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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 24, 2017 1:30pm-2:01pm GMT

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tom the original cast including tom baker recorded the actual script to go with animated versions of the missing parts. and what has got fans particularly excited is for the conclusion, tom baker went back to bbc television centre, stepped onto the set from 1979 and filmed two lines of dialogue. he had no qualms about returning to the role. lines of dialogue. he had no qualms about returning to the roleli lines of dialogue. he had no qualms about returning to the role. i think it was that probably it never left me and that is why i can't stay away from it. it was a lovely time of my life. i loved doing doctor who because it was life to me. tom baker are proving you don't have to be a time lord to travel back to the 19705. time lord to travel back to the 1970s. wonderful. time for a look at the weather. here's tomasz schafernaker. we have been getting a lot of snowy pictures in the last few days, mostly pictures in the last few days, m ostly fro m pictures in the last few days, mostly from the highlands, it is not
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quite cold enough for snow in other parts of the uk but this was a very pretty seen, dalwhinnie in the highlands. and another one here from the highlands. and anotherfrom highlands. and another one here from the highlands. and another from the highlands, you can get the message, a lot of wintry scenes up in the mountainous regions but for most of us more mountainous regions but for most of us more than anything it will be a couple of showers and maybe some sleet in parts of wales and the moors but for many others it is a crisp afternoon, the best epicentre in eastern and southern areas. you can see the showers in scotland and the temperatures will be dipping like last night. this is what it looks like around 6pm, temperatures already not far from freezing in the lowla nds already not far from freezing in the lowlands of scotland, in belfast and evenin
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lowlands of scotland, in belfast and even in the midlands only four or five so very nippy friday evening. on the south coast, about 6 degrees celsius so chilly weather which is here to stay for the next few days. let's have a look at this evening and overnight, showers continuing in scotland, some in the north—west of england and wales, possibly one or two across the moors as well but the east and south will be staying clear. even in central london, only 2 degrees. further north with the showers, the risk of iciness in scotla nd showers, the risk of iciness in scotland and northern ireland and maybe the pennines and wales. look at the cold on saturday, reaching as far south as northern spain and portugal, really digging down into western europe and again on saturday we will see more of those showers coming in on a cold north—westerly wind into scotland and showers in north—west england as well but for most of us are cold and crisp day.
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it might be around five or 6 degrees briefly in the afternoon but will feel closer to freezing particularly in the north. a chilly wind. it will start off cold again on sunday, a lot of fine and right weather but look at the weather systems in the atla ntic look at the weather systems in the atlantic coming into the north—west of the british isles. the second half of sunday into monday it is going to turn a bit less cold but overall the weather pattern will remain cold for the foreseeable future. thank you. a reminder of our main story this lunchtime. zimbabwe has a new president. emmerson mnangagwa is sworn in, and promises to rebuild the country, and repair its economy. that's all from the bbc news at one so it's goodbye from me and on bbc one we nowjoin the bbc‘s news teams where you are. good afternoon, a look at the days
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sport. we start with the ashes win neither england nor australia can ta ke com plete neither england nor australia can take complete control a topsy—turvy second day. england will take a 137 run lead into day three helped with a half century. toby roland—jones only missed out on the series through injury having taken his test foul early this year. most of them have played the county game for a long time and been successful over a long time and been successful over a long period. when you go on a tour thatis long period. when you go on a tour that is as difficult as this, understanding your game is a really important part of it. all of those quys important part of it. all of those guys are important part of it. all of those guys are in a good place and have had guys are in a good place and have ha d su ccess guys are in a good place and have had success for a number of years. i think maybe these are actually the
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quys think maybe these are actually the guys who have been consistently performing well. they've all put their hands up at various points in their hands up at various points in the first test. across town in brisbane, winger valentine holmes scored six tries as australia beat fiji by 54 scored six tries as australia beat fiji by 5a points to six, to reach the final of the rugby league world cup. (tx oov) he broke his own record for the number of tries in a match — and took his tournament tally to 12, making him top—scorer. they'll face the winner of tomorrow's semifinal — and that's between england and tonga. fiji will find positives, after reaching the semi—finals for three world cups in a row— semi—finals for three world cups in a row — and after a number of skirmishes in the game, both still sidesjoined together at skirmishes in the game, both still sides joined together at the end, in a show of mutual respect. singing. well holmes is very much ‘on song' at the moment, he's now scored 11 tries in two games, much to the joy of his captain. really pleased.
