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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 25, 2017 7:00am-8:01am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. egypt strikes back after the deadliest terror attack in the country's recent history. at least 235 people were killed at the mosque in north sinai. the military say they've carried out air strikes on those behind the killings. good morning, it's saturday the 25th of november. also this morning: police issue pictures of two people they think may have sparked the confusion on the tube in london sparking panic. a rise in vandalism on cars in england and wales, the rac says its latest figures could be just the tip of the iceberg. in sport, a captain's innings gives australia the edge. joe root faces the bombardment.
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steve smith shows why he's the world's number one batsman with a century as australia go past england's total in the opening ashes test. as analysts predict record spending on black friday, we hear the thoughts of some keen bargain hunters. just came for black friday, ended up buying a television, headphones, clothes, jewellery, all sorts of things. and ben has the weekend weather. good morning. a cold, frosty and in places icy start but the reward will be some crisp autumn sunshine. some wintry showers as well. all the weekend weather details coming up. see you soon, ben. good morning. first, our main story. egypt's military says it carried out air strikes on those behind the deadliest islamist terror attack in the country's recent history. 235 people were killed and more than 100 injured after gunmen detonated a bomb and stormed a packed mosque in north sinai yesterday. egypt's air force says it has destroyed vehicles used by the militants, as well as weapons and ammunition at what it described as terrorist locations. orla guerin‘s report contains some distressing images. a rush to save those wounded when a place of worship became a place of carnage.
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the attackers struck during friday prayers. for egypt, this was a grim new first, a massacre in a mosque. the mosque was popular with sufi muslims, who revere saints and shrines, and are viewed as heretics by islamic extremists. within hours, a televised address to a nation in shock. president abdel fattah al—sisi telling egyptians their anguish would not be in vain and there would be decisive punishment. the sophisticated assault on the mosque was the latest attack by militants based in sinai. the state has been battling them for years. the most deadly previous attack by is here was the downing of this russian aircraft in sinai in 2015, with the loss of 224 lives. in the past year, is have killed scores of christians in three
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attacks on churches, saying followers of the cross were their favourite prey. this time, militants in sinai have targeted their fellow muslims, showing no mercy. outside local hospitals, crowds waited to donate blood. after a day of horror, many egyptians now fearful about what might come next. orla guerin, bbc news, cairo. we will talk to a security and intelligence expert about what this attack means to the region just after 9am. police have released cctv images of two men they want to speak to after panic broke out on the streets of london yesterday afternoon, injuring 16 people. armed officers were called following reports of gunfire at oxford circus tube station, but investigators now say there is no evidence weapons
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had been fired. our reporter andy moore is in central london for us now. andy, what more do we know about what happened yesterday? british transport police are trying to piece that together. we know the incident happened at 4:37 p.m., the busiest time on one of the busiest days of the year. police responded very quickly, they responded as if it was a terror incident. eyewitnesses talk about a fight starting on the tube platform and transport police have released two images of men they would like to trace in connection with what they are calling an altercation that erupted. with me is david, a former counterterror officer. police are getting multiple reports of gunfire at various locations, it must be a nightmare to deal with? very much so. nightmare to deal with? very much 50. turning up here at any time of day is difficult so. turning up here at any time of day is difficult but especially when there's panic like yesterday and the
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police officers turning up will have a scant amount of information, they're simply told there are reports of gunshots and people running away. and they will turn up and there will be an attempt to work out what's going on. very difficult when you got lots of people running around and lots of people telling you conflicting information, and you're trying to look for suspects among the people running away and it's very confusing. but the police are well trained, they do look to try to shut down these things as quickly as possible and move things away but some of the information that the government had put out, run, hide, tell, it's quite difficult for people to find out what's gone on when people are running away and they're not giving the information they should do. this was a false alarm but is there anything we could do to spread this panic, hysteria, or is it something we have to deal with in present circumstances? yesterday there was an attack in egypt, 235 killed. here
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we've got people running around saying there's gunshots being fired and we're approaching the anniversary of the berlin market attack. people are worried about their safety. there isn't a great deal we can do. social media doesn't help, there's lots of disinformation oi'i help, there's lots of disinformation on social media. stick with reliable soufces on social media. stick with reliable sources of information. david, thank you very much. 16 people were injured in the panic to get away yesterday, seven treated at the scene, eight were taken to hospital with minor injuries, one with more serious leg injuries. naga. andy, thank you. there's no clear link between the number of prison suicides and overcrowding, a new international study suggests. packed prison cells have traditionally been thought of as a highly significant factor. however, the research published in the lancet sychiatry journal did conclude that suicides could be cut by sending fewer people with mental illnesses to prison. there are no simple explanations for this prison suicide, so overcrowding, prisoner numbers,
