing and noticeably cooler start than yesterday with temperatures in the single figures. a bit more cloud around through the morning and good sunny spells developing from the north—west as we go into the afternoon. temperatures today at a maximum of ten with lighter winds than yesterday. as we go through this evening and overnight we will hold onto varying amounts of cloud but plenty of clear skies which will allow the temperatures to fall away, soa allow the temperatures to fall away, so a widespread frost. these are the temperatures in towns and cities but in ruralareas, temperatures in towns and cities but in rural areas, cooler than that. a bright, cold and frosty start tomorrow, plenty of sunshine through the morning increasing through the afternoon but holding onto good spells of sunshine. a bristol north west in the breeze so feeling cold with highs of seven. —— a bristol north—westerly breeze. a cold night on sunday and then sunday looking dry and bright with that north—westerly breeze so
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temperatures struggling into the single figures, a maximum of seven. a frosty start to the day on monday and then we'll see a spell of rain through the morning, which will allow the temperatures to rise momentarily before we return to the cooler conditions after that. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello — this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. we'll bring you the latest news and sport injust a moment. coming up: could reports of an explosion dash hopes that the 44 crew of a missing argentine submarine might still be alive? we'll get the assessment of a former submariner. that's lovely. liverpool legend ‘king kenny‘ dalgleigh will be here to talk about his life on and off the pitch as a new film explores what he achieved and endured during his time at anfield. 0n the march.
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we'll find out how this extraordinary footage of an army of spider crabs evading the detection of stingrays was captured for blue planet two. good morning. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. zimbabwe's new president is due to be sworn in later this morning in the country's capital, harare. 60,000 people will gather at a sports stadium to witness emmerson mnangagwa taking control of the country following the resignation of robert mugabe after 37 years in power. mr mnangagwa says the country is witnessing a "new and unfolding democracy". theresa may will meet the president of the european council, donald tusk in brussels later as eu leaders gather for a summit. it will be the first high—level discussion between the two sides since the prime minister secured the backing of her cabinet to offer more money for the so—called divorce bill. there will be another in december where eu leaders will decide whether to trigger the next phase of talks. families of the 44 crew members on board the missing submarine say they've given up hope. the argentinian navy said an explosion was detected
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near to the vessel's last known position over a week ago, but relatives and the media were only told yesterday. the defence secretary gavin williamson has offered sincere condolences. shoppers are expected to spend more than £1 billion online during black friday. it is the custom that originated in america a few years ago but there is evidence that shoppers are tiring with the annual event. a handful of stores are keeping out of the promotion with one suggesting it is bonkers to cut prices now. a bbc investigation has been told of a flaw with one of the ways youtube deals with inappropriate comments aimed at children on the site. volunteers who monitor and report the comments say the issue means potentially predatory behaviour has not been removed, even after it has been reported to moderators. the site has denied any technical failure, and says content that endangers children is abhorrent and unacceptable. andy burrows, from the nspcc, is calling on ministers to act.
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we think it's really important the government now steps in to require all social media firms to take consistent steps to make children sake. what should that look like? that should ensure that children have the highest privacy settings established as default. that should mean that the social network employs specialist people to moderate reports that come through from children and that those reports are prioritised. they shouldn't just sit at the back of the queue. millions of small savers may be hit by a little noticed tax change announced in this week's budget, according to a leading insurer. royal london insurance says it affects long term policies sold by companies and sometimes collected door—to—door. in the long run losses could add up to hundreds of millions of pounds. our personal finance correspondent, simon gompertz reports. sometimes chancellors say things in
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the budget people don't quite understand at the time and this, the abolition of an ex— —— and a skua tax break which appears to benefit many small savers, could have been one of those occasions. there is a case now for removing the anomaly of the indexation allowance for capital gains, bringing the corporate tax system in line with the capital gains tax system. i will therefore brings this allowance so companies receive relief for inflation up to january 20 —— 2018 but not thereafter. insurers say there is an impact on traditional savings policies often sold door—to—door at the workplace. they include endowments which pay you a lump sum, whole of life—insurance which pays out after you die, and other investment policies which have had some other annual growth tax—free. from early numbers we've looked at, we think that millions of people have these policies and will now be losing relatively modest amounts of money, perhaps £20, £50 each, some a lot more by this all adds up to a huge amount, hundreds of millions of pounds for the chancellor. the
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budget document said no individuals will be affected and the treasury adds: but a royal london argues that this is a tax grab from people who have done the right thing and saved and it should be reversed. a former british soldier is due to appear in court in turkey today, charged with terrorism offences. joe robinson, from lancashire, is accused ofjoining the kurdish militia in syria to fight the so—called islamic state group. he denies the charge, claiming he was there in 2015 as a medic. a teddy bear that was lost in an airport has been flown 200 miles to be reunited with a young girl in 0rkney. 4—year—old summer accidentally left teddy behind at edinburgh airport, but luckily a member of loganair‘s cabin crew spotted a social media plea to find the bear. kirsty walter tracked down the toy and teddy was even given his own seat on a flight back to kirkwall to be reunited with his owner. nice light, get your own seat, get a
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biscuit, some chocolate. donning his trademark stripy scarf, these are the first pictures of tom baker stepping back into the tardis to reprise his most famous role as the doctor. the 83—year—old actor has completed work on the unfinished doctor who episode shada which was left uncompleted 38 years ago because of industrial action. some parts have been animated, with baker providing his distinctive voice, and he's also starring in one live action scene. what they have done, it was an unfinished doctor who. doctor who fa ns unfinished doctor who. doctor who fans know about this. they used animation alongside real stuff.|j wonder what kind of monster he was facing. and how it's going to fit
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in. you have to watch it as part of a series? you watch a little bit of it and it is to be released. a series? you watch a little bit of it and it is to be releasedlj a series? you watch a little bit of it and it is to be released. i would love to hear about how superstitious people get in sport. i've worn this tayport —— this type for two days running, especially to commemorate the ashes. the kangaroos and the lions. if it continues like this, will i be able to take it off for the next six weeks? so far today, the next six weeks? so far today, the reason i have the time, england are going well. australia's captain has come to the rescue. when steve smith came to the crease, they were in trouble at the gabba. but he made a half—century. past 120. starting to swing back
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towards the hosts. the wickets have been shared with the england bowlers. 132/ for now, steve smith 50 not out. -- 132/4. everton were thrashed 5—1 at home to atalanta in the europa league last night. they were already out but in front of a half—empty stadium, they finished bottom of their group — and it wasn't a great entry on the cv for caretaker manager david unsworth, who wants the job permanently. arsene wenger said it was job done, after arsenal won their europa league group despite losing in cologne. a second half penalty won it for the home side but results elsewhere meant arsenalfinished top. you feel you haven't —— you have done thejob to you feel you haven't —— you have done the job to finish top of the group and after that, we plan our final game at home against nottingham with not much at stake apart from the fact that we want to
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win the game but what does it really mean, i don't know. but that's what you wanted. a possible link between heading a football and brain damage will be the subject of a study commissioned by the football association. it will begin injanuary and will look at whether players are at an increased risk of dementia. the former england captain alan shearer recently made a bbc documentary on the issue. i think this is a huge day for football. as i said, it's been a long time coming. delighted that the associations have now backed it and we can get the answers but football needs. england's women take on bosnia herzegovina in a world cup qualifier tonight — it's interim coach mo marley's first competitive match in charge. england beat russia 6—0 in their opening qualifyer in september but they'll be without experienced defender casey stoney. wales are also playing tonight, at home to kazhakstan. in around an hour, england will play hosts new zealand for a place
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in the final of the women's hockey world league final. they beat the usa to make it through to the semis. the england side includes eight of the squad who won olympic gold with team gb last summer, and it was rio 0lympian sophie bray, who scored both the goals. we're in the run—up to the winter olympics in pyeongchang, and scotland's curlers are warming up nicely. they've made the final of the european championships in switzerland after beating the hosts 9—8 — they'll face sweden for the title on saturday. later, scotland's women also take on the hosts in their semifinal. and finally, it's a journey from anfield to ascot for former liverpool and england striker michael owen. at lunchtime, he will ride for the first time as a jockey in a charity race at ascot. 0wen owns horses and a training stables but has never got into the saddle before. and he's had to lose nearly a stone
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in weight to do that because it is it -- in weight to do that because it is it —— asa in weight to do that because it is it —— as a jockey, you need to make the right weight. right weight. kenny dalglish, the new film about what he's been through. thank you very much. it is 10 days since zimbabwe's army took control of the capital, harare, in a move they insisted wasn't a coup, now the country is preparing to swear in a new leader. that's robert mugabe's former right—hand—man, 75—year—old emmerson mnangagwa will take control, whether he ushers in a new democratic future remains to be seen. he's known as ‘the crocodile' for his fearsome reputation and was at mr mugabe's side during the war of independence and post—liberation government. during the 1980s, he was the country's spymaster but denies any involvement in the massacre of civilians in that time. he's accused of masterminding attacks on opposition supporters after the 2008 election.
