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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 25, 2017 6:00am-7:00am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. egypt strikes back after the deadliest terror attack in the country's recent history. at least 235 people were killed at the mosque in north sinai. the military say they've carried out air strikes on those behind the killings. good morning, it's saturday the 25th of november. also this morning: panic on the streets of central london leaves 16 people injured. police issue pictures of two people they think may have sparked the confusion. a rise in vandalism on cars in england and wales, the rac says its latest figures could be just the tip of the iceberg. in sport, a captain's innings gives australia the edge. steve smith shows why he's the world's number one batsman with a century as australia go past england's total in the opening ashes test. as analysts predict record spending on black friday,
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we hear the thoughts of some keen bargain hunters. just came for black friday, ended up buying a television, headphones, clothes, jewellery, all sorts of things. and ben has the weekend weather. good morning. a cold, frosty and in places icy start but the reward will be some crisp autumn sunshine. some wintry showers as well. all the weekend weather details coming up. see you soon, ben. good morning. first, our main story. egypt's military says it carried out air strikes on those behind the deadliest islamist terror attack in the country's recent history. 235 people were killed and more than 100 injured after gunmen detonated a bomb and stormed a packed mosque in north sinai yesterday. egypt's air force says it has destroyed vehicles used by the militants, as well as weapons and ammunition at what it described
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as terrorist locations. orla guerin‘s report contains some distressing images. a rush to save those wounded when a place of worship became a place of carnage. the attackers struck during friday prayers. for egypt, this was a grim new first, a massacre in a mosque. the mosque was popular with sufi muslims, who revere saints and shrines, and are viewed as heretics by islamic extremists. within hours, a televised address to a nation in shock. president abdel fattah al—sisi telling egyptians their anguish would not be in vain and there would be decisive punishment. the sophisticated assault on the mosque was the latest attack by militants based in sinai. the state has been battling them for years. the most deadly previous attack by is here was the downing of this russian aircraft in sinai in 2015, with the loss of 224 lives. in the past year, is have killed
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scores of christians in three attacks on churches, saying followers of the cross were their favourite prey. this time, militants in sinai have targeted their fellow muslims, showing no mercy. outside local hospitals, crowds waited to donate blood. after a day of horror, many egyptians now fearful about what might come next. orla guerin, bbc news, cairo. police have released cctv images of two men they want to speak to after panic broke out on the streets of london yesterday afternoon, injuring 16 people. armed officers were called following reports of gunfire at oxford circus tube station. but investigators now say there is no evidence weapons had been fired. our reporter andy moore is in central london for us now. andy, what more do we know about
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what happened yesterday? well, it all happened at 4:37pm yesterday, about the busiest time on one of the busiest days of the year. police got multiple reports of shots being fired, both underground in the chew and on the street at oxford street. they say they treated it as if it was a terrorist incident and they we re was a terrorist incident and they were here within one minute. what started it all? eyewitnesses talked about a fight underground on the platform, they were ever actuated from the tube, the panic underground spread to the panic on street level. 16 people were injured, seven treated at the scene discharge, eighth taken to hospital with minor injuries, one with more serious leg injuries. british transport police have released this image of two men, cctv images of two men on the platform, they believe they might know something about what's being called an erupted on the platform. andy, for the moment, thank you.
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this afternoon the dup leader arlene foster will address her party's conference in belfast, despite there still being no government in northern ireland. aside from domestic issues, politicians in both the uk and the republic of ireland will be waiting to hear how she addresses the brexit negotiations. our ireland correspondent chris buckler reports. at stormont‘s parliament buildings lies empty. there hasn't been a government here since the start of the year and that's causing much concern, along with brexit. though one who lives along the irish border is entirely sure what will happen to the scores of open roads that connect northern ireland and the republic. the democratic unionist party still have political influence because a conservative government need there supporting crucial votes at westminster. but to get back into power at stormont they need to do a deal with sinn fein and that's not looking likely. we want a devolved government back and we're up for trying to find a way through all of
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this but it has to be sensible and it has to be balanced between unionism and nationalism, we can't have a situation where one community feels they haven't been respected. last yea r‘s party conference was feels they haven't been respected. last year's party conference was an upbeat affair. then arlene foster was first minister and in her speech she boasted of how times have changed since northern ireland was a byword for political crisis. when she gives her conference speech today, she'll be very aware that stormont and instability are once again closely linked in people's mines. chris buckler, bbc news, belfast. there's no clear link between the number of prison suicides and overcrowding, a new international study suggests. packed prison cells have traditionally been thought of as a highly significant factor. however, the research published in the lancet psychiatry journal did conclude that suicides could be cut by sending fewer people with mental illnesses to prison. our home affairs correspondent danny shaw reports. prisons can be harsh, depressing and
