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tv   The Papers  BBC News  November 26, 2017 9:30am-10:01am GMT

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once we get back into the the south. once we get back into the cold air tomorrow we are stuck with it for much of the week ahead. northerly winds all the way from the arctic, and a very chilly field. crisp autumn sunshine but showers as well, and with the showers canopy could be wintry. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: drone users will be required to take safety awareness tasks as part of planned new legislation on their usage. police will also be given new powers to crack down on illegal use. five people, including three children have been killed after a
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car crashed into a tree in leeds. ireland's european commissioner says dublin will "play tough to the end" over its threat to veto brexit talks moving on to discuss trade. the eu has said "sufficient progress" has to be made on the irish border before negotiations on the future relationship can begin. a warning to airlines after ash clouds spew from a volcano on the indonesian island of bali. the red warning means a forecast of an eruption being imminent. royal navy sailors will perform the intricate routines of the changing of the guard ceremony for the first time at buckingham palace this morning. coming up in a few minutes our sunday morning edition of the papers — this morning's reviewers are the journalist and broadcaster rachel shabi and peter conradi of the sunday times. before the papers, sport, and for a full round up, let's cross to the bbc sport centre. australia are crusing to victory in the first ashes test. after england were bowled out for 195 in their second innings, the aussies needed just 170 to win
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and they're making short work of it. the home side finished day four on 114 without loss needing just 56 for victory. andy swiss reports from brisbane. the first three days of this test match worked so evenly balanced, but it looks as if australia will take a 1-0 it looks as if australia will take a 1—0 lead. england knew they had a chance if they batted well, but they lost only wickets, most crucially joe root. moeen ali batted well, but he was given controversially out stumped. from the england lost their last four wickets for just ten runs to set australia at target of just 170. england bowlers tried their best, but cameron bancroft and david warner were in superb form. they
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both scored unbeaten half centuries before the close. australia need just 56 on the final day to go 1—0 up just 56 on the final day to go 1—0 up in this ashes series. england knew they would face a tough task in australia. 1—0 down though, it will seem tougher. obviously very disappointed. i thought the first three days we played well in the game and then today we let ourselves down. with the batth especially, we got in and never really went on to get the big score that we needed. the australians certainly haven't had it all their own way in rugby union's autumn internationals, which are are over for another year. scotland ended their campaign in style against the wallabies, while wales' miserable run against new zealand continues. patrick gearey reports. no wonder they're buying souvenirs. something's stirring in scottish rugby. and who better to test their new confidence against than australia 7 there is heartbreaking history here. the wallabies have a habit of snatching victory from the scots. and there were ominous signs. it all changed with a charge. this was the last act
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of sekope kepu's match. it's a red card from me. red meant go for scotland. from the moment they dived over they were in total control. mcguigan was not even due to be playing that match, but scored twice. with the extra man, scotland found several extra gears. eight tries in all. they had never beaten australia by more than nine points, this time, they had 29. they had hopes of defying history in cardiff too. there are only fading flickering memories of the last time wales beat new zealand back in 1953. on a different ground, and in what seems to be a different game to the one the current all blacks play, a combination of the bombastic and the gymnastic. waisake naholo, scoring twice from two attacks. wales hadn't deserve that. still, instead of getting mad, they very nearly got even. scott williams got them to within a point at half—time. they trailed by more in ‘53. but the men in black are dangerously elusive. they score when you think you are safe. rieko ioane went over twice. that's why wales must keep waiting and the all blacks are the world's best.
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patrick geary, bbc news. england made it three wins out of three with a 48—14 victory over samoa at twickenham. the samoans have lost every game this autumn, but england only pulled away in the second half, elliott daly scoring two of england's seven tries in what proved to be a record victory over samoa. meanwhile ireland beat argentina in theirfinal test. david stockdale was named man of the match for scoring two tries. cj stander got the other withjohnny sexton‘s kicking adding to the final score of 28—19 in dublin. england's women put 10 tries past canada to pull off an autumn series whitewash at twickenham. it finished 69—19 with five tries coming from jess breach who returned to the side following injury.