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so what does the future hold? let's speak to sara rich dorman, a senior lecturer in african politics at the university of edinburgh. thank you for your time this morning. all of this came to many people by those scenes ofjubilation and they were real scenes of jubilation as robert mugabe officially said he was standing down. this is a very important date the zimbabwe. absolutely. people we re the zimbabwe. absolutely. people were delighted. they are delighted. it opens up a real window of possibility for people in zimbabwe who have suffered tremendously. economically, politically and in terms of abuses. all those things we tend to take the granted. people in zimbabwe aren't stupid. they understand that is just one man. a
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bigger system that also needs to change. 0fficial events taking place. the stadium has a few people in it. the main event, 60,000 people will be packed in there for the inauguration itself. what will happen next? tells about the man who will succeed robert mugabe and a lot of people say there are an awful lot of people say there are an awful lot of similarities in what they have been involved in in the past and what he might be like as leader. emmerson mnangagwa has been around a long time, he goes back to the liberation struggle, the armed struggle and was in jail for ten yea rs. struggle and was in jail for ten years. like robert mugabe, he studied for a law degree while he was injail. and then after independence, he took up a ministerial post. what is striking
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is not how far back he goes but actually how consistently he has beenin actually how consistently he has been in power. he was one of the only two remaining figures of robert mugabe's original cabinet. he has been there from the start of the new state, the liberated state of zimbabwe. he has carried through until his sacking about two weeks ago ina until his sacking about two weeks ago in a range of different portfolios. he has had ups and downs, very senior posts but is a lwa ys downs, very senior posts but is always bounced back from those. such an area of expectation about what the future might be like the zimbabwe, with so many problems for its infrastructure. his emmerson mnangagwa don't have to reinvent himself as a proper democratic leader as the world watches on? he has a reputation for someone who gets things done. is not much of a speaker. he doesn't have the same
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sort of charisma that other contenders had. i don't think he's the best speaker. he is not perhaps as diplomatic or is rhetorical but he does have the reputation for getting things done. that's what people are counting on an hour hoping for. they are hoping that he will be to bring that sort of fundamental change. by bringing in investment, strengthening the economy. that is a huge ask for any leader, particularly one with his baggage. sarah, thank you very much for your time. we saw those events through the morning this morning and we will go to our correspondent ben brown in zimbabwe later on. here's nick with a look at this morning's weather. it's getting really chilly, neck, it's feeling like we have definitely changed? -- nick. absolutely, we've talked about it
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all week, the cold air coming south, that process is under way, a cold morning this morning than recent mornings, —3, minorscore at morning this morning than recent mornings, —3, minor score at their lowest, scotland and northern ireland, the cold theme staying through the weekend, enhanced by a colder stronger wind on saturday especially. lot of sunshine around but there will be wintry showers, so some will see some snow out of the showers as they move through quite quickly on the wind but quite a lot of dry and sunny weather to come this weekend. as there is today, but we've already got wintry showers, this is 8am pushing into scotland, north of the central belt, lots of this will fall asleep or snow and icy patches around as well, into northern ireland and north—west england —— falling as sleek. a met 0ffice england —— falling as sleek. a met office a weather warning out there this morning so take care —— falling as sleek. dry weather in england and wales but here temperatures lower
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than for some. these are going to trundle further along southern coastal counties as we go through the days. we will take these showers, some rain but sleet, snow, perhaps fail in more of scotland, northern ireland and parts of northern england, maybe some into wales later in the afternoon and although the winds are lighter than they've been, it will be quite priskin northern scotland and the northern isles and temperatures colder than the weekend —— brisk in. we will bring more wintry showers further south, rain, sleet, we will bring more wintry showers furthersouth, rain, sleet, hill snow out of these two and increasingly in scotland and northern ireland and north—west england as the night goes on, sleet and snow in lower levels and icy patches with a widespread frost to start saturday. the big picture, the reason why it is so cold, high pressure here and low pressure to
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the north, a flow of air around the system is coming down from the arctic so it's going to be a cold direction. —— the systems. more sleet and snow showers affecting parts of scotland, northern ireland and north—west england, one or two for wales, the midlands and the south—west but in a large swathe of the east of the uk into southern england, we will stay dry, some sunshine but if you factor in the wind to the temperatures, that's what it will feel like on saturday so feeling like the coldest weekend of the season so far with another frost on sunday morning. a fine, dry, sunny day down the ease on sunday, still wintry showers in the west, fading later in the day as the cloud increases and it becomes a bit less j—league —— the cloud increases and it becomes a bit lessj—league —— the east. a lot of people like this fine, dry, sunny weather that many will have this weekend even though it's going to be cold —— a bit less chilly. weekend even though it's going to be cold -- a bit less chilly. are we stuck with this for a while? we are, less cold on monday as the weather system less cold on monday as the weather
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syste m m oves less cold on monday as the weather system moves through but next week looks like single figures for most. 0n the cold side of average but it's the time of year for it!|j 0n the cold side of average but it's the time of year for it! i don't know why i'm always disappointed, it does happen, doesn't happen, doesn't it? nick, thanks very much. retailers are gearing up for black friday, it's the spending spree that originated in america and has caught on over here in the last few years. do you know who decides? ben? he knows everything. good morning and welcome to tilbury, amazon's brand—new facility and it's absolutely huge, it's the size of 34 football pitches and it's full of this kind of stuff. you might be able to see some of the robots moving around here, these are the robots that take stuff from the warehouse and they bring the entire sheu warehouse and they bring the entire shelf to the packer rather than having to walk to the shelf and picked the stuff off, they bring the sheu picked the stuff off, they bring the shelf itself, full of all sorts that
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we can buy online. as you said, black friday traditionally an online shopping day. were expected to spend £1.3 billion before the holiday —— we're expected. katie are with me. good morning to you. andy, we talk about black friday, imported from the us, it's funny, we don't have the us, it's funny, we don't have the thanksgiving day before that traditionally fracked friday comes after? we've ended up enablers are situation —— black friday. its globalisation, which is what the internet does, it allows you to bring things over like this that doesn't make any sense —— we've ended up in eber is our situation. —— we've ended up in a bizarre
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situation. this is a strange day, it was meant to be after christmas that he would get the clearance sale, but black friday brings forward opportunities to get great discounts ata time opportunities to get great discounts at a time that can be very expensive in the run—up to christmas. at a time that can be very expensive in the run-up to christmas. what are the discounts going to be like, are they all cracked up to be? is it old stuff, they were having? i've been shopping plenty myself, we've got great feedback, people know when they come to amazon they get great prices and great deals, not only on the products we have but we've got hundreds of small businesses taking pa rt hundreds of small businesses taking part and offering their products. andy, we've always associated black friday with electricals, tvs and computers, but now more and more retailers are taking part, there's sort of an expectation that whatever type of shop you are you will to offer a sale? black friday is a complete and all me in the retail
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calendar, everyone has to get involved —— is a complete anomaly. it started out as a electricals, now everyone is aware this is the day to get discounts, lots more people are shopping today than on any other day of the year and consequently everyone is trying to get as much of that share sale as they can. everyone is trying to get as much of that share sale as they canm everyone is trying to get as much of that share sale as they can. if you don't take part, do you lose as a retailer? some people have died in their heels and said we refuse, some people have made a bit of a virtue of it —— dug in their heels. it's ha rd of it —— dug in their heels. it's hard to say as to whether they lose customers. everyone has to do something, you don't have to discount but you have to be very active today. what about this facility, we're looking at these robots, incredible investment from amazon in this part of the country, a huge site, you must have the demand to need this? in previous yea rs we demand to need this? in previous years we get 84 items a second, we've added 50 facilities like this,
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more than 5000 people, we're getting ready for christmas and days like this to get all the products to customers on time —— three facilities. we will talk more later. you might be able to see these guys loading up the big yellow shelving units, all the stuff comes in from the manufacturers and the big suppliers around the country and these guys put it onto the shelves and they get put into this huge facility. 34 football pitches' worth, this is one flaw, there are three like this, it goes back four miles. —— this is one flaw. i will ta ke miles. —— this is one flaw. i will take you on a tour later.|j miles. —— this is one flaw. i will take you on a tour later. i hope you got co mfy take you on a tour later. i hope you got comfy shoes on? i've got the big boots on. big boots, big ben. thanks very much. see you later on. the actor gary 0ldman, best known for his performances in bram stoker's dracula and in the spy film tinker, tailor, soldier, spy says his latest role has been the most daunting
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challenge of his career. in darkest hour 0ldman plays winston churchill as a jolly, idiosyncratic, sometimes conflicted version of the british prime minister. 0ur entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba has been talking to him about the part which is widely tipped for an oscar. you cannot reason with a tiger when your head is in its mouth! gary 0ldman, perhaps his most powerful and charismatic. would you stop interrupting me while i'm interrupting me while i'm interrupting you ? interrupting me while i'm interrupting you? almost unrecognisable for a performance he hopes truly embodies churchill.” knew i didn't look like him but i thought with some work i could approximate the voice. you get to a point where it has two become creation rather than impersonation, you try and get the spirit and the essence of the man. let me see your
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true qualities, your courage. like churchill out of public view, altmann did have occasional doubts the yellow —— of the fox h —— goldman. —— 0ldman. the yellow —— of the fox h —— goldman. -- oldman. it seemed insurmountable. churchill has been played semi— times by so many. you've got this image of churchill, but is that contaminated or in a nyway but is that contaminated or in anyway influenced by albert finney as churchill —— churchill has been played so many times by so many. 0r robert hardy as churchill. they will soon be looking for war. site i went to the newsreel, i saw a man who was dynamic —— so i went to the newsreel. youthful, full of energy. i believe we are to meet regularly.