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brutal places and times. suicide is a regular occurrence. in england and wales, last year was the worst on record. 119 inmates took their own lives, two every week. staff shortages and population pressures may have played some part in the high suicide rate, but the conditions prisoners are held in are a less significant factor than traditionally thought according to a new study. the research looked at cases across the world. it examined more than 3900 prison suicides in 2a countries. the study found wide variation in prison suicide rates, but no link with prison overcrowding, except in low income countries were extremely crowded cells might cause extra stress. there are no simple explanations for this prison suicide, so overcrowding, prisoner numbers,
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prison of the sun numbers, how much you spend on prison, that didn't seem to be an explanation for these differences in rates of suicide. the study found proportionately more self—inflicted deaths in jails study found proportionately more self—inflicted deaths injails in countries such as norway and sweden. there custody was generally reserved for the most violent and dangerous offenders, including those with mental health problems. that led researchers to conclude that the best way to reduce prison suicides would be to cut dramatically the number of inmates with severe mental illness and improve access to psychiatric care and social welfare provision. danny shaw, bbc news. glasgow airport was closed temporarily last night after a tug vehicle hit a passenger plane which was preparing for take—off. flights were delayed and diverted after the runway froze in bitterly cold temperatures. it's thought the tug may have skidded on ice as the plane was pushed back from the stand. no—one was injured and the airport has now reopened. the president of argentina, mauricio macri, has ordered an inquiry
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into what happened to a navy submarine that disappeared over a week ago. hopes have faded of finding any of the 44 people onboard alive, after the argentine navy said an event consistent with an explosion was detected near the submarine's last—known location. actress emma thompson the latest high profile celebrity to back the campaign to free the british iranian woman nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, who has been in prison in iran for nearly 19 months. she will lead a march of families from mrs ratcliffe's neighbourhood in north—west london urging iran's leader to reunite nazanin with her husband and 3—year—old daughter gabriella. car vandalism in england and wales has jumped by 10% in three years. 210,000 vehicles suffered criminal damage such as smashed windows and slashed tyres in 2016, according to data obtained by rac insurance. it's believed that the figures could be higher as many motorists don't
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report incidents because they fear it would push their insurance premiums up. richard lister reports. it's an infuriating problem for motorists and it's on the rise. around 60 cars were vandalised on this colchester industrial estate in august costing of pounds to fix. new police figures show that across the country more than 210,000 cars suffered criminal damage last year. that's up 10% since 2013, but the increase in hertfordshire and in west yorkshire was 25%, while greater manchester saw a 37% rise. and none of us are immune. in 2009 the former cabinet minister hazel blea rs the former cabinet minister hazel blears found her car had been attacked by vandals. slashed tyres and broken windows mean a vehicle can be off the road for days. very frustrating for a motorist because of the inconvenience, the cost and the time it takes to actually get an effective repair but we also feel it's probably just the effective repair but we also feel
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it's probablyjust the tip of the iceberg because many people won't actually report a small incident of vandalism and certainly won't make an insurance claim. in this area near luton airport, holidaymakers who parked in residential streets to avoid airport car parks had an unwelcome surprise when they returned. paying for secure parking would have been cheaper. and if that's not available, the advice is to find well lit unobtrusive spaces to avoid the vandals. richard lister, bbc news. sightseers on a london tour bus have shared their journey with an unexpected stowaway. this fox is believed to have boarded the double—decker in a depot before riding it all the way to the centre of the capital, taking in all the sights on the way. it sat on the top deck, unnoticed, until the bus reached park lane, where it was safely removed, and taken back to its den. the thing is, if it wanted to be
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warm, why go on the top deck? because you get a better view? of course! black friday yesterday. hundreds of thousands of us snapped up a bargain yesterday with estimates that shoppers spent more than £2.5 billion in one day alone, but was it a record breaking year for retailers? we've been out in manchester to see what shoppers had to say. done a bit of christmas shopping? hadn't planned on christmas shopping. half my christmas presents sorted. i came with a budget and i'm going home with more than what i thought i was going home with. came for black friday, ended up buying a television, headphones, clothes, jewellery, all sorts of things. we