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there was also a hat—trick from abigail dow to bring the total number of tries across all three tests to 32. in the premier league yesterday, chelsea came from a goal down to draw at liverpool. it was a former chelsea player who opened the scoring — mohamed salah with his 15th goal for the reds injust 20 games. but the champions didn't let up — willian came off the bench after scoring twice in midweek, and equalised with just over five minutes to go. incredible teams, unbelievable attitudes from both sides. it was so intense. after a week like this which we both had, after the trips we had to do and the journey, it was one of the better draws i have had my life. manchester united are within five points of neighbours
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and league leaders city, who play huddersfield later this afternoon. jose mourinho's side have won every home game this season. but it was an own goal from brighton's lewis dunk that that broke the deadlock and sealed the win. but perhaps the result of the day came at selhurst park where crystal palace scored a 92nd minute winner against stoke. captain for the day mamadou sakho giving roy hodgson‘s men a 2—1victory. they're nowjust one point adrift at the bottom. there were just two games in the scottish premiership. hibernian missed the chance to go second in the table after drawing one all at hamilton. they took the lead through simon murray. but antonio rojano equalised with just over a quarter of an hour to go at new douglas park. hearts have now gone 5 games without a win after they played out a goalless draw with ross county. lewis hamilton will have his work cut out trying to end the formula one season with a win after his mercedes team mate beat him in qualifying for the abu dhabi grand prix. valtteri bottas smashed the track record at the yas marina circuit
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to claim the top spot on the grid by more than a tenth of a second from the new world champion. it's the fourth pole of the season for the firm who has an outside chance of finishing second in the championship. to do that he needs to win the race and hope ferrari's sebastian vettel finishes no higher than ninth. everything was under control and held well in the car. it was enough for pole and i am really happy. england have been beaten 1—0 by korea in their bronze medal match in the women's hockey world league in auckland. korea scored from a penalty corner in the opening 15 minutes and that proved to be enough as the koreans claimed the bronze medal. the netherlands are currently taking on new zealand in the final. british olympic pilot lamin deen secured the first major medal of his career with silver in the four—man event at the bobsleigh world cup. gb‘s deen, ben simons, toby olubi and andrew matthews led
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the standings after setting a track record of 50.66 seconds in their opening run in whistler. but russia's alexander kasjanov‘s final run was enough to take gold. the podium finish equals the best result for a british team since sochi 2014 afterjothackson‘s second place at the lake placid world cup event four years ago. that's all the sport for now. now on bbc news, it's time for the papers. welcome to our look ahead is at what the papers have brought us to day. with me are the journalist and broadcaster rachel shabi and peter conradi of the sunday times. before i speak to them, let's have a look at the front pages. the sunday telegraph claims that the prime minister has been warned by mp‘s not to retreat from a pledge to "take back
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control" of british laws from brussels post brexit. the sunday times meanwhile reports that top private girls schools have suffered a slump in exam performance. the mail on sunday alleges that there are links between boris johnson and michael gove's bid to persuade theresa may to take a tougher stance on brexit and a russian tycoon. and finally the sunday express reports that meghan markle is being guarded by royal protection officers as the palace prepares to announce her engagement to prince harry. it hasn't happened yet, but anyway, let's begin. peter, will you start us let's begin. peter, will you start us off? this is a story in the observer about island in the border, whether it should be on the mainland, down the irish sea or whatever. this is a crucial argument in this whole debate. it's a statement of the obvious rather than an exclusive front—page story, what
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they have got is the agricultural minister said another problem. if we have a hard brexit, if we don't have a trade deal, if we crashed out of the single market, what is going to happen to northern ireland? the problem being that you either have a ha rd problem being that you either have a hard border between northern ireland and the republic or have some arrangement when northern ireland is pa rt arrangement when northern ireland is part of the republic. then what happens to its status within the united kingdom? lots of other things you can see a way of fudging it, but this one, i don't see how. there has been a lot about technology covering to people's rescue and it matter about borders in the old—fashioned sense. i think the reports about technology were widely dismissed. it was things like drones which people
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pointed out were going to be affected by things such as weather. it is quite a big thing and doing you can understand why islands is so concerned about it —— ireland. the dup have said they don't want to have a different set of regulations to the rest of the uk and the republic is saying actually, we absolutely do need to have that. we need some sort of continuity in customs regulations otherwise there will be a hard border between us and that's the last thing that anybody wants, given the history, given the past and given the fact that it is a condition of the good friday agreement. it does seem to be that because staying in the customs union
