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tv   World News Today  BBC News  November 26, 2017 9:00pm-9:31pm GMT

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this is bbc world news today. i'm lucy grey. our top stories. the first aid shipment in weeks arrives at yemen's rebel—held port after the saudi—led coalition eases its blockade. more details emerge about the attack on a mosque in egypt which killed 300 people. officials believe up to 30 gunmen were involved thousands are evacuated from around bali's mount agung which has been spewing out ash and steam for the second time in a week. also in the programme, cracking down on the illegal use of drones. police in the uk could be given new powers following safety concerns. hello and welcome to world news today. the united nations says the first ship carrying aid to a rebel—held port has arrived, after the saudi—led coalition eased a blockade that's lasted
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nearly three weeks. the world food programme says the vessel docked at saleef, loaded with 25—thousand tonnes of desperately—needed wheat. saleef is about 70 km north of hodeida which has been the main conduit for un—supervised deliveries of food and medicine. but what's thought to be a commercial ship has arrived in hudaydah, raising hopes that shipping could resume to the port, seen as vital to un efforts as it is closest to the majority of people in need. a un plane carrying desperately needed vaccines landed in the rebel—held yemeni capital sa naa on saturday. coalition forces had partly lifted the blockade, after warnings that thousands of people could die. the un child agency welcomed the reopening of the airport to aid flights. it allowed us to send in the first
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humanitarian convoy, 1.9 million doses of vaccines, which are urgently needed. for a planned campaign to vaccinate 600,000 children, across yemen. vaccinate them against diphtheria, meningitis, whooping cough, pneumonia and tuberculosis. stephen anderson is the director of the world food programme in yemen, speaking from the capital sanaa, he confirmed their ship was waiting to unload. the shipjust the ship just arrived in a port which isjust due north of the ship just arrived in a port which is just due north of the the ship just arrived in a port which isjust due north of the port of hodeida on the red sea in yemen, and it has sufficient food for 1.8 million yemenis for one month, yemenis on the brink of starvation, which is an extremely important development for us. talking about 20
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million people in yemen needing urgent assistance, it is such an extraordinary figure, isn't it, tell us extraordinary figure, isn't it, tell us what life is like for people? most of the civil servants, for over a year, have not received their salaries. we have two thirds of the population who does not know where their next meal is going to come from. and we are trying to target the most urgent among them, around 7 million, and of course, with onset, recent onset of the blockade, and the restrictions at all this, all the restrictions at all this, all the prices went up, prices of food and fuel and basic necessities. this really impacts children, women, elderly, the most. so the country is really in freefall. how difficult
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has it been for your ship to get to the position where it is now?m has it been for your ship to get to the position where it is now? it has been extremely difficult, the blockade was announce on the 5th of november, it actually arrived off the coast on the 11th of november, and it has been waiting, we have kept it waiting, it has been waiting. we need that food is desperately for northern yemen, the people who are, as i said, on the brink of starvation, and so we persevered, and we are extremely pleased to see that we finally got permission last night. thousands of people have been evacuated from the area around bali's mount agung which has been spewing out ash and steam for the second time in a week. there are fears of a full scale eruption for the first time since 1963 when about 1,500 people were killed. indonesia has issued its most serious warning for aircraft,
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and many tourists have been left stranded. tiffany wertheimer reports. voiceover: the people of indonesia are used to sites like these, the mountain is for the second time this week ‘s un black ash high into the sky. balkan knowledges to have detected molten rock close to the surface, which means a powerful eruption could be imminent. mount agun s been declared a danger zone, and everyone within the seven and a half alarm at radius has been evacuated. —— volcanologist. half alarm at radius has been evacuated. -- volcanologist. we must exercise caution for the possibility ofa exercise caution for the possibility of a strong explosive eruption. exercise caution for the possibility of a strong explosive eruptionm is this the ash spewing six hours
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and metres into the sky which presents the greatest danger to human life, within it, sharp fragments of glass, crystal and rock. authorities are handing out masks to everyone in its path. 25,000 people have fled to evacuation centres but they are struggling to cope. in september, 140,000 people fled when mount agung first started rumbling, many have never left shelters, too frightened to return home. on the ground, the alert status is three out of four, and authorities say that the island is safe. the local residents are still getting worried about their daily business. still cleaning up the ash, to make the place presentable. bali is a major tourist destination and results are still open although many flights have been
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cancelled or diverted. however, the ash cloud is drifting east, towards the island of lompoc, and it's airport has been closed. we are trying to find out how to get out. indonesia is home to more than 130 active volcanoes, and sits on the pacific ring of fire, where there is frequent seismic and volcanic activity, mount agung is the most sacred mountain in meat back bali and the last interrupted was 1963, 1500 people died. —— the most sacred mountain in bali. this time around, no one is taking any chances. let's take a look at some of the other stories making the news. at least 23 civilians are reported killed in the latest syrian government attacks on a rebel—held enclave on the outskirts of damascus. activists say towns in the eastern ghouta district have been subjected to air strikes and artillery fire.