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darkest hour doesn't reach uk cinemas until next january, but gary 0ldman is already odds—on favourite to win the academy awards for best actor. if i was going to get an 0scar i can't think of a better part to get it for, let's put it that way. we shall fight on the beaches... way. we shall fight on the beaches. . . a way. we shall fight on the beaches... a portrayal of the past that many expect to make history in the film world too. we will never surrender! lizo mzimba, bbc news. you're watching breakfast. still to come: this is little miss inventor, we will speak to the author of the new book about challenging stereotypes and creating an engineer as a positive role model for girls and we're asking you what little miss or mr men you would be. which one would you be? i have no idea, haven't thought about it yet. i've thought about it. good! don't you want to
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know? i will tell you! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. the family of a teenage boy who was stabbed to death in wet london last weekend say they're living in a nightmare after his senseless murder. jason isaacs, who was 18, was chased by his attackers on two mopeds and repeatedly stabbed in northolt on saturday. detectives have announced a £20,000 reward for help in catching his killer. london's commuter belt has seen a spike in the number of homes left empty for at least six months despite a downward trend across the uk. in harrow, the number of empty homes has risen by more than 500% in a year, by far the largest increase in the country. in wednesday's budget, the government announced that local authorities will get new powers to charge a 100% council tax premium on empty homes. now, many of us will be shopping online in the run up to christmas,
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but instead of using a delivery van, one company is trialling a greener alternative. it's an electric trolley attached to a bike designed so the rider can't feel the weight of the trailer. there are more than 80,000 delivery vans on london's streets, which contribute to pollution in the capital. what we have here today is a cycle solution that, once its complete, will allow us to eliminate one or even more vehicles completely from our operation. so replacing diesel with cycles. travel now. a signal failure means the central line has minor delays between hainault to leytonstone via newbury park and grange hill. those works on the 0verground still going on, it's closed between gospel oak and barking. and we have a burst water main in kensington. here's how it looks there.
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there are lane closures on the high street at kensington church street. the a12 has delays approaching the redbridge roundabout for the north circular. let's take a look at the weather now with lucy martin. hello, good morning. lots of dry and bright weather as we move to the weekend but with that it will be feeling cold. today we start off with a bit more in the way of cloud but good sunny spells developing and a noticeably cooler start to the day than yesterday with temperatures in the single figures. a bit more cloud around through the morning and good sunny spells developing from the north—west as we go into the afternoon. temperatures today at a maximum of ten with lighter winds than yesterday. as we go through this evening and overnight, we'll hold onto varying amounts of cloud but plenty of clear skies which will allow the temperatures to fall away, so a widespread frost. these are the temperatures in towns and cities but in rural areas, cooler than that. a bright, cold and frosty start tomorrow, plenty of sunshine through the morning tending to increase through the afternoon but holding onto good spells of sunshine. a brisk north—westerly breeze so feeling cold with highs of seven. a cold night on sunday and then sunday looking dry and bright with that north—westerly breeze
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so temperatures struggling into the single figures, a maximum of seven. a frosty start to the day on monday and then we'll see a spell of rain through the morning, which will allow the temperatures to rise momentarily before we return to the cooler conditions after that. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello — this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. a new era for zimbabwe — in the next few hours, a new leader will be sworn in. tens of thousands of people are expected to witness the official end of 37 years of rule by robert mugabe. good morning. it's friday 24 november. a warning that youtube's system
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further reporting comments against children is flawed. black friday, is it all it's cracked up to be? i'm at amazon's new warehouse in essex. and australia's captain comes to their rescue. after at one point, australia were 76/ four earlier on today. and nick has the weather. black friday followed by a blue weekend. we are in the cold air this weekend. we are in the cold air this weekend. a frosty night. by day, quite a bit of blue sky. some wintry showers around. the weekend weather coming up in the next half—hour.
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in the next few hours, zimbabwe is preparing to swear in a new president, after ten days of extraordinary drama that culminated in the resignation of robert mugabe after 37 years in power. 60,000 people will gather at a sports stadium in harare to witness emmerson mnangagwa taking control of the country. the opposition is urging him to end the culture of corruption. tom burridge has this report. the reaction when robert mugabe resigned shows how high expectations are about what comes next in zimbabwe. with a crumbling economy, most people wantjobs. we have degrees but we don't havejobs. we are looking forjobs. the other day, we were sending cvs but we don't have jobs at all. the man who will be inaugurated as president today and is tasked with changing that is emmerson mnangagwa, hailed as a hero by supporters when he returned two days ago. here, being sworn in
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as vice—president, he was once mugabe's right—hand man but when mugabe sacked him, the army stepped in and carried out what was, in the end, a peaceful and popular coup. a crocodile... mnangagwa's supporters call him ‘the crocodile' for his political cunning. his opponents question whether he represents real change. the first thing that needs to be transformed is the culture. the culture of violence, the culture of corruption. we need to change that culture. so a new president today. hope that life here can improve. but the challenge is vast for zimbabwe in a new political era. shoppers are expected to spend more than one billion pounds online during black friday.
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it is the custom that originated in america a few years ago but there is evidence that shoppers are tiring with the annual event. ben is at an amazon centre in essex for us this morning. welcome to tilbury in essex, we are at amazon's new facility. this cove rs at amazon's new facility. this covers the equivalent of 34 football pitches and gearing up for what is a busy weekend. as you said, black friday, that import from the united states, were a lot of discounts are offered, on things like tvs, washing machines and computers but it now been spun out to all sorts of different shops and services. we are expected to spend about £1.3 billion over the day also of course on monday, cyber monday. there is a
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suggestion we are growing a bit tired of it. just one in five of us back to take part in the sale is on offer today. that is down a little bit on this time last year. why? maybe we are growing a bit more cynical. 28%, more than one quarter, think that the deals are on —— the deals that are on offer are not all they are cracked up to be, not such great discounts after all. maybe we are shying away from spending so much. we might be feeling more of a squeeze in our pockets. we are here at amazon's facility. you might be able to see some of the robots moving. these are the shelves that are brought to the pickers rather than the pickers actually going to the shelves. the orange robot brings a big yellow shelving unit. all sorts of things you can buy on line. we will show you around a little later. they have told me there is no way that one can run into me. we are
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safe yet an hour. how does it know not to run into you? they have got a very clever tracking. an area has been roped off, sort of an invisible area. within the packing facility. we are quite safe. this one is not moving anywhere just yet. adam fleming is our correspondent in brussels, telling us what happens when theresa may meets the president of the european council, donald tusk. this summit is called the eastern partnership summit, with leaders meeting countries to the east of the eu, talking about closer cooperation and of course, russia
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further to the east. theresa may will use this as an opportunity to say even though the uk's leading the structures of the eu, it is committed to stability and security across the continent of europe. she will talk about the fact that the uk will talk about the fact that the uk will be spending £100 million over the next five years to counter disinformation, fake news and propaganda from russia in those eastern countries. while brexit is on the agenda, it will come up later on the agenda, it will come up later on when theresa may sits down with donald tusk, the president of the european council. he will be chairing that next crucial summit in the middle of december when they decided there has been enough progress in the first phase of brexit talks to move on to the second phase, which is all about trade and future cooperation. we will be looking for clues they how that process is going. families of the 44 crew on a missing submarine in the south atlantic say they've given up hope. the statement comes after the argentine navy said there was a suspected explosion hours after the sanjuan was last
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seen nine days ago. the defence secretary, gavin williamson has offered britain's "sincerest condolences" a huge international search effort has been taking place to find the vessel that disappeared almost two weeks ago. jonathan beale reports. it's known as the silent service but there's been no communication from the sanjuan and her 44 crew for more than a week. the search had already reached a critical phase with fears this submarine would soon be running out of air. now, more worrying news — scientists confirm they detected an abnormal sound in the water in her last known location. an argentine navy spokesman said it was a short, single, violent event,
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consistent with an explosion. it's a bitter blow for relatives. just a few days ago, they had been wrongly told trhat there had been attempts by the submarine to make contact. now they feel betrayed. translation: i feel cheated. they are swines. they manipulated us. the sanjuan left the southern tip of argentina almost two weeks ago. she was on a 2,000—mile journey back to mar del plata when she reported an electrical failure. the last communication home was last wednesday, the same day they have identified that sound like an explosion. it now seems unlikely their prayers will be answered. for the families of the 44 crew, hopes of a miraculous rescue have all but disappeared. jonathan beale, bbc news. joe robinson from lancashire is
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accused ofjoining the kurdish militia in syria to fight islamic state and —— however he claims he was there as a medic. a member of the cabin crew spotted a young girl's teddy bear. kirsty walter tracked it down and teddy was given his own seat on the flight to be reunited with his owner. those are the main stories. the weather and sport coming up a little later on. that is returned to the inauguration of the president. let's go straight to our correspondence, ben brown. you're in the stadium where the inauguration will take place. a very significant date the zimbabwe.