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defence is going really good. very pleased with that. scoring some points. valentine holmes is scoring left right and centre. give it to him next week again. second practice is underway for the season—ending abu dhabi grand prix. sebastian vettel pipped lewis hamilton to set the fastest time in the first session. the ferrari driver was more than a tenth of a second quicker than a tenth of a second quicker than the mercedes of the new world champion. red bull's max verstappen was third. former england striker michael owen has said he's never gone so fast on a horse after finishing second in his debut race asa finishing second in his debut race as a jockey. owen was taking part in the race at a scot. he was the only novel novice in the field of ten amateurs riding calder prince and finished second behind tom chatfield
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roberts. he said he'd got the bug and may race again. england will play in the bronze medal match of the hockey world league final after losing to hosts new zealand in their semifinal this morning. it was a frantic game, with england creating the better chances. lily owsley had a goal disallowed while sophie bray hit the crossbar. but olivia merry‘s penalty corner just five hit the crossbar. but olivia merry‘s penalty cornerjust five minutes from the final whistle was enough to give new zealand the win. england will play either the netherlands or south korea for the bronze on sunday. it was fast, it was attacking. unfortunately they are so fit and they are so great. we needed to kill that game for them. we needed to make it not so running, not so counterattack and we couldn't quite control at the way we wanted to. some of their quicker players tore through that the end and we couldn't hold that momentum. u nfortu nately couldn't hold that momentum. unfortunately they broke us down at
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the end. that's all the sport for 110w. the end. that's all the sport for now. find more on the bbc sport website. let's talk a bit more about one of oui’ let's talk a bit more about one of our main stories. the new president of zimbabwe, emmerson mnangagwa, has defended the actions of his predecessor, robert mugabe — saying he'd made an immense contribution to the nation. in his inauguration speech, he vowed to rebuild the country and and insisted elections would go ahead as planned next year. mr mnangagwa was speaking after being sworn—in during a ceremony at the national sports stadium in harare, attended by thousands of cheering supporters. president mnangagwa paid a glowing tribute to his predecessor, robert mugabe. let me at this stage pay special tribute to one of and the only surviving founding father of our nation, comrade robert gabriel mugabe.
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he led us in our struggle for national independence. he assumed responsibilities of leadership at a formative and very challenging time at the birth of our nation. that needs to be lauded and celebrated for all times. whatever errors of commission or omission that may have occurred during that critical phase in the life of our nation, let us all accept and acknowledge his immense contribution towards the building of our nation. applause. to me personally, he
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remains a father, mentor, comrade—in—arms and my leader. we say thank you to him and trust that our history will grant him his proper place and accord him his deserved stature as one of the founding fathers and leaders of our nation. president mnangagwa also said the task at hand was to "rebuild our great country". for close to two decades, this country went through many developments. whilst we cannot change the past, there is a lot we can do in the present and the future to give our nation a different positive direction. as we do so, we should never remain
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hostages of our past. i humbly appeal to all of us that we let bygones be bygones, gladly embracing each other in defining a new destiny of our beloved zimbabwe. the task at hand is that of rebuilding our great country. it principally lies with no one but ourselves to do so. i implore you all to declare that never again, never again should circumstances that put zimbabwe in an unfavourable position be allowed to occur or overshadow this process.
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cheering. the new president of zimbabwe and we will have more from the country over the course of the day. we will turn our attention is to stories back at home. ajudge we will turn our attention is to stories back at home. a judge at leeds crown court has ordered that a teenager who killed a seven—year—old girl in york be detained for life with a girl in york be detained for life witha minimum girl in york be detained for life with a minimum term of five years. our north of england correspondent danny savage is outside leeds crown court. explain what's happened this lunchtime. many people will remember the killing of katie rough in january this year. it was in a playing field on the edge of york. it was quite terrible circumstances. she was killed by another child. she was smothered and attacked with a
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knife. the police and emergency services were there quickly but there was nothing they could do. the child who attacked her, who cannot be named for legal reasons, has been detained ever since. for many months 110w detained ever since. for many months now psychiatric assessments have been carried out on a teenager to work out whether she should be subject to a hospital order or given a detention order. those assessments have finally taken place. what happened today was a sentencing hearing for that girl who is now 16 yea rs hearing for that girl who is now 16 years old. she appeared via a video link. she sat with her head bowed, listening to thejudges link. she sat with her head bowed, listening to the judges comments as he sentenced her. thejudge listening to the judges comments as he sentenced her. the judge said none of the experts involved could quite agree on exactly what her psychological and mental health problems were. nobody doubted she had them but what they all agreed on was that she didn't need to be subject to a hospital order. she was
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sentenced to detention for life with a minimum term of five years, because she admitted to manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility. she's been sentenced today and after that hearing the senior investigating officer from north yorkshire police came out and made this statement. today is the end ofa made this statement. today is the end of a process, and that is a relief but it's not the end of our story. our story is about a loving home and family that were torn apart on the day when we lost our daughter. our story goes on into the future where our home feels very empty, but we will keep going for the sake of our other children and out the sake of our other children and our grandson. we are grateful for everyone who's helped us in these months including the whole community of york, who have been so generous with their kindness, their time and their money. we are especially thankful for the support of our closest family and friends, you know who you are. one of the points the