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got friday off with our friends and so got friday off with our friends and so it happened to fall on black friday, which is handy, so we got lots of bargains. just girls out on a friday! we got 2596 lots of bargains. just girls out on a friday! we got 25% off, lots of bargains. just girls out on a friday! we got 2596 off, 1096 off, any discount is better than nothing so any discount is better than nothing so we've done well i think. we've not overspent i think, what we've doneis not overspent i think, what we've done is we knew what we wanted to get and we've come out and we've got that really. so quite a positive experience with it. milli feels like she's overspent. i've overspent. those are the thoughts of some of those who were spending money yesterday and we will analyse some of the figures later on. you didn't go out shopping yesterday? oddly enough! let's have a look at this morning's papers. let's get down to business says the front page of the daily mail. it's talking about theresa may, who was in brussels yesterday, saying the eu has finally indicated its ready to start talks on a post—brexit trade deal last night. on the front page of the daily
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mirror, entirely different theme, they have an interview with coleen rooney, who made comments in connection with her husband, wine, talking about their situation. the guardian is talking about scores of complaints against a surgeon who isa of complaints against a surgeon who is a pelvic specialist —— wayne. he's been accused of leaving patients with traumatic compensation so patients with traumatic compensation $03 patients with traumatic compensation so a group patients with traumatic compensation so a group of 100 women are considering legal action. this picture of michelangelo's david in florence in italy, following legal action images of this can only now be used with official permission so says the guardian. front page of the daily telegraph uses some of the images of events yesterday at oxford circus, we now know this was just an altercation between two men, police said. they've released cctv images of the two people that might have been responsible for some kind of fight in the tube station initially. and this story, a portion of women who will never have children
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doubling. similar picture on the front page of the times, but its lead story a revolt over defence cuts, a defence minister has threatened to resign if the military cuts the army to below 70,000 soldiers. the minister quoted is tobias ellwood. here's ben with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. it's probably time to ring out the thick coat and maybe even the ice scrape this morning. a cold and frosty start and an icy start in some places where there have been showers through the night. further showers through the day and crisp autumn sunshine. here's how it looks early. showers in the north—western areas and western parts of scotland. showers are wintry even the lower levels. don't be surprised to see snow. in western
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scotland, northern ireland, north—west england and into wales where we have the showers there's the risk of icy stretches the roads. there could also be ice in parts of the south—east. a couple of showers through the morning. a scattering of showers in the south—west england and even here over high ground some of the showers are wintry. through the day areas exposed to the wind, quite a strong wind, will continue to have heavy showers, perhaps with hailand to have heavy showers, perhaps with hail and thunder. most of the wintry weather confined to high ground as the day goes on. or persistent sleet and snow in the northern england. this is the idea of what it will feel like with the strength of the wind. some sports feeling subzero through the afternoon, the particularly strong winds in the far north of scotland. it this evening and tonight showers continued to feed into northern and western areas. again wintry. mostly over high ground. temperatures in towns and cities about one or two degrees,
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but could easily get lower than that in the countryside. we start sunday with this high pressure. not a bad looking day. the frontal system approaching from the west. that will change things later. on sunday and other day of sunshine and showers. vidic ely eastern area staying dry. our west we have quite a few showers and this band of persistent rain moves into northern ireland by the end of the day. temperatures may be nudging upa end of the day. temperatures may be nudging up a little bit. eight degrees in cardiff and plymouth. for the test match down under, a different feel. temperatures around the mid— 20s. even here there will bea the mid— 20s. even here there will be a couple of showers at times, as well as spells of sunshine. into the start of next week and monday is going to bring cloud and rain and most of the rain will move through during the early hours of monday. there could be held snow for a time. but as you can see as the rain moves through you will temporarily see
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something milder in places. however, into tuesday the cold air returns and we get to a northerly wind. temperatures 6—7 degrees at rest, with wintry showers. the - for is for there snow. there "me for now. back to you. thanks. they were the trenches that changed the face of modern warfare forever. now 100 years since the first tanks we re now 100 years since the first tanks were deployed, members of the royal regiment have returned to the french town to mark the loss of life in the largest ever attack mounted. robert hall sent us this report. on the terrorist all of the memorial, they look back to a week which cemented the bonds of the new
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military family. these men will tell you stories of the friendship and teamwork particular to this regiment, as true now as it was a century ago. in november 1917 the early tank men clambered into over 400 lumbering machines for the largest tank attack ever mounted. inside the metal holes crews were ove rco m e by inside the metal holes crews were overcome by heat and exhaust fumes. any tanks broke down. but courage and determination took most of their objectives. major arthur griffiths was one of those honoured for his bravery. having seen some of the pressures of conflict, it is particularly poignant. you understand the sorts of pressures there were at the time. understand the sorts of pressures there were at the timelj understand the sorts of pressures there were at the time. i think the standout point for me was in the tank you would make sure the bullet was hitting the front of the tank and then you would know you were going in the right direction.
