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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 27, 2017 6:00am-8:30am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. eruption imminent. bali's airport is closed leaving thousands stranded as mount agung becomes increasingly volatile, with lava and molten rock close to the surface. the area is now on the highest state of alert indicating a major risk of eruption. hundreds of thousands have been moved into shelters. good morning, it's monday the 27th of november. also this morning: the five people killed when a stolen car smashed into a tree in leeds are named. three are children, including two brothers. desperate measures. fears that children with special needs are being failed by the system as increasing numbers of parents are home educting their children. the government unveils its strategy
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for britain's post—brexit industrial future with high—tech sectors top of agenda. in sport, england lose the first ashes test. australia get the runs they needed easily to win by ten wickets in brisbane. macro # i bet you look good on the dancefloor, i don't know if you're looking for romance or, i don't know what you're looking for... dad dancer or disco diva? we'll be asking why research suggests that three quarters of men never or hardly ever strut their stuff. and matt has the weather. good morning. a wet and windy start to the new week for some but it's the mildest morning of the week, cold air throughout, more details on that and you're full forecast in 15 minutes. thanks, matt. good morning. first, our main story. authorities in bali have warned that a volcano on the island is in imminent danger of a full—scale eruption.
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mount agung has been sending clouds of thick ash and smoke thousands of feet into the air since saturday. the airport has been closed and locals have been ordered to leave their homes. andrew plant has the latest. bali's most sacred mountain, an ancient volcano rumbling back to life with billows of black smoke. mount agung has been sleeping for more than half a century, now awake and angry. experts believe a major eruption could be about to happen. translation: the volcano has entered the magmatic eruption phase. there is now the possibility of a strong explosive eruption. those living nearby were evacuated in september at the first signs of activity. now the exclusion zone is activity. now the exclusion zone is a circle 12 miles wide. the thick ash rising thousands of metres means many flights to and from this
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popular tourist destination have now been grounded. all the flights were cancelled so we're just now at the airport, we don't know what we're doing and we are trying to find another flight. in bali, no one is taking any chances. more than 150,000 people are in temporary shelters. when the volcano last erupted in 1963, more than 1000 people were killed. this time the indonesian government says it is much better prepared. andrew plant, bbc news. more on that through the programme for you. there are fears children with special needs are being let down by the education system. a bbc breakfast investigation has revealed an increasing number of children have no school place. the national association of special educational needs has told this programme it is worried that some families believe home education is their only option. 0ur education editor branwenjeffreys has more. for more than a year, emily has been
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learning at home. she's been diagnosed with autism and adhd. school felt noisy and overwhelming. a bit stressful because i don't really like, like, a lot of loud noises because it just really like, like, a lot of loud noises because itjust makes me really u pset noises because itjust makes me really upset and i want to learn things that i'm interested in, but, it's like i can't learn anything because i don't know how to and they don't tell me how. emily would get angry and lash out. now she is on medication at home. her mum, lorna, decided to home educate after trying free schools. i couldn't cope with her going to school and then coming back with her so school and then coming back with her so stressed out, so angry at me and then not wanting to go to school the next day. the meltdowns were horrendous and i can't pick her up and put her in the car and physically take her to school. lorna isn't the only parent to reach this
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decision. a growing number of families with children with special needs are deciding to home educate. the fear is there doing that because they feel let down by the school system. between 2013 and 2017 there was a 57% increase in children with special needs being home educated, and that's just children who have a statement or equivalent in england, wales or northern ireland. it's a 64% increase if you just look at england. scotland has a different system, making comparisons difficult. i think before there was people genuinely making a choice because that was the right thing for them and now there are too many families who are saying they don't feel like they have either option so they're having to resort to home education, that can't be right. emily is learning differently with some extra classes. she's happier out of schools but misses her friends. in england the government says more special education places
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are being created and its putting money into the system to make it work better. bra nwen money into the system to make it work better. branwenjeffreys, bbc news. throughout the week we are looking specifically at special education needs and what it's like for children, parents, teachers. and branwen will be here to explain more about this in around 20 minutes. the families of five people, including three children, who died when a stolen car crashed into a tree in leeds have paid tribute to their relatives. police are still investigating the collision, which happened on saturday night. andy moore reports. a vigil last night by the friends and family of those who died. some struggling to come to terms with the sudden death of so many young people. the stolen renault clio crashed into a tree. the wreckage was soon removed. people who saw it said it was simply a crumpled mess, almost unrecognisable as a car. police are still trying to establish if all seven people involved were in that vehicle.
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all five who died have now been named locally. brothers ellis and elliott were the youngest, aged just 12 and 15. darnell harte, also 15, was the third child victim. two adults were killed. robbie meerun, who was 2a, and