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prison officer numbers, how much you spend on prison, that didn't seem to be an explanation for these differences in rates of suicide. glasgow airport was closed temporarily last night after a tug vehicle hit a passenger plane which was preparing for take—off. flights were delayed and diverted after the runway froze in bitterly cold temperatures. it's thought the tug may have skidded on ice as the plane was pushed back from the stand. no—one was injured and the airport has now reopened. the president of argentina, mauricio macri, has ordered an inquiry into what happened to a navy submarine that disappeared over a week ago. hopes have faded of finding any of the 44 people onboard alive after the argentine navy said an event consistent with an explosion was detected near the submarine's last—known location. car vandalism in england and wales has jumped by 10% in three years. 210,000 vehicles suffered criminal damage such as smashed windows and slashed tyres in 2016, according to data obtained by rac
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insurance. it's believed that the figures could be even higher as many motorists don't report incidents because they fear it would push their insurance premiums up. richard lister reports. it's an infuriating problem for motorists and it's on the rise. around 60 cars were vandalised on this colchester industrial estate in august, costing of pounds to fix. new police figures show that across the country more than 210,000 cars suffered criminal damage last year. that's up 10% since 2013. but the increase in hertfordshire and in west yorkshire was 25%, while greater manchester saw a 37% rise. and none of us are immune. in 2009, the former cabinet minister hazel blears found her car had been attacked by vandals. slashed tyres and broken windows mean a vehicle can be off the road for days. very frustrating for a motorist because of the inconvenience, the cost and the time it takes to actually get an effective repair
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but we also feel it's probablyjust the tip of the iceberg because many people won't actually report a small incident of vandalism and certainly won't make an insurance claim. in this area near luton airport, holidaymakers who parked in residential streets to avoid airport car parks had an unwelcome surprise when they returned. paying for secure parking would have been cheaper. and if that's not available, the advice is to find well lit unobtrusive spaces to avoid the vandals. richard lister, bbc news. mike will have the latest on the sport, the cricket is under way, and ben will have the weather. we can go back to our main story and the attack on a mosque in north sinai, which killed 235 people. 0ur correspondent sally nabil is in cairo. do we know any more about who carried out the attack? the number has risen overnight and
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according to some medical sources in northern sinai, they issued 300 death certificates. that was kind of expected because we know that many of those injured are in a critical condition. this number might not even be final, we don't know if things are going to change in the next few hours. as for the response, the egyptian army issued a statement saying they managed to carry out a number of airstrikes that targeted the vehicles believed to have taken pa rt the vehicles believed to have taken part in this attack and there were a number of militants inside these vehicles, and they managed to kill them all, according to the military
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statement. this comes just a few hours after president sisi vowed retaliation and he said these kind of attacks are not going to intimidate egyptians, it will only make them more determined and stronger. sally, thanks very much, reporting from cairo. the dup conference gets under way later today and while there are plenty of problems at home, northern ireland still doesn't have a government in place, it will be the party's ambitions for brexit commanding everyone's attention. leader arlene foster will address her colleagues under more scrutiny than perhaps ever before. jon tonge is a professor of politics at the university of liverpool and joins us now from belfast. good morning, lovely to see you. why should we be... what should we be looking for in terms of nuances today at the dup conference? what we're looking for is a clear statement from the dup as to what it once in terms of the border. their position, though, is becoming clear. it's in opposition to what the eu,
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the irish government and the opposition parties want at westminster, which is basically northern ireland to continue in a special customs union with the irish republic. that would allow their to be no customs regime at the border on the island of ireland, you would simply see continued trade as normal between northern ireland and the irish republic. the dup doesn't want that because basically they want to remain an integral part of the united kingdom. if there was a bespoke uk irish republic deal, that would be ok for the dup but they don't want a northern ireland deal, which they believe would push northern ireland close to a united ireland. it would give northern ireland. it would give northern ireland special status within the european union so arlene foster will as leader of the dup this afternoon make it abundantly clear it's not on, and try selling that to the dup when you're so beholden to them as a conservative government, those ten dup mps are probably the most valuable in the world after
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extracting £1 billion from this government so this deal is an sellable. how much influence is arlene foster having as the head of the party, considering how crucial the party, considering how crucial the dup support has been to prop up the dup support has been to prop up the conservative government? the fa ct the conservative government? the fact there is no government in northern ireland is a problem for arlene foster, she's leading her party from belfast but the axis of power is very much from westminster where the dup ten mps are very powerful indeed. their lead at westminster is nigel dodds and in many ways power has gravitated to him -- many ways power has gravitated to him —— leader. the dup once restoration of power sharing in northern ireland but the dup will not give round to sinn fein on their key demand, which is bore a stand—alone irish language act —— wa nts. stand—alone irish language act —— wants. arlene foster will make it clear there can be an irish language act but only as part of a broader act but only as part of a broader act that protects british culture in northern ireland —— is for. sinn
