Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 26, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

5:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines at five: two teenage boys are in custody after five people died when a stolen car hit a tree in leeds. the international trade secretary, liam fox, says the future of the irish border can't be resolved until the uk and eu reach a trade agreement. dangerous drones — owners will have to register and sit safety tests under new plans. a red alert to airlines over the plume of ash from a volcano on the island of bali. also in the next hour... they‘ re changing guard at buckingham palace. sailors perform the famous ceremony for the first time in history as part of a year—long celebration of the royal navy. and cricket — australia are on the verge of victory at the end of day four in the first ashes test in brisbane. good afternoon and
5:01 pm
welcome to bbc news. five people including three children have been killed after a stolen car crashed into a tree in leeds. officers were called to the meanwood area of the city last night, to stonegate road just before 10pm. two boys aged 15 are in custody. our correspondent alison freeman has more. officers said they were faced with a scene of complete carnage when they arrived here last night. the west yorkshire force said a stolen renault clio had crashed into this tree just before ten o'clock. five people lost their lives. the youngest of those who died was a 12—year—old boy. two other boys aged 15, and two men aged 2a and 28 were also killed. it's not yet known if all of those who died had been travelling in the car when it crashed
5:02 pm
or if some had been walking along the road at the time. two other 15—year—old boys have been arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving. the major collision inquiry team is at the scene, trying to work out exactly what happened here last night. police are appealing for witnesses, to what they are describing as a tragic accident, to come forward. alison is still at the scene as darkness has fallen. what's the latest? as you say, darkness has fallen and we have been watching officers sifting through the debris on the road left from last night's crash. we have learnt a few more details this afternoon. the 12—year—old boy and one of the teenagers are believed to have been brothers. police say they have told
5:03 pm
their next of kin but they are not informing us of their identities at the moment. but as i say, the police operation seems to be winding down. the road is still cordoned off and the two 15—year—old boys are in custody, questioned on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving. another thing police confirmed today is that although we don't know whether all the victims were passengers in the car, two died at the scene whilst another three were pronounced dead in hospital. alison freeman, thanks very much. the international trade secretary, liam fox, has said there can be no final decisions on the future of the irish border until britain and the european union have reached a trade agreement. he rejected a suggestion by the irish government, that the uk may have to stay inside the single market — or the eu customs union — to avoid a return to border controls between the republic and northern ireland. our political correspondent chris mason reports.
5:04 pm
could this be the giant sticking point that stops the brexit talks moving on? the border between northern ireland and the republic, what will soon be the frontier between the uk and the eu. ireland insists it must remain open, almost invisible after brexit, or it could block the talks progressing. but one leading brexiteer in the cabinet says the negotiations need to move forward to discuss the future in order to sort this out. we can't get a final answer to the irish question until we get an idea of the end state, and until we get into discussions with the european union on the end state, that will be very difficult. so the quicker we can do that, the better, and we're still in a position where the eu doesn't want to do that. we are getting close now to 2018, when we will be talking about next year when we leave the european union. the british government wants the uk to leave what's known as the single market and the customs union after brexit, meaning our economy and the eu economy would be governed by different rules. some say that means it'll be
5:05 pm
impossible not to have a more obvious border, and so... the way to stay the same on the island of ireland as it is today post—brexit is for at least the uk to take their red line off the table, but to stay in the customs union and single market gives us what we have today — an invisible border, seamless trade, and it will help build and keep those relationships. labour says the government needs to be willing to be more flexible. what this government has done is it's ruled out remaining a member of the single market or a member of the customs union. that is what they have said very clearly, that they will leave both of those institutions. we have not ruled those off the table. we've said they are still options. in just over a fortnight, it'll be crunch time for the government. will the eu say yes to talking about the future?
5:06 pm
what happens along this 310—mile border will be central to how that question is answered. chris mason, bbc news. police could be given the power to crack down on the illegal use of drones, as part of proposed new legislation. owners of devices over a certain size will also have to register with the authorities and sit safety awareness tests. the measures are included in the draft drone bill to be published next spring. joe lynam reports. once the preserve of enthusiasts, nowadays drones are everywhere. they‘ re cheaper, lighter, and can do a lot more than just hover in the air. many prototype drones are being developed to work where it might be dangerous for humans. they can fly into water, for example, and propel themselves back out. these drones can be used on oil rigs to fix cables in treacherous conditions.