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surviving tanks are now too fragile to run. this is a copy made for the film war horse. one battle scar their trend has been adopted by the french village where it fought. tank backrower what —— is tank was lost. in 1958 they began the task of preserving her. today, deborah is the centrepiece of a new museum commemorating her part in the battle and the five crewmen she lost.|j a lwa ys and the five crewmen she lost.|j always moved when i'm here. it's pa rt always moved when i'm here. it's part of myself and it is simply a love story. a love story which started 25 years ago when first i metan started 25 years ago when first i met an old lady who let me know that she knew a place where the tank was buried. for me it was exactly as if she had given me a map to find a treasure. when the five men who now live together at this military
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cemetery climbed into the battle, they knew they were part of something extraordinary. but the bravery of the crews and the power of the tanks came to naught. the allies were once again driven back. however, cambrai marked the start of a change in the way wars were fought. the tank had proved its worth. a machine that is still evolving, still a terrifying presence. its birth came at a high cost. these ceremonies mark the passing of the tank men who still lie under the rolling farmland they crossed. now it's time for the travel show. this week the team are in dubai, finding out how it's become one of the world's fastest—growing tourist destinations. we'll see you for the headlines at 6:30. 20 years ago, dubai set out to become one of the most talked
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about towns in the world. since then this young city state, one of seven emirates in the uae, has largely succeeded. it's become one of the fastest growing tourist destinations on the planet. synonymous with spectacular skyscrapers, gigantic shopping malls and high—end hospitality and also the occasional stories of tourists who fall foul of local customs. but scratch deeper and there's much more to this place. no longer the brash new kid on the block, dubai is now an established hub and one of the world's few truly global cities. oh, yes. and although the impulse to impress is still here, there's now a complex identity taking shape and i'm here to see how that's changing the look and feel of dubai, its people and its future. this is the creek, the real heart
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of old dubai, and gorgeous in this light. now, this used to be a real trading hub for the city and the kinds of boats you can see behind me bring in spices and other goods from countries like india, iran and much further afield. this is my personalfavourite part of dubai, the old town. you get a real sense of the past. as it's a contrast to the skyscrapers and shopping malls
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downtown. what is this? this is cinnamon. cinnamon, yeah, i recognised that. very good. this one is turmeric. turmeric, yeah, very good for cooking. this one is for cooking, and this is for the face massage. for the face massage? 0k. and what is this? this is a long piece of wood, what is it? this is more cinnamon! very good! you're testing me, aren't you! tell me the difference, that is bigger? this is bigger and this is smaller. is that it?! laughs frankly, if i hadn't stopped him i think he would've taken me through every single spice in the shop. this one is for smoking and for soup. of course if you're into bling you don't have to go too far to find that here too. but to find authentic arts and crafts 21st century style, then you'll need to venture even furtyher from the glitz and skyscrapers, and head to be gritty al quoz
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industrial area, where a flourishing warehouse—based community arts scene has sprung up. this is "calligraffiti", a mixture of traditional arabic calligraphy and graffiti, and it's the signature style of a french—born artist of tunisian origin, who goes by the name of el seed. he'd taken his unique approach to street art around the world with astonishing results, including this monumental project he created in a working—class district of cairo. so what's he doing in dubai? for me, dubai is like, a new city. i look at it, i try to have a different view to it. a lot of people coming from outside say, "oh, it is fake, you are an artist, how could you be here? for me, there is this kind
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of growing art scene, there is a growing art community. as an artist it's always good to see that i am part of this, i am part of making a change and making this movement. if i can question you on that, it is also a place that is glamorous and wealthy, you have a big expat population, you have some very rich people here. is that inspiring for you? we are here in the middle of the industrial zone that has been turned into this cultural and art community. like, when you cross the road you have still factories. this is the dubai that i want to see. i am not interested in the shiny things, that's not for me. but some people that they want it. i think at some point there is a switch, dubai will show people, this is what we do. some people love paris, i love paris, some people hate
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paris. some people love new york, some others hate new york. you cannot compare. for me it's too naive. but what i look? yes, what has been done here in less than 30 years is crazy. i think people should just salute that. while the artists there are busy feeding the soul, many locals and expats here in dubai are also now keen to exercise their bodies. some of them in the most quintessential emirati locations. now, you wouldn't normally associate dubai with cycling. in fact, riding through the dubai rush hour is definitely a no—no. but the sport is becoming increasingly popular here, thanks to facilities like this, a cycling track. it's long, smooth, purpose built and flat as a pancake.
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in a country not famed for its exercise culture, these days many locals are now getting into a whole range of sports. and in case you're wondering, i'm going to leave this one to the experts. hi, i am a wake boarder in dubai. i'm all about board sports, so snowboarding, wakeboarding, kite surfing, all accessible in dubai. living in the desert, the closest mountain is in lebanon or georgia or something. you have the best instructors, you learn how to snowboard here and when you go into any mountain from the alps to colorado, it's simple. the younger generation is actually
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crazy here in dubai. they're crazy when it comes to extreme sports. they're trying to compete more internationally. it's actually really nice to see. the vibe of the city is all about work hard, play hard. you put in so many hours at work, so the little time you have left, you don't want to waste it just lolling around. keen to get another fix of the great outdoors, i'm now heading out to the desert early in the morning to experience something new, that i am told you can only see here in dubai. it's a new twist on traditional arabian falconry.