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the un says after years of siege, conditions are dire for the 400,000 people living in the enclave. officials in china say two people have been killed and more than thirty injured in a big explosion at a factory in the port city of ningbo, south of shanghai. windows more than a kilometre away were reportedly shattered by the blast. -- 30. police say the cause is unclear. cambodia's prime minister, hun sen, has asked to shut down one of the country's main human rights groups. the n60 founder is an opposition leader who is now injail. earlier this month the supreme court dissolved the main opposition party. this means mr hun sen will run potentially unopposed in next year's election. more details are emerging about the mosque attack in egypt on friday, the worst the country has suffered in recent memory. three hundred worshippers, including dozens of children, were killed. as our middle east correspondent 0rla guerin reports, local people are asking what more can be done in the fight against extremists in sinai.
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her report contains some distressing images. trying to bring comfort after an attack that has horrified egypt and caused shock around the world. among the survivors, the imam, mohammed abdul fatah. he was leading the prayers when terror came to the mosque. as soon as people heard firing they started to run, he said. some climbed onto the pulpit. they were piled on top of each other. the attackers were shooting at anyone breathing. my friends lost their families, lost their cousins and brothers, some of them lost their sons. this sinai journalist is from bir al—abed, where the attack took place. he says it's a turning point for local tribes, who have resolved to hunt the militants themselves. they had a meeting of their chiefs. the tribe members yesterday, almost 400 people were in the meeting. and they decided to carry arms.
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and here, in a propaganda video, the main suspects, the egyptian branch of is, which has found fertile ground among the desert sands and neglect in sinai. now it has real money, resources, weapons and recruits. sadly and tragically, the egyptian government has basically used only military means against the isis branch in north sinai. what you need is to dislodge isis from the social, economical and political grievances that exist in sinai. experts say the egyptian army has been relying only on military might to try to defeat is in sinai. but now, more than ever, it needs a new battle plan. 0rla guerin, bbc news, cairo. the man who mediated robert mugabe's
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resignation with the military has said the former president of zimbabwe will continue to play an active role in politics, albeit in an advisory capacity. father fidelis mukonori, a close friend of mr mugabe attended the meeting with the army generals last week. he says the former leader wasn't offered a deal to resign, but decided to step down for the good of the country. he spoke to the bbc‘s richard galpin. outside the capital, harare, a celebration of the first mass in what is a new era for zimbabwe. the end of the rule of robert mugabe, unleashing a sense of freedom not felt for decades here. and thejesuit priest conducting the service, father fidelis mukonori, is the man who brought it all about, he is close to robert mugabe and acted as a mediator. having played such a crucial role
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in the transfer of power, what then can father fidelis reveal about the deals done to persuade robert mugabe to stand down and how the former president is reacting to losing control of the country? in his office, father fidelis said that mr mugabe's decision to resign was the best thing he had ever done. he also said mugabe will still play an active role. i don't know how you do it in the rest of the world but in the african world, senior citizens are there for advice. in his office, father fidelis said that mr mugabe's decision to resign
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was the best thing he had ever done. he also said mugabe will still play an active role. i don't know how you do it in the rest of the world but in the african world, senior citizens are there for advice. but will people go to him for advice, for example, the new president? the new president said, he is my mentor, he is my father, my leader. when he is my father, my leader, my mentor, as he said, i don't think so. you played a key role as the main mediator to persuade robert mugabe to stand down; what was the deal which did persuade him to go, what was he given, what has he been offered? we did not offer him anything. you are asking a direct question for him to resign, he was not offered anything, he resigned for the good of zimbabwe. there are reports that he has been offered millions of dollars, that he will have immunity
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from prosecution, that all his businesses will be left untouched. is that correct? what i have read in the newspapers about immunity... that he will be looked after, like any other head of state. that is what i have read in the newspapers. how confident are you that the new president will pursue a democratic path rather than reverting to a more autocratic presidency, like that of robert mugabe? he has said so. that he will be a democrat? yes. and you believe him? well, i do, after 50 years of active life as a soldier and as a politician, he knows what it means, he knows that democracy is crucial. at the moment, this remains a honeymoon period for zimbabwe, people here determined to believe real change has come, but that has yet to be proven. stay with us on bbc world news,
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still to come: cracking down on the illegal use of drones, police in the uk could be given new powers following concerns over safety headlines: the first aid shipment in weeks arrives at yemen's rebel held port after the saudi led coalition eases its blockade. thousands are evacuated from around bali's mount agung which has been spewing out ash and steam for the second time in a week. ireland's european union commissioner, phil hogan, has said his country will "play tough to the end" over its threat to stop brexit talks progressing. the eu says more clarity is needed on the future border between the irish republic and northern ireland, which is part of the uk. the government in the south doesn't want to see a new physical border with the north. 0ur political correspondent chris mason explains.