5:07 pm
and that's the kind of application that the aviation minister wants industry to tap into. we've looked at the drones today, which can help in the construction industry, in the mining industry, on offshore oil rigs, and what's really exciting is actually they can do the jobs which actually put people at risk, so hopefully it will help on safety as well. and to prevent drones getting too close to airports and prisons, the proposed drone bill could mean that owners of drones weighing more than 250 grams will need to register and do a test. they will also be banned from flying near airports or higher than 120 metres, or 400 feet. police will get new powers to seize unmanned aerial vehicles. dji is one of the biggest drone manufacturers in the world. could these new rules hit their sales? it could. but we have already implemented many of the things we have seen the government now proposing, so we don't believe that it will. and we believe, as an industry, that anyone flying a drone
5:08 pm
should take proportionate measures for safety. with the christmas rush well under way, some have predicted that drones will be one of the biggest sellers this winter. soon, though, new owners won't simply be allowed to open the box and fly them straightaway. joe lynam, bbc news. earlier i spoke to simon stickland — he runs a civil aviation authority approved drone filming company called dragons' eye filming and he gave us his thoughts on the proposed legislation. in theory it's a good idea. the problem is the overstretched police force, will they be given the training and money to catch those who are breaking the rules? we already have rules in place and there seem to be a lot of people getting away with things they shouldn't be. what sort of things are concerning you as a legitimate
5:09 pm
operator? partly the costs, the costs for renewing our permissions through the caa, last year went up 70%, next year a0%. through the caa, last year went up 70%, next yearli0%. hopefully through the caa, last year went up 70%, next year a0%. hopefully this will go towards catching those that do break the law but at the moment we are seeing very few successful prosecutions. hopefully, with the new police powers, this will be giving them the power they need to catch those who are doing things they shouldn't be doing. what are they shouldn't be doing. what are the things they shouldn't be doing that you think do need to be stamped out? flying illegally too close to airports without permission, flying over towns and cities without permission. tools and drones are the same thing. drones get used to rescue people, to save lives, it is how they are used. it is how they are used and used responsibly. you
5:10 pm
talked about cost, i think you said it's gone up 70% and will go up another a0%, from what to what? it's gone up 70% and will go up another 40%, from what to whenm has another 40%, from what to what?m has gone up from £130 to the renewal will then be about £180, so it is small—scale but when the costs keep going up compared to the level of service that we get, the two don't a lwa ys service that we get, the two don't always match. what about the argument there is a need for safety awareness tests, that people buying awareness tests, that people buying a drone in a high street over christmas, then getting it up and treating it like a model aircraft but not really knowing the risks? that's a very good idea. there is already the drone code in place and navigational orders. all new drones sold in this company should have a copy of that code with them. they can also be easily and freely found online. the drone test is a very
5:11 pm
goodidea online. the drone test is a very good idea but if people have to pay more money to take the test, those that are going to break the law won't want to do that either. and i suppose all of that is down to resources , suppose all of that is down to resources, time, people being available to enforce that. exactly. it's the enforcement and education of the public, the flyers and for the police forces. to give us an idea of how fast this area is developing, in terms of the work you do, filming, how has the demand increased? i started my business nearly two years ago, i do aerial filming. i have filmed sea birds for the rspb, ifly at filming. i have filmed sea birds for the rspb, i fly at world filming. i have filmed sea birds for the rspb, ifly at world heritage site, we also do small advertising. the work is extremely varied, 3d work forfilms. it the work is extremely varied, 3d work for films. it is a huge business and the tools that these
5:12 pm
are and the potential that it brings for growth across media industry to save people's lives, to save putting people at risk, to help people in trouble, that we are still looking at the better ways to use them. simon strickland talking to me earlier. a 39—year—old man has been charged with aggravated burglary and the attempted murder of a d—day veteran. 96—year—old jim booth seen here dancing with the duchess of cornwall was seriously injured in an attack at his home in taunton in somerset. joseph isaacs will appear in court on monday. two men questioned by police about an altercation at which led to mass panic on oxford street have been released without charge. the men, aged 21 and 40, attended a police station voluntarily after the incident at oxford circus tube
5:13 pm
station on friday evening. at least 23 civilians are reported to have been killed in syrian government attacks on a rebel—held enclave on the outskirts of damascus. activists monitoring the conflict say towns in the eastern goota district have been subjected to air strikes and artillery fire and conditions for the enclave's 400,000 people are dire. earlier i spoke to alanjohnston, our middle east analyst, and asked about the military situation in the area. we are talking about quite a large area on the eastern edge of damascus, towns and villages and farmland home to hundreds of thousands of people but very much in rebel hands all through the syrian warand rebel hands all through the syrian war and besieged by the syrian government forces and their allies. in recent weeks we have seen the government forces death up the pressure on the enclave carrying out air strikes and other attacks, and more of the same today. various force is talking about air strikes beginning on sunday morning and heavy artillery fire and there looks
5:14 pm
