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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  November 24, 2017 9:00am-11:01am GMT

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hello. it is friday, welcome to the programme. scenes ofjubilation in zimbabwe today as the country gets a new president. emmerson mnangagwa will be sworn in to lead the country three days after robert mugabe was forced out in a military take over after 37 years. this is the scene now in the stadium where crowds are waiting for the new president to take the oath of office in about half an hour's time. we will be live throughout the programme at the national stadium in harare. theresa may is meeting the president of the european council, donald tusk, in brussels today. they will discuss european security and the progress in the brexit talks. the united kingdom is unconditionally committed to continuing to play our leading role in maintaining europe's security. we may be leaving the european union but we are not leaving europe. we
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will have the latest from brussels. oscar pistorius has had his murder sentence more than doubled by a judge. the south african athlete was jailed last year after being found guilty on appeal of murdering his girlfriend, reeva steenkamp, on valentine's day 2013. hello. welcome to the programme. we're live until ”am this morning. we're going to be talking to two primary schools headteacher is about the difficulty of the teaching jobs with questions about whether the job is too stressful and worries about funding. we will also have the latest from zimbabwe as the new president is sworn in. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning, use the hashtag victorialive. and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today..
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theresa may will meet the president of the european council, donald tusk, in brussels today, the first such high—level encounter since the prime minister secured the backing of her cabinet to increase britain's divorce payment. the summit will address the eu's relationship with its eastern neighbours, but discussions on the fringes of the meeting will focus on brexit. she's already been challenged on the divorce bill as she arrived in brussels. let's just hear what she had to say. the summit here today is about working with our eastern partners but of course i will be having other meetings, i will be seeing president tusk here today talking about the positive discussions, positive negotiations we are having, looking ahead to the future deep and special partnership that i want... are you putting a figure on a table? that i want with the european union. these negotiations are continuing. what i am clear about is that we must step forward together. this is for the uk and the european union to move on to the next stage. adam fleming can give us the latest.
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what can you tell us? this summit is called the eastern partnership summitand it called the eastern partnership summit and it is all about eu leaders sitting down with leaders of six countries to the east of the eu are talking about security and stability. brexit is not officially on the agenda or that it has reared its head and theresa may was saying that even though diedhiou —— of the uk is leaving the eu, it is still unconditionally committed to security across the continent and she will point as an example to the £100 million the uk is preparing to spend the next five years in that region to counter russian fake news, propaganda and disinformation but the fact is there were reminders of the fact is there were reminders of the brexit prose is all around. this is the irish foreign minister arriving a few minutes ago, he talked about how he wanted written commitment from the uk about how they planned to avoid a so—called ha rd they planned to avoid a so—called hard border between northern ireland
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and the republic of ireland. the chancellor of austria reminded everybody that there still is to be an agreement on how to calculate the uk financial obligations as it leaves and john coyle junk up saying that he will be having a crunch meeting with theresa may in brussels in december —— jean meeting with theresa may in brussels in december ——jean claudejunker. the big thing we are looking forward to is the meeting between theresa may and donald tusk who is the man who chairs these summits and he will be chairing the summit on the 14th and 15th of december where eu leaders will decide if there has beenin leaders will decide if there has been in progress in this first phase of brexit talks all about divorce related issues like money for the talks to move on to the second phase which is trade and a future relationship and the possible transition deal. i don't think that meeting will be a massive step forward today, it'll be a small step ina forward today, it'll be a small step in a bigger diplomatic dance that will a couple of weeks and will culminate next time we are all here in brussels in the middle of next on
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you. we can go now to the newsroom for a you. we can go now to the newsroom fora summary of you. we can go now to the newsroom for a summary of the rest of the news today. good morning. zimbabwe is preparing to swear in a new president this morning after ten days of extraordinary drama that culminated in the resignation of robert mugabe, who'd ruled for 37 years. zimbabwe's army and mr mugabe's party, zanu—pf, turned on him after he dismissed his deputy, emmerson mnangagwa, the man who's about to replace him. 0ur correspondent, tom burridge, reports. cheering. the reaction when robert mugabe resigned shows how high expectations are about what comes next in zimbabwe. with a crumbling economy, most people wantjobs. we have degrees but we don't havejobs. we are looking forjobs. every other day, we were sending cvs but we don't have jobs at all. the man who will be inaugurated as president today
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and is tasked with changing that is emmerson mnangagwa, hailed as a hero by supporters when he returned two days ago. here, being sworn in as vice—president, he was once mugabe's right—hand man but when mugabe sacked him, the army stepped in and carried out what was, in the end, a peaceful and popular coup. a crocodile... mnangagwa's supporters call him ‘the crocodile' for his political cunning. his opponents question whether he represents real change. the first thing that needs to be transformed is the culture. the culture of violence, the culture of corruption. we need to change that culture. so a new president today. hope that life here can improve. but the challenge is vast for zimbabwe in a new political era. tom burridge, bbc news. moving on to south africa.
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ajudge in south africa has more than doubled the jail term for the athlete 0scar pistorius who murdered his girlfriend, reeva steenkamp. the sentence has gone up from six years to 13 years and five months. reeva steenkamp's family say the ruling has "verified that there is justice". the families of 44 sailors on board an argentine submarine that disappeared in the south atlantic say they've given up hope. the argentine navy thinks there was an explosion on the vessel. jonathan beale reports. it's known as the silent service but there's been no communication from the sanjuan and her 44 crew for more than a week. the search had already reached a critical phase with fears this submarine would soon be running out of air. now, more worrying news — scientists confirm they detected
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an abnormal sound in the water near her last known location. an argentine navy spokesman said it was a short, single, violent event, consistent with an explosion. it's a bitter blow for relatives. just a few days ago, they had been wrongly told that there had been attempts by the submarine to make contact. now they feel betrayed. translation: i feel cheated. they are swines. translation: i feel cheated. the sanjuan left the southern tip of argentina almost two weeks ago. she was on a 2,000—mile journey back to mar del plata when she reported an electrical failure. the last communication home was last wednesday, the same day they have identified that sound like an explosion. it now seems unlikely their prayers will be answered. for the families of the 44 crew, hopes of a miraculous rescue have
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all but disappeared. jonathan beale, bbc news. the actor uma thurman has broken her silence about the disgraced hollywood producer harvey weinstein by posting something of a cryptic message. she praised other women for coming forward last month but said she was too angry to comment herself but now in a post on instagram she has said... she says you don't deserve a bullet.