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0utside harare, it is filling up. we are about to slash three hours away from the inauguration itself of msn and then —— amazon manangagwa. the people want to be careful what they believe is a historic moment. —— emmerson mnangagwa. there will be a 21- emmerson mnangagwa. there will be a 21— gun salute. a fly past. lots of excitement and euphoria as the new man comes in. a lot of questions as well about whether he will be better than robert mugabe. he has come in saying he wants a new era of democracy in this country. and that he wants to create jobs, jobs, jobs but he also has a dark history. he is one of the most ruthless henchmen. he has been implicated in massacres, vote rigging, corruption. then, give us a sense of the
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problems zimbabwe is facing in terms of the economy and people's daily lives. we saw those scenes of jubilation. there is a sense of expectation about what could happen in future. the problems are notjust that there has been political repression here and no realfreedom in elections that have been rigged but the economy is on its knees. there is 90% unemployment here. when you think about it, only one in ten people has a job. you think about it, only one in ten people has ajob. it's extraordinary. we've been out on the streets talking to people. highly educated graduates who are selling flowers, selling anything they can in the streets just to make ends meet. it's a desperate situation. people here are desperately hoping that the new president will not only bring in political reform but economic reform investment as well. ben brown reporting from the stadium
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which is filling up as we speak. a bbc investigation has been told of a flaw with one of the ways youtube deals with inappropriate comments aimed at children on the site. volunteers who monitor and report the comments say the issue means potentially predatory behaviour has not been removed — even after it has been reported to moderators. we can talk to the children —— the children's commissioner and parrot zone, who works with children to make the internet safe. they give are joining make the internet safe. they give arejoining us. what is the problem here, what kind of content is on there and what is being done about it? i have seen some of this content. this is a site where children spend hours a day looking and going through videos but also loading their own content, often quite inoffensive and oftenjust
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loading their own content, often quite inoffensive and often just a pa rt quite inoffensive and often just a part of their everyday life. adults who want to get access to children are using some of these videos and the comments facility, posing quite suggestive, very sexualised comments that are in children potentially and potentially encouraging them to take pa rt potentially encouraging them to take part in very risky activities. what's been reported is that youtube aren't responding adequately and are leaving these comments there were clearly they should be removed. youtube has given us a response, saying the content that endangers children is borrowed an unacceptable to us, we have clear policies against videos with comments that sexualise exploit children and we enforce them aggressively whenever alerted. youtube has made clear that it has responded once this has been flagged. well, what the reports are
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saying is that that response has not been swift enough so as a result, we really are talking here about a channel which is used every day for hours at a time. three quarters of 5- 15 hours at a time. three quarters of 5— 15 —year—olds say they would rather be on youtube ban on tv so this is a trusted part of life for many families. they will need reassurance, and myself, that youtube are proactively monitoring and identifying and proactively removing content whenever there is any doubt. vicki, this is the territory that you look at. we have heard this before about technology being ahead of the curve, there is a gap between how you monitor what is going on. is that what is happening? partly. this is an interesting story because parents say all the time it's hard to monitor what children
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are doing, they don't want us checking accounts and we can't follow their instant messages, this is different, this is a broadcast medium and this is a scenario where i would say to parents you should know what your children are posting online, it's possible to see what's online, it's possible to see what's on youtube, its public. as an organisation, wada you see as the responsibilities of youtube, you've heard the statement, what are their responsibilities in connection with these comments that are left —— what do you. as a parent i would turn off comments on my child's channel, that's a sensible safety precaution to turn off comments, as far as youtubeis to turn off comments, as far as youtube is concerned, they've got a huge responsibility to make sure they have policies in place in a timely fashion. this isn'tjust youtube, this is a conversation about social media in general and how pa rents about social media in general and how parents monitor or advice children, and technology is changing all the time, the rules change and
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shift really quickly? they do, and it isn'tjust the shift really quickly? they do, and it isn't just the technology but our social norms and behaviour online. 0ne social norms and behaviour online. one thing i've found shocking about this story is that this content even exists, sometimes it's parents who create content that is prank content as they would describe it. it isn't nice, it isn't illegal, but it's certainly not very nice. we should question ourselves about what sort of content we think is ok to post online. anne longfield, as children's commissioner, vicky was going through the thought process of switching off comments for examples so they aren't there, parents are having that battle between how much is in their control, but equally questions have to be asked of big organisations about how seriously they are taking the issue. that's right. parents absolutely have to ta ke right. parents absolutely have to take responsibility and make sure they know what their children are doing and make sure they can see what's going on. but the companies are part of everyday life now for so
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many children. their multibillion pound companies that really have a huge impact on children's lives. they are clever people, they can employ people who can make this sort of stuff stop, remove it from the content and that's what i'm asking them to do. what if they don't? well, i think they're looking then at potential regulation. we're looking at minimum standards potentially. again, they won't be a trusted part of peoples lives if children and families can't have that confidence. —— people's. it's a balance and they need to keep on the right side of this. thanks very much, anne longfield and vicki, thanks for your time. let's talk to nick and find out what is happening with the weather. is that snow? it is, this is what it's looking like in some parts of scotland this morning after some overnight wintry showers, one from our weather watcher in aberdeenshire, watch out
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for icy patches. that's the case this morning after the showers overnight and those coming in. it sets the theme for a cold weekend ahead across the uk, the coldest of the season so far, temperatures below average for the time of year. a lot of dry, sunny weather around but also more wintry showers and more of us will see snow after the showers moving through quite quickly on the breeze. look at things this morning and we will see more of these showers of sleet and snow particularly in northern scotland spreading east through the morning, and again with those temperatures close to freezing, icy patches in northern ireland, bringing in showers here, the frozen ground in places, and in north—west england, watch out for icy patches on untreated surfaces in the morning. a lot of fine weather to come on friday in many parts of england and wales, some showers affecting parts of south—west england, tracking further east as we go through the day. bringing wintry showers across
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scotland, northern ireland and parts of northern england, rain, sleet, snow and hail out of these, a brisk wind in northern scotland and a light breeze elsewhere. a large part of england and wales will bring low temperatures. single figures through most of the weekend. we bring a few more of these showers southwards across the uk through the night, sleet and snow through higher ground possible out of this and the breeze picks up as well. temperatures dropping again so they will be a widespread frost, temperatures lower in rural spots and the cold theme through the weekend is because we have high pressure to the south—west, low pressure to the north, and a flow of air around these pressure systems is dragging these pressure systems is dragging the air down from arctic and of course that will be cold. a frosty start, lot of sunshine, some showers, wintry flavour into parts of scotland, the north and west, north—west england, the whales, the midlands and the far south—west.
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many southern and eastern parts of the uk will be cold with cold wind but lots of dry sunny weather —— east wales. for some temperatures will be lower than what the thermometer might suggest, so in the wind despite the sunshine it will be feeling like it is close to freezing in some spots. part two of the weekend, sunday, a frosty start with sunny weather down the east. wintry showers affecting western parts why time, seen cloud increasing through the day, perhaps becoming a little less chilly at the end of sunday and into monday. that's how your weekend is shaping up, naga and charlie. thanks, nick. 14% of children in english schools have a special educational need or disability, that's according to government figures but that number only tells part of the story. new analysis given to this programme by the education policy institute show almost 40% of children in england are identified as having special educational needs at some point between the age of five and 16, significantly higher than the estimate. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin reports. children at this special school
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might have different needs to most pupils in mainstream education, but they still have the same kinds of hopes and dreams. what's the plan, jacob? i want to become a football manager. i want to be a pet store manager. i want to be a pet store manager. i.e. the one to be a doctor or manager. i.e. the one to be a doctor ora manager. i.e. the one to be a doctor ora spike! manager. i.e. the one to be a doctor or a spike! -- i want to be. i like this ambition, two completely different things —— spy. it was previously thought only 14% of children have a special educational need or disability, that's any need that has to be met outside of the normal curriculum at either a mainstream or a special school. but today a report from the education policy institute says that number is actually much higher. that official government statistics of 14% is taken from a snapshot ofjust one year. but if you look across the
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lifetime of a child, then 40% are registered at some point with a special educational need. but government policy and sen did provision is based on that much lower official figure, which leads some to ask if that provision is anywhere near enough.” some to ask if that provision is anywhere near enough. i don't think there are things in place, i don't think there's the budget to put things in place, i don't think there's the political will to put anything in place because i think what needs to happen for these children costs money. david and carrie have four children with send. they say they've had to fight for the right support. i will not accept this child that has anything different, they all have to fit into a box and if they don't fit inside a box we will squash them until they do. and that is the biggest issue that children with sen face. children's commissioners in england, wales, ireland and scotland say despite differences in their systems they all have significant concerns,
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concerns shared by tv presenter chris packham, who as autism. when you think 40% of young people have those requirements or needs at some point in their education, i can't believe they're being effectively addressed. but the department for education tell us the 14% figure allow schools to plan year—on—year, while 40% represents the changing nature of needs. but some believe sen kids are being let down. it's just sad seeing people have this condition and it's not being treated right. because when it is treated right. because when it is treated right everything just goes that brilliantly? yeah. these young people deserve a chance and their amazing young people with lots and lots to give. anything's possible? absolutely. that was jayne mccubbin reporting and she's now here in the studio. hearing from those young people brings it home why it is so important, the statistics tell a
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confusing picture? the data, the institute, they looked at the data and they looked that the data across the lifetime of a child instead of one year, so the lifetime of a child instead of one year, so the niche issue isn't niche at all, at one point in a trial's like it will affect a lot of kids. this is why next week we will shine the light on these issues —— trial's life. let's look at the numbers. —— child's life. so the government says that right now 1.4m kids have special educational needs in england, wales and northern ireland. in most cases that is growing mild. in scotland we're told that around 170,000 children are registered as having additional support needs. they have a much broader definition of need in scotland. but of course, there will be a very small proportion of students across the uk with much more complex needs which require a ‘statement‘ or ehc plan. that's a legal document which says exactly how a child's needs
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must be supported. 2796 in 27% in england are on the autistic spectrum and 14% have speech and language communication problems. these are the figures for that smaller group in england. the majority are on the autistic spectrum. but what we've learnt today is this 40% figure. we are going to look at this all in more detail next week. 0ne one thing that is good about the 40% number, it may be very surprising and shocking, but it will make a lot of pa rents and shocking, but it will make a lot of parents and children go, it's not just me. it will, and they will breathe a sigh of but only if the support is there. that's one thing you are going to look at. when we look at the parents who say, we are sick of the system and the support isn't there, but we will look in a special school where the most serious needs are met. it costs a fortune to put children in a special school but you wouldn't believe the
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results, if you keep this money on the needs and the expertise, some of the needs and the expertise, some of the reports over the week will make you cross, some will fill you with hope for the potential of the children. so much to share and i hope you will watch. you're watching breakfast. injury has played a big part in england cricket squad's selection for the ashes. a back problem precluded toby roland—jones's inclusion, he'll be on the sofa with his take on the team's performance down under. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. the family of a teenage boy who was stabbed to death in wet london last weekend say they're living in a nightmare after his senseless murder. jason isaacs, who was 18, was chased by his attackers on two mopeds and repeatedly stabbed in northolt on saturday. detectives have announced a £20,000 reward for help in catching his killer. london's commuter belt has seen
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a spike in the number of homes left empty for at least six months despite a downward trend across the uk. in harrow, the number of empty homes has risen by more than 500% in a year, by far the largest increase in the country. in wednesday's budget, the government announced that local authorities will get new powers to charge a 100% council tax premium on empty homes. now, many of us will be shopping online in the run up to christmas, but instead of using a delivery van, one company is trialling a greener alternative. it's an electric trolley attached to a bike designed so the rider can't feel the weight of the trailer. there are more than 80,000 delivery vans on london's streets, which contribute to pollution in the capital. what we have here today is a cycle solution that, once its complete, will allow us to eliminate one or even more vehicles completely from our operation.