to be several areas within eastern ghouta that were targeted. part of a pattern we have seen in recent weeks. even allowing for the people who have been injured and died because of the air attacks, presumably if it is under siege the humanitarian situation must be getting terrifying. it is dire. this area under siege for a long time but for yea rs area under siege for a long time but for years it was relatively easy for smugglers to come and go bringing supplies, trading across the front lines if you like, using a network of tunnels but in the summer, around july, august, government forces tightened their grip on the perimeter and after that the humanitarian situation, the supply of food and medicine and so on, got very much more difficult in the enclave. last week we had the world food programme report which said that people in some cases have been reduced to eating animal fodder and
5:15 pm
even garbage, school children, teachers even, fainting at school and reports of at least four people having died of starvation. a un boss talked about eastern ghouta being the epicentre of suffering in syria at the moment. it might surprise people that an area that is relatively close to the capital at a time when we have heard so much about russian air support for example for the syrian regime that possibly the balance of the war was shifting in president assad's favour and the possibility of him staying seemed to be increasing, but the syrian military have not been able to retain it? you are right. for many months now the syrian government, thanks to the intervention of the powerful russian military, is in the ascendancy and it has been making important progress in many areas. but the fact is this area east of ghouta on the edge of damascus has managed to hold
5:16 pm
out. you can imagine the government will be concerned about that degree of rebel power right on the edge of the capital, and certainly the rebels launch attacks into the capital. you can imagine the government is intent on putting whatever pressure it can on this rebel area, but the rebels hold out. the headlines on bbc news: two teenage boys are being held in custody after five people — including three children — died when a stolen car hit a tree in leeds. the international trade secretary, liam fox, says the future of the irish border cannot be resolved until the united kingdom and the eu have reached a trade agreement. and drones could be banned from flying near airports, or above 400 feet, under new laws being proposed by the government. the head of armed policing and his deputy are understood to be
5:17 pm
among those suspended by police scotland amid allegations of criminal conduct and gross misconduct. assistant chief constable bernard higgins was suspended on friday by the scottish police authority. it's the latest in a series of suspensions of senior officers in the uk's second largest police force. our correspondent in glasgow is catriona renton. we have these suspensions on friday of senior officers, what else can you tell us? as you say, one of the people suspended on friday was bernard higgins and he's one of the most high—profile of police scotland's officers. today two more have emerged, one is superintendent kirk canal, head of armed policing at police scotland, and his deputy, chief inspector bob glass, who was head of the former armed response
5:18 pm
unit at the time of the 2007 airport terror attack. another officer whose name we don't know has been suspended as well and he was suspended as well and he was suspended on friday also. to additional officers have been placed on restricted duties. this came about after in —— anonymous allegations were made of criminality. they were referred to the crown office who has asked the commission to investigate. mr higgins has denied any wrongdoing. police scotland is not that old force because it was a merger of previous regional forces and force because it was a merger of previous regionalforces and it's had a controversial period since it was created. that's right, it has had a very short history and has only been around for four and a half yea rs. only been around for four and a half years. it came about as a result of a merger of eight police forces around scotland. in its time already it's had two chief constables. the
5:19 pm
current one is on special need —— special leave constable phil gormley. its current chair resigned amidst claims about his conduct and he will be replaced by a new chair next month. scotland's justice minister told replaced by a new chair next month. scotland'sjustice minister told the bbc he isn't convinced there's a problem with the culture at police scotla nd problem with the culture at police scotland but he says he's willing to investigate if there are lessons to be learned at the end of these investigations. when you have got senior police figures within police scotland who are under investigation for a range of different issues, that's why it's important... but do you think there is a cultural problem? i'm not sure that's the case but having said that...
5:20 pm
wouldn't you like to find out? i'm not sure that is the case because there are different types of complaints but having said that, what i think is important is we make sure the command team that may have within police scotland just now through ian livingstone is giving the support that's required. once we have the outcome of this —— these investigations, we will then be in a better place to understand exactly what the circumstances were that we re what the circumstances were that were related to those complaints. gordon brewer talking on sunday politics scotland. that is the official government view, any response yet from the opposition parties at holyrood? yes, there has been a response and i think there will be a move to keep the pressure on michael mathieson to look at what has been happening at police scotland. questions about confidence and trust the public will have in
5:21 pm
the force after these high—profile obligations have been reported. opposition parties have said the scottish conservatives have already called for a strong and positive reaction from the government. the scottish liberal democrats have said there needs to be a statement to holyrood to set out how the leadership of police scotland will be secured while the months of investigation take place into senior officers so i think there will be more to come on this. thank you. the archbishop of york, john sentamu, has put his clerical dog collar back on, ten years after saying he wouldn't wear one until zimbabwe's president robert mugabe resigned. in 2007, the archbishop dramatically cut up his old dog collar during a bbc interview. he's now put on a new one, saying mugabe should apologise for taking a prosperous country to the brink of ruin. do you know, andrew, i could attempt to put this one back. or i could try and put them all together using superglue.