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harvey 12 jameis —— harvey weinstein denies engaging in nonconsensual sexual conduct. a key part of youtube's system for reporting people who leave sexualised comments on videos of children has not been functioning correctly for more than a year according to volunteer moderators with inside knowledge of the site. youtube has denied any technical failure. there are warnings in dublin that a political row could force the irish government to call a snap election. the opposition fianna fail party, which has been supporting the minority fine gael government, says it will table a motion of no confidence in the deputy prime minister. the prime minister, leo varadkar, has vowed to stand by frances fitzgerald, even if that leads to the collapse of the government. research suggests people with schizophrenia can benefit from a new therapy that gets them to talk face—to—face with a computer representation of the voices they hear. the study, published in the journal lancet psychiatry, found that the therapy was more effective at reducing hallucinations
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than supportive counselling. tom baker has returned to the tardis to film part of an unfinished dr who episode from 1979. wearing his trademark long stripy scarf and coat, the 83—year—old actor shot the scene on the original set at the bbc‘s television centre. the episode, shada, wasn't made at the time because of an engineering strike. definitely one for the fans to watch out for. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 9.30am. do get in touch with us throughout the morning. use the hashtag victorialive and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. time to get some sport now and quite a day in the first ashes test match with the advantage swinging between england and australia and ending up in the middle? i would agree, it was an entertaining second day and for much england looked to be on top but it is still pretty much level
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pegging going into what could be a pivotal third day at the gabba. england might be happier but maybe tinged with regret as to what could have been because a half—century from dawid malan was good but the first innings did not end as england would have hoped, losing six wickets for 56 runs and all out in the end for 56 runs and all out in the end for 302. but the bowlers did well, stuart broad had cameron bancroft out for just five and jake ball got the experienced david warner as he threatened to get going but with australia struggling at 76—11, captain steve smith showed how it was done with an unbeaten half—ce ntu ry was done with an unbeaten half—century and that helped australia to end the day on 165—4 but england still have a healthy lead of 137 going into the third day with the match delicately poised. dawid malan impressed with the half—ce ntu ry dawid malan impressed with the half—century and jake ball was amongst the wickets. it is always
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nice to get the big wicket. we sort of see warner and smith as the two make australian players. for me to get one of their big players out is very satisfying. —— main players. we feel we are in a decent position. if we can come out in the morning, get a good nights rest and come out hard in the morning and get a couple out, you are into the tail and that is a good position to be in. that is what england will be looking for. much like the australia and this morning, they will want to take quick wickets at if they end ahead on first things they will be happy. talking about michael owen, he has taken a step further than being a racehorse owner? he was known as a speedster in his football days. we will see if he is faster on a horse
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because at lunchtime he will be riding for the first and as a jockey ina riding for the first and as a jockey in a charity race at ascot. he owns horses and has a training stable but has never got into the saddle before. he will be watched by the prince of wales and the duchess of cornwall. what we're dealing with here is 550 kilos of puel muscles thatis here is 550 kilos of puel muscles that is bred and trained to explode into life — — that is bred and trained to explode into life —— up your — pure —— pure muscle. i had to lose some weight. we will see if he is any good later, it should be interesting. thank you very much, we will speak to you later. let's show you the jubilant scenes in zimbabwe this morning, where in the next hour or so a new president will be sworn in after ten days of extraordinary drama that culminated in the resignation of robert mugabe, who'd ruled for 37 years. zimbabwe's army and mr mugabe's party, zanu—pf, turned on him
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after he dismissed his deputy, emmerson mnangagwa, the man who's about to replace him. lets go straight to the capital harare now and ben brown is at the ceremony. it is an extraordinary atmosphere here. we are the national sports stadium just outside harare, a capacity of 60000 and it is pretty much full. you can see huge crowds have come here to watch the inauguration of emmerson mnangagwa, the new president of zimbabwe, after 37 years of rule by robert mugabe. this is a real moment of history. we have said that a few times in the last few days, the huge demonstrations we saw on the streets and then the dramatic resignation of robert mugabe himself, and now the
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inauguration of the new man, emmerson mnangagwa. will he be a breath of fresh air? at huge change for zimbabwe? that is what this whole country is hoping for. we have heard from government sources here that robert mugabe himself will not, surprise surprise, be attending the ceremony where his successor will be sworn in. let me bring in somebody who is here to watch the inauguration. why did you want to come here today? i wanted to come here to watch the inauguration of the new president. this is a big day for us, this is the new zimbabwe and we are expecting so much from the new president. but can he deliver? will he deliver real change?” new president. but can he deliver? will he deliver real change? i think he will deliver, because he has gone through the liberation struggle, he has seen everything that was going
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on after independence, up to this very day. he has seen people going jobless, companies being closed, food shortages, money shortages. so i'm very sure that he will be able to deliver, because he knows what has been going on. what is it you wa nt really ? has been going on. what is it you want really? freedom and democracy, but also economic change? everyone i talked to say they need jobs, 90% unemployment here, nobody has a job. what we are looking at is we need jobs. the majority of zimbabweans i now unemployed, so we look forward to having new jobs, now unemployed, so we look forward to having newjobs, new accommodations, you name it, fathauer children. let's have a future, a better life for them. thank you very much indeed. have a good day, enjoyed. thank you so much. so, a lot of hope, and a lot of expectation as well. but there are questions about this man, emmerson mnangagwa. he has been
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nicknamed the crocodile because of his cunning and wily ways as a political operative. he was a pretty ruthless henchmen in the mugabe yea rs, ruthless henchmen in the mugabe years, and he has a record of some human rights abuses allegedly, critics say that he was implicated in the massacres in matabeleland in 19805, in the massacres in matabeleland in 1980s, so people will be watching him very carefully. we know there is a two hour time difference, we talk about it being a historic day. what we expect to happen during the ceremony for the rest of the morning? let me run you through it. i'm not sure that things are running to time, but it is supposed to begin in 15 minutes whether chiefjustice of supposed to begin in 15 minutes whether chief justice of zimbabwe will administer the oath of office to the new president. then we will see the commander of the defence forces, general chiwenga, the man
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who effectively carried out the military takeover here, who some would say has put mr mnangagwa into power, and he will swear allegiance to the new president, and then there will be more celebrations, a 21 gun salute and a fly past. and the people here just incredibly excited, optimistic as well. ben, for now, thank you very much. we will rejoin ben at the inauguration ceremony in zimbabwe later on this morning. let's talk now to our guests. in the zimbabwean capital we have priscilla misihairabwi, who is an opposition mp. silvanos mudzvova is from zimbabwe but now lives in manchester. he says he was abducted by state agents, tortured and left for dead. and we can also speak to zenzele ndebele who is a resident of bulawayo. good morning to you all. what happened to you, first of all?|j good morning to you all. what happened to you, first of all? i am a performing arts activist, and in
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september 2016 i was abducted, and they came to my house in the middle of the night. they knocked the door down, and forcibly took me. they took me about a0 kilometres outside harare, and then they started torturing me, all over my body, and they electrocute it only on my toes and private parts, and as a result, asa and private parts, and as a result, as a result of that, i was hospitalised for four weeks, and after coming out of hospital, the whole of my left side is now paralysed because of that. silvanos, what message were you trying to get across? i always do plays that deal
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with human rights, good governance, accountability, so i most of the time took them to the friend of the parliament of zimbabwe so that the mps can actually take action about theissues mps can actually take action about the issues that i will be raising in all the plays that i will be doing. and despite what happens, your activism is performance, isn't it? you continue to perform? yes. after coming from hospital, i started my physiotherapy. i went again to the parliament and did two performances again. ifelt that parliament and did two performances again. i felt that it was a calling that i had to actually use my talent in the arts for me to convey the messages, mostly if it is to do with corruption. the minister for messages, mostly if it is to do with corruption. the ministerfor higher
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and tertiary education, jonathan moyo, stole about 500,000 american dollars. everybody was shocked that those grants existed, he stole the grants, soi those grants existed, he stole the grants, so i felt that i needed to raise the issue. so i thought that even despite that i am now disabled, i cannot stop doing what i know, and i cannot stop doing what i know, and i cannot stop doing what i know, and i cannot stop demanding justice. how hopeful are you that things will change with a new leader? you are here in the uk at the moment, the inauguration is happening in zimbabwe right now. well, yes, in terms of other sectors, yes, there might be change. because for most people, emmerson mnangagwa is a person of reform. in terms of business, he could change the laws
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that were created by the mugabe regime. most people feel that mugabe was doing a personalfight, but in terms of changing the human rights, this was the same guy who was in charge of the security, despite the fa ct charge of the security, despite the fact that he was actually the vice president, but he was directly in charge of those two ministries, and the institutions have been violating a lot of human rights. the departments that are also responsible for making sure that people are not allowed to demonstrate, to go in the streets to voice their own concerns, so looking at the electoral fraud, i don't see anything changing just because there isa anything changing just because there is a change of face from mugabe to mnangagwa. he might try to improve on other issues, like family,
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mining, but in terms of human rights... can we leave it right there for the moment, because i want to bring in prison. when man —— when emmerson mnangagwa returned, he said he wanted to bring in more jobs. but what is he going to do with the human rights violations, in terms of what happened in this particular coup? have any human rights violations have taken place? and no one is talking about it. what will he be able to do in his time in power, so between now and elections next year in september? fundamentally, the question is where does power light? if power lies with him, then the first things that one would advise him to do, if he is able to do, is to obviously create
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the best government, but broad—based, which can influence the things that the last colleague is talking about, to begin to talk about the human rights violations, to begin to talk about the security sector, to begin to talk about creating a free and fair environment. because clearly we wanted mugabe to go, but we did not wa nt wanted mugabe to go, but we did not want someone wanted mugabe to go, but we did not want someone was in wanted mugabe to go, but we did not want someone was in control. so is mnangagwa his own person, or is he under control of the army? and if he is under control of the army, we have a real problem on our hands. what is the mood like they're at the moment? we can see pictures of the inauguration ceremony taking place, thousands of people have packed the stadium, it is full of dignitaries as well. does that reflect the mood outside? certainly. as you may know, for the people of zimbabwe, the one
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person who was creating all the problems that we had going through, nojobs, lack of problems that we had going through, no jobs, lack of freedom, was problems that we had going through, nojobs, lack of freedom, was robert mugabe. we know that it is the system, and not just mugabe. we know that it is the system, and notjust robert mugabe, but for the person in the street, the removal of mugabe is the removal of all the problems that they went through, and that is the expectation that people have. and we live to see how much of that emmerson mnangagwa will be able to deliver. zenzele ndebele, let's come to you, how do you feel about today?” ndebele, let's come to you, how do you feel about today? i am excited about the departure of robert mugabe, but very cautious, because as the people previously have said, this isjust the beginning of the process. mugabe has gone, but the syste m process. mugabe has gone, but the system that kept him in power was there. mnangagwa is there, his election agent in 2008 when he lost the elections and refused to go, he
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is the president today, so we know that mnangagwa is not a saint, he is not the messiah, so we are not about to make a biblical change. mnangagwa was mugabe's right—hand man and a member of the party for decades. so what other problems he needs to address to significantly change the way things are and improve the economy, which is a big problem at the moment? the biggest problem for mnangagwa here is his legacy when it comes to the future. he said a lot of hate speech like calling certain groups cockroaches. he even said that those who follow the path of
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zanni pf will survive, but those who follow the opposition will die very fast. so still lots of relatives we re fast. so still lots of relatives were injured or died because of mnangagwa's speech. he once legitimately in the party because he took power by force, but the first thing that he needs to do is to acknowledge his role, and apologise, and then the issue will go, even if he is not on it? if today he doesn't mention that in his speech, then we will know that he is not serious about that. priscilla, what does the future hold for the 93—year—old robert mugabe, who has been given assurances? well, i'm sure he will be protected, because one of the biggest problems that mnangagwa is
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going to have is there are a lot of people who are around him who themselves, the things that mugabe was responsible for, whether it is corruption, those people who are at the centre of mnangagwa's campaign who are around him right now, they are not the people that inspire confidence in us. they are not the people that have a clean past. and i can see robert mugabe surviving this and being left to go, because anything that takes an robert mugabe and his kind fundamentally means all of those that have still survived, because they would have to put their issues on the table. if you are going to get rid of everybody who is corrupt, 90% of the people that are still around mnangagwa are corrupt themselves. sol still around mnangagwa are corrupt themselves. so i can see robert mugabe surviving this pretty well.