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fein will say that's not good enough and they will say ten years ago the british government promised an irish language act in the st andrews agreement, so sinn fein are only saying they want what is promised. but the dup have dug in on this, as have sinn fein, and the show can't continue for much longer and the secretary of state for northern ireland will say we have to suspend the devolved government permanently and all 90 assembly members will lose theirjobs and arlene foster's position... frankly she would be jobless in northern ireland. interesting to see what happens. thanks, jon tonge, professor of politics at the university of liverpool. here's ben with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. it may be autumn but the wetheriggs doing a good impression of winter this morning. —— the weather's doing. some people waking up to their first snow of the season. waking up to their first snow of the season. wintry showers in
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staffordshi re season. wintry showers in staffordshire from one of our weather watchers and for many more it's a cold and frosty start to the day. as we go through the day it will stay cold and quite windy with the mixture of sunny spells and also some wintry showers. those showers packing in on the wind. showers falling as a mixture of rain, sleet, hailand falling as a mixture of rain, sleet, hail and snow, not only over high ground in western scotland, even lower levels has snow, with the risk of icy stretches. eastern scotland starting dry and bright, but very cold. down on the north—west england and wales, a few showers and sleet and wales, a few showers and sleet and snow mixed in. even snow to lower levels at times. east anglia and the south—east could have the odd icy patch through the night. lots of showers in the south—west england. these are wintry over high ground. through the day we continue to see showers. at the levels most of the showers in the west will turn back to rain, but still sleet and
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snow over high ground. persistent sleet and snow over high ground in scotland. windy, gales at times. further east, the better chance of staying dry. crisp autumn sunshine and feeling chilly, 4— eight degrees is the best we can expect. into the night central and eastern areas have a lot of dry weather. still showers into the west. windy then last night. maybe not as cold. these are town and city temperatures. the countryside could get below freezing. another frosty start to tomorrow morning. not a bad start to the day. but then the frontal system pushes on from the west. it will change things later. initially a story of sunshine and showers. then the showers fade before the cloud comes in from the west. particular if northern ireland we have more persistent rain arriving by the end of the date and with that hints of something a little bit milderfor a time. the further east you are,
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another chilly day. in australia for the in brisbane a different feel. it's spring in australia. 36 degrees, with the risk of a shower -- 26. degrees, with the risk of a shower —— 26. back home on monday through the early part we have rain sweeping south. maybe hill snow for a time in scotland. it temporarily turns milder, but that won't last. we get back into the deep freeze on tuesday. cold air sweeping southwards and that will be with us throughout the week ahead. in the deep freeze? that doesn't sound nice. not very nice, but at least we get sunshine. can't complain too much. thanks very much. hundreds of thousands of shoppers snapped up a black friday bargain yesterday, with estimates that more than £2.5 billion were spent in one day alone, but was it a record breaking year for retailers? we've been out in manchester to see what shoppers had to say. done a bit of christmas shopping.
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i hadn't planned on christmas shopping. i've got half my christmas presents sorted. i spent less than what i thought today. i came with a budget and i'm going home with more than what i thought i was going to go home with. just came for black friday, ended up buying a television, headphones, clothes, jewellery, all sorts of things. we actually got friday off with our friends and so itjust happened to fall on black friday, which is handy, so we got lots of bargains. we're just girls out on a friday! some places we got 25% off, some had 10% off. i guess any percentage, any discount is better than having nothing so we've done well i think. we've not overspent i think, what we've done is we knew what we needed to get and we've come out and we've got that really. so, yeah, quite a positive experience with it. millie feels like she's overspent. i've overspent. i think it's all about self love!
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how have the retail stunt? katherine is from a retail agency and we have someone is from a retail agency and we have someone from retail economics research, a consultancy firm. someone from retail economics research, a consultancy firmlj stayed in on thursday and did some shopping. like lots of people did. the biggest increase in shopping online was between 6pm and 7pm, so shopping in pyjamas. then i was out in the stores yesterday to see how busyit in the stores yesterday to see how busy it got. 0nce in the stores yesterday to see how busy it got. once the kids went to school yesterday the stores filled up. yesterday in leeds it was heaving by lunchtime. so there's been a real mixture. 0nline shopping in even on and on the way to work. so smart phones have taken over this yearin so smart phones have taken over this year in terms of the way people have shocked. —— shopped. year in terms of the way people have shocked. —— shoppedlj year in terms of the way people have shocked. -- shopped. idon't year in terms of the way people have shocked. -- shopped. i don't know what evidence we have in terms of the numbers. what's the information
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coming through? i think the reality is that like friday hasn't finished yet and will still go into next week. —— black friday. we've had a weaker leading into it. retailers will still be counting their profits next week. this year the backdrop for households is more challenging. inflation is at a five—year high, so spending is under real pressure. this is taking its toll on consumers, so this is taking its toll on consumers, so whether or not black friday will be as good as last year remains to be seen. do you think consumers are becoming wiser to the fa ct consumers are becoming wiser to the fact that the sales happen in the to christmas, so they are perhaps not buying presents, maybejust thinking, i need that, iwas buying presents, maybejust thinking, i need that, i was going to buy it anyway, so it's cheaper and take advantage? to buy it anyway, so it's cheaper and take advantage ?|j to buy it anyway, so it's cheaper and take advantage? i think that the case. i think there are two macro factors. in a lot of cases there's been pent—up demand since october. the figures in october were