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i hear it's going to be truly breathtaking. 2,500 years ago, people relied on the falcon the way you and i rely on the supermarket. falcons put food on the table. traditionally the way it worked, birds from europe and asia migrated from the middle east to africa. on that migration they would trap them from the wild and then use them in the winter months. at the end of winter they would untie them and release them into the wild. it is a beautiful system of borrowing a bird from the wild and then giving them back. we are about to release oberon from the basket and i will untie him. you'll see he's wearing a transmitter on his tail, that is so i can
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find him if he flies away, and i will pop his hood off in a second, this device is called the hood, and this is keeping him calm and relaxed. that comes off, ok. ready, guys? five, four, three, two, one... wow! amazing. hey! good boy. do you want to go? i would love to, let's try. oh, yes. peter has helped to hand rear these birds from birth and the bond
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of trust between them is vital. it's clear that to him the falcon‘s welfare is paramount, and months go into training the birds to get them used to the sights and sounds of the baloon and its passengers. it's practised. these birds are in good shape. so the bird is not suffering. absolutely not. what more could you ask for? a unique experience and a beautiful animal. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. good morning, here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: egypt's military says it carried out
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air strikes on those behind the deadliest islamist terror attack in the country's recent history. 235 people were killed and more than 100 injured after gunmen detonated a bomb and stormed a packed mosque in north sinai yesterday. egypt's air force says it has destroyed vehicles used by the militants, as well as weapons and ammunition at what it described as terrorist locations. orla guerin‘s report contains some distressing images. a rush to save those wounded when a place of worship became a place of carnage. the attackers struck during friday prayers. for egypt, this was a grim new first, a massacre in a mosque. the mosque was popular with sufi muslims, who revere saints and shrines, and are viewed as heretics by islamic extremists. within hours, a televised address to a nation in shock. president abdel fattah al—sisi telling egyptians their anguish would not be in vain and there would be decisive punishment. the sophisticated assault on the mosque was the latest attack
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by militants based in sinai. the state has been battling them for years. the most deadly previous attack by is here was the downing of this russian aircraft in sinai in 2015, with the loss of 224 lives. in the past year, is have killed scores of christians in three attacks on churches, saying followers of the cross were their favourite prey. this time, militants in sinai have targeted their fellow muslims, showing no mercy. outside local hospitals, crowds waited to donate blood. after a day of horror, many egyptians now fearful about what might come next. orla guerin, bbc news, cairo. police have released cctv images of two men they want to speak
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to after panic broke out on the streets of london yesterday afternoon, injuring 16 people. armed officers were called following reports of gunfire at oxford circus tube station. but investigators now say there is no evidence weapons had been fired. they are appealing to speak to these two men in connection with the incident. the dup leader arlene foster will address her party's annual conference in belfast later today and is expected to focus on their position of influence in westminster. mrs foster will also reaffirm their commitment to restore a power—sharing agreement at stormont, and will be watched closely for thoughts on brexit and the question of the irish border. the democratic unionists unexpectedly gained a prominent seat at the negotiation table after agreeing to prop up theresa may's minority government. there's no clear link between the number of prison suicides and overcrowding,
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a new international study suggests. packed prison cells have traditionally been thought of as a highly significant factor. however, the research published in the lancet psychiatry journal did conclude that suicides could be cut by sending fewer people with mental illnesses to prison. glasgow airport was closed temporarily last night after a tug vehicle hit a passenger plane which was preparing for take—off. flights were delayed and diverted after the runway froze in bitterly cold temperatures. it's thought the tug may have skidded on ice as the plane was pushed back from the stand. no—one was injured and the airport has now reopened. car vandalism in england and wales has jumped by 10% in three years. 210,000 vehicles suffered criminal damage such as smashed windows and slashed tyres in 2016, according to data obtained by rac insurance. it's believed that the figures could be even higher as many motorists don't report incidents because they fear it would push their insurance premiums up. he's been called the real—life
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iron man and has blasted into the record books with his self—builtjet engine power suit. richard browning set a guinness world record last month for flying in the suit and was showing it off here at media city in salford yesterday. browning spent £40,000 building thejet pack, and it hits speeds of 32 miles per hour. he hopes to inspire students to follow a career in engineering. we had him in and we lifted up the bits that do his arms and it was so heavy. when you get close you can smell the paraffin and you can see the flames coming from his wrists, it suddenly put me off having a go, you need to know what you're doing and be very experienced. lots of things happening as we speak this morning? new zealand, we will come to the rugby league world cup in a moment, england trying to reach their first