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could this be the 310—mile sticking point that stops the brexit talks moving on? the border between northern ireland and the republic, what will soon be the frontier between the uk and the eu. ireland insists it must remain open, and almost invisible after brexit, or it could block the negotiations progressing to discuss trade. but the government says until there is a discussion about the future, the border issue can't be resolved. we can't get a final answer to the irish question until we get an idea of the end state, and until we get into discussions with the eu on the end state, that will be very difficult. so the quicker we can do that, the better, and we're still in the position where the eu doesn't want to do that. and we're getting close now to 2018, when we will be talking about next year when we leave the european union. there's long been irritation in government here that the eu won't let talks progress
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until sufficient progress has been made on money, citizens' rights and the irish border. both london and dublin agree that they don't want to see the return of a hard border, but neither side has yet publicly suggested a solution which both would be happy with. the government wants the uk to leave what's known as the single market and the customs union after brexit. meaning, in broad terms, our economy and the eu economy would be governed by different rules. some say that means it'll be impossible not to have a more obvious border, and so... the way to stay the same on the island of ireland, as it is today, post—brexit is for at least the uk to take their red line off the table. but to stay in the customs union and single market gives us what we have today, an invisible border, seamless trade,
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and it also will build and help us keep those relationships. ministers here though insist that will not happen. labour says the government needs to be willing to be more flexible. what this government has done is it has ruled out remaining a member of the single market or a member of the customs union. that is what they have said very clearly, that they are going to leave both of those institutions. we have not ruled those off the table. we've said they are still options. christmas is getting closer, but next month's crunch eu summit is closer still. this is a delicate operation. all sides agree a unique solution is needed for the irish border. but they agree too that pulling that off is an incredibly tricky manoeuvre. chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. here in britain, police could be given the power
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to crack down on the illegal use of drones, as part of proposed new legislation. around the world there have been concerns about drones flying near airports, and being used for smuggling and even terrorism. joe lynam reports. they could be one of the most coveted presents this christmas. prices have come down and you can do a lot more with them. this potential customer says he would use one for aerial surveys and research. but he knows there needs to be more controls. it's all for safety, isn't it? we don't want drones crashing into planes and things like that. safety concerns surrounding drones were highlighted in july, when gatwick airport had to close when a drone was flown under a plane about to land. there have been near misses at leeds bradford, cork and manchester airports since 2015. and to prevent drones getting too close, the proposed drone bill could mean that owners of drones weighing more than 250g will need to register and do a test. they will be banned from flying near airports, or higher than 120 metres, or 400 feet. and police will get new powers
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to seize unmanned aerial vehicles. but drones have a growing list of useful applications. this prototype can fly into water and propel itself back out. these drones can be used on oil rigs to fix cables in treacherous conditions. and they are the types of uses that the aviation minister wants to encourage. we've looked at the drones today which can help in the construction industry, in the mining industry, an offshore oil rigs. and what's really exciting is that they can do the jobs that actually put people at risk, so hopefully it will help with safety as well. with the rising popularity of drones comes the issue of potential misuse by the public. this legislation could mean that new users won't be able to simply take it out of the box and start flying it straightaway. joe lynam, bbc news. tolsen tullet has all the sport.