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silvanos, what else are you hoping to hear in the new president's opening speech? i want to hear about the changes, mostly to do with the elections. how is he actually going to do it? is he going to align the new constitution with the old one? will there be a lot of changes in providing a lot of industries? and even his own way of hindering the creative sector in zimbabwe, which is one of the things which has never been funded by the government since 1980. the last funding that was done for the creative sector was done by the smith government. so that is one of the things that i am hoping for as an artist. at the same time, i wa nt to as an artist. at the same time, i want to know what is he actually going to do about employment creation, which is very critical, also of our country. we have an
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unemployment rate of 95%, which is really shocking. we cannot go forward and win any election with 95% unemployment rate. but at the same time, i am also looking and thinking, why can he not be inclusive in his government when he is actually going to come in? we need to rebuild our nation, look at people who came out on saturday. we are so divided. robert mugabe was dividing us on racial lines, and tribes. that is one thing that i expect to end. we need unity and concentration in the country. things have been happening since 1982. we need healing from that, and also what actually happened in 2008. we mustn't expecting to actually say, all the people, people like me, we should be allowed even to open
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police dockets, just a police docket for them to acknowledge that something happened to me. we need to know what actually happened to a personal friend of know what actually happened to a personalfriend of mine know what actually happened to a personal friend of mine who died. those are the critical thing is that iam those are the critical thing is that i am looking at, not speeches where he is actually going to promise us heaven on earth, yet we know we are still miles away. and i would be so excited if he can make it inclusive, and then we can have electron or is in the next 3—5 years. it would help us in the next 3—5 years. it would help us to have elections in 2018 with an environment that has not changed. we are hoping to come back to you but we are going to get an update on the news and sport. theresa may has again urged the european union to move past the initial stage of the brexit negotiations and start talking about a future trade deal. she made the comments as she arrived at a summit of eu states and eastern european partner
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countries, at which she will meet the president of the european council, donald tusk. in the last hour, a judge in south africa has more than doubled the jail term for the athlete oscar pistorius who murdered his girlfriend, reeva steenkamp. the sentence has gone up from six years to 13 years and five months. reeva steenkamp's family welcomed the ruling and said it showed justice could prevail in south africa. the actor uma thurman has broken her silence about the disgraced hollywood producer harvey weinstein by posting something of a cryptic message on instagram. she worked with harvey weinstein on several films and said she was waiting to feel less angry before speaking about the hollywood sexual harassment scandal. she now suggested she had been the target of u nwa nted suggested she had been the target of unwanted sexual advances. harvey weinstein denies engaging in "non—consensual sexual conduct".
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a key part of youtube's system for reporting people who leave sexualised comments on videos of children has not been functioning correctly for more than a year according to volunteer moderators with inside knowledge of the site. youtube has denied any technical failure. there are warnings in dublin that a political row could force the irish government to call a snap election. the opposition fianna fail party, which has been supporting the minority fine gael government, says it will table a motion of no confidence in the deputy prime minister. the prime minister, leo varadkar, has vowed to stand by frances fitzgerald, even if that leads to the collapse of the government. research suggests people with schizophrenia can benefit from a new therapy that gets them to talk face—to—face with a computer representation of the voices they hear. the study, published in the journal lancet psychiatry, found that the therapy was more effective at reducing hallucinations than supportive counselling. that's a summary of
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the latest bbc news. we can go live to the inauguration ceremony in zimbabwe where crowds have gathered in the stadium in the capital, harare, to witness the swearing in of emmerson mnangagwa as the president. the oath of office is about to be taken. we can see the pictures, fantastic crowds turned out to support the new president. robert mugabe is not there. he was supposed to attend but has not arrived with his wife, grace. he was supposed to be inspecting the guard of honour but that will not happen. the party wanted to give the impression of a natural transfer of power and not a military to. it is
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taking place in the national sports stadium. it is an historic day in the history of zimbabwe with the country hopeful for change and a new beginning. robert mugabe has been in power for 37 years. the former vice president who is taking up the presidency was dismissed earlier this month which is why we are where we are. he led the zanu—pf party, the army intervened and forced mr mugabe to quit, reluctantly and we can now listen into what is happening. these are the pictures live from the
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national stadium in harare and we are expecting the swearing in to happen any moment now. may i now have the privilege and honour to invite the incoming president, comrades emmerson mnangagwa, to proceed to take the oath of office of the president. cheering your excellencies, invited guests, distinguished invited guests from your excellencies, please take your seats. in terms of section 96, subsection
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one of the constitution, the former president of the republic of zimbabwe, by written notice has notified the speaker of parliament of his resignation from office of the president. and whereas in terms of paragraph 1a, subparagraph a b of
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the sixth schedule of the constitution, a vacancy in the office of the president must be filled by a nominee of the political party which is a former president representative. and whereas in terms of paragraph 1a, subparagraph five of paragraph 1a, subparagraph five of the sixth schedule, the ruling party, zanu—pf, has nominated emmerson dambudzo mnangagwa. .. cheering as the candidate, as the party's
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candidate to assume the office of the president. and whereas in terms of section 9a of the constitution, the president must take before the chiefjustice the oath of president in the form set out in the third schedule. now therefore i, chief justice of the republic of zimbabwe, do hereby call upon you, emmerson
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dambudzo mnangagwa, to take the oath of president. cheering i. i, emmerson dambudzo mnangagwa, swear that, as a resident of the republic of zimbabwe, i will be faithful... cheering to zimbabwe and obey, uphold and defend the constitution and all other laws of zimbabwe. and that i
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will promote whatever will advance and oppose whatever may harm zimbabwe. that i will protect and promote the rights of the people of zimbabwe. cheering that i will discharge my duties with all my strength to the best of my knowledge and ability and hold true to the dictates to mike conscience andl to the dictates to mike conscience and i devote myself to the well— being of zimbabwe and i devote myself to the well—being of zimbabwe and and i devote myself to the well— being of zimbabwe and its people. so help me god! cheering
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cheering thank you. thank you. congratulations. i'm happy for you. we have just witnessed an historic moment in zimbabwe's history, the new president, emmerson mnangagwa,
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being sworn in as president. zimbabwe has just seen the swearing into office his excellency the new president of zimbabwe, emmerson mnangagwa. cheering studio: the new president, emmerson mnangagwa, being presented with the new medal of office, the official signing in ceremony hasjust new medal of office, the official signing in ceremony has just taken place. an oath of office, the signing in ceremony, the dawning of a sash and a pledge of allegiance by military commanders, a historic day for zimbabwe. i'm still joined
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military commanders, a historic day for zimbabwe. i'm stilljoined by our guests, two in zimbabwe and one in manchester. let's go to priscilla first of all, an opposition mp. what is your response to what you have just witnessed? historic, very emotional. for many years, for two decades, i have waited to see the moment in watch robert mugabe is no longer the president of this country. but of course i would not have wanted to witness the coming in of another zanu—pf person. but now, willjust cherish that zimbabwe has finally been able to see, for me to see in my lifetime, a change of president. i had almost given up that i would ever be able to witness this. silvanos, how does it feel to
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be watching that from manchester, a significant piece of history in your home country? i don't know whether to cry to smile, or to a celebrate, i have only known one president, most people my age know about four. this is not what we expected. i expected to see someone fresh, someone new, someone from expected to see someone fresh, someone new, someone from the opposition, but it is history. we are all tired of saying that mugabe must go. this is great news to me. i knew since he resigned that it was going to be friday, but the expectation was high. when you are living in a country,, this is
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historic. zenzele, the message sounded hopeful and we heard him say that he was devoting himself to the well—being of zimbabwe. how do you feel about it? now i have to well—being of zimbabwe. how do you feel about it? nowl have to be careful, because i can be charged with undermining the authority of the president because he is president now. i am happy that mugabe is going, i might never see justice for my relatives that were killed during gukurahundi. he has been accused of a lot of corruption and he needs to come clean. why do
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people say his speeches promising, i was worried that he was still using the hit rate that he has, he sounded vengeful, and he used the slogans that were talking about people they needed to keep ruling, which was on presidential for someone who is trying to have a fresh start. so i think mixed feelings. i am waiting to hear him put down his plan on what he is going to do, and maybe i will start believing in it. mugabe is might still be with us. thank you very much indeed. we are looking at pictures now of the signing in ceremony which hasjust pictures now of the signing in ceremony which has just taken place, an oath of office, the sash and medal of honour have been presented as well. thank you to our guests joining us live from zimbabwe and manchester. we will bring you more