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judge made was that the experts have had such difficulty in assessing this teenager because she's remained absolutely silent about what happened that day when she killed katie rough. all the experts are hampered by or —— hampered by your silence. despite giving the sentence of life with a minimum term of five yea rs, of life with a minimum term of five years, thejudge of life with a minimum term of five years, the judge stressed of life with a minimum term of five years, thejudge stressed if of life with a minimum term of five years, the judge stressed if this teenage girl is still deemed to be a danger to the public then she will not be released. thejudge danger to the public then she will not be released. the judge stressed he didn't want people to think she would serve a minimum of five years. if she is still deemed to be a danger to the public she will have her sentence continued. millions of small savers may be hit by a little noticed tax change announced in this week's budget, according to a leading insurer. royal london insurance says it affects long term policies sold by companies and sometimes collected door—to—door. in the long run losses could add up
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to hundreds of millions of pounds. our personal finance correspondent, simon gompertz reports. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. sometimes chancellors say things in the budget people don't quite understand at the time and this, the abolition of an obscure tax perk which appears to benefit many small savers, could have been one of those occasions. there is a case now for removing the anomaly of the indexation allowance for capital gains, bringing the corporate tax system in line with the capital gains tax system. i will therefore bring this allowance so companies receive relief for inflation up to january 2018 but not thereafter. insurers say there is an impact on traditional savings policies, often sold door—to—door or at the workplace. they include endowments which pay you a lump sum, whole—of—life insurance which pays out after you die, and other investment policies which have had some of their annual growth tax—free. from early numbers we've looked at, we think that millions of people
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have these policies and will now be losing relatively modest amounts of money, perhaps £25, £50 each, some a lot more, but this all adds up to a huge amount, hundreds of millions of pounds for the chancellor. the budget document said no individuals will be affected and the treasury adds: but royal london argues that this is a tax grab from people who have done the right thing and saved, and it should be reversed. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. emmerson mnangagwa has been officially sworn in as the new president of zimbabwe. he was sworn in in a ceremony in harare. theresa may has urged eu leaders to start talking about a post—brexit trade deal, as she arrives for a summit in
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brussels. ireland's main opposition party has tabled a motion of no—confidence the deputy prime minister. 1.2 million women and 700,000 men reported some form of domestic abuse last year in england and wales. for people who need a safe place to go, refuges are a lifeline. the charity women's aid, on one date 200 women and children we re on one date 200 women and children were turned away from a refuge because they don't have enough beds. when people say, why didn't you just leave, i want them to understand that it's just not that simple. how could i leave? this man was going to kill me. it's so complex and people just don't understand. for that person to have so much power over you makes it impossible. it took charlotte nine years to find
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the courage to leave her husband and finally report him to the police. she and her children went first to a refuge and later to a new home. charlotte's husband was convicted and given a seven—year prison sentence in. but her two daughters say the memories of what he did will stay with them forever. we ended up going into hiding while the court case was on. i was very confused because i grew up with this man and to me he was my dad. i felt abandoned, it was sort of a loss for me. the latest crime survey for england and wales shows 1.2 million women and more than 700,000 men reported some form of domestic abuse in the last year. with one in ten women between 16 and 19 saying they've experienced abuse. charity women's aid says on one day this year they were helping more
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than 11,500 women and children at refuges in england. but on that same day had to turn away almost 200 more because they didn't have enough room. years after the charity helped her and herfamily, charlotte now works for a women's aid refuge in surrey. there's always a waiting list here. the last family left an hour ago and i'm told a mother and her three children are on their way here now. it's expected they'll arrive with very little. so here are just a few basics to get them start their new life. women's lives are already at risk and i think this statistic is something like over two women a week are murdered in england and wales. if there weren't the refuges that there are now, that figure will go up. i already fear when we have to say to somebody, sorry, no, we're full, i already fear, where's that woman going to go? the government has said it's committed £40 million until 2020 and is introducing a domestic
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violence and abuse bill to protect and support victims and their children. meanwhile, charlotte says she'll everything she can to help other women like her. i could sit here and not tell you my story, but if i gave into that and gave into that fear of thinking, is he watching, what's he going to do? then i've lost and he's won, and that's not going to happen. i'm continuing to speak out and that's why i'm talking to you, because it's really important and nobody‘s going to stop me doing that. the number of people killed in egypt where militants have attacked a mosque has risen to more than 100. the president is holding an emergency security meeting. it happened in the northern sinai region. armed men stormed a building
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and detonated a bomb during friday prey is. one report says the target appeared to be supporters of the security forces who were attending priors. this is the deadliest attack yet ina priors. this is the deadliest attack yet in a three—year insurgency in sinai. we'll have more on that story on bbc news after 2pm. 14% of children in english schools have a special educational need or disability, that's according to government figures, but that number only tells part of the story. new analysis given to the bbc by the education policy institute shows almost 40% of children in england are identified as having special educational needs at some point between the age of five and 16 — significantly higher than the estimate. jayne mccubbin reports. children at this special school might have different needs to most pupils in mainstream education, but they still have the same kinds of hopes and dreams. what's the plan, jacob? i want to become a football manager.