5:22 pm
it would be a pretty ropey collar, archbishop? ropy collar. i think the lesson for zimbabwe is the same. they just can't try and stitch it up. something more radical, something new needs to happen in terms of the rule of law, allowing people to getjobs, because 90% of people are out of work. so they can'tjust stitch it up. i need a new collar. here is the million—dollar question, will you put a collar back on now? i promised that when mugabe goes, i will put my collar on. so i have no choice but to put it back on. it is your promise. absolutely. mugabe has gone but the new president needs to remember something more new than simply stitching up a thing will work. robert mugabe's nephew says
5:23 pm
the former zimbabwean president is in good health and quitejovial, despite having been forced to resign last week after 37 years in power. leo mugabe said he has visited his uncle, who was looking forward to his new life. our correspondent richard galpin spoke to father fidelis mukonori, a jesuit priest and close friend to the former president, who mediated his resignation with the military. outside the capital harare, a celebration on the first mass in what is a new era for zimbabwe. the end of robert mugabe's mongrel, already unleashing a sense of freedom is not felt for decades here. and the jazz with priest conducting the service, father fidelis mukonori, is the man who helped bring it all about. he is close to mr mugabe and acted as the mediator with the army. having played such a crucial role in the tra nsfer of played such a crucial role in the transfer of power, what then can
5:24 pm
father fidelis mukonori wrap —— now reveal about the deal is done to persuade mr mugabe to stand down and how the former president is reacting to losing control of the country. in his office, father fidelis mukonori told me mr mugabe's decision to resign was the best thing he'd ever done. despite leaving office he got —— he said the former president would still play an active role in politics. i don't know how you do it in the western world. in the african world, senior citizens are there for advice. what are people going to go to him for advice? for example, the new president? the new president said he is my mental. he also said he is my father, and my leader. so when he said that, you tell me he's going to stay off from his father?
5:25 pm
from his mentor? his leader? i don't think so. you played a key role as a mediator to persuade mr mugabe to stand down. what was the deal to persuade him to go? what was he offered? we didn't offer him anything. you are asking a direct question for him to resign, nothing is offered. he resigned for the good of zimbabwe. there are reports he's been given or offered millions of dollars, that he will have immunity from prosecution, that all of his businesses will be left on torched. is that correct? he will be looked after like any other former head of state. is that correct then? that is what i have read in the newspapers.
5:26 pm
how confident are you that the new president will pursue a democratic path rather than reverting to a more autocratic presidency like that of mrmugabe? autocratic presidency like that of mr mugabe? he has said so. that he will be a democrat? yes. and you believe him? well, i do. after 50 yea rs believe him? well, i do. after 50 years in his active life as his soldier and as a politician, he knows what it means that democracy. at the moment this remains a honeymoon period for zimbabwe. people here determined to believe real change has come, but that has yet to be proved. indonesia has put out a red alert, warning airlines to avoid flying near a volcano on the island of bali. mount agung has been spewing out
5:27 pm
smoke and volcanic ash thousands of metres into the sky, and there are fears it could soon erupt for the first time in more than 50 years. sailors from the royal navy have been performing the famous changing the guard ceremony outside buckingham palace in london for the first time in its 350—year history. the manoeuvres are usually carried out by a regiment from the army, as our correspondent jane—frances kelly explains. shortly before 11 this morning, sailors marched into the history books. from all over the world gathered to watch them into the gates of buckingham palace. this temporary changeover from soldiers to sailors is part of a year—long celebration of the navy in the uk. leading them was
5:28 pm
lieutena nt—commander steve elliott, believed to be the first captain of the queen's guard from the royal navy since sir walter raleigh during the reign of elizabeth the first. it's a great opportunity for the royal navy in what has been termed the year of the royal navy to act as a capstone this year and also to coincide with the formal commissioning of hms queen elizabeth. my team have worked really ha rd to elizabeth. my team have worked really hard to get themselves ready for it. it's not something we would perhaps be traditionally famous for, are marching. hms queen elizabeth is the royal navy does biggest warship. the queen will travel to portsmouth to formally commission it into the fleet. another recruit of this service is alex stacey, who never dreamt she would be undertaking this duty at buckingham palace. dreamt she would be undertaking this duty at buckingham palacelj dreamt she would be undertaking this duty at buckingham palace. i only joined in january so duty at buckingham palace. i only joined injanuary so i am still very new in the navy so it's a great honour and privilege to be able to do something like this. sailors from the royal navy are also undertaking
5:29 pm
guard duty at saintjames palace, the tower of london and tomorrow at windsor castle in what has been a very busy year for the service. it looks like we may have to make the best of the weather, judging by the best of the weather, judging by the prospects. susan powell has the details for the week ahead. some briefly milder but wet and windy weather overnight tonight. here is the weather system that will be packing that in and we can see the strong winds arriving into northern ireland and scotland soon after dusk. the system clears throat to bring heavy rain into the north—west of england and wales, through the small hours, then sitting across southern england by the end of the night. a much milder night than we have been used to recently. generally, probably the most lively weather first thing on monday will come courtesy of this weather front with really heavy rain bursts are
5:30 pm
embedded in it. there could be difficult conditions anywhere south of the m4, but my old with temperatures in double figures. show was for wales and the north—west of england, showers too for northern ireland and north and west of scotla nd ireland and north and west of scotland and we could season wintry ones, especially in the north, and we will still have a pretty strong wind here too. that weather front gets out of the way in the south, into the channel by lunchtime. things should start writing by the afternoon. temperatures to the south in double figures on monday and that's the first time we have seen that's the first time we have seen that in a while, and probably the last time as we look further into the week ahead. that mild air with us the week ahead. that mild air with us only briefly, ones that clears into the continent it opens the doors for cold air coming from the arctic on tuesday. there is the weather front, low pressure to the east, high pressure to the west and
5:31 pm
straight from north to south the air across the british isles. for tuesday, plenty of showers with significant smoke across the north york moors, plenty of showers of rain, afew york moors, plenty of showers of rain, a few for pembrokeshire and south—west england too. it will still feel chilly with frosty nights. the chilly day for many, windy story in the east and a fair few showers across higher ground. scattered showers for wales and the south—west of england. here is your week ahead, briefly milder but only very briefly on monday, then back into a cold regime with a biting northerly wind. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines. two of the five people killed when a stolen car hit a tree in leeds have been named on social media as brothers ellis and elliot. police are holding two teenage boys in
5:32 pm
custody. international trade secretary liam fox has said the future of the irish border cannot be resolved until the united kingdom and the eu have reached a trade agreement. drone users will have register and sit safety awareness tests as part of plans to regulate their use. the police will also gain new powers to crack down on illegal and irresponsible drone flying. those are the headlines, we will have a full bullet and just before six o'clock but first, time to get all of the sport... good afternoon. manchester city's lead at the top of the premier league looks set to be cut — they're on course to pick up just one point from their game at huddersfield — it's currently 1—1. huddersfield took the lead on the cusp of half—time. city defender nicolas otamendi inadvertedly heading into his own net but not long after the break, the visitors were back on level terms.