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on that story a little bit later. the speech will be happening, the new president's first speech will be happening at around 1015, and we will bring you up to speed with that as well. moving on to our next story this morning. schools are struggling with a "leaky pipeline" of teachers, with not enough joining the profession and too many leaving, headteachers are warning. more than three fifths of school leaders polled by the national association of headteachers said vacancies were only filled with a struggle. while 18% said they had failed to recruit. the findings paint a stark picture of our school system, which detractors claim is filled with high stress, endless targets, and a lack of cash. the government insists it is taking steps to address recruitment challenges. so where does the truth lie? let's talk now to paul harris, the headteacher of curwen primary school in london. joyce obaseki, a former teacher in essex. lynn knapp, the headteacher of the
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windmill primary school in oxford. and from manchester, labour's shadow education secretary, mp mike kane. paul, good morning. thank you for joining us. let's come to you first of all. you are a headteacher looking after a number of schools. why is this such a big problem?” think there are a range of issues that are highlighted in the actual report. it ranges from funding to the paver staff, to the overworked thatis the paver staff, to the overworked that is expected of them. and it is a combination of all these factors thatis a combination of all these factors that is causing problems in the retention, the recruitment of staff but also the retention across all the schools. i work with a group of schools, and they are struggling to retain and recruit staff of a high
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enough quality, and i think there area number of enough quality, and i think there are a number of reasons for that. i think pay is an issue, particularly in areas like london, i have teachers who i living to three hours away and having to travel long distances to get to work because they just cannot afford distances to get to work because theyjust cannot afford to live or rent in areas around the schools, so pay is a problem, it hasn't gone a prolonged time, but i think there area number of prolonged time, but i think there are a number of other factors that are a number of other factors that are part of that, and there is a range of things that we need to consider. joyce, how big a problem is this in your opinion?” consider. joyce, how big a problem is this in your opinion? i think it is this in your opinion? i think it isa is this in your opinion? i think it is a huge problem, i have thought that the 16 years, and in that time, you have a number of things that goes on. you have too many targets, and of course you have the workload that you have to take home, so even in yoursleep that you have to take home, so even in your sleep you are thinking about
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the work, so the brain never shuts down, you are constantly stressed. ifi down, you are constantly stressed. if i ruled the world, i would make teaching the number one, most importantjob teaching the number one, most important job in the teaching the number one, most importantjob in the world, but unfortunately, but unfortunately, the society and government don't see that, and they overworked teachers and stress them. teachers are only human, and if you don't have a life outside your work, you are likely going to one day wake up and say, no more. so the targets are unrealistic, the workload is too much, the behaviour in schools sometimes is terrible, some kids, sometimes is terrible, some kids, some schools don't have the policy in place to tackle the behaviour, and it gets too much sometimes the teachers to handle. so culturally there is a problem as well? do you think this is notjust about pay, it is also about teacher bashing co nsta ntly ? is also about teacher bashing constantly? constantly, it is endless. in some schools, you get
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the observations, but it is almost like constantly having a reason to control what you can do and what you cannot do. so they are taking the ivy cannot do. so they are taking the joy of actually teaching away from teachers, and giving you things that you need to do, and if you look at it, it is not as effective as it needs to be. when i started teaching 16 years ago, it is totally different as it is now. so yes, you can'tjust do different as it is now. so yes, you can't just do what you're supposed to do, which is very sad. mike kane, shadow a education secretary, what would you do? this is a government created crisis. the government for five years has missed its target is to get teacher training in our country. if teachers miss their targets like that, they would be put on competency measures. the first thing paul said, pay. they have not had a pay rise for seven years now,
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in fact teachers are £15,000 worse off because of the way their wages have fallen behind, and that is what is making the profession, which is the number one job is making the profession, which is the numberonejob in is making the profession, which is the number one job in the world, as a former teacher myself, so unattractive at the moment for new recruits. but it is notjust teachers. because of austerity, lots of people across public services and emergency services also haven't had a pay rise. justine greening is said to be in favour of lifting that 1% cap. she may be in favour of it, but there was no new budget in the —— no new money in the budget this week to lift that pay cap, and if you add to the fact that this government has taken £2.8 billion out of the school system, the only way schools can cope is by spending £1.3 billion on supply teachers to cover the gaps. but it isn't just supply teachers to cover the gaps. but it isn'tjust about money, there are external factors, lack of worklife balance, stress, high workload and a cultural problem with the perception of teachers. yes, the
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government has literally since 2010 smash the traditional system of schools by introducing multi—academy trusts, free schools, new targets, new curriculum, and ofsted putting places in huge stress on schools, and this is led to work stress being overbearing for too many people, so since 2011, one third of teachers started training since then have already left the profession. this is unsustainable. we are also facing a demographic time bomb, because we have 3 million pupils coming online in our country as the primary surge goes through to secondary, and we have nowhere near enough teachers coming forward to plug that gap. lyn, why did use trouble to recruit teachers? for many of the reasons that you have already commented on. it is accommodation of factors. we live in oxford, where house prices
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are hugely high, and we don't even get the london weighting for teachers, so there is definitely that aspect of can you afford to live in oxford, can you afford to go to university and then stay in the area, and many teachers do move away for that reason, they move to other parts of the country. some of my staff have done that in order to have a family and a home. so there is that factor, and i would agree entirely with pressures of work, and one of my teacher said to me this morning, our best is never enough. and that is true, the bar keeps getting lifted. change is happening all the time which teachers are just expected to take on board with a huge amount of accountability, and it does impact on the quality of their life and the way in which they are able to manage their families and their lifestyle, and i think we need to be really consistent with all of that. plus there is pay and then looking at how we can increase then looking at how we can increase the number of people coming into the profession by making it more attractive. i know in the past we couldn't find a year five teacher
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last year because there simply were not enough teachers coming through the system. can you respond to this tweet we have just had from aj who says, headteachers management style and demands on staff has to be taken into account with teacher retention. it is the headteachers that set workload levels, not the government or ofsted. it is a balance. we are under huge pressure from the government, and i agree that the headteacher, i have that responsible at you to my teachers to get a worklife balance, and we do have a very low turnover of staff, i have lost three teachers in two years in a school of 21 classes, which is a good percentage. most people move because they want to go to divide, canada, hampshire. soi because they want to go to divide, canada, hampshire. so i believe our school functions with the lowest bureaucracy level we can in order to meet the targets the government are setting. so yes is headteachers we have that power to create a system in our schools which supports our teachers, and i wholeheartedly
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support that, that really matters to be hugely. thank you very much. i am just going to bring in some comments from people who are watching, which is imported. dave on facebook says teachers are leaving because the kids are badly behaved, no respect or manners. it should be part of the curriculum. alex says, teachers are leaving with guilt over the politically incorrect indoctrination they are forcing on their pupils. —— politically correct indoctrination. they wonder if the education system itself is to blame. thank you for all your messages. a department for education spokesman told us there are now a record number of teachers in our schools, 15,000 more than in 2010, and overall, the number of new teachers entering our classrooms out numbers those who decide to retire or leave. we recognise however that there are challenges facing schools, and we are taking significant steps to address them. that's why we
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continue to invest significant sums in teacher recruitment, with £1.3 billion up to 2020 being invested in teacher bursaries to attract the best and brightest into the profession. time now to get the latest weather update. new president, emmerson mnangagwa, being sworn in as president. we might be getting into the final weekend of autumn but it is all about winter as things have turned colder and the icy wind screen will be part of the story with frosty mornings and some smoke. highland scotla nd mornings and some smoke. highland scotland has seen some so far and there will be more wintry showers this weekend but not for all of us and although it is cold, many of us will stay dry and have some pleasant sunshine. going through today into tonight, showers in scotland and northern ireland, some will reach northern england and wales, single figure temperatures. light winds,
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showers moving south—east overnight and a mix of rain and sleet and snow and a mix of rain and sleet and snow and hailand and a mix of rain and sleet and snow and hail and strengthening wind. widespread frost on saturday, lower temperatures in rural spot and the weekend will have an arctic flow of air across the country with high pressure to the west and low pressure to the west and low pressure to the north and a stronger wind. that will add an extra chill. the show was running into scotland, northern ireland, north—west england and wales will have sleet and snow and wales will have sleet and snow and there could be made on the coastline, some pushing into the midlands and some in the far south—west. but a lot of sunshine in southern and eastern parts, many of us southern and eastern parts, many of us with crisp blue skies. the wind will make the temperatures feel lower, closer to freezing for many. i know a lot of people are fans of this sunny crisp weather rather than mcgee and damp. on sunday, most of us mcgee and damp. on sunday, most of us will be bright —— muddy.