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particularly sure. the pent—up demand where consumers have delayed spending, waiting for the black friday sale. but at the same time it's pulling sails away from christmas. that traditional buildup of retail sales in the to christmas is being distorted i black friday and consumers is being distorted i black friday and cofisuttiei's are is being distorted i black friday and consumers are bringing forward those purchases. on that theme of what is a real sale and when are things cheapest, are people being duped? are they really cheaper on black friday than january, for example? or close to christmas when maybe retailers get worried again? pent—up demand is there from october, as we said. there are great deals about this weekend, so you must get the deals but do your homework. check what the price was, because there could be better deals. at this black friday has been successful, 7% up on last year, and
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it will take about £5 billion over the weekend. if you are going to go out and buy yourself a party dress and it is to 5% off this weekend, now is the time to buy it. i'm not planning to buy a party dress this weekend, will be closer to christmas. but how do people know they are getting a genuine sale? you say to your homework. you see the 60% or 70%. how do you know whether. .. people often 60% or 70%. how do you know whether... people often think they are being slightly messed with. what are being slightly messed with. what are they comparing it with? some of the deals yesterday, there were some 70% of deals, these were on summer where, like a bikini. so think about what you want to buy. if you watch all of the time, lots of us tend to stop products and look at what we wa nt to stop products and look at what we want to buy. make sure you do that work. there are loads of price checking websites. and also the thing that you need or want. don't
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be duped to buying things you don't really need. that's always the trick with shopping. gui finkler you are going to see the panic you see on christmas eve —— do you think. when retailers say, we haven't quite hit the last—minute sales. is that going to happen? i think there's an element of competitive advantage when it comes to black friday. for the industry as a whole, whether it's a good event for the industry, it's a good event for the industry, it's probably not. but what we've seenis it's probably not. but what we've seen is that there's a shift towards spending online and so spending is more fragmented across categories. so electricals will do well and clothing and footwear will do well. so if you are retailer operating those particular parts of the market, it's very difficult not to get involved in black friday because otherwise you are losing market share to competitors. it is spreading now. how long have you got
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if you want to take advantage of these offers? probably from last weekend until the middle of next week. the genie is out of the bottle and it's excellent for shoppers, but not great for the retailers. it's a really good time of year. as you get paid this weekend, now is the time to go. but probably until monday or tuesday. but there will be panic in the last week if retailers have stock left. thanks for your expertise this morning. they were called the ‘dreadnoughts of the trenches‘ that changed the face of modern warfare. now, 100 years since the first tanks were deployed in the battle of cambrai, members of the royal tank regiment have returned to the french town to mark the loss of life. robert halljoined the crowds paying their respects. on the terraced lawn of the cambrai memorial, today's tank crews look back to a week which cemented the bonds of a new military family. these men will tell you stories of the friendship and teamwork
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particular to this regiment, as true now as it was a century ago. in november, 1917, the early tank men clambered into over 400 lumbering machines for the largest tank attack ever mounted. inside the metal hulls, crews were overcome by heat and exhaust fumes. many tanks broke down. but courage and determination took most of their objectives. major arthur griffiths was one of those honoured for his bravery. having seen some of the pressures of conflict, it's particularly poignant. you understand what the pressures on him were at the time. i think the standout point for me was in the tank you would make sure the bullet was hitting the front of the tank and then you would know you were going the right way towards the enemy. surviving tanks are now too fragile to run. this is a copy made for the film war horse. one battle scarred veteran has been
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adopted by the french village where it fought. tank d51, deborah to her crew, was abandoned and lost. until a local historian found her in 1998 and began the task of restoring her. today, deborah is the centrepiece of a new museum commemorating her part in the battle and the five crewmen she lost. when there are not many people, i'm always moved when i'm here. it's part of myself and it is simply a love story. a love story which started 25 years ago when first i met an old lady who let me know that she knew a place where the tank was buried. for me it was exactly as if she had given me a map to find a treasure. when the five men who now lie together at this military cemetery climbed into tank d51 at the start of this battle,
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they knew they were part of something extraordinary. but the bravery of the crews and the sheer power of the tanks came to naught. the allies were once again driven back. cambrai, however, did mark the start of a change in the way wars were fought. the tank had proved its worth. a machine that is still evolving, still a terrifying presence. its birth came at a high cost. these ceremonies mark the passing of the tank men who still lie under the rolling farmland they crossed. a little later we will bring you up—to—date with what's happening in the ashes. it is getting pretty hot and some serious bowling going on. we'll show you the pictures later. see you soon.
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good morning you're watching breakfast from bbc news with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we'll have the news and sport in a moment. coming up on the programme: as the campaign calling for the release of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe intensifies, we're speaking to the sister—in—law of the british—iranian mother who's been injail in iran for nearly 19 months. we're catching up with explorer ben saunders, who's making the first solo unassisted crossing of antarctica in honour of his friend who died attempting the same trip. we'll hear how the opening of the uk's first ever wound research centre could lead to scar free healing within a generation. but this is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. egypt's military says it carried out air strikes on those behind the deadliest islamist terror attack in the country's recent history.