5:33 pm
raheem sterling fouled in the box. penalty to city. up stepped the clubs all—time record scorer sergio aguero, who simply rolled the ball home. 15 to play in west yorkshire and it's all square at one all. there's been another heavy defeat for everton, under caretaker manager david unsworth — they lost 4—1 to southampton this afternoon. saints striker charlie austin scored two second—half headers on his first league start of the season before steven davis beatjordan pickford from the edge of the box to wrap up the victory. everton have won just once in seven games under unsworth. confidence is probably lower than it has ever been. this is a team that has ever been. this is a team that has been underperforming for the majority of the season and we have had a lot of tough games and away games andi had a lot of tough games and away games and i think we need to get back to just
5:34 pm
games and i think we need to get back tojust some games and i think we need to get back to just some basics, we games and i think we need to get back tojust some basics, we need to stop conceding goals, they are killing us. we need some home comforts, we need to get back to goodison park and we have that next week. we need to put some points on the board quickly because this performance was not acceptable. one more result to bring you from the premier league this afternoon and arsenal are up to fourth, above tottenham now, after they beat burnley, thanks to a controversial injury—time penalty. 1—0 it finished, with respective managers understandably split on the penalty decision. there is a lot of rage but it is ok, my view is that it is highly unlikely that anything other than a penalty would be given. celtic have won their fourth domestic trophy in a row as they retained the scottish league cup this afternoon, beating motherwell 2—0. motherwell held their own until james forrest curled an excellent shot into the far corner shortly after the break. but their hopes were over after cedric kipre was sent off for a controversial challenge on scott sinclair and mousa dembele had no problem doubling the lead with the penalty kick.
5:35 pm
for celtic, that's 65 domestic games now without defeat. it was a mercedes one—two at the abu dhabi grand prix, where valterri bottas led from pole and held off his team mate lewis hamilton. a fitting end to a season in which mercedes have dominated. nick parrott reports. the greatest spectacle of the yas marina circuit was after the chequered flag, unfortunately what went before was less dramatic. but three bottas, lewis hamilton and sebastian vettel started and ended in that order. for drama you have to look down the order. through nobody ‘s fault but his own, kevin magnussen dropped last on the opening lap. his team—mate, grosjean, winning an enthralling battle with lance stroll but they could not finish in the points. neither could daniel ricciardo, hydraulics ending his race and costing him fourth in the drivers‘
5:36 pm
championship. felipe massa left f1 but a point and fernando alonso was going faster than him. carlos sainz‘s day ended prematurely but nico hulkenberg rescued renault, securing sixth in the constructors‘ championship. battery but has held up championship. battery but has held up hamilton to claim his third win of the season but third place was enough to sebastian vettel to finish as runner—up in the title standings. it isa as runner—up in the title standings. it is a really important win for me after having a pretty difficult second half of the year. working ha rd second half of the year. working hard on all of the issues and getting better and better with everything. i could not be happier to end the season like this. again, congratulations to lewis hamilton for the title and sebastian faure second place in the championship. hopefully we will be better next year. england are on the verge of defeat in the first ashes test after australia dominated the fourth day in brisbane. the hosts need just 56 more runs
5:37 pm
to win with 2 days remaining. meanwhile, the ecb says it has spoken to england wicket—keeper jonny bairstow after claims of an alleged incident involving australia‘s cameron bancroft during a night out earlier in the tour. andy swiss has more. a difficult day for england on the pitch and difficult off the pitch and stop the england and wales cricket board have spoken to wicketkeeperjonny bairstow after reports that he was involved in an incident in a bar in perth at the start of the tour for weeks ago. the bbc understands he was having a drink in the same bar as the australian player cameron bancroft when at one point in the evening, their hits met. it is understood the players left amicably. the ecb released a statement saying there has been no report of any incident from the venue, security or police and there was no injury reported
5:38 pm