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on monday, less chilly, but the rest of the week it will be cold again. enjoy your weekend. zimbabwe has a new president. in the last ten minutes, emmerson mnangagwa has been sworn in before thousands of ecstatic supporters. i. i, emmerson dambudzo mnangagwa, swear that, as president of the republic of zimbabwe, i will be faithful. convicted murderer and athlete oscar pistorius has his jail term for killing his girlfriend doubled by a south african judge. his father says he's heartbroken. and, donning his scarf again for the first time in 36 years,
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tom brake comes back in real life at the age of 83 to play the time —— tom baker. good morning. ido i do have a dalek in the studio because we are going to be talking about doctor who later. here's annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. good morning. emmerson mnangagwa has been sworn in as the new president of zimbabwe in harare. tens of thousands of people gathered to witness the inauguration which comes after ten days of extraordinary drama which culminated in the resignation of robert mugabe who had ruled for 37 years. i, emmerson dambudzo mnangagwa, swear that, as
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president of the republic of zimbabwe, i will be faithful... cheering to zimbabwe and obey, uphold and defend the constitution and all other laws of zimbabwe. the new president of zimbabwe. theresa may has again urged the european union to move past the initial stage of the brexit negotiations and start talking about a future trade deal. she made the comments as she arrived at a summit of eu states and eastern european partner countries, at which she will meet the president of the european council, donald tusk. ajudge in south africa has more than doubled the jail term for the athlete oscar pistorius who murdered his girlfriend, reeva steenkamp.
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the sentence has gone up from six years to 13 years and five months. reeva steenkamp's family welcomed the ruling and said it showed justice could prevail in south africa. the actor uma thurman has broken her silence about the disgraced hollywood producer harvey weinstein by hitting out at him on instagram. the actor, who worked with weinstein on several films including kill bill and pulp fiction, had said she was waiting to feel less angry before speaking about the hollywood sexual harassment scandal. now in an instagram post she used the hashtag metoo which suggests she had been a target of unwanted sexual advances. she added, "i'm glad it's going slowly — you don't deserve a bullet — stay tuned. harvey weinstein denies engaging in "non—consensual sexual conduct". a key part of youtube's system for reporting people who leave sexualised comments on videos of children has not been functioning correctly for more than a year according to volunteer moderators with inside knowledge of the site. youtube has denied any technical failure. there are warnings in dublin that
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a political row could force the irish government to call a snap election. the opposition fianna fail party, which has been supporting the minority fine gael government, says it will table a motion of no confidence in the deputy prime minister. the prime minister, leo varadkar, has vowed to stand by frances fitzgerald, even if that leads to the collapse of the government. research suggests people with schizophrenia can benefit from a new therapy that gets them to talk face—to—face with a computer representation of the voices they hear. the study, published in the journal lancet psychiatry, found that the therapy was more effective at reducing hallucinations than supportive counselling. tom baker has returned to the tardis to film part of an unfinished dr who episode from 1979. wearing his trademark long stripy scarf and coat, the 83—year—old actor shot the scene on the original set at the bbc‘s television centre. the episode, shada, wasn't made at the time
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because of an engineering strike. we can speak now to daniel hill. he's one of the leading actors who recreated his part in the lost episode alongside tom baker. you're there with your wife olivia and you met on the set of dr who. a fantastic story, lovely to have you with us, tell us what it was like to go back and film the rest of this episode. did you imagine that would happen? never, not for a million years. the technology needed to do it was extraordinary but everybody who worked on the show had such a great time and it was one of those moments in your career where you just wanted completion. when they rang up and asked if we could do it, like a shot! i would have done it for nothing but don't tell them that! you can only imagine the
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excitement of the legions of doctor who fans so when can they see it?” think it will be on dvd on the ath of december but they can download it right now. and what was it like picking up the story with tom baker, for decades later? just like stepping straight back into the studio. the great thing about tom, he is such a welcoming, great big personality and he sort of wraps you up personality and he sort of wraps you up and you get carried along and he isa up and you get carried along and he is a fantastic bloke and i love him dearly. tell us about your part. my pa rt dearly. tell us about your part. my part is chris parsons who is a postgraduate at cambridge who is doing something about physics and chemistry and he gets dragged along on this epicjourney in the tardis and also another ta rdis on this epicjourney in the tardis and also another tardis that belongs to another time lord. he is the guests assistant to what was six
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episodes then. it was a really big deal at the time and i was sad when it did not happen but now it is brilliant. and olivia, you were working on the production, how does it feel that this has been completed all these years later? it's absolutely wonderful, it was my first show as a production assistant in television so it was a huge honour to be on doctor who. and we we re honour to be on doctor who. and we were absolutely heartbroken when we had to stop. the studio doors were locked so we did all of the outside sequences and the first studio setup but we went in to do the second, we had two more to do, and the studios we re had two more to do, and the studios were locked with chains on the doors. it was really upsetting. i think for a long time we thought it would be remounted, but it was tom's la st would be remounted, but it was tom's last series and peter took over. we had a change of producer as well. it
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was never remounted at the time sadly. but now it has been. daniel and olivia, thank you for talking to us. and olivia, thank you for talking to us. thank you so much. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. back to you. thank you. emmerson mnangagwa has been inaugurated as the new president of zimbabwe. coming up very soon, probably within the next 15 minutes, the new president will be making his first speech and we will be able to join that opening speech. it has been 37 yea rs that opening speech. it has been 37 years since the country has had a new president and we will be joining that later in the programme but first let's get some sport. good morning. the first ashes test at the gabba is finely poised after an entertaining second dave between england and australia with england
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leading by 137 runs. it could have been better had it not been for a patient half—century from australian captain steve smith. and the swiss was watching. what an enthralling day we have at the gabba with the pendulum swinging to and fro but ending with honours pretty much even. england began the day in a decent position and batted well for an hourand a decent position and batted well for an hour and a half, dawid malan reaching a half—ce ntury, an hour and a half, dawid malan reaching a half—century, but it all we nt reaching a half—century, but it all went wrong and they lost their last six wickets forjust 56 runs in barely an hour. 302 all out at lunch. australia seemed very much in the ascendancy but the england bowlers help them fight back with stuart broad taking the first wicket of cameron bancroft on debut and australia subsided to 76—4 at one stage. but then a recovery thanks to captain steve smith and shaun marsh who guided them through to 165—a at
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the close. another day of fluctuating fortunes but the match is intriguingly poised going into the third day. it's always nice to get a big wicket. we sort of see warner and smith as the two main australian players so for me to get one of the big players is very satisfying. i think a few of the lads in the team were happy to see the back of him. we feel we are in a decent position and if we can come out in the morning get some rest and come out hot in the morning and get a couple about and you are into detail, that is a good position to be in. in football there was another bad result for managerless everton who were thrashed 5—1 at home by ata la nta who were thrashed 5—1 at home by atalanta in the europa league. they we re atalanta in the europa league. they were already out of the competition but in front of a half empty goodison park they finished bottom of theirgroup, goodison park they finished bottom of their group, not a great entry on their cv for caretaker boss david
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u nsworth their cv for caretaker boss david unsworth who still wants job permanently. arsene wenger said it wasjob done after permanently. arsene wenger said it was job done after arsenal won their europa league group despite losing in cologne. a second penalty won it for the home team but results are to add arsenalfinished top for the home team but results are to add arsenal finished top of the group. england will play in the bronze medal match of the hockey world league final after losing to new zealand in their semifinal. it was a frantic game with england creating the better chances. they had a goal disallowed while sophie bray the crossbar but olivia merry ‘s mike corner five minutes from the end was enough to give new zealand victory and england will play either the netherlands or south korea on sunday. that is all the sport, back with more later. thank you very much. emmerson mnangagwa has just been sworn in as the new president of zimbabwe. he formally took up office in a ceremony in the national sports stadium in harare, in front of tens of thousands of people.