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at least 300 people were killed including 30 children and more than 100 injured after gunmen detonated a bomb and stormed a packed mosque in north sinai yesterday. egypt's air force says it has destroyed vehicles used by the militants, as well as weapons and ammunition at what it described as terrorist locations. countries around the world have paid respects to the victims of the attack. in paris, the eiffel tower switched off some of its lights in tribute to those affected in egypt. police have released cctv images of two men they want to speak to after panic broke out on the streets of london yesterday afternoon, injuring 16 people. armed officers were called following reports of gunfire at oxford circus tube station. but investigators now say there is no evidence weapons had been fired. they are appealing to speak to these two men in connection with the incident. the dup leader arlene foster will address her party's annual conference in belfast later today, and focus on the party's influence in westminster. mrs foster will also reaffirm the dup's commitment to restore a power—sharing agreement at stormont, and will be watched closely for thoughts
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on brexit and the question of the irish border. the democratic unionists unexpectedly gained a prominent seat at the negotiation table after agreeing to prop up theresa may's minority government. there's no clear link between the number of prison suicides and overcrowding, a new international study suggests. packed prison cells have traditionally been thought of as a highly significant factor. however, the research published in the lancet psychiatry journal did conclude that suicides could be cut by sending fewer people with mental illnesses to prison. there are no simple explanations for this prison suicide, so overcrowding, prisoner numbers, prison officer numbers, how much you spend on prison, that didn't seem to be an explanation for these differences in rates of suicide. glasgow airport was closed temporarily last night after a tug vehicle hit a passenger plane which was preparing for take—off. flights were delayed and diverted after the runway froze in bitterly cold temperatures.
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it's thought the tug may have skidded on ice as the plane was pushed back from the stand. no—one was injured and the airport has now reopened. the president of argentina, mauricio macri, has ordered an inquiry into what happened to a navy submarine that disappeared over a week ago. hopes have faded of finding any of the 44 people onboard alive after the argentine navy said an event consistent with an explosion was detected near the submarine's last—known location. car vandalism in england and wales has jumped by 10% in three years. 210,000 vehicles suffered criminal damage such as smashed windows and slashed tyres in 2016, according to data obtained by rac insurance. it's believed that the figures could be even higher as many motorists don't report incidents because they fear it would push their insurance premiums up. it's probably just the it's probablyjust the tip of an iceberg because many people won't
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actually report a small incident of vandalism and certainly won't make an insurance claim. he's been called the real—life iron man and has blasted into the record books with his self—builtjet engine power suit. richard browning set a guinness world record last month for flying in the suit and was showing it off here at media city in salford yesterday. browning spent £40,000 building thejet pack, and it hits speeds of 32 miles per hour. he hopes to inspire students to follow a career in engineering. it remains one of those extraordinary sites, doesn't it? mike is here now. we're looking at events that have been happening as we speak, but first the ashes, sometimes in sport there is an image that illustrates what's going on? the ashes have arrived, it's got nasty in the last hour in a sporting way. australia are known for their venomous snakes, they've unleashed some real bites on the english
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batsmen in the last hour. joe root taking one fully in the face in his helmet but he's ok. england have finished day three of the opening ashes test with a slim lead of seven but australia will feel they're on top after really turning up the heat in brisbane. england started the day really brightly, stuart broad bristled with intent, catching mitchel starc off his own delivery, one of three wickets for the broad but try as they might, england had no answer to captain smith, who remained unbeaten on 141. and by the time every one of his teamates were out, australia, had a lead of 26. england needed to bejust as stubborn as smith, butjust like in the first innings, alistair cook was out quickly again, one of two early wickets to fall as australia smelt fear and unleashed a late bombardment. joe root felt the full force, but he survived and so england are 33—2, a lead
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of seven. we will come to the rugby league in a moment, the world cup, england against tonga. onto football, and wales are top of their qualifying group for the women's world cup just ahead of england after beating kasakhstan in cardiff. the match marked the return of wales's all—time leading goalscorer helen ward, who played for half an hour just two months after giving birth to her second child. but the only goal of the game came from hayley ladd's late free kick. england have a game in hand over wales, and they made it two wins from two last night, beating bosnia—herzegovina 4—0 in walsall. captain steph houghton scored twice in what was interim manager mo marley's first competitive game in charge. really happy. been doing a lot of work since obviously we've been in post about being a bit more creative and, you know, the opportunities that we created, obviously we're really pleased with. obviously tough opposition, really difficult to break down but overall really happy with the performance. david moyes got his first
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point as west ham manager as they drew with leicester. they had to come from behind after marc albrighton rewarded leicester's bright start. but whatever moyes said at half time galvanised the irons, and kouyate equalised but it wasn't enough to move west ham out of the relegation zone. we are desperately trying to get a level we think the players will need to play at to get results. we think we worked quite hard tonight and it got us a point, so it shows you we've still got a long way to go, we're going to have to work harder but i also think there were moments tonight where the football was a bit better and we gave ourselves some more chances as well. dundee are off the bottom of the scottish premiership after adding to the recent woes of rangers. matt o'hara was the star man with the winner and that was his second goal of the night in a 2—1win. managerless rangers have now lost two on the trot and are fourth. back to our other big story in new
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zealand. england haven't been in a rugby world cup final for 23 years. they thought they were there, they we re they thought they were there, they were 20—0 up against tonga in the last hour or so but it was so hairy at the end! another few minutes and tonga would have ended those england dreams. let's look at what happened. joe lynskey reports. for england, some wins are worth waiting for. after three straight defeats in world cup semifinals, victory finally came but with ace care. to get to brisbane england had to cross the red sea. in auckland they were staring down at tongass poste town. this stadium can hold a quarter of the nation but england found an early break through the pacific wave. wing play in this sport is about timing and mcgillvary is rarely late. a try for him for the 10th straight england match and by half—time england had it under
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control. garreth widdop grounding it, his team looking safe and sound. bateman's bird scored looked to have sealed it. a crow commentator england's tried. it's looking now like it's going to be england's semi—final. but the drama was just beginning. tonga's fans sing hymns from the stands, now the team had found something almighty. three tries in the final seven minutes of the match and with ten minutes to go they were on charge for the line. fifita's lost it! tonga will never become so close to the top of the world sporting stage but in the end england's cruise control became survival instinct. it's australia next for a shot at the title. joe lyns key, next for a shot at the title. joe lynskey, bbc news. it maybe a big weekend of rugby union autumn internationals but it's still a busy one for club sides. gloucester are up to third in rugby union's premiership after beating newcastle 29—7.