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moment, england trying to reach theirfirst final moment, england trying to reach their first final 422 years but it's been happening in the cricket. at the end of the day it is time for steady nerves. they have lost an early wicket as alastair cook's poor tour continues. it was australia's captain who gradually ground down the england attack on the third day of the opening ashes test. england started the day really brightly as stuart broad bristled with intent, taking the wicket of shaun marsh. and broad did it all himself soon after, catching mitchel starc off his own delivery. but try as they might, england had no answer captain smith, who remained unbeaten on 141. and by the time every one of his teamates were out, australia had built themselves a lead of 26. england have just started batting again. they got to 11 runs when alastair cook was caught my mitchell starc. he made seven today after scoring
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two in the first innings. england are 17—1. england are on course to reach the final of the rugby league world cup for the first time in 22 years. they lead tonga 14—0 in auckland, the winners will face australia for the titl.e e final. and england made the perfect start, jermaine mc gillvary opened the scoring in front of a crowd packed out with tonga fans. and they extended their lead going into half—time, gareth widdop managed to ground this legally. they're in the early stages of the second half now. england have lost their last three world cup semi—finals, but they're on course to win this one. onto football, and wales are top of their qualifying group for the women's world cup just ahead of england after beating kasakhstan in cardiff. the match marked the return of wales's all—time leading goalscorer helen ward, who played for half an hour just two months after giving birth to her second child. but the only goal of the game came from hayley ladd's late free kick. england have a game in hand over wales, and they made it two wins from two last night,
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beating bosnia—herzegovina 4—0 in walsall. captain steph houghton scored twice in what was interim manager mo marley's first competitive game in charge. really happy. been doing a lot of work since obviously we've been in post about being a bit more creative and, you know, the opportunities that we created, obviously we're really pleased with. obviously tough opposition, really difficult to break down but overall really happy with the performance. david moyes got his first point as west ham manager as they drew with leicester. they had to come from behind after marc albrighton rewarded leicester's bright start. but whatever moyes said at half time galvanised the irons, and kouyate equalised but it wasn't enough to move west ham out of the relegation zone. we are desperately trying to get a
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level we think the players will need to play at to get results. we think we worked quite hard tonight and it got us a point, so it shows you we've still got a long way to go, we're going to have to work harder but i also think there were moments tonight where the football was a bit better and we gave ourselves some more chances as well. dundee are off the bottom of the scottish premiership after adding to the recent woes of rangers. matt o'hara was the star man with the winner and that was his second goal of the night in a 2—1win. managerless rangers have now lost two on the trot and are fourth. lewis hamilton seemed relieved that the formula 1 season is almost over after breaking the track record in practice for the abu dhabi grand prix. he kept mercedes on top, going a tenth of a second quicker than ferrari's sebastian vettel. hmilton will be looking for the 73rd pole position of his career. he said, "it's been a good friday but i'm happy that it's the last one of the season." it maybe a big weekend of rugby union autumn internationals but it's
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still a busy one for club sides. gloucester are up to third in rugby union's premiership after beating newcastle 29—7. they ran in four tries,including this from henry purdy, showing off his footballing skills to give newcastle their fourth defeat in a row. and in the pro14, a late try from andrew trimble helped ulster beat italian side treviso by a single point 23—22. there were also wins for cardiff, leinster and the cheetahs. now, the journey from football field to furlongs went far better than expected for the former england striker michael owen. he finished second in his debut race as a jockey and says he may do it again. owen, who's 37, and had to lose over a stone in training, he was riding calder prince in a charity race at ascot, the only novce in a field of ten amateurs. he says the reaction he got on his phone was almost as big as when he played against brazil in the world cup quarter—finals. better than i expected, must admit, we seems to go really quick early on
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andi we seems to go really quick early on and i thought, wow, no one can keep this up. that's probably the fastest i've ever been on a horse and it felt like the horse slowed up into the bend, whipped up on the inside and all ofa the bend, whipped up on the inside and all of a sudden i was on the front and i thought, come on now, but that was a long straight and i got very tired. he may do it against yellow buzzing after that. he knows you can get batted in that sport so you have to think of the children. fantastic achievement. very brave but he could have pushed it harder at the end. you were shaking your head, charlie, does that mean england have lost wicket? i can see in the corner of my eye, another wicket.|j wicket? i can see in the corner of my eye, another wicket. i saw your reaction and my heart sank. james vince has gone so england, 17—2. on trying to do my maths, they are still trailing but by nine. australia ending the third day very much on top. this match as ebbed and
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flowed one way and then the other and in an hour i could be saying england have wrestled back the initiative. let's hope so! a chilly weekend in store for many. ben is having a look at the weather. the weather watchers always make it clear what the weather is doing, but not always as clear as this. there is frost. this was a picture sent to us is frost. this was a picture sent to us from norfolk. some places waking up us from norfolk. some places waking up to us from norfolk. some places waking uptoa us from norfolk. some places waking up to a covering of snow. we've had wintry showers in western areas. through the day it will remain cold and windy. a mixture of sunny spells and windy. a mixture of sunny spells and wintry showers. the showers packing in on the wind. this area exposed to the breeze. in northern and western scotland, the showers, a mixture of rain, sleet and snow and the potential for icy stretches on untreated roads. eastern scotland getting off to a cold and dry start. lots of showers in the north—west