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so replacing diesel with cycles. travel now. the central line still has minor delays between hainault to leytonstone via newbury park and grange hill, also some minor delays on the piccadilly line. and there's no 0verground between edmonton green and cheshunt due to a faulty train. there's a burst water main in kensington. you can see the lane closures on the high street. and works on the m25 mean delays in both directions betweenjunction 21a for st albans and junction 22 for london colney. let's take a look at the weather now with lucy martin. hello, good morning. lots of dry and bright weather as we move to the weekend but with that it will be feeling cold. today we start off with a bit more in the way of cloud but good sunny spells developing and a noticeably cooler start to the day than yesterday with temperatures in the single figures. a bit more cloud around through the morning and good sunny spells developing from the north—west as we go into the afternoon. temperatures today at a maximum of ten with lighter winds than yesterday.
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as we go through this evening and overnight, we'll hold onto varying amounts of cloud but plenty of clear skies which will allow the temperatures to fall away, so a widespread frost. these are the temperatures in towns and cities but in rural areas, cooler than that. a bright, cold and frosty start tomorrow, plenty of sunshine through the morning tending to increase through the afternoon but holding onto good spells of sunshine. a brisk north—westerly breeze so feeling cold with highs of seven. a cold night on sunday and then sunday looking dry and bright with that north—westerly breeze so temperatures struggling into the single figures, a maximum of seven. a frosty start to the day on monday and then we'll see a spell of rain through the morning, which will allow the temperatures to rise momentarily before we return to the cooler conditions after that. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back
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to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello — this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. coming up: zimbabwe's new president is due to be sworn in later this morning in the country's capital, harare. 60,000 people will gather at a sports stadium to witness emmerson mnangagwa taking control of the country following the resignation of robert mugabe after 37 years in power. mr mnangagwa says the country is witnessing a "new and unfolding democracy". theresa may will meet the president of the european council, donald tusk in brussels later as eu leaders gather for a summit. it will be the first high—level discussion between the two sides since the prime minister secured the backing of her cabinet to offer more money for the so—called divorce bill. there will be another in december where eu leaders will decide whether to trigger the next phase of talks. these are like images coming in from
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brussels. we will keep you up—to—date if theresa may arrives. group she makes any comments in connection. —— or if she makes any comments in connection. families of the 44 crew members on board the missing submarine say they've given up hope. the argentinian navy said an explosion was detected near to the vessel's last known position over a week ago, but relatives and the media were only told yesterday. the defence secretary gavin williamson has offered sincere condolences. a bbc investigation has been told of a flaw with one of the ways youtube deals with inappropriate comments aimed at children on the site. the children's commissioner has said more needs to be done. there is a flaw with what other ways youtube deals inappropriate comments. volu nteers deals inappropriate comments. volunteers who monitor and report the comments the site has denied any
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technical failure. the comments the site has denied any technicalfailure. anything the dangers children is abhorrent or unacceptable. the companies are part of everyday and light. they are multibillion pound companies which have a huge impact on children's lives. they are clever people, they can employ people who make this sort of stuff, stop and remove the content and that is what i'm asking them to do. what if they don't? i think they are looking at potentially regulation, looking at minimum standards potentially but again, they won't be a trusted part of people's lives of children and families can't have that confidence it's a balance there and they need to keep on the right side of this. a former british joe robinson, from lancashire, is accused ofjoining the kurdish militia in syria to fight the so—called islamic state group. he denies the charge, claiming he was there in 2015
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as a medic. donning his trademark stripy scarf, these are the first pictures of tom baker stepping back into the tardis to reprise his most famous role as the doctor. the 83—year—old actor has completed work on the unfinished doctor who episode shada which was left uncompleted 38 years ago because of industrial action. some parts have been animated, with baker providing his distinctive voice, and he's also starring in one live action scene. some of those pictures were from him when he was on the set.” some of those pictures were from him when he was on the set. i wonder how it is going to work. i do how it is going to feel. i've never watched a programme that was half and half. by many, programme that was half and half. by any programme that was half and half. by many, many years ago with more
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modern animation. the cast are reunited. if you got tom baker, it would be amazing, don't you think? the old monsters, the sea devils, that would be good. i don't remember that. what have you got us? the test cricket comedy ebbs and flows. maybe i cursed it by saying england were doing so well. in the last hour, no more wickets to england. it's not even stevens. they are about to finish for the day. australia's captain has come to their rescue, after england made 302 in theirfirst innings. it could have been even better, but for a late flurry of wickets. moeen ali, was out l.b.w, and johnny bairstow, paid the price for aiming for the sky but england's bowlers didn't let that affect their confidence,
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as stuart broad had cameron bancroft, caught behind, and there was a debut wicket, forjake ball, who stopped the aussies were 76—4 until captain smith showed how its done century. that is the final score for the day. it's what england could have done with. jones, sadly is injured but good news, he is here. what is your injury? i had a stress fracture. it sounds a little bit worse than it is. it's not too painful. how long to recover? i am back bowling again ona to recover? i am back bowling again on a light scale are probably around the new year. what about the strain
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the new year. what about the strain the body goes through?m the new year. what about the strain the body goes through? it is among fa st the body goes through? it is among fast bowlers in particular. it is one of those where it comes on the adverse stress at any time, it can just appear. how frustrating is it for you? it's mixed feelings with that. it's been really nice to watch the guys, i really interesting start, ebbing and flowing. there is always that bit in the back of your mind whether you would be out there and playing. it's got a little bit ofa tint and playing. it's got a little bit of a tint on it. but it's been great to sort of see it get under way. the first session has been my target. i watched most of it last night and certainly really interesting to see
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the way the game has sort of changed so the way the game has sort of changed so quickly from yesterday. the pace has seemed to quicken up. there was a lot of hype is always is ahead of the ashes, that there are some australian bowlers in the kind of thing that was going to happen when they first walked out onto the pitch. what made the atmosphere around the ashes this year? it's been interesting. it seems people have been tried to force the issue in terms of creating the media rivalry, if you like, but there is a real barrage of quick bowlers and return. —— turned up and it's quite a slow wicket. they haven't really come to the poor as much as people want. explain to people who are not overpay. it means having a team of fa st overpay. it means having a team of fast bowlers is negated. particularly any intimidation factor is, the ball sticking in the week at a little bit more. therefore, it's a
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bit easier for the batsmen to deal with. it seems to have been a bit of a strange pitch in that regard. certainly watching the australian attack on this, i think that got them ona attack on this, i think that got them on a faster pitch. it could be very interesting to watch. what is the language like between the two? i've never personally played against australia. it would be really competitive out there. there would bea competitive out there. there would be a few subtle exchanges. both sides will have guys who are particularly vocal and some prefer to quietly go about their business. you watch the likes of david warner in the field. what's been excellent to see is how well england's debutants have to see is how well england's debuta nts have done, to see is how well england's debutants have done, going to the gabba was something like 30 years since australia lost. but the debutants are playing without fear.
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what is it? the reputations get forgotten about? such a great atmosphere. it's almost time to get atmosphere. it's almost time to get a start in the game. starting the innings off nicely. and he suddenly start getting back into all the processes that have got you there in the first place. the three guys who scored 50s, they showed great composure. it's a shame, really, that neither of them kicked on, i guess, to get that really big score. i think looking at the game now, it is really important the contributions they have all made. absolutely, they have surprised the australians. have we got a prediction from you? on the series? 2-1, prediction from you? on the series? 2—1, england. we would settle for that. toby, all the best for your recovery. thank you so much.