that they will follow up of the england management after the end of this test match. but the ongoing controversy surrounding ben stokes, this is not the sort of thing they need right now. rugby union and premiership champions exeter are back at the top of the table after snatching a win against saracens. they fought back to claim victory byjust two points. 18—20 the final score — patrick gearey has the details. two of the best teams in the country, one of the biggest games, not all of the top players. with many stars on international duty, this was a test of strength in depth, and if saracens to be thankful england are not calling on the talents of alex goode. it is not their way to focus on individuals, they say the strength is the pack and the strength of the pack is the will. the law of thejungle and the rule of the maul,, but exeter chiefs and one of the few teams who know how to beat saracens. they did that en route to the title last season and ian whitten lead them back. the
5:39 pm
chiefs piled into the breach, eight minutes remaining as saracens try to hold them up. somewhere in there, murray lowe went lower. wait for the whistle. try. the position meant a simple conversion, and almost effortless end to a relentless match. in the other premiership match today, wasps came from behind to beat london irish 17—13. and in the three games in the pro14 today there were wins for glasgow, scarlets and munster. european number one tommy fleetwood finished two shots off the lead — tying for 6th place at the hong kong open the race to dubai winner hit a closing round of 69, managing just this solitary birdie on the 17th. australia‘s wade ormsby won his first european tour title at the 264th attempt. in netball, england have won the second match of the vitality netball international series against malawi. the roses led 31—25 after half—time and continued that dominance to win 61—53
5:40 pm
at the copper box arena in london. they go 2—0 up in the 3 match series. british olympic pilot lamin deen secured the first major medal of his career with silver in the four—man event at the bobsleigh world cup. britain led the standings after setting a track record in their opening run in whistler. but russia‘s final run was enough to take gold, with gb‘s combined time 0.28 seconds slower. iamso i am so proud of this team, i am the senior man in the team and i have never seen the team in such a good place. we had a difficult summer. this has given us renewed confidence. we knew that we were capable. you just have to keep our composure and get to the start line. we we re composure and get to the start line. we were not fazed by anything, we willjust go in there, do our best
5:41 pm
and the results came. england women‘s hockey team have narrowly missed out on a bronze medal at the women‘s hockey world league in auckland, beating 1—0 by south korea, who scored from a penalty corner in the opening 15 minutes and that proved enough as they claimed third place in the tournament. new zealand were beaten three nil by the netherlands in the final. endless rugby league team have suffered a blow, hookerjosh hodgson missed the match on saturday with a knee injury suffered in the win over tonga and england‘s women were thrashed 52—4 by new zealand in their semifinal in syd ney by new zealand in their semifinal in sydney this morning. the kiwi firms will face australia in the final next weekend. that‘s all the sport for now. manchester city have just scored to stop it is 2—1 against huddersfield in the premier league and some tennis news... france have beaten
5:42 pm
belgium in the last few minutes to win this year‘s davis cup. all of the sport for now. more on all of the sport for now. more on all of the stories on the website. now, it is time for me to the author. a christmas thriller with the ghost stories of mrjames and carols of kings thrown in. nicola upson takes her investigator to cambridge in the 1930s where, as is her habit, she helps the police with two different investigations, both dark and complicated. nine lessons, subtitled some wounds never heal, readers will realise a conscious tribute to the english detective tradition, not least becausejosephine in real life was a formidable, now though largely forgotten, writer of old style thrillers herself. welcome. if anyone doubted the debt you feel
5:43 pm
to the traditional story, they would be left in no doubt after this book, cambridge 1930s, ghost stories, a very traditional story, in a sense you‘re paying your debt, aren‘t you, you are making it obvious? i am paying debt to that tradition when i decided to go down a route of novels that featured josephine as the character. i decided i would include all the things we love about the golden age, the puzzle, mystery, red herrings, suspects, but i would also combine that with a modern sensibility. they are set during the golden age period but they are by no means golden age novels. a couple of plot lines which are intertwined which we won‘t go into in detail because it‘s a thriller and we don‘t want to spoil it.