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england and wales. rain, sleet and snow, perhaps with rain and thunder. across east anglia and the south—east are largely dry start. a couple of showers overnight. some icy churches. wintry showers over high ground. today the showers continue across western areas. most of the snow confined to high ground through the day. more likely rain at lower levels. further east, largely dry weather. windy, especially in northern scotland, where we are likely to see gales and persistent rain. temperatures struggling. 3— eight degrees at the very best. this evening and tonight we continue to see showers into the north and north—west. again, wintry showers. windy are that the night just north—west. again, wintry showers. windy are that the nightjust gone. maybe not as cold, but having said that towns and cities still around 1-2 that towns and cities still around 1—2 degrees. in the countryside we are likely to get below freezing. tomorrow we start with a high
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pressure. this frontal system will start to come into play later, bringing thickening cloud into the west and outbreaks of rain. the all that happens it's another chilly start. another day of sunshine and showers. still wintry showers in the west. temporarily we have something milder pushing into the west and south—west later. nine degrees in plymouth for the middle of the afternoon. further east another chilly day. compared that with the temperatures down under. 26 degrees in brisbane during sunday. even here not all plain sailing. the risk of showers and spells of sunshine as well. back home, into monday, we have cloud and ranger in the first pa rt have cloud and ranger in the first part of monday. out of that clears away as we get into monday daytime. temporarily double—digit temperatures in the south, but into tuesday and the rest of the coming week it looks like we will have the colder weather returning. a mixture of sunshine and showers and some of
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them will be wintry. that's all from me for now. thanks very much. time now for a round—up of the technology news in click. on click we often look out for technology which can help save people's lives. for example, we went to rwanda to look at how drones were speeding up deliveries of blood and recently closer to home, i looked at how the response times of the air ambulance in london were being improved by better connectivity. if you live in the developed world, you'll probably take it for granted that you can dial the emergency number, someone will answer and help will arrive. well, in kenya, that's not the case. in the capital nairobi alone, there are more than 50 different numbers for different ambulance
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services and if you need a fire engine, well, that's at least a dozen more, and even then there is no guarantee they'll be able to get to you. well, kate russell has been to meet a couple of entrepreneurs who have had the great idea of amalgamating them all into one service. think uber for emergency services. for most living in a modern metropolis, calling an ambulance involves dialling a single short code. but in a city more than 6 million people, nairobi has no functioning central emergency number. with five public hospitals and dozens of private hospitals and clinics all operating independently, you have to know who to call if you need an ambulance here and hope there's someone on duty to pick up. caitlin and maria run a start—up in nairobi hoping
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to address this problem. you just take for granted that 911 exists and we did as well, both of us had lived here for years and we never even considered it and we'd worked in health and i never even thought what i would do in an emergency. we just started asking people, have you seen an ambulance before? who has an ambulance? we would go and meet and find ambulances in parking lots and we started a really simple tally of how many ambulances we could find. we realised there were so many ambulances and nobody has any idea where they are. flare's aim is to connect emergency response vehicles on an uber—style platform that can route calls to an operator that can get there quickest. when the call comes in i get to know the patient‘s location, i click on the location. we can see all the vehicles that are within my range. i can select the ambulance service, which is six minutes away. let's click on the ambulance service i'm going to dispatch,
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it gives me the contact number and their location and the estimated time. it also gives me the direction route for them. sorry, sorry? leah, emergency! a busy city hospital, we left patrick to his work and headed out onto the streets to see first—hand the traffic problems that make this kind of operator routeing a lifesaver. this was especially important when violence broke out during the october elections. flare's ambulances were 33% busier attending to emergencies in these hotspots. the response times we've seen have gone down from 162 minutes, which is the average, which is nearly three hours, which is insane, to about 15—20 minutes. so far, the platform has 30 ambulances online,
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with a goal to reach at least 50 by the end of january next year. an annual membership fee gives patients access to the emergency hotline and covers the cost of any callouts, which otherwise would have had to be paid by credit card before an ambulance is dispatched. the fee is currently around $15—$20 but flare say this might change as the service matures. eventually, flare wants to add more concierge—style features for its members, like real—time updates and treatment information. the data being collected might also prove useful to help co—ordinate better service across the city. one of the things we recently learned is there's a lack of ambulances between 7am and 9am and the reason for that is that the night team is handing over to the day team, so all providers are doing that shift change, so there's a delay in that happening so then there aren't enough ambulances online to respond to the emergencies.