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they ran in four tries,including this from henry purdy, showing off his footballing skills to give newcastle their fourth defeat in a row. and in the pro14, a late try from andrew trimble helped ulster beat italian side treviso by a single point 23—22. there were also wins for cardiff, leinster and the cheetahs. lewis hamilton seemed relieved that the formula 1 season is almost over after breaking the track record in practice for the abu dhabi grand prix. he kept mercedes on top, going a tenth of a second quicker than ferrari's sebastian vettel. hmilton will be looking for the 73rd pole position of his career. he said, "it's been a good friday but i'm happy that it's the last one of the season." now, the journey from football field to furlongs went far better than expected for the former england striker michael owen. he finished second in his debut race as a jockey and says he may do it again. owen, who's 37, and had to lose over a stone in training, he was riding calder prince in a charity race at ascot,
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the only novce in a field of ten amateurs. he says the reaction he got on his phone was almost as big as when he played against brazil in the world cup quarter—finals. a big weekend of tennis, the davis cup final between france and belgium, you can watch it on the bbc sport website. if you're lamenting the end of the tennis season, but you're more comfortable watching than playing, there may be a way for you to improve your game and burn more calories than you would playing a traditional match. cardio tennis combines racquet skills with a full body work out, and i've been giving it a go. i love tennis, but unless i find
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someone i love tennis, but unless i find someone pretty much as bad as me, it can bea someone pretty much as bad as me, it can be a bit of a ball watching experience, as you just chase finnair. hardly anywhere these —— thing care. so you're not getting much of a workout. but there is now a version of the sport which does give you a chance to combine both. a version which keeps you moving on the court regardless of your abilities. cardio tennis combines a trip to the gym with games designed to improve your fitness and your confidence with the racket. to improve your fitness and your confidence with the racketlj to improve your fitness and your confidence with the racket. i think some people are scared about playing tennis, either they had a bad experience at school or it's not the game for them but cardio tennis is a great way into tennis. there are balls flying around your head at all times, because it is a sport that's non—stop. it's a mental challenge keeping up what you're meant to be doing at first. might turn against bid this isjust doing at first. might turn against bid this is just great. it's doing at first. might turn against bid this isjust great. it's running with a bit of tennis in a middle. i've probably lost a stone since the
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kember. it's got another aspect to it. i like chasing after a balderdash since september. you stay still before the play the next game, you have breaks in between —— since september. you just go, go, you have breaks in between —— since september. youjust go, go, go. you have breaks in between —— since september. youjust go, go, gom the us in the last year this has seen the us in the last year this has seen the biggest growth of any participation sport. now there are hundreds of clubs involved in the uk as well. the lawn tennis association claims an hourof as well. the lawn tennis association claims an hour of cardio tennis burns 25% more calories than an average singles match and twice that than a doubles contest. you don't need to be any good at tennis, you don't need to be particularly fit, it's poor people of all tennis abilities and fitness abilities because of the knee outcome of the shot is irrelevant, it doesn't matter if you hit the ball out or to the back fence, you just keep running around. unlike a spin class where you're working the lower half of your body, you're a pie, your download. there is a competitive
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element for this as well in that it's not singles or doubles but quadruples, four on each team and you keep swapping positions. it's crazy. you just feel like a child against blew it gets bihar grey cup. always running around and getting a good workout. you meet so many new people and you or on the go all the time, you don't get the chance to. if you have farting how what in this version of the sport there is no shame. our fitness is the only real winner. it looks like quite hard work but a lot of fun. it was hard work but we all got into it. you can always have all got into it. you can always have a glass of water and a rest if you need to. i thought you were going to say a glass of something else! perfect for people like you and i who aren't very good at tennis. and
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su btly who aren't very good at tennis. and subtly it does improve your game. you used to play that thing around table tennis tables. you run around the table in your living room. you will bring us up to date with the ashes later on, thanks, mike. let's talk to benny and bjorn doubt what's happening with the weather. a chilly one but we're not going to get too much whether some of us are waking up to the first snow of the season. this was a scene from one of our weather watchers in staffordshire. for many more we are waking up to a touch of frost. temperatures down as low as —4 or —5 in places. that was in suffolk a short time ago. through the day it remains cold and quite windy. a mixture of sunshine and showers for those showers continue to be wintry. this is the radar picture from earlier. the showers have been packing in from the north—west. snow not only over high