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and the single market in some shape or form seems to be such an anathema to the hard brexit component of the government that it's actually making this intractable. ireland want us to stay in the customs union. of course they do. we are the biggest trading partners. if brexit is going to be complicated for the united kingdom, it will be even more competitive for the republic. anything involving brexit, ultimately all the other 27 member states have a right of veto, so member states have a right of veto, so if we don't keep ireland happy, they can effectively veto any deal. staying with the subject, perhaps you can start us off with the sunday telegraph. a warning to the prime
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minister? it's about british law is being taken back and we don't want european courts telling us what to do. it's interesting because it's another one of those red lines imposed by the hard right brexit element of the cabinet and their cheerleaders in our press. this is another one of the issues that needs to be resolved before we can proceed to be resolved before we can proceed to the trade components. it concerned eu citizens and the idea was that there would be a situation where the rights would remain as they are and
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the hard brexit element of the cabinet is saying no because we have two be the ec] because that is what we voted for. it's interesting to see how all these elements that could be resolved, we could move to the next stage of negotiations, are being impeded by the same group in government. all these words are being used. cabinet ministers, politicians, but it never says exactly who they are. talking about bouncing the prime minister. it sounds chaotic. it does, but underlying it is that this is something that is hugely important toa something that is hugely important to a small group of politicians i think fundamentally. the average reader, the average member of the country is probably indifferent to whether the european court of justice rules on particular issues 01’ justice rules on particular issues or it some other court. in such an arcane thing. you say that, but for
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people who voted for brexit it was one of the things. we want our laws back and we don't want to be told what to do by brussels. it was always a web thing to say about laws that britain had a huge part in making and was beneficial to the uk. its was a web thing to say about the ecj. its was a web thing to say about the ecj, right? if you were to ask people how important is it to you that the ecj hasjurisdiction people how important is it to you that the ecj has jurisdiction over british laws, i think it will be high on the priority list like things such as the nhs, immigration, the cost of living. let's move on. the mail on sunday, again there is a brexit link, but as always, it's a personalising of stories. boris and
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gove. i have to admit i read it about four times before i understood it. unravel it for us. it's a difficult one. i think the headline is the simplest bit. essentially, they are building on a scoop that they are building on a scoop that they had a couple of weeks ago in which there was a letter by boris johnson and michael gove to the prime minister with three key demands. one to force hammonds to plan for brexit, and also to sweep away all the bureaucracy around brexit. it's all complicated. it's a
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suggestion of building on the previous crew and building on this institute. is it tied into putin? no. there are questions to be answered and we need to know why they have such influence over this think tank and members of the cabinet. it has a big stock in the russian state—controlled gas company, but that could just be because they took advantage of what was called the short doctrine and capitalism would describe it as making hay, which was to go into russia when it was just changing,
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they went in and bought up all state—owned utility companies. they went in and bought up all state-owned utility companies. it's a long way from that to getting involved with borisjohnson and michael gove. but they are free marketeers. they are into having a singapore style type of tax haven. let's turn the uk into that post brexit. that is the hardline version of brexit favoured by people like borisjohnson michael of brexit favoured by people like boris johnson michael gove. we of brexit favoured by people like borisjohnson michael gove. we do have to wonder why this institute has so much influence. we have to remind ourselves that the mail on sunday is a remainer. it is. the agenda is skewed here. it is. i worked many years in russia and i
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follow events the closely. you have written about russia. yes, thank you for mentioning my book. anyone who has ever done business in russia, if they are in the spotlight for any reason, its protein and used against them and they are turned into putin's pawn, which is a little bit far—fetched. putin's pawn, which is a little bit far-fetched. let's move on to the observer. fake online accounts driving anti—muslim abuse. observer. fake online accounts driving anti-muslim abuse. what is this about. it's following on from the mail on sunday who have been running stories about russian involvement in our political conversation in a few weeks ago they had a story about russian troll farms pumping out fake news on twitter. one of the things that was mentioned is that it was particularly bees trolls who are
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pumping into our political conversation supplies stories that we re conversation supplies stories that were fuelling anti—muslim hate. this is the story based on research from the anti—racist organisation that is looking into the impact of these tweets. it is skewed our national conversation by pushing up the influence of these sort of hate filled and anti—muslim islamophobic tweets, thereby creating the impression that there more support for the sentiments that actually is the case. peter, what did you make of it? it was interesting and alarming that this is being artificially flamed up. they don't make the russian connection, which isa make the russian connection, which is a missed opportunity. they are basically pinning the blame on