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i want to be a pet store manager. i want to be a doctor or a spy! i like this ambition, two completely different things. it was previously thought only 14% of children have a send, or a special educational need or disability, that's any need that has to be met outside of the normal curriculum at either a mainstream or a special school. but today a report from the education policy institute says that number is actually much higher. that official government statistics of 14% is taken from a snapshot ofjust one year. but if you look across the lifetime of a child, then 40% are registered at some point with a special educational need. but government policy and send provision is based on that much lower official figure, which leads some to ask if that provision is anywhere near enough. i don't think there are things in place, i don't think there's
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the budget to put things in place, i don't think there's the political will to put anything in place because i think what needs to happen for these children costs money. david and carrie grant have four children with send. they say they've had to fight for the right support. people think, i will not accept this child that has anything different, they all have to fit into a box and if they don't fit inside a box we will squash them until they do. and that is the biggest issue that children with sen face. children's commissioners in england, wales, ireland and scotland say despite differences in their systems they all have significant concerns, concerns shared by tv presenter chris packham, who has autism. when you think 40% of young people have those requirements or needs at some point in their education, i can't believe they're being effectively addressed. but the department for education tell us the 14% figure allow schools to plan year—on—year, while 40% represents the changing nature of needs.
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but some believe sen kids are being let down. it's just sad seeing people have this condition and it's not being treated right. because when it is treated right everything just goes brilliantly? yeah. these young people deserve a chance and they're amazing young people with lots and lots to give. anything's possible? absolutely. much more coming up from 2pm. time for a look at the weather. it's called across most parts of the uk by now. quite frosty this morning. we are going to see frost around as we go through the course
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of the weekend. quite a bit of cloud around but you get a sense this cloudy pattern across our part of the globe there is a bit of a gap forming between weather systems. that means there will be a lot of sunshine around over the next couple of days. certainly for the rest of the afternoon fine weather across many parts of england and wales. the north of the uk from the northern isles around western scotland, down into dumfries and galloway and northern ireland, they've got quite a few showers around. some of them falling as snow. by this stage it's barely above freezing in the of scotland. it is chilly enough for nottingham, birmingham and even on the south coast. those temperatures will be dropping away rapidly through the course of the evening. a nippy friday night. showers across many northern areas will continue. some of them drifting into the pennines, maybe one or two across wales and the south—west. they could
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be sleet and snow across the hills. look at these temperatures, it is more 01’ look at these temperatures, it is more or less the same everywhere by the early hours of saturday morning. this cold air we've been predicting has drifted out of the norwegian sea to the east of greenland. the cold air has died down as far south as iberia. a chilly one tomorrow, a bit ofa iberia. a chilly one tomorrow, a bit of a breeze out there. it will feel colder than some of the temperatures suggest. we could see temperatures of 4—5, but with the wind it will feel closer to freezing. four example in newcastle even minus one. that saturday. i think fewer showers around on sunday. another crisp, bright day. there are weather systems approaching the north—west of the country late afternoon sunday evening. these always bring slightly milder weather but i think overall
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the messages things are going to be turning quite a bit less cold but overall i don't think we are in for any mild weather for quite some time. hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm... a bomb and gun attack on a mosque in egypt's north sinai province kills more than 180 people. a new president and a fresh start for zimbabwe — as emmerson mnangagwa promises elections and vows to serve all citizens. we should never remain hostages of our past. i must humbly appeal to all of us that we let bygones be bygones. let's get things moving — theresa may is in brussels offering more money so trade talks can start soon. coming up on afternoon live... all the sport. and in sport, of course, it's the ashes.
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still good use? it was a topsy—turvy second day in
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