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everton were thrashed 5—1 at home to atalanta in the europa league last night. they were already out but in front of a half—empty stadium, they finished bottom of their group and it wasn't a great entry on the cv for caretaker manager david unsworth, who wants the job permanently. arsene wenger said it was job done, after arsenal won their europa league group despite losing in cologne. a second half penalty won it for the home side but results elsewhere meant arsenalfinished top. and finally, it's a journey from anfield to ascot for former liverpool and england striker michael owen. at lunchtime, he will ride for the first time as a jockey in a charity race at ascot. 0wen owns horses and a training stables but has never got into the saddle before. what we are dealing with here is 500, 550 kilos of pure muscle, that
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has spread and trained to just exploded into life. i was about 13 stone, six six weeks ago and had to get my head down and start losing some weight. i would like to eat something to get that energy but i just can't. he really wants to win as well. they don't lose that competitive spirit. talking about liverpool legends, if i set to people, who would you like —— most like to chat to, they would say kenny dalglish. when i was growing up, he was the number you would put on your back, number seven. even as an england —based player or youngster, but he has been through the highs and the lows. the hillsborough disaster. and you talk about his life as you said but it's worth saying, he doesn't give a lot of interviews. he is one of those old school players. that's right, it
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would be fascinating, after 8:30 a.m.. he doesn't like the media, or he didn't when he was a player manager. the time is 7:42 a.m.. nick is taking a look at the weather. it is taking a look at the weather. it is getting much colder. winter is coming. it's the time of year when we don't expect it should be less careful —— you should be less careful. the theme continues throughout the weekend. the coldest weekend of the season so far so it will be frosty. a lot of dry and sunny weather. further wintry showers. the strong wind will move through quite quickly. that is how the weekend is shaping up. got to get through friday first of all. heading out of the door, the weather looks at eight o'clock, this is the scene across the uk. some high
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routes you have snow on them. icy patches as well. bringing these showers and rain and sleet and snow again. icy patches but in north—west england, that begins the day. a large part of england and wales with afine, dry large part of england and wales with a fine, dry start but a scattering of showers affecting parts of england and it will run eastwards. a bit more cloud here. sunny spells in scotla nd bit more cloud here. sunny spells in scotland and northern ireland. these showers ahead of them. a bit further south. going into the late afternoon and evening. these are the temperatures. particularly across southern areas. much colder compared to recent days. widespread frost kicking in. we will have some of these wintry showers heading further south. rain, sleet, snow. coming into scotland and northern ireland. increasingly sleet and snow into
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lower levels. as the start of the weekend. high pressure to the south—west of others. arctic air coming down across the uk. greater visibility, mind you. clean, arctic air. a further scattering of wintry showers into northern and western scotland. a few into the midlands and the far south—west of england. actually through southern and eastern parts of the uk, very likely to stay dry. plenty of sunshine but yes, feeling cold. this is what it tends to feel like. these temperatures come down even more if you get some of these showers moving on through. another frosty start on sunday morning. can see it in parts of the uk, a lot of dry sunny weather on sunday. still some wintry showers in the north and west, increasing cloud late in the day. monday will be less cold. then the cold air comes right back next week. retailers are gearing
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up for black friday, it's the spending spree that originated in america and has caught on over here in the last few years. you have learned this morning? it's the first friday after thanksgiving. we think it's a us based thing but todayis we think it's a us based thing but today is the day. ben's is at a new amazon centre for us this morning. good morning. welcome to tilbury in essex. you might notice these shelving units are moving, they are robots, you might be able to see the orange bit at the bottom, that's the robot and the shelf comes to the person who picks the items and puts them in the box and sends them out to you, such is the technology here, a new site amazon has invested in. it is huge, let me give you an idea of how big. you can see on the map, we are the green blog here, but the blue bits are the shelving units you
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can see behind me. look how many there are, there are two of these things on every floor and there are three floors in the entire facility. this site is absolutely vast, full of all the stuff we might want to buy over the course of the next 24 hours stoppila sunzu just more about how this works. for the big retailers, they've got to gear up to make sure they've got the right stuff in the right place at the right time. how does it all work? katie is one of the bosses and helen, we will talk about the psychology in a moment. katie, black friday, a busy time for you, but do we really need it? the great advantage of black friday is it gets customers great value and prices in the run—up to christmas, which can bea the run—up to christmas, which can be a really expensive time of year
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for many. we get great feedback from customers, it's really popular. 0ne of the busiest days of the year, in previous years we've done 84 orders a second, to give you an idea of how many orders are coming in. a bigger vestment for you here, one of a number of sites you've opened up around the country, and when we look at the robots, quite an investment in the technology —— big investment. we have invested £24 billion since 2010 in the uk, this is one of three facilities opened this year and the robots we have here work with the tea m robots we have here work with the team to make sure we can pick and pack everything and get it out to the customers on time. we have added 5000 the customers on time. we have added 50 0 0 staff the customers on time. we have added 5000 staff this year so we are geared up and ready for christmas. it will save them walking to the shelves, those robots. helen, psychologically speaking, it is fascinating, when you offers online they often have a countdown clock and things to make you by now, some
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say our willpower needs to be stronger and if we'd to buy something then don't but that's not the case for everyone? it's hard enough to resist the deals on a normal day, when you see the countdown clock ticking down, you only have three items left in... we all want something to make us feel better and the marketing tells you it's the latest product or buying more gifts and christmas will make you a better parent, it's understandable people could end up buying things they don't want or need and getting into a spiral of financial difficulty. what is the solution? the retailers say it's a great time of year for them, they're in business to make money, they are going to sell things and if they sell them more cheaply people might buy them. online shopping has benefits for many people, gives them access to goods they might not otherwise have, but it's about making sure online shopping remains something easier and more pleasurable for everyone. we want to see beyond online retailers and banks giving people the tools to make shopping fun and safe —— the online retailers. there's setting a spending limit, so you don't have to
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risk ending up with spiralling costs, all limit in their shopping in the middle of the night when impulse control is more reduced —— or limit. thanks for you much both of you. let me look at what else is coming down the production line. as we said, some floodlights here, and something we might find very useful, an alarm clock. back to you guys. that would be very good for all of us. i do need a new alarm clock. little miss chatterbox and little miss magic have delighted young readers for years but have they inspired young girls in their future careers? a new addition to the series could be set to do just that. this is little miss inventor, she's an engineer and has been created as a positive role model for girls. so is this a canny reinvention or a sea change in the portrayal of female characters? adam hargreaves is the book's author. he's in our tunbridge wells studio and helen wollaston, the chief executive of wise, a campaign for gender balance in science and engineering joins us here in the studio.
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good morning. adam, let's talk to you about what was the inspiration behind little miss inventor? principally it's the idea of a positive role model for children, although essentially mr men and little miss books are about entertaining children and having fun with different perspectives of our personalities. some people will be watching and saying, do we need to pc everything, was that in your mind? do you feel there's a pressure for illustrators and authors to reflect a nd for illustrators and authors to reflect and offer some roles for children to aspire to?” reflect and offer some roles for children to aspire to? i think that's important but quite a small factor in terms of myjob as it
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were. i see it principally as entertaining children with fun stories. helen, what do you make of it, little miss inventor?” stories. helen, what do you make of it, little miss inventor? ithink it is great. i'm really pleased to see a character that's a girl that's inventing things because i want to encourage more girls to explore different things and be able to make things and feel confident they can do that. has there traditionally been a problem? i'm very careful to say this, these are entertainment, children's books, but has there been traditionally a problem of stereotypes we all said and many people like yourself complained about four years, is there a problem in the way children's stories are told? i do. i have a niece and nephew in bristol and it shocks me all the girls toys are pink and the boys' toys are very different. to have that gendered split is wrong
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because it limits the choices and the messages we are sending about what children can be and what they can do. it's not i'm saying every girl should be an engineer or an inventor, but i want to encourage all girls to explore that creative and inventive and curious side. a book that is a character that does thatis book that is a character that does that is going to encourage that. adam, cani that is going to encourage that. adam, can i ask you, are you going to play with the theme of the other way round ? to play with the theme of the other way round? are you going to have a mrmen way round? are you going to have a mr men character who does a role... a storyline attached to something people traditionally associate with a female role? i can't see anything wrong with that. it's not something i have thought of particularly. when i'm thinking about writing a new character or writing a story, i'm thinking about human nature because that's what mr men's all about in terms of what gender you are applied
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to it, it can easily go either way. how do you come up with the ideas? this is a select group of little people and children and adults who enjoy the books like to know who they are and feel familiar with them. introducing a new one, you have to be quite careful.” them. introducing a new one, you have to be quite careful. i guess so. my inspiration is human nature because mr men are based upon our personalities. their personifications of happiness, nosiness, being accidental. —— they are. that's really where my inspiration comes from. it's a point of trying to create something that is really fun and entertaining but also has... shows what we're all about ina also has... shows what we're all about in a way. it's a bit like asking their parent which is their favourite child, have you got a favourite? i think that has to be mr
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silly. he's the character that personifies my father's sense of humour most of all and i think that's what mr men in a way is really about, that daft, silly sense of humour. helen, you're running this competition to encourage toymakers to disrupt the whole gender stereotype. what's the point of that? we hope to encouraged more toy manufacturers to create toys that aren't so stereotyped —— to encourage. that an pink and blue, girls' toys and boys' toys. is it as simple as flipping the gender stereotypes or is it being more creative than that? more creative i think. the toy that won is called the cure city box, it isn't for girls or boys, it is neutral colours, it's been tested with girls and more than half the children that use it are girls —— the cure city
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box. i thought of a different character last night, because of technology, you could have little miss coder —— the curiosity box. that's the future. thank you very much, helen and adam, thanks for your time this morning. just a little bit of news, we will update you about it more through the programme, the south african appeals court has increased 0scar pistorius‘ sentence to a period of 13 years and five months we understand, that was under review and that decision has just come through. 0scar pistorius‘ sentence has been increased to 13 yea rs sentence has been increased to 13 years and five months. we will keep you updated on that throughout the programme. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. the family of a teenage boy who was stabbed to death in wet london last weekend
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say they're living in a nightmare after his senseless murder. jason isaacs, who was 18, was chased by his attackers on two mopeds and repeatedly stabbed in northolt on saturday. detectives have announced a £20,000 reward for help in catching his killer. london's commuter belt has seen a spike in the number of homes left empty for at least six months despite a downward trend across the uk. in harrow, the number of empty homes has risen by more than 500% in a year, by far the largest increase in the country. in wednesday's budget, the government announced that local authorities will get new powers to charge a 100% council tax premium on empty homes. now, many of us will be shopping online in the run up to christmas, but instead of using a delivery van, one company is trialling a greener alternative. it's an electric trolley attached to a bike designed so the rider can't feel the weight of the trailer. there are more than 80,000 delivery vans on london's streets, which contribute to pollution in the capital.