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fire means even bigger problems for emergency callouts in nairobi. as well as the fractured co—ordination issues seen with ambulances, there is a desperate shortage of both trucks and water supplies. tragedies like this in nairobi's vast clothes market gikomba are all too common and often left burning for much longer than they should be because of a simple lack of access to resources. 999 goes directly to the police headquarters, the police control room. once you call the police control room, they start looking for the nearest ambulance service or the nearest fire service. there's no radio linkage anywhere. the phones they have belong to individuals. the fire and ambulance service are controlled separately by different players. ict fire and rescue is the first firefighting school of its kind in kenya. i went to visit them and got
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to try out some training. flare is working with the school to add as many firetrucks as possible to their nairobi coverage, as well as locating available public and private water supplies to add to the map. there are enough hydrants in nairobi theoretically, they were planned for, but a lot of the hydrants have been built on top of, so we're surveying nairobi to see where there are publicly available hydrants and where their private hydrants are that we can actually tap into. at this stage, it's unclear how the membership funding model will play out for fire cover as callout costs could be radically higher and more variable than ambulance work. flare has high hopes of becoming the 911 call equivalent for the whole of kenya in the future. hotstepper is a wayfinding app that
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uses this scantily clad character to guide you to your designated destination. it is doing so by combining ar, geolocation data, and mapping, and while it's not the only app to overlay directions on the real world, it certainly has its unique character. he's just doing a dance for some people that are walking past the pub. you must be luke. hiya. lara, good to meet you. you too. so why am i following this man around? why have you designed him looking like this? after the year we have had in 2017, i think we all needed some humour so itjust makes it more interesting to get from a to b. there are a lot of navigation apps out there. why are people going to choose this one? some people find maps on their phones quite complicated to use. we have also put in gigantic 3—d arrows at the end of the road so you can follow him and can
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you also see from the arrows where you want to go. there are some challenges — we don't actually know where a road begins and a pavement stops, so we have to kind of do our best to calculate where we think that is. to make it look as believable as possible, what we're doing is trying to find out where we think you are, what the weather is like where you are, so if it's a sunny day or a cloudy day, and then specifically the location of the sun. and if we can work out where the sun is, we can then render his shadow naturally to where it should be. but when you're not having fun on foot, then maybe you're trying to find a place to leave your car. well, ar measuring app airmeasure are prototyping a function to help you parallel park — not something you would want any inaccuracy on. in the meantime, the app can be used for measuring furniture, creating a floor plan, or seeing how tall you are. but if you are more focused on finding your way around and have taken a shine to hotstepper,
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just don't lose your friend or you might lose your way. ok, you cannot miss that arrow but where has my man gone? where is he? whenjames bond used a jet pack to escape the bad guys in thunderball, the world went jet pack mad. but the us military—designed bell rocket belt that he used was later scrapped due to its high price and limited flight time. almost 60 years on, science fiction is finally becoming science fact. several companies, and even individuals around the world, have taken to the skies in recent years to show off their versions of a jet pack. and recently, i was invited to strap myself into one. fortunately, this was only in vr. ok, here we go. we are going to go up. 0k!
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the real thing has been built and tested by new zealand company martin aircraft, which has now been bought by the kuangchi science company in china. first things first — technically, it isn't a jet pack. it lifts off using two ducted fans which are powered by a petrol engine. it is still in testing but the team hopes that by the time it is ready, it will be able to fly as fast as 40 kilometres an hour at an altitude of 2,500 feet. on a single tank, it should last for about 30 minutes covering distances of 20 kilometres, carrying about 100 kilos. and kuangchi says it will be used for far more than just fulfilling the dream of human flight. translation: what can we do if there are people stranded in a high—rise fire? this jet pack can reach places where a helicopter cannot. a helicopter requires space
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but with a jet pack, you can get very near and hose the fire down. martin aircraft has been developing flight technology for over three decades and previously thought it would start selling these by last year. now, the company hopes the chinese financial boost will finally be enough to get it off the ground. back at my vr demo, i am starting to realise i may not be the ideal jet pack pilot. yes, that's quite enough for now. the full—length version of click is up on iplayer. as always, there is plenty more happening on facebook and on twitter. thanks for watching and we will see you soon. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. egypt strikes back after the deadliest terror attack in the country's recent history. at least 235 people were killed at the mosque in north sinai. the military say they've carried out air strikes on those behind the killings.
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good morning, it's saturday the 25th of november. also this morning: police issue pictures of two people they think may have sparked the confusion on the tube in london sparking panic. a rise in vandalism on cars in england and wales,
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