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let's watch that moment again. i. i, emmerson dambudzo mnangagwa, swear that, as president of the republic of zimbabwe, i will be faithful... cheering to zimbabwe and obey, uphold and defend the constitution and all other laws of zimbabwe. and that i will promote whatever will advance and oppose whatever may harm zimbabwe. that i will protect and
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promote the rights of the people of zimbabwe. cheering that i will discharge my duties with all my strength to the best of my knowledge and ability and true to the dictates of my conscience and that i will devote myself to the well—being of zimbabwe and its people. so help me god. cheering let's talk now to professor stephen chan who specialises in the international politics of southern africa at the soas university of london. drjudith tyson, a research fellow
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at the overseas development institute and an expert on how the long—term economic crisis has driven the current political crisis in zimbabwe. and to martin fletcher, who is a former foreign correspondent and foreign editor of the times, and is one of the first western journalists to have interviewed with emmerson mnangagwa. a historic moment in zimbabwe's history. i'd like to get your response to the swearing in ceremony, what we have seen this morning on the response in the stadium. i think it shows he is going to have a honeymoon. this is a very popular move, not so much for him but for the sake of robert mugabe disappearing from the political scene. so the new president mnangagwa has got to very much capitalise on his honeymoon period and start delivering. he has very difficult entrenched problems that he faces. mugabe has disappeared from the ceremony, that
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is for sure. i think they wanted him there, but unsurprisingly he wasn't, and neither was his wife, grace. what kind of leader do you think the new president mnangagwa will be?- will be a lot more pragmatic, and i think he will try to craft a more technical article bridge to the problems of particularly the economy. “— problems of particularly the economy. —— technocrat approach to the problems. i think he wants to get back on some economic trajectory. there was a message of hope for the country's welfare, but having been mugabe's right—hand man for so long, and after decades in the same party, can he reinvent himself? i think it is very interesting issue, because as you say, he has had a long history of being closely aligned to the mugabe policies, but there is a window of opportunity for reform, and the question is, does he see it? we have
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had pressure from within zanu—pf itself in the last 18 months that economic reform, particularly under for example the minister for finance who was also fired last month by mugabe partly because he was pushing to reforms, and i think if he aligned himself with that faction within zanu—pf, we should be optimistic, but i think the big issue was also that there are deep structural problems in the economy and no quick fix that can be applied to them. we are talking about zimbabwe, it has been the focus of our news here, and globally, because of mugabe. and him then going on to resign. but what has led to deep—rooted economic problems. why have they got to the state that they are in the people who don't know, in terms of the economy?” are in the people who don't know, in terms of the economy? i think what you have is a moment of meltdown starting in the year 2000 is and the nationalisation of the farms. the pre—empt the aunt planned way in which it was carried out destroyed
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and agricultural sector. what happened in that year? the farms we re happened in that year? the farms were seized by party thugs and war vetera ns. were seized by party thugs and war veterans. whose farms? the white owned farms. because they were agri— industry lead based, they earned export receipts for the country that underpinned the economy. the farms never really recovered that kind of scientifically —based agricultural capacity. we are looking now at a country without productivity or export earnings. unemployment is at an all—time high in zimbabwe, but at the same time, it is a highly literate country, literacy is in its 90s, something like 95%? unemployment is probably well into the 90s, but as you say, literacy rates are amongst the highest in africa, so in terms of the education of the population, would also of the business community, it is strong, and we have a million szyba boy and
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is currently living in south africa who are business orientated, —— a million zimbabwe citizens currently living in south africa. but there has also been a degeneration in physical culpability in the country, infrastructure is in a terrible state, electricity in short supply, the roads are shocking condition, and within manufacturing firms and agricultural processes, the machinery has become obsolete, so there is a need for significant injections of capital if the economy is to recover. and where do they get that capital from ? is to recover. and where do they get that capital from? that is the great question, because the government is bankrupt and has been refused money from the imf because they are in arrears, they owe $9 billion to various external parties, and i think that is both their biggest problem at the moment because they are desperate to cash, but also where the international community can both help or hinder the process of reform. and what is in it for the
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international community? we need to stabilise zimbabwe from humanitarian perspective. poverty levels are shocking. we see a quarter of children are stunted because they haven't received a nutrition, a third of the population receive food aid. but we also need to have a sta ble aid. but we also need to have a stable state in southern africa, the la st stable state in southern africa, the last thing we need is an out spring event where we cd stabilised states. let's bring in martin at this point. good morning to you. you were one of the first western journalists to interview emmerson mnangagwa, what was he like? i interviewed him this time last year. he was courteous, he is not a garrulous man, he doesn't smile a lot. he is quite an intimidating figure to interview given his past record, but he was courteous to me because i think he wanted to get a message out that he
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would be different. he talked about the need for foreign investment in zimbabwe, about the need to be build the economy, about the need to bring back the brightest and the best who fled during the mugabe era. you know, he wanted to make the point that he would try and rebuild the economy as quickly as he can. did you get a sense... ? the key sentence that he used to me was that capital goes where the weather is warm and welcoming, and when it is cold, you go elsewhere, it goes elsewhere. those are words mugabe would never have used. he also said his economic model was china, which is an authoritarian government, regime, that has nonetheless delivered for its people at economically, and i think that is
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the direction he will take. and china is zimba bwe's the direction he will take. and china is zimbabwe's biggest exporter at the moment. when you did that interview, you didn't have a visa. were you worried about your personal safety at any point? yes, it was actually on my very last day, i had beenin actually on my very last day, i had been in zimbabwe for two or three weeks, andl been in zimbabwe for two or three weeks, and i had been trying for this interview with mnangagwa more in hope than expectation, walked into his office that final morning, and the first thing his aide said was, you do have a journalist visa, don't you? and i had to admit that i didn't, andl don't you? and i had to admit that i didn't, and i was aware that a lot of my fellow journalist didn't, and i was aware that a lot of my fellowjournalist had previously been locked up for working in zimbabwe without authorisation, and at that moment, he summoned me in, i did the interview and then i drove straight to the airport and was very relieved when my plane took off three or four hours later. correct me if i'm
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wrong. i believe you have said that the new president, mr mnangagwa, needs to help white farmers and get agricultural going again. he fought against minority white rule. is that likely? i think yes. against minority white rule. is that likely? ithink yes. he is against minority white rule. is that likely? i think yes. he is very close to quite a lot of white businessmen. he doesn't seem to be, to have the same sort of animosity towards whites as robert mugabe had. i spoke to somebody close to him this week who said one of the things he expected him to do quite fast was deal with the compensation issue to white farmers, but also find a way of leasing land to them so that they could get back to work. he wants to tap into the expertise, as you have just heard, one third of the country is on food aid. this is a country that supplied most of southern africa with food, and it is now
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having to import it from the countries it used to supply. and do you think people will now be able to speak out against the government, against the president? because we have had this extraordinary week, ten days, couple of weeks, where people have been very vocal, but that was because mugabe was under house arrest, the military coup had taken place, and one of our guest said this morning, speaking to us very openly before the swearing in, and after the swearing—in, said, i'm not sure i can be critical any more. the demonstrations will orchestrated and permitted by the military to put pressure on mugabe to go, and they wanted him to go in a way that did not make it appear that it wasn't a military coup, because mnangagwa is going to need at least a veneer of international legitimacy. i don't think he is going to relax the political status quo in zimbabwe. he isa political status quo in zimbabwe. he is a zanni pf hardliner through and through. and he wants zanu—pf to
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have a god—given right to govern zimbabwe. i don't think he is going to relax it politically. mugabe didn't go as a result of a popular uprising against to radical regime, he went as a result of an internal feud within zanu—pf. they may go through the motions and set up some sort of government of national unity, but it is smoke and mirrors, it is for appearance's sake, he knows the opposition is disorganised and fragmented. i don't think you will see much political liberalisation. but do you think, we saw the scenes in zimbabwe, the national stadium today, there is that sense of euphoria, people cheering at the things that we heard, the new president saying,
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this message of togetherness, looking after the welfare of zimbabwe. how hopeful do you think people will be beyond today's swearing—in ceremony? people will be beyond today's swearing-in ceremony? at the moment he isa swearing-in ceremony? at the moment he is a hero. he got rid of mugabe. but you have to remember that before the events of the last two or three weeks, this was one of the most feared and hated men in zimbabwe, who had been closely associated with all the worst excesses of the mugabe regime, the massacres, the farm seizures, the rigging of elections. he hasn't suddenly become a model democrat. but i do think that if he delivers on the economy, and i think actually the economy could be turned around quite fast. this is a country with very rich resources, and an educated population and so on. i think a lot of zimbabweans would settle for that at the moment. i think that is more important to them
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than having a perfect democracy. martin, phone app, thank you very much. let's talk about china. —— martin, for now, thank you very much. what will the chinese make of all of this? i think they will be happy that there is a change of government. because they were big investors, they became increasingly worried that their interests were not being safeguarded by president mugabe. they were very hard hit by in digitalisation laws which took away a lot of the value of their holdings, and i fixed away a lot of the value of their holdings, and ifixed the away a lot of the value of their holdings, and i fixed the chinese we re very holdings, and i fixed the chinese were very much concerned about not throwing good money after bad, so very curiously, one of the reasons why they are so successful economically is because of transparent forms of public administration. that is not to say it isa administration. that is not to say it is a perfect economy in china, but they will be seeking greater transparency, less corruption in the zimbabwe economy, and that can only be good for the future of the
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country. how do you think president mnangagwa's presidency will affect zimbabwe's mnangagwa's presidency will affect zimba bwe's standing on mnangagwa's presidency will affect zimbabwe's standing on the world stage? we have already sent a junior minister to go to zimbabwe. he was there today, we stuart, we have not sent a minister of any stripe for quite a number of years. is that significant in itself? i think it is, it is a signal that we are prepared to being gauge, but there are conditions to the reading gauge mad. some of these do concern human rights, particularly as defined by the constitution of zimbabwe which is not in itself a bad constitution. one of the things that we can say is, look after your people in terms of your own constitution. we want to see constitutional rule. so that is how the uk is responding at the moment. how is the rest of the world responding to his leadership? right now we have got to wait and see. one of the things the world is waiting for is whether he does indeed invite the opposition to some form of unity government, some kind of coalition
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government, some kind of coalition government, and then who gets the finance portfolio and the economic planning portfolio? if he brings the best brains from both sides of the house, those kinds of economic portfolios, that will give confidence to the international community to begin the process of the actual process of re—engagement. it is interesting, because zimbabwe have a new president after 37 years, but there are new elections being held next year in september, so things could change in less than a year anyway. what do you think could happen between now and the elections next year in september? i think there is a big range of possibilities and the best would be a coalition government being formed and free and fair elections and that the international community help with that. interesting that rory stewart is already offering finance which is a big lever for the international community, but on the other hand we could also see a