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american racist groups and pamela geller, a controversial activist, who is allegedly behind a number of these issues. we stay in the world of cyber matters. let's go back to the sunday times front page. peter, your turn. cyber slackers doom at the uk economy. is this the issue of people looking at facebook, twitter, e—mailing? people looking at facebook, twitter, e-mailing? one of the big stories that came out of the budget this week is that britain has a problem with productivity. living standards are depressed and will continue to be that way because we are not productive enough. they‘ re be that way because we are not productive enough. they're having all sorts of explanations. is it to
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in -- is it all sorts of explanations. is it to in —— is it down to under investments? or is it that we spend too much time at work on our phones on social media and shopping. a senior analyst that the bank of england who wrote on the blog said that people are spending too much time at work checking the devices which leads to a crisis of attention which leads to a crisis of attention which is leading to a drop in productivity. you are not checking your phone now, are you? it does make me a bit cross a story like this because we note that productivity has that line. we know that we are looking at lost decades where wages can't grow and indeed they are currently at levels lower than they were ten years ago before the crash. people up and down this
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country know that they are working harder for less pay under worse conditions. i find harder for less pay under worse conditions. ifind it harder for less pay under worse conditions. i find it insulting to all those people, all of us who are working hard to suggest that low productivity, which is something the government can fix with investment and stimulation, the blame is passed on workers spending too much time on the devices. it's an insult. there are ways to fix the economy. germany is way more productive. why is that? they have a government that invests in infrastructure. that is how you get innovation, creativity, where the efficiency. last story, very briefly. sunday express. royal guard for meghan. will they announced their engagement? you know, it is
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widely tipped to be imminent. people are looking at all the signs of why this is going to happen. one of the reasons is this the as the story says, she has been given a wild card, meghan morkel. there has been speculation all week. —— meghan markle. she has moved her pet dogs to the uk as well. very telling. well, she has begun the process of sending her dogs to england. well, she has begun the process of sending her dogs to englandm ta kes a sending her dogs to englandm takes a while. we will all have to keep checking on social media to get the latest. thank you both very much indeed. we will take a look at tomorrow's front pages tonight at
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10:40pm, yearof bbc tomorrow's front pages tonight at 10:40pm, year of bbc news. —— here on bbc news. another chilly start today, but bright enough of this weather watcher in north lincolnshire. the night, it will turn wet and windy. this is where we see milder weather, but it will only stay mild for a very short time. the cold air will return. central and eastern areas dry with clout coming into northern ireland. it will feel chilly. 7 degrees in london with good spoils of sunshine. showers across wales and the south—west, but they will fade. temperatures are struggling in the northwest. plenty of sunshine,
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but carved across northern ireland and parts of scotland. the rain will then spread eastwards with heavy rain in some places during the evening. snow developing over high ground in scotland and heavy downpours in northern england in north wales overnight. with that gales are likely, but ahead of the rain band, milder areas. gales are likely, but ahead of the rain band, milderareas. 11 gales are likely, but ahead of the rain band, milder areas. 11 degrees in the south west to stop monday morning. we will have a wet rush hourin morning. we will have a wet rush hour in southern england and there could be some minor transport disruption. the rain will slide away and the skies will brighten. hefty showers chasing on behind in the brisk winds. there could be gales in
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places. temperatures dipping away as the day goes on with the cold air moving from north to south. once we get back into the cold air we will be stuck with it for most of the week ahead. northerly winds all the way from the arctic. the chilly feel, crisp autumn sunshine, but showers too. where the showers do turn up, they could be wintry. this is bbc news. the headlines at 10am: five people die, including three children, after a stolen car crashes into a tree in the north of leeds. drone users will be required to take safety awareness tests as part of plans to tackle rogue operators. ireland's eu commissioner says dublin will "play tough to the end" over its threat to veto brexit talks moving on to discuss trade. a warning is issued to airlines about the danger of volcanic ash
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in the skies close to the indonesian island of bali. also in the next hour: for the first time in the 357—year history of the changing of the guard ceremony, royal navy sailors will perform the intricate routines and drill movements at buckingham palace this morning. and cricket — australia are on the verge of victory
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