5:44 pm
there are a series of attacks on women which is rendered in a contemporary way, that the writers of that period in the early ‘30s wouldn‘t have dared touch. that is the joy of hindsight with this. you can treat crimes like that in a more honest way in the way that people would have talked about it to each other at the time but no way would it have got into print. that series of attacks you mentioned is based on a much more contemporary crime, the cambridge rapist peter cook. were you around at the time? no, i was young then. but my partner, interestingly, was in cambridge at that time and she ran a music club at a pub there called the anchor, when peter cook was caught and his picture started appearing in the papers, she realised she knew him, served him every week, he worked for a wine merchant and delivered wine to the pub. the shock of that, which still resonates with her, i think the fear of the cambridge rapist for people who lived in cambridge in that time is still very strong,
5:45 pm
you can see the bars on the ground floor windows. and the intimacy of the setting has a lot to do with this story as well, everybody knowing everybody else, you know, students in that era lodging in all the little passageways close to the university centre in the city. it‘s a very claustrophobic atmosphere. it is and it‘s amazing how easily that crime transported itself back to the ‘30s. in the ‘70s, the people who suffered that were a group of female students, by and large. that wouldn‘t be relevant in the ‘30s but transfer that to shop workers, waitresses, nurses at the new addenbrooks hospital and it works very well and those themes, the suspicion of the innocent men, the randomness and the idea that the man who is holding the town to ransom could be your taxi driver, your ambulance driver or the man you queued next to in the cinema is still very relevant. we are dealing with a series of murders which conceal a secret not unconnected, and i think it‘s fair to say this, with the ghost
5:46 pm
stories of mr james, who was provost of king‘s at one point and used to read the stories to students at christmas. now, it‘s an extraordinarily innocent kind of scene in a way, you know, going in and listening to the boss reading out these things. it is. quite intoxicating. it is. i love the fact that mr james, or monty, as he was known, he‘d emerge from the study with the ink still wet, blow out every candle but one and read the new story to the handful of very select people gathered around to hear it. when you write books like i do that mix fact with fiction, you are always looking for that little window in the truth that‘s just big enough to get your story through and i found that in december 1913, when for the first time mr james didn‘t finish a new story. what if something so terrible happened that christmas that 25 years later those men gathered
5:47 pm
round to be entertained started dying, killed off one—by—one in ways that echo his stories? you have said it. you talk about merging fact and fiction and there is one particular way in which that is relevant to the novel and the six that preceded it in the series, as it were. that is the character ofjosephine tay, who acts as an investigator and assistant to the police. she‘s on the scene, realises things and has insights. but, of course, she was a practitioner of the detective novel in the golden age, wrote, i think, eight books. what was it that attracted you to her as a character? it was in particular her novel, the franchise affair. when i read it, i loved the fact that way back in 1948 someone was brave enough to write about two women abusing a young girl. she picked up the golden age rule book and seemed to rip it to shreds. no murder, no puzzle, no brilliant detective. it was a book that could be
5:48 pm
read on many levels. that‘s what i love about her. although reading it now, it‘s about an england that, for better or worse, is gone and you feel the sunshine on your face when you pick it up, it‘s nostalgic. there is a depth, modernness and darkness to it way ahead of her time and that is what appealed to me. she had a life in the theatre, wrote great plays in the west end that ran for over a year. she worked withjohn gielgud. importantly, for her as a character, there were lots of gaps in her life. a bold thing to do, pick a real person that you didn‘t know and stick her in a book as a protagonist, as someone who makes the plot turn. did you have to think hard before you did that? i did, actually, in honesty. it felt brave. the novels have had a long gestation period so it was before real characters in fiction and film
5:49 pm
were quite as prevalent as they are today. i also knew that although tay wasn‘t as well known as people like christian marsh, the people who loved her work really loved her. in life she was complex and difficult and contrary. she was aloof and dogmatic. although i don‘t want to sugar over the cracks, i want to bring the flaws in her personality forward, that is what people like about the character in the books, that she isn‘t nice all the time, sometimes you want to pick her up, shake her and scream at her. but she is quite likeable. if you are going to use the character of the outsider, the assistant, you know, that looks in on the case and whether it‘s a blundering police officer or somebody who just has missed the main point, you know, comes in and sets it right, that person is bound to be a little bit awkward, a little bit of a loner, really?
5:50 pm
she is. that is very true to the woman in real life. she did keep herself to herself very clearly and i think i‘m enjoying very much creating the relationship thatjosephine in the books has with archie penrose in the book. rather than do the on—off romance thing, which is another much—loved thing about crime fiction, to write about their friendship and the ups and downs, particularly in the context of this novel where josephine‘s gift forfriendship is more needed than ever, is quite an interesting thing to look at. it‘s a pretty gruesome book in the sense that the crimes that we are dealing with in two parallel series of events, leave nothing to the imagination, they‘ve got a modern sensibility, if that is the right word, about them, particularly the first one. do you ever feel reluctance or distaste to go so near the edge in what people will do
5:51 pm
to each other? i think everybody who writes crime fiction has a line and you don‘t know what that line is until you‘re nearly at it, and i agree with you very much that the first murder in this book comes close. i think also what is important to me, and has been throughout all my books, is to make those murders very, very relevant to the victim, to the life they lead before they became the corpse in your puzzle or the victim in a murder inquiry. i think the crimes that affect these men in this book are relevant to who they were when they were alive. that is very important to me. nicola upson, author of nine lessons, thank you. thank you. some briefly milder but wet and
5:52 pm