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ground. even at low levels with had sleet and snow mixed in with the showers and these showers keep coming through the morning. if you are out and about over the next few hours we will have wintry showers continuing the western scotland, where there could be icy stretches. eastern scotland dry but called to start the day. the risk of ice from northern ireland and across north—west england, into the midlands and parts of wales. there could be a few icy stretches towards the south—east where there have been a couple of showers overnight. three degrees in london at nine o'clock. showers pushing in the south—west. some of them have been wintry over high ground. through the day the wintriness will become confined to higher ground. at low levels most of the showers will be rain, they will be heavy, with rumbles of thunder not out of the question. or persistent rain, sleet and snow in the northern scotland. gales at times. dry weather further east, where we have crisp autumn sunshine. temperatures at best for — eight
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degrees. overnight the showers keep coming. again wintry and coming to lower levels as the night goes on. windy than it was last night. some spots in the countryside will get below freezing. further south and east it will stay largely dry. that's the case tomorrow in eastern and england. largely dry with autumn sunshine. showers in the west fading through the day, at only because we have this cloud and persistent rain which will push into northern ireland by the end of the day. maybe something milder temporarily into the south—west. during sunday night we have this weather system coming in from the west. that will bring great and perhaps he'll snow for a time in scotland. still rain around in places and milder conditions for a time, but the cold will return. it is decidedly chilly. crisp autumn
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sunshine and showers. in the showers there could be some snow. that's all from me for now. thanks very much. now it's time for newswatch. this week, samira ahmed examines how bbc news deals with data. hello and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. this week's budget was as full as ever of statistics, how does bbc news try to help us understand facts and figures through data journalism ? and the queen and prince philip celebrate their 70th wedding anniversary, which makes the date of their marriage, err, when? it had been eagerly awaited by many for some time but when robert mugabe announced his resignation on tuesday it still came as something of a surprise. africa editor fergal keane was on the spot in zimbabwe for that night's news at ten. it is the night of the free, a night like no other in their lives. a great tension has broken. the epoque of fear, of desperation,
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of robert mugabe has ended. how rarely does politics translate into something so truly felt? this is history in the making. we have never thought that something like this was going to happen in zimbabwe. this is history, you guys! but was the bbc reporting the joyous reaction of zimbabweans orjoining in the celebrations itself? one viewer thought the latter, writing: one consequence of robert mugabe's resignation was that the queen became the world's oldest living head of state and, as it happened, her majesty had had her own cause for celebration the previous day, an anniversary which featured prominently on the news all day. when it came to newsnight
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on bbc two, emily maitlis signed off with the programme's own take on the landmark occasion. that's all from us. but before we go on the 20th of november 1937 under grey skies and cheered on by thousands of well—wishers, princess elizabeth married lieutenant philip mountbatten. 70 years later the queen and prince philip are celebrating their platinum wedding anniversary. back then remember britain's relationship with the rest of europe was about to change dramatically. conservative prime minister was engaging in crucial talks on the continent while facing mutiny from his own ranks back home and spain was in crisis as warring factions fought for control. some things don't change, including those grey skies. here are some pictures from the 1937 day. from all of us here, good night. some apt parallels between 1937 and the present day but was the wedding of the queen and prince philip actually in 1937 as confidently stated there twice? no, the year was 1947. surely it should have been apparent that the princess elizabeth would not have married at the age of 11. who checks facts?
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surely emily maitlis's common—sense should have told her none of this could be true. what next? an article about prince charles visiting the troops on the western front? thank you to cedric malborough and all the viewers who pointed out newsnight‘s mathematical mistake, for which they have apologised. now, last saturday, the body of gaia pope was found in a field near herfamily home in dorset after extensive search. police have described her death as unexplained and on monday released without charge three members of the same family who had been arrested on suspicion of murder. that led gary snashall to ask: wednesday's news was
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dominated by the budget, with that night's bulletin starting with a report from political editor laura kuenssberg. almost ready to go. a big day for downing street, whose grip for months has been shaky to say the least. reporter: feeling the pressure, chancellor? the priority for number 10 and 11, those powerful next—door neighbours... reporter: is this a make—or—break budget? ..was for today's events not to slip, to keep the budget is tightly within their grasp. the chancellor, the aim to be the steady national bank manager, not to tear up the rules altogether, knowing his own job as well as the government's fortunes would be shaped by what he was about to say.