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top of the league barcelona were denied a penalty in the first half of their match against valencia. replays appeared to show the ball from a lionel messi shot that was fumbled by neto had clearly crossed the line but with goal line technology not in use the goal wasn't awarded. rodrigo then added insult to injury with a goal on the hour mark that sees valencia ahead and if it stays that way would narrow the gap at the top to just one point. elsewhere 5th—placed sevilla continued their habit of coming from behind, this time they went 2—0 down to villarreal only to win 3—2, ever banega with a penalty to win it 12 minutes from time while las palmas move off the bottom after a 2—2 draw at real sociedad with deportivo la coruna and athletic bilbao finishing 2—2. manchester city scored two second half goals to re—establish their eight point lead at the top of the english peremier league winning 2—1 at huddersfield town. pep guardiola's side equalled the club record,
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set in 2015, by securing an 11th successive premier league victory, despite falling behind through a nicolas 0tamendi own goal. raheem sterling scored the winner with six minutes remaining which added to the penalty converted by sergio aguero shortly after the half time interval. it was the first time city have come from behind at half—time to win a premier league away match since april 1995. the premier league is so tough, especially now winter has come. they are so especially now winter has come. they are so aggressive. so strong, but we are so aggressive. so strong, but we are so are so aggressive. so strong, but we are so happy for the way we have won this. a controversial stoppage time penalty from alexis sanchez handed arsenal a 1—0 victory against burnley at turf moor. the win moves the gunners up to fourth in the table ahead of north london rivals tottenham, while the clarets remain 7th. elsewhere everton's wretched season continues losing 4—1 at southampton with saints striker charlie austin scoring two second—half headers on his first league
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start of the season. france have clinched their 10th davis cup title, after lucas pouille's convincing victory over steve darcis in the deciding match in lille. the frenchman won in straight sets 6—3, 6—1, 6—0, wrapping up the best—of—five tie 3-2. it's france's first title since 2001 which was celebrated wildly by the 27,000 crowd at the pierre moroit stadium. valtteri bottas brought the formula one season to a close with an untroubled win at the abu dhabi grand prix on sunday. his mercedes team mate lewis hamilton — who won his fourth world championship with two races still remaining in the season — couldn't end his campaign in front while ferrari's sebastian vettel was outclassed in third place. —— pierre—mauroy. sailors from the royal navy have been performing the famous changing
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the guard ceremony outside buckingham palace in london for the first time in its 350 year history. the ceremony involves one set of guards, the old guard, handing over the responsibility of protecting buckingham palace and st james's palace to another set of guards, the new guard. the manoeuvres are usually carried out by a regiment from the army. that is all from me, get in touch on twitter. thank you for watching, goodbye for now. weather has rather flick flack between the faces of autumn of late, rememberthe between the faces of autumn of late, remember the floods in the north—west of england, things have calmed down nicely for some, at the same time, others have recorded this weekend there first snow of the season. we are about to change again, over my shoulder, air of low
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pressure. “— again, over my shoulder, air of low pressure. “ area of again, over my shoulder, air of low pressure. —— area of low pressure through the course of the night, really quite wet for a time, 30, 40 millimetres, quite windy as well, gusts around 40 mph. for the most part, within the body of the area of low pressure, the air is relatively mild. how are we shaping up first thing on monday morning, some rain quite heavy, surface water and spray around where it has stopped raining just to the north but along the rain band, could be some heavy pulses of rain. coming down into the 830, north of that, mixture of sunny spells, particularly to the east, but there are plenty of showers to be had. —— a30. again, some of those are wintry in nature, gaining them together again in the far north of scotland, the tail end at the front, taking time to pull away into the north sea. the wind, quite a feature of the day, temperatures, notjust as low as they are going to get in days to come. double figures across
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the south. and that really is the la st of the south. and that really is the last of the mild air because once the weather front moves across the channel off into the near continent, that opens the gate to a supply of cold air, streaming down these isobars, from well north of the british isles, so that is what will change the weather from the relatively mild air of late sunday and monday into something a good deal colder, moving into tuesday, wednesday and into thursday. notice the supply of showers across northern and eastern parts, and of the irish sea, down into parts of the irish sea, down into parts of the south—west, again, some showers here turning wintry across higher ground. the wind really becoming a feature across eastern parts, as we get on through the day, and where we have high ground, there will be lying snow and the temperatures never better than about seven, feeling much lower, considering the strength of the wind. briefly milder, then it turns cold, and
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watch out for that biting wind. this is bbc world news, the headlines: reports from yemen say the first aid ship has arrived at the rebel—held port of hodeidah after the saudi—led coalition eased a blockade that's lasted nearly three weeks. it's carrying 5,500 tonnes of flour to yemen — where millions of people are at risk of starvation. more details are emerging about the mosque attack in egypt on friday — the worst the country has suffered in recent memory. 300 worshippers, including dozens of children, were killed. officials believe up to 30 gunmen were involved. at least 23 civilians are reported killed in further syrian government attacks on a rebel—held enclave outside damascus. activists say towns in the eastern ghouta district have been subjected to air strikes and artillery fire. thousands of people have been evacuated from the area around
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