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what we have here today is a cycle solution that, once its complete, will allow us to eliminate one or even more vehicles completely from our operation. so replacing diesel with cycles. travel now. the central line has minor delays westbound between white city, ealing broadway and west ruislip. minor delays too eastbound on the piccadilly line between acton town and arnos grove. those works on the 0verground still going on, it's closed between gospel oak and barking. there's been an accident on the a2. you can see the queues into town towards peckham. and there are long queues on the a12 northbound into essex after an accident between the m25 and shenfield. let's take a look at the weather now with lucy martin. hello, good morning. lots of dry and bright weather as we move to the weekend but with that it will be feeling cold. today we start off with a bit more in the way of cloud but good sunny
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spells developing and a noticeably cooler start to the day than yesterday with temperatures in the single figures. a bit more cloud around through the morning and good sunny spells developing from the north—west as we go into the afternoon. temperatures today at a maximum of ten with lighter winds than yesterday. as we go through this evening and overnight, we'll hold onto varying amounts of cloud but plenty of clear skies which will allow the temperatures to fall away, so a widespread frost. these are the temperatures in towns and cities but in rural areas, cooler than that. a bright, cold and frosty start tomorrow, plenty of sunshine through the morning tending to increase through the afternoon but holding onto good spells of sunshine. a brisk north—westerly breeze so feeling cold with highs of seven. a cold night on sunday and then sunday looking dry and bright with that north—westerly breeze so temperatures struggling into the single figures, a maximum of seven. a frosty start to the day on monday and then we'll see a spell of rain through the morning, which will allow the temperatures
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to rise momentarily before we return to the cooler conditions after that. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. a new era for zimbabwe as thousands gather ahead of the swearing in ceremony for a new president. it will mark the official end of 37 years of rule by robert mugabe. and this is the scene live in the national stadium in harare where the cveremony is due to get underway shortly. good morning, it's
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friday 24th november. a south african court has increased the sentence on 0scar pistorius to 13 years and five months for killing his girlfriend. the children's commisioner for england tells breakfast social media companies need to do more to monitor their sites orface more regulation. like it or not, today is black friday, the discounted shopping days before christmas but does it really lived up to the hype? i am at the amazon headquarters in essex. in sport, australia's captain comes to their rescue. england had torn into the hose with
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jake ball taking the prized wicket of david warner. a half—century from steve smith meant it is evelyn stevens. and nick has the weather. after black friday it is a blue weekend ahead, cold air but plenty of sunshine and also wintry showers and some of us with a dusting of snow this morning, i patches to watch out for, all of that coming up in the next half—hour. good morning. first, our main story. later this morning, zimbabwe will swear in a new president after ten days of extraordinary drama that culminated in the resignation of robert mugabe who was in power for 37 years. 60,000 people will gather at a sports stadium in harare to witness emmerson mnangagwa taking control of the country. 0ur correspondent ben brown is there for us this morning. good morning. good morning, they
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have been packing in here since about six o'clock in the morning and the inauguration is still a couple of hours away. 60,000 seater stadium on the outskirts of harare and there are scenes of greatjoy because this isa are scenes of greatjoy because this is a new era for zimbabwe after all the years of the mugabe, the dictatorship and economic mismanagement and brutal repression, now emmerson mnangagwa will be in charge. people here hope he will be a better president but he does have a better president but he does have a record some would say of human rights abuses, people say he has blood on his hands from a massacre in the 19805 and that he was involved in corruption. i can talk toa involved in corruption. i can talk to a couple of people, nathan is here, why did you want to come?” came to witness a great moment, a
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new dawn for zimbabwe. we're ahead to experience the inauguration of the second president of zimbabwe so i wanted to be here to make ourselves part of this big event and very happy. zimbabwe has been liberated and emancipated from the tyra nt liberated and emancipated from the tyrant mugabe. we're expecting a lot from the new president, expecting him to deal with issues of corruption and unemployment and development and also helps. we're waiting for a change from the new president and we have faith in him so president and we have faith in him so it is high time he has to deliver what we expect. ashley, your broad your children, why did you want to come? —— brought your children.” came because i am very happy there isa came because i am very happy there is a new president. always mugabe was president. now i have my children and they have been asking
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me, what is the name of the new mugabe and isaac is not mugabe. it isa mugabe and isaac is not mugabe. it is a new president. —— and i say it is a new president. —— and i say it is not mugabe. a lot of happy faces, 60,000 people will be here, there will be a 21 gun salute and a fly past. thank you for the moment. ben brown in harare. shoppers are expected to spend more than £1 billion online during black friday. this is a custom that originated in america a few years ago but there is evidence that shoppers are tiring with the annual event. ben is at a warehouse in essex for us this morning. we can almost become immune to all those e—mails that come in telling us about black friday. and it is all about that pressure to feel that you have to buy because time is running
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out to snap up a special offer, get it in the next 12 hours. we have been talking about that because black rider is the discount shopping day before christmas and places like this will be pretty busy —— black friday. we are expected to spend 1.3 brilliant "1.3 —— 1.3 billion browns today that you are right that there is a suggestion that we might be tiring —— £1.3 billion. the numbers are actually down on this time last year. maybe we are getting a bit cynical about those so—called offers. 28% of us think those sales might not be all they are cracked up to be but here they are cracked up to be but here they are cracked up to be but here they are gearing up for up pretty busy day also to explain about what you can see, these yellow units are full of all sorts of things you can buy online. you might be able to see
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the orange robots, they transport the orange robots, they transport the entire unit around this massive warehouse. it is the size of 34 football pitches and rather than workers having to go to shelves, the robots go and get the shelves and bring it to the people so you take it off and put it in the box and send it out. it is a busy time for them right now as the deals kick off for all retailers across the country. we will speak to you later, thank you. in the last few minutes, the severed an appeal court has increased the sentence of paralympic athlete 05car pistorius to 15 years for killing his girlfriend. he had been sentenced to six years in prison for the murder of reeva steenkamp in 2013. he was initially found guilty of manslaughter but that was changed to murder on appeal. he will now spend 13 years
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in prison due to time already served. in total it is now 15 years, his sentence. we will have more on that story in the next few minutes. theresa may will meet the president of the european council, donald tusk, in brussels later as eu leaders gather for a summit. adam fleming is in brussels for us this morning. we saw some arrivals earlier. what can we expect to happen today? theresa may arrived here and she did what we expected, stick to the subject that this summit is all about, not brexit, it is about helping and building a relationship with six countries to the east of the eu. azerbaijan, ukraine, georgia, places like that. there is a big focus on regional security and stability and theresa may made the point that although the uk is leaving the eu it is still unconditionally committed to things like that. she will be pointing for example to the £100 million that the
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uk is preparing to spend over the next five years in that region to cou ntera ct next five years in that region to counteract russian propaganda, disinformation and fake news, making the point that the uk is leaving the institutions of the eu but is still committed to working with its neighbours. she will have that meeting with donald tusk this afternoon. i don't expect any big developments or leaps forward in the brexit process, this is about a series of little diplomatic steps leading up to the next time we will all be here on the 14th of december when eu leaders will decide if enough progress has been made in the brexit talks to start talking about trade and the future relationship with the uk. thank you. the children's commisioner for england has told bbc breakfast social media companies need to do more to monitor their sites orface more regulation. it comes after a bbc investigation was told of a flaw with one of the ways youtube deals with inappropriate comments. volunteers who monitor those comments say it means potentially predatory behaviour has not been removed, even after it
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has been reported. the site has denied any technical failure, and says content that endangers children is abhorrent and unacceptable. the companies are part of everyday life now fought so many children, they are multi—billion pound companies that really have a huge impact on children's lives. they are clever people and can employ people who can make this sort of stuff stopped, removing it from the content and that is what i am asking them to do. and what if they don't? i think they are looking at potentially regulation, minimum standards potentially, but again they will not be a trusted part of peoples lives is children and families cannot have that confidence. it is a balance and they need to keep on right side of this. that was the children's commissioner speaking to us earlier. relatives of the 44 crew members on board the missing argentine
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submarine had their hopes dashed yesterday when it was revealed an explosion had been detected near its last known location. the sanjuan left the southern tip of argentina almost two weeks ago heading back to the mar del plata naval base. the last contact with the submarine was on the 15th of november. the uk, the usa and russia arejust some of the countries involved in the rescue effort. the submarine was built in 1983, and relatives are now blaming the government for allowing the crew on board the vessel they say was "unsafe". joining us now is the former submariner kevin errington. thank you for talking to us. i am assuming you have been following these events and the confusion is, it does feel like hopes have been dashed because of this noise with some are interpreting as an explosion on board. the feeling at
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the moment among the submarine community nationally and internationally, all the chaps and the girls as well, is that we are still hoping that they will be found successfully. the longer it goes on, the less likely the outcome will be because of the lack of communication. can you explain what is different about this vessel? my limited understanding is that oxygen can be produced on submarines but not with this one? this one should have, both nuclear and diesel submarines have oxygen generating capabilities and also c02 absorption capabilities and also c02 absorption capabilities so you can scrub the air. 0n capabilities so you can scrub the air. on our boat we had something called an oxygen generator which could generate oxygen for you.