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return to the old zanu—pf and we have do hope for the optimistic outcome and tried to support that. if they hold elections and they have to be held by august next year at the latest, the key test is whether they are honest elections. they have an advantage in that the opposition is so disorganised right now and the leader of the opposition himself is suffering from cancer but that'll be a litmus test to whether there is this it was government response to the public or whether it is really zanu—pf reinvented with a new face. and the world will be watching. thank you very much. still to come. . . part of youtube's system for reporting sexualised comments left on children's videos has not been functioning correctly for more than a year, say volunteer moderators. so how worried should parents be by this? we'll get reaction. returning to the tardis. we will be speaking to ‘whovians', and finding out their reaction to the news that tom baker is to play doctor who once again. our lead story this money has been
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zimbabwe and the swearing—in of the new president. emmerson mnangagwa is about to make his speech and we will cross to that when it happens but first a summary of the latest news. emmerson mnangagwa has been sworn in as the new president of zimbabwe in harare. tens of thousands of people gathered in the national sports stadium to witness the inauguration. it comes after ten days of extraordinary drama that culminated in the resignation of robert mugabe, who'd ruled for 37 years. in the last hour, a judge in south africa has more than doubled the jail term for the athlete oscar pistorius who murdered his girlfriend, reeva steenkamp. the sentence has gone up from six years to 13 years and five months. reeva steenkamp's family welcomed the ruling and said it showed justice could prevail in south africa. a key part of youtube's system
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for reporting people who leave sexualised comments on videos of children has not been functioning correctly for more than a year according to volunteer moderators with inside knowledge of the site. youtube has denied any technical failure. the actor uma thurman has broken her silence about the disgraced hollywood producer harvey weinstein by hitting out at him on instagram. the actor, who worked with weinstein on several films including kill bill and pulp fiction, had said she was waiting to feel less angry before speaking about the hollywood sexual harassment scandal. now in an instagram post she used the hashtag metoo which suggests she had been a target of unwanted sexual advances. she added, "i'm glad it's going slowly — you don't deserve a bullet — stay tuned. harvey weinstein denies engaging in "non—consensual sexual conduct". that's a summary of the latest bbc news. thank you. here's some sport now with hugh.
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it is about honours even in the opening ashes test match with england leading by 137 runs going into the third stake in brisbane. jake ball took the prized wicket of david warner and that left australia reeling on 76—a but steve smith came to the rescue with a composed half—century. a dreadful night for everton, already out of the europa league and thrashed 5—1 at home by ata la nta league and thrashed 5—1 at home by atalanta in front of a half full goodison park. arsenal top their group despite losing in cologne. england have been beaten in the semifinals of the women's hockey world league final, leading to new zealand with the goal coming in the final five minutes. zealand with the goal coming in the finalfive minutes. former england and liverpool striker michael owen will ride for the first time as a jockey today in a charity race at ascot. he owns courses but has never
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raced before. that is the sport this morning —— he owns horses. thank you. a key part of youtube's system for reporting people who leave sexualised comments on videos of children has not been functioning correctly for more than a year. volunteer moderators with inside knowledge of youtube claim that there is a flaw in the main tool used by members of the public to take down accounts which are attempting to groom or sexually abuse children. a bbc trending investigation has found that since late 2016, people could report potentially predatory accounts but links to the comments predators left might have gone missing before reaching youtube moderators. elizabeth cassin has this report. here's a list of comments that bbc trending found on youtube videos of children. they're too shocking for me to show you. many of them are graphic and sexual. although the videos themselves were completely innocent there are attempts by adults to collect personal information from children and requests from them to remove clothing. these are a clear violation of youtube's child endangerment policy so you might expect comments
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like these would be removed immediately once reported. but no. it's claimed one key part of youtube's mechanism for reporting comments like this hasn't been working properly for over a year. so some obscene comments directed at children have remained on the site. the problem was first brought to our attention by a group of youtube's trusted flaggers — they are youtube's volunteer moderators who flag up inappropriate content. so we put youtube's reporting function to the test ourselves. a few weeks ago the trending team reported 28 accounts from this list to youtube using their public reporting mechanism. two weeks later 23 of these accounts still remained on the site but when we approached youtube as journalists they remove the remaining ones right away. youtube declined to give us an interview, instead they sent us this statement. they have since announced they will completely disable comments on videos where there has
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been sexualised comments directed at children. we took our list of comments to anne longfield, the children's commissioner for england. she advises the government on issues that involve vulnerable children. they are clearly, clearly inappropriate. highly sexual comments around individual children on the site, some very, very highly sexual wording. the sheer volume of this is over a short period of time is really very, very worrying and again, this is something that i'll be asking youtube to respond to. very swiftly, with reassurances that this cannot continue to happen. so if you are a parent, what steps can you take to keep your child safe on youtube? what we'd encourage parents to do is to have conversations with their children about how to stay safe online and for that to be a regular part of the conversation they have with children. parents will ask children how their day at school was, ask about what they are doing online and if they have
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encountered any risks. if they have particular concerns we'd also encourage them to get in contact with us, they can call the nspcc helpline and we can walk them through practical steps to help to make sure they keep their children safe. earlier this morning, childrens comissioner anne longfield told the bbc why the problem seems to be happening. what we have is a site where children literally spend hours a day looking and going through videos, but also loading their own content, often quite inoffensive, often just part of their everyday life. what seems to be happening is that the adults who want to get access to children are using some of these videos and the comment facility with it to post quite suggestive, very sexualised comments that are luring children, potentially, and potentially encouraging them to take part in very risky activities. now, what's been reported is that youtube aren't responding to this
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adequately and are leaving these comments there, when clearly they should be removed. let's speak now to tony stower from the nspcc. and dr mary aitken who is a cyberpsychologist and academic advisor to the european cyber crime centre at europol. welcome to the programme. i will come to you in a moment, mary. but first, if this has not been working for more than a year, this system of reporting predators, why are we only talking about it now? it is clear that youtube is not been taking action even when it's custard flag at report issues and it is concerning and it shows that these companies should not be left to mark the own homework —— its trusted flag is --
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the own homework —— its trusted flag is —— flaggers. the videos are often of children doing perfectly innocent things, talking about their day, making arts and crafts, which is fine but we note some of these abusers can post comment underneath that are quite sexualised and asking the children to do extra dares and ta ke the children to do extra dares and take things forward in an entirely inappropriate weight. even when those messages are flagged, nothing seems to happen and it is concerning. youtube will say they have stepped up their efforts to improve the process and they are getting tougher. it is great they have a trusted flagger system and have a trusted flagger system and have moderators but we don't know enough about how they are trained and what child protection understanding they have and it is not acceptable for them only to take action when there is a media story. these services need to be safe for children to use from the first moment they go online. have you seen a rise in calls at the nspcc from children who are perhaps worried about some comments they have
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received on line or youtube videos that have been posted? we have a lot of calls to our service from children were being bullied online especially through these kind of videos and we asked children about the services and systems they use on the services and systems they use on the internet and 26% told us they we re the internet and 26% told us they were concerned about youtube because of the dangerous comments that are posted and almost 50% said they did not know how to make a report and we now know that even when reports are made they are not often being actioned. what advice would you give to parents when it comes to monitoring children? you want them to get the best out of the internet and what it has to offer but for them to be safe. absolutely, children use the internet in many ways to improve their lives and it isa ways to improve their lives and it is a fantastic resource and we would never say to adult that they need 2-100% of never say to adult that they need 2—100% of their children's use. you need an open door policy so that children and adults can have good conversations about how to keep
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safe. you need to talk about it in an everyday way, not special conversations, but if you are confused or you need advice then the nspcc is here to help. if you cannot monitor 100% of what children are looking at, there will always be a risk surely? there always will be and that is why we need those conversations to make sure people understand those risks and what you can do to protect yourself and crucially children know what they can do about it. and it is also about flagging and making children aware of the types of comments that send out warning signs and are not appropriate. absolutely. children need to know how they can flag them and if they have a concern, whom they can talk to and that might be a pa rent they can talk to and that might be a parent or trusted adult or the nspcc service. what is your response to this, mary? i think it is outrageous. we get the standard response, we are going to try better, but that is not good enough. i think we need an urgent enquiry. i
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would call on anang field to open such an enquiry and have experts, people who understand how these processes work, looking at it. —— anne longfield. i continue about the impact on children, but we also need specialist in artificial intelligence, cybercriminal g specialist in artificial intelligence, cybercriminal 6 am all coming together and are holding these companies who make billions to account. youtube have said to us, "we have clear policy against videos and comment on youtube which sexualised or exploit children and we enforce them aggressively whenever alerted to such content. we have happened our approach. we are committed to getting this right and recognise we need to do more both through machine learning and increasing human and technical
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resources. " increasing human and technical resources." can they do any more than that? absolutely. toughened, do more, we are talking about children. what we need is transparency. we agree that it is scary and if there are predatory people who are able to contact and the comments on children's videos, that is obviously a very worrying situation to be in but when you have the volume of videos that go on to youtube every second, watmore practically needs to be done? that's not an answer, just saying it is a big data problem, that's not acceptable. we have a lot of cancer but we don't throw our hand in the air and sayjust because there is too much we can't do anything. we need transparency around their human moderation system, around their corporate guidelines and most importantly we need transparency around the algorithmic infrastructure that pulls these things together. and we
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need experts looking at them and giving expert opinion outside of these corporations. isn't it also down to the government to make them take action?” isn't it also down to the government to make them take action? i think so, andl to make them take action? i think so, and i think this is an opportunity for government to step in and say, there has been a problem, let's now do a complete audit of this problem, c wyatt has occurred and make robust recommendations moving forward. —— to see why it has occurred. to put toddlers and paedophiles on the same platform, for heaven's sake, what could go wrong?! we are going to leave it there, thank you very much to you both. the story of the lost episodes and a lea p story of the lost episodes and a leap back in time. yes, he's back his donning his long multi—coloured scarf to play the doctor on screen for the first time in 36 years.