windy weather on the way, here is the weather system that will be packing all of that end. they will see the rain and strong winds arriving into northern ireland and scotla nd arriving into northern ireland and scotland soon after dusk with some snow also on the scottish mountains. the system clears to bring heavy rain to the north—west of england and wales and also across southern england by the end of the night. milder than recently, still patchy frost across east of scotland and the early risk of ice. generally, the early risk of ice. generally, the most lively weather first thing on monday will come courtesy of this weather front with heavy bursts of rain embedded in it as it stretches across southern england for the morning rush hour. could be some difficult conditions anywhere south of the m4 but mild temperatures into double figures. some showers for wales and the north—west of england, showers for northern ireland and northern and western scotland and we could see entry showers in the north and we will still have a pretty
5:53 pm
strong wind. a pretty windy day across the board, that front gets out of the way in the south into the channel by lunchtime and things should brighten up for the afternoon and we will continue with showers for northern and western exposures but temperatures to the south into double figures on monday and that is the first time we have had that in a while and probably the last time as we look to the week ahead. the mild aironly we look to the week ahead. the mild air only weather is briefly, once at weather front clears into the continent we have cold air coming from the arctic once again for tuesday. this is the weather front plunging into the continent, no pressure to the east and high pressure to the east and high pressure to the west and from what to south, the air across the british isles. tuesday, plenty of showers for eastern coasts, significant snow across the north york moors and plenty of showers of rain. a few for the south—west also and lots of winter sunshine. but it will feel chilly, frosty nights, a cold sandra
5:54 pm
webster, chilly for many, windy in the east and a fair amount of showers and they could be wintering on higher ground. scattered showers for wales and the south—west of england. the week ahead, briefly milder but only very briefly and then this cold regime with a biting northerly wind. the international trade secretary says irish border arrangements cannot be finalised at this stage of the brexit process. brussels wants sufficient progress on issues including the irish border in the coming weeks — liam fox says it can only be fully resolved alongside future trade. two teenagers are in custody after a car crash in leeds killed five people, three of them children. tightening up the law on drones, registration and safety tests could be introduced next year. and with england on the verge of defeat in the first ashes‘ test, players‘ behaviour off the pitch
5:55 pm
comes under scrutiny. good evening. the international trade secretary, liam fox, has said there can be no final decision on irish border arrangements after brexit until the uk and the eu have reached an agreement on future trade. the comments come as the eu demands enough progress on issues including the border within the next few weeks in order for talks to move on to the next phase. in order for talks to move irish officials have suggested that they might veto that unless they have guarantees on how the border will operate in future. our political correspondent chris mason reports. could this be the 310 mile sticking point that stopped the brexit talks moving on? point that stopped the brexit talks the border between northern
5:56 pm
ireland and the republic, what will soon be the frontier between the uk and the eu. ireland insists it must remain open, almost invisible after brexit, or it could block the talks progressing. almost invisible after brexit, or it but the government says until there isa but the government says until there is a discussion about the future, the border issue cannot be resolved. we can‘t get a final answer to the irish question until we get an idea of the end state, and until we get into discussions with the european union on the end state, that will be very difficult. so the quicker we can do that, the better, and we‘re still in a position where the eu doesn‘t want to do that. we are getting close now to 2018, when we will be talking about next year when we leave the european union. there‘s long been irritation in government here that the eu won‘t let talks progress to the next stage until sufficient progress has been made on money, citizens‘ rights
5:57 pm
and the irish border. both london and dublin agree that they don‘t want the return of a hard border, but neither side has yet publicly suggested a solution that is compatible on both sides of the irish sea. that is compatible on both sides the british government wants the uk to leave what‘s known as the single market and the customs union after brexit, meaning our economy and the eu economy would be governed by different rules. some say that means it‘ll be impossible not to have a more obvious border, and so... impossible not to have a more the way to stay the same on the island of ireland as it is today post—brexit is for at least the uk to take their red line off the table, but to stay in the customs union and single market gives us what we have today — an invisible border, seamless trade, and it will help build and keep those relationships. seamless trade, and it will help ministers seamless trade, and it will help here insist that wil happen. labour says the government needs
5:58 pm
to be willing to be more flexible. what this government has done is it‘s ruled out remaining a member of the single market or a member of the customs union. that is what they have said very clearly, that they will leave both of those institutions. clearly, that they will leave both we have not ruled those off the table. we‘ve said they are still options. those off the table. christmas those off the table. is getting closer, but next christmas is getting closer, but next month‘s crunchy eu summit is closer still. this is a delicate operation, and all sides agree a unique solution is needed for the irish border. they agree that pulling that off is an incredibly tricky manoeuvre. chris mason, bbc news. tricky manoeuvre. our ireland correspondent chris buckler is in belfast. there chris buckler is in belfast. seems to be a picture bi of there seems to be a picture building of frustration on both sides of the border? yes, the british and irish
5:59 pm
governments have always talked about the shared interest they have a long shared border, but the language is definitely. even today you have an eu commission from ireland saying that it will use its veto to prevent talks moving on to trade unless they get guarantees about the border. the republic of ireland has been dangling this idea that even if the rest of the uk were to leave the customs union and the single market, northern ireland could potentially stay in it. however, that is a solution that is completely unacceptable solution that is completely u na cce pta ble to solution that is completely unacceptable to the democratic unionist party. they say that, in simple terms, it would create a
6:00 pm

14 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on