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much more on the budget followed, too much for tony siddall, who wrote: glenn scott also picked up on the westminster village aspect of the coverage when recording his thoughts for us on video. glenn scott also picked up on the westminster village aspect of the coverage when recording his thoughts for us on video. if ever there was a prime example of westminster and media cartel is this week's prior reporting the budget. i would suggest the most important thing for the people of this country is not whether the chancellor keeps hisjob or the respect of his cabinet colleagues,
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but how the budget will affect each and every one of us. we do not want an opinion from the westminster insiders. wake up and smell the coffee, political presenters. now, there was plenty of detail around the budget coverage, including a welter of facts, figures and statistics. to help the audience make sense of these, bbc news, and especially its website, provided a number of graphs and other visual material enabling us all to calculate the impact of some of the chancellor's measures and the state of economy. these are all part of a big area of growth for bbc news known as data journalism, and with me now to tell us about it isjohn walton. welcome to newswatch. data journalism is talked about a lot, what is it and is it something new? a data journalist is often starting their story with figures, data or statistics, so you might find a data journalist rummaging around in a spreadsheet, which is quite a different
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image from that of a typical kind of roving reporter. but i think it's been with us for a long time. you could argue people like florence nightingale could be a data journalist if you look at the kind of visualisations shaded around the figures from the crimean war, so that kind of thing has been around for a long time. the reason we're getting into this is it's helping people understand the world around them. there's ever increasing amounts of data and it's part of daily life so we need to be across that. a lot of what you do is personalised. can you talk us through what you did on the budget? yes, so for the budget we produced, in collaboration with the business team and with deloitte, we made a budget calculator where people coming to the website could tap in about 10 or so questions, put in theirfigures and from that we would give them a quick summary of how the budget might have affected them. so that's getting people away from just having to deal with the averages or the national figures that the chancellor might be giving them. what we're hoping to do is put
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somebody in the story themselves so they can see directly how this affects them. how much data are you dealing with on stories. perhaps you would look at the housing price story you did recently? so the house pricing story is a really good example of that. we wanted to see how house prices had recovered since 2007 and the crash. and what we did to do that was we looked at about eight million rows of data, all the house sales in england and wales over that period. so we could look at how that had changed across england and wales, and we were able to look at those figures and estimate that about 58% of neighbourhoods or wards had not recovered once inflation is taken into account. so their house prices were actually lower than when they started in 2007. are you finding new stories as well through user data ? yes, that's right. one series of stories was on the nhs, when we looked at nhs figures. we've also done the house prices story that we just mentioned. we're looking in all
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sorts of places. we did some... the most delayed airport recently. we're looking at civil aviation figures. so there's lots of different data sources. this is a real growth area for journalists. there is so much data out there and not everybody has the skills to interpret it themselves. it is something we need to be across. some people have said that the personalised stories that can appear on the news website, can seem oversimplified. do you put in enough data for them to be really meaningful? i think we do. i think that as long as you put context around the figures, if you can show how they may have changed or you can show how they may compare to another country for example, as long as you're putting context around the figures in these apps, i think the audience can make their own judgments as to how useful they find them. with more than half of the audience to the website at least coming on a mobile phone, we have a very small canvas to work with, so people have to be able to take in figures that are just on that small screen and we have to work to that. so that's a very practical issue.
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one complaint we have had at newswatch in the past and i think it comes up every so often, when they're watching reports that give a number, x million pounds extra going to nhs, but not a percentage or a context to make a judgment about them. that's not been a criticism necessarily of the website, but sometimes of straight news reports. why is that happening and what can you do about it as head of data journalism? i think it happens simply because if you're covering something like the budget it is difficult not to get into the figures. but i think there are things you can do to humanise that. if you want to help people understand figures you can bring them down to a human level, so instead of saying there maybe £1 billion spent on such and such, you try and work out what that figure might be per household or per person, or, if it's education, per child. so you humanise the figures and make them smaller and making them more relevant to people. john walton, thanks very much. before we go, a taste of what thursday's afternoon live brought its viewers in the studio
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ahead of this weekend's uk beat boxing championship were jack and rupert, demonstrating their art to simon mccoy. tara mulholland posted her reaction on twitter: but after the item had been re—shown an hour later, richard mills thought: do let us know if you would like to see more or less beat boxing on bbc news and if you have any other opinions on bbc news and current affairs or would like to appear on the programme you can call us on: ore—mail:
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you can find us on twitter: do have a look at our website, the address for that is: that is all from us. we're back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast, naga munchetty and charlie stayt. egypt strikes back after the deadliest terror attack in the country's recent history. at least 300 people were killed at the mosque in north sinai — the military say they've carried out air strikes on those behind the killings.
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good morning, it's saturday 25th november. also this morning. photographs are issued of two men police want to speak to after an altercation on a tube platform sparked panic in central london. a rise in vandalism on cars in england and wales — the rac says its latest figures could be just the tip of the iceberg. in sport, they nearly threw it away, but england are through to the rugby
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