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u nfortu nately, could generate oxygen for you. unfortunately, you only have a limited time that this will work. because the air inside will get increasingly foul and difficult to breathe. but it does give you that moment where you can buy time with it. there are various things, it is difficult, we don't speculate, none of us on our website are speculating about what has gone on, it is just our thoughts are with the crew and theirfamilies. you our thoughts are with the crew and their families. you have our thoughts are with the crew and theirfamilies. you have to remember, our families also serve even though they are not out there doing thejob even though they are not out there doing the job itself. even though they are not out there doing thejob itself. they even though they are not out there doing the job itself. they waved goodbye to their loved ones and hopefully they will return. u nfortu nately hopefully they will return. unfortunately in case they have gone missing. but we still have hope, until the moment the boat is found and they can say yes or no, we still hope. we are seeing the images, the
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desperate situation for the families of those on board. give us a thought about the search operation. people might think on the face of it, they think of submarines as things with amazing technological innovations on board, including communication devices, so why can't we locate it? by devices, so why can't we locate it? by the very nature of the job, it is called the silent service. when a submarine goes to see, it slips below the waves and it has a patrol area and we don't give away where we area and we don't give away where we are and what we are doing. generally, in peace time can you give a diving signal, we are diving and we are expected to surface at a particular time and you wait for that signal. wartime is different, they used to go out and say, we will be back in six weeks, they would have a patrol area but you would not know where they were. they could receive but not transmit because you would give away your position. and
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if you are on exercise, they try to find you, you are in a certain operating area, it could be massive or small, but you are in that spot and until you pop up and say hello, we are back again, you don't know where they are. it can be difficult. nobody on any of our forums, and we have people from all over the world on them, are speculating about this has gone wrong or this has happened or what we just want their safe return. thank you for your expertise this morning. that is kevin errington. let's talk to nick and find out about what is happening with the weather. good morning. many of us having a sunny start this
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morning, but cold air across the uk today, and it is staying with us through the weekend. a lot of us will see dry weather, some lovely crisp sunshine in the arctic air, but there will be some of these wintry showers to be had. a lot of them falling over the weekend as sleet and snow, this is the picture this morning in scotland. snow on the higher routes this morning, and icy patches for northern ireland as well as we see showers coming eastwards over the next few hours. across northern england, the midlands, wales, east anglia, good sunshine to begin with, but southern parts of england have more cloud around. a scattering of heavy showers across parts of the south—west, especially cornwall and devon. 0ne south—west, especially cornwall and devon. one or two more to come, running east along the coastal counties, particularly near the south coast the day. elsewhere, the sunshine continuing, moving across northern ireland and into parts of
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england, 10 degrees in london but most of us falling well short of that. light winds for many of us today, still breezy in northern scotland. we will find tonight the wind picking up a bit of blowing more showers south—east across the uk. some sleet and snow to hills, but to lower levels, and rural temperatures will be lower than this. expecting a widespread frost is the weekend begins, some of us will be scraping ice off the cars again. low pressure to the north of us, so it is the flow of air around these pressure systems are bringing these pressure systems are bringing the air down the arctic, but great visibility in this clean arctic air, lots of sunshine to come, but a stronger, colder wind and more of these sleet and snow showers, parts of wales, pushing into the midlands, a few into the far south—west. temperatures come down a little
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further, but the wind is stronger and it will feel colder as a result, some of us will feel like it is below freezing. there will be another frost for the second part of the weekend on sunday to begin with, a lot of dry, sunny weather to come especially in the east. still a scattering of wintry showers to the west, they will tend to become more rain at lower levels, snow and sleet on the hills. and briefly, less cold on the hills. and briefly, less cold on monday, but don't get used to it, temperatures come down again next week, single figures pretty much throughout. cold air with us for the weekend. thank you, nick. 1.2 million women and more than 700,000 men reported some form of domestic abuse last year in england and wales. for those who need a safe place to go to, refuges are a lifeline. but the charity women's aid has told this programme that on just one day this year, nearly 200 women and children were turned away from their refuges because they didn't have enough beds.
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fiona lamden has been hearing one woman's story. when people say, why didn't you just leave, i want them to understand that it's just not that simple. how could i leave? this man he was going to kill me. you know, it's so complex, and people just don't understand. for that person to have so much power over you makes it impossible. it took charlotte nine years to find the courage to leave her husband and finally report him to the police. she and her children went first to a refuge and later to a new home. charlotte's husband was convicted and given a seven—year prison sentence. but her two daughters say the memories of what he did will stay with them forever. we ended up going into hiding while the court case was on. i was very confused because i grew up with this man and to me he was my dad. i've felt abandoned, it was sort of a loss for me. the latest crime survey for england
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and wales shows 1.2 million women and more than 700,000 men reported some form of domestic abuse in the last year. with one in ten women between 16 and 19 saying they've experienced abuse. charity women's aid says on one day this year they were helping more than 4,500 women and children at refuges in england. but on that same day had to turn away almost 200 more because they didn't have enough room. years after the charity helped her and herfamily, charlotte now works for a women's aid refuge in surrey. there's always a waiting list here. the last family left an heupage. children are on their way here now. it's expected they'll arrive with very little. so here, just a few basics to help them start their new life.
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women's lives are already at risk and i think this statistic is something like over to women a week are murdered in england and wales. if there weren't the refuges that there are now, that figure will go up. i already fear when we have to say to somebody, sorry, no, we're full, i already fear, where's that woman going to go? the government says it has committed £40 million until 2020 and is introducing a domestic violence and abuse bill to protect and support victims and their children. meanwhile, charlotte says she'll do everything she can to help other women like her. i could sit here and not tell you my story, but if i gave in to that and gave in to that fear of thinking, is he watching, what's he going to do? then i've lost and he's won, and that's never going to happen. so i'm continuing to speak out, and that's why i'm talking to you, because it's really important
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and nobody‘s going to stop me doing that. katie ghose is the ceo of women's aid. a very brave story, to try to finally make that break, but when they get somewhere, there are no places. it is a tragedy. domestic abuse is an epidemic, and we know that many women and children would be in that situation of having to flee in abusive relationship and to start all over again. i have been to her refuge and it does amazing work, they are already operating on a shoestring and have already had to close their doors in many cases, and we are looking to the government to work with us and to guarantee the future of refugees so that any woman and child in charlotte's situation will have somewhere to go to and
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they can recover from the trauma and rebuild their lives. you say it is an epidemic, so how many beds, how many rooms to you need on a permanent basis so that they are available for any person, male or female, in trouble? 13,000 women and 13,000 children were in refuges last year. we don't know what they need is because so many women cannot speak out or sometimes tragically they do speak out but they are not a lwa ys they do speak out but they are not always believed. we know that the demand will only go up as we have a society where people can be brave like charlotte and speak out and get the help they need. we are looking to the government to give a cast—iron guarantee that they will abandon the proposals they have come up abandon the proposals they have come up with a round funding so far, and work with us and everyone else to come up with a sustainable solution. how much will that cost? it will cost far more if the money is spent on the refuges and places. think about the human cost, the financial costs if you wait. unfortunately we
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do have to talk about figures, we have just had the budget this week, talking to philip hammond, he is under immense pressure to find that money, so what figure do you need to put on this for the government to say, we can meet that? you are absolutely right, we do need to put absolutely right, we do need to put a figure on it, but the government is just about to announce a law which is fantastic on domestic abuse and violence, and we think that will make demand go up, that is a good thing if people are coming forward for the support they need. other moment we spend pennies on domestic abuse services in this country. if we spent pounds, the cost, the health and education costs, would be reduced, if everybody had the right response the first time around. presumably if women or men in these situations don't feel the confidence of having a place to go to, that is a deterrent from doing anything about the situation you are in the first place, because you feel you have nowhere to go, so you would
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maybe stay in a terrible circumstance for longer.” maybe stay in a terrible circumstance for longer. i meet women and children every week who have been put in that situation where they have wanted to seek help and go to a service, and the services are not there. we can have the best police response in the world when a woman calls out for help. if that isn't the local support there, the emergency place of safety, the other practical support that she needs to get her life together, then more women will stay in abusive relationships. the department for communities and local government has said it has already committed £40 million until 202476 domestic abuse project across england, providing more than 2200 beds and helping 19,000 people. —— until 2020, for 76 domestic abuse projects. that means some projects have been able to stay open and not close their doors, but what we need now is a long—term solution. two thirds of women flee outside of
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their area because they fear being hunted down by the perpetrator, so we need a government to come forward with a solution that recognises that refuges a re with a solution that recognises that refuges are a national network. katie, thank you very much, katie ghose is from women's aid. details of organisations offering information and support with domestic violence are available at bbc.co.uk/actionline. and you can call for free at any time to hear recorded information on 08000 888 809. the time now is 8:26am. we will be speaking to kenny dalglish later in the programme. it is rare for him to give interviews, and he will be looking back on what was an extraordinary football career, but also talking in a new film and talking to us this morning about some of the events he has been
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involved in, including of course hillsborough, and the ibrox stadium tragedies that have peppered his career in football. he will be here later on. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. morning, a pretty cold start but we have sunshine across many parts of the uk today. cold weather for many of us with sunny spells with the headline and we have some showers in the forecast which are giving us some snow over the higher ground in scotla nd some snow over the higher ground in scotland and northern ireland, watch out for ice in those areas. for many of us, a lot of sunshine go into the afternoon with a few showers in the south and chillier in the south—east compared to yesterday with temperatures 7—9d, only three or four celsius further north. win to reach out feeding into scotland and northern ireland and northern england and wales overnight and with
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the showers and temperatures close to freezing there is the risk of ice first thing on saturday. a cold start to the weekend, a brisk north—westerly wind which will make it feel colder certainly on saturday. might come across but also for many some sunshine —— night—time frosts. some ice in northern and western areas and through saturday it is similarto western areas and through saturday it is similar to today with wintry showers across scotland, northern ireland, north—west england and wales and they can turn into snow over higher ground but sunshine further south and east and temperatures around 4—7d. 0n further south and east and temperatures around 4—7d. on sunday, still this north—westerly and that cold aircoming in, still this north—westerly and that cold air coming in, not quite as windy so perhaps not feeling quite as cold. still some showers in coastal areas, some hill slope but drier and brighter in the south—east
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certainly and temperatures of 4—7. more details on the website. that is all from me. this is business live from bbc news with ben bland and samantha simmonds. it's a multi—billion dollar bonanza. black friday sales have spread around the world but how much extra will we actually spend? live from london, that's our top story on friday 24th november 2017. the post—thanksgiving discounts started in america but retailers are looking to cash in on the holiday spending season everywhere. also in the programme... china gives us the details of its plans to cut import tariffs so will it help the rest of the world sell more to the world's biggest market? we will be keeping an
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