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it's tom baker. the 83—year—old last played the time lord in 1981. he was the fourth doctor and had the role for seven years — the longest any actor has kept the part. baker had started filming shada — penned by hitchhikers' guide writer douglas adams — in 1979 but it got cancelled when the bbc went on strike. here's a taste of what to expect from the new series. when i was on the river, i heard voices forced you bought a book from gallifrey in the tardis? it is shada. your mind shall be mine. i'm not mad about your tailor. kill them! what have you done? october! let the universe prepare itself.
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someone who knows tom baker well is toby hadoke. he's a comedian and writer who worked with the 83—year—old time lord on the lost episodes. he joins us from salford. and for reaction so far from fellow whovians, emily cook is here — she's from the doctor who magazine. welcome both to the programme. let's come to you first of all. what is your reaction? i think it is brilliant, it is exciting, because it is brand—new dr who. i know that this is an old story, but it has not been recreated in full before, so it is really exciting for fans. and you have worked with him, what is it like for fans? i was the voice of
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k-9, like for fans? i was the voice of k—9, when we work together, although i have been replaced in tapes by the original actor, david i have been replaced in tapes by the originalactor, david brierley. i have worked with tom before, but seeing him play the dr in a studio opposite me when he is such a force of energy, and you could tell it was like he was when he was playing it at the time, he always said he wanted a talking cabbage to be his assistant, because that is the example of the sort of invention that he has, he is a very fine dramatic actor, but he comes into a scene dramatic actor, but he comes into a scene from a completely different angle from everybody else, and he keeps his fellow actors on his toes, and it gives every scene, it keeps the energy going. this was abandoned in1979, and here the energy going. this was abandoned in 1979, and here we are all these years later, and it has been put together by a producer call charles
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norton who has an attention to detail that borders on the psychopathic. the music was supposed to be done at the time by dudley sibson who died earlier this month, and one of his colleagues, a later doctor who musician called mach has done a score that apes the style of dudley sibson. and a bbc sound recorders from the 1970s was involved. the audience might not consciously notice, but it really has added to the authenticity and the love that has gone into the whole thing. and tell us a little bit about how he is seen by fans of the show in terms of actors who have taken on the role. tom is i think still the most eagerly identifiable doctor. that silhouette of the curly hair, the dazzling smile, long scarf. and because he lasted so long, as well, i think even people
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who have come to the series because they are like emily much younger than all stooges like me, i think tom still has that iconic place in the show. does he still have that appeal? he totally does. as a new fan, you come to the show knowing that there is this whole history to it, and it is quite daunting and confusing to begin with, the difference between what is missing story and a lost story and what have you, but i think tom baker stands out as being very iconic from the beginning, really, and going back and exploring all of these classic stories israeli fun as a new fan. and how many episodes have you seen, and have you seen some of the older episodes with him in it?” and have you seen some of the older episodes with him in it? i have since gone back and seen some of the older ones. for me, the thing that i love is the storytelling, and it doesn't matter if it looks a bit old—fashioned all the sets are wobbly or the special effects are not as good, because it is the character of the doctor and the stories which i find really
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appealing. but it seems bizarre but an episode is being completed nearly four decades after it was started and then abandoned. it does seem a little bit mad, but doctor who is a bit mad as well, and i think fans, they like things to be complete, they'd like it when it is incomplete, so the idea of making shada as complete as possible is perfect. and this idea of it not been completed because the bbc was on strike at the time. i was chatting with daniel hill, the guest star, yesterday, and he was saying how much a fan he was, and how frustrated he was when it got cancelled, because he was so excited to bea cancelled, because he was so excited to be a part of it, saving, being able to complete it is good as well. and toby, what was the reaction, i'm not saying you remember it 38 years ago, but what do you know of the reaction at the time? this episode wasn't finished because of a strike at the bbc. how did people respond?
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it is on to imagine it now, but doctor who was part of the televisual furniture then, that the media wasn't the same, and so shada beyond the confines of the most fastidiously anora ked, of beyond the confines of the most fastidiously anoraked, of which i am one, it didn't hit the papers in the way that it would now when people like me are we all that to be on your show, it was just one of those things, and strike action at the bbc was not uncommon things, and strike action at the bbc was not uncommon either, so it is a lwa ys was not uncommon either, so it is always a thing that has been sort of bubbling away without being headline news, and to pick up on emily's line about dan catt matt hill, he met his wife on shada, that is why he loves it, and christopher nimes flew over from la to pick up and finish off a pa rt from la to pick up and finish off a part that he did not manage to com plete part that he did not manage to complete in 1979, so it isn'tjust tom, this has been a huge exercise
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in getting a whole load of people together, and i think that would only happen with doctor who, partly because the people who are in it loved it so much, but i think it is a testa m e nt loved it so much, but i think it is a testament to what the show is all about, in that the people that it enchanted when they were younger, like charles, the producer of this, the people that are now responsible, or contribute to keeping the flame alive and making sure things like this are stored or recovered or whatever, so it is fuelled by the very children that it cast its magic speu very children that it cast its magic spell on all those years ago. thank you both very much indeed. we look forward to watching that episode. we can take you now straight to some live pictures from zimbabwe. emmerson mnangagwa has been sworn in as zimba bwe's new emmerson mnangagwa has been sworn in as zimbabwe's new president. the country getting even leader after nearly four decades, he was robert
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mugabe's protege, comrade and right—hand man, he was at his side during the fight against white minority rule and during the post—liberation government. but this isa post—liberation government. but this is a question that every feels otter two. will mnangagwa bring change? earlier we brought you pictures of the swearing—in ceremony, and we think that speech is about to happen, so let's listen in. cheering heads of state and former heads of state, former vice presidents, chief justice, justice luc malala, president of the senate, speaker of the national assembly, honourable
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ministers, the general, judges of the supreme court, thejudge resident, judges of the high court, heads of diplomatic nations, deputy ministers, deputy speaker of parliament, deputy president of the senate, members of parliament, the chief secretary to the president and cabinet, chairman of the public service commission, members of the public service commission, members of various commissions, chief secretaries, permanent secretaries, service chiefs, governor, vice
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chancellors of universities, directors of departments and public service, mayor of harare, members of the diplomatic corps, representatives of war veterans, detainees collaborators, representatives of various political parties, representatives of the business community, representatives of the farming community, heads of religious do nominations, heads of civil society organisations, are students...
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cheering ladies and gentlemen, comrades and friends, countrymen. i feel deeply humbled by the decision of my party, zanu—pf, inviting me to serve our great nation, the republic of zimbabwe, in the capacity of president and commander—in—chief of zimbabwe defence forces. with effect from today. cheering iadmit i admit that i hold no particularly unique qualification which set me apart from the deep pool of able
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citizens of our party and our land, who otherwise could have been chosen to occupy this honourable office. but even as i make constant reference to my partisan peers, i am not oblivious to the many zimbabweans from our close political ethnic and racial divide who have helped make this day and the legitimate expectations of the office i now occupy. the decision of my party is merely
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for the purpose of political identification, as i intend, nay, and required, to serve our country as the president of all citizens, regardless of colour, creed, religion, tribe, totem or political affiliation. applause let me at this stage pay special tribute to one of and the only surviving founding father of our nation, comrades robert mugabe. he led us in our struggle for national
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independence. he assumed the responsibilities of leadership at a very challenging time at the best of our nation. that is to be lauded for all times. whatever errors of commissioner or omission might have occurred during that critical phase in the life of our nation, let us all accept and acknowledge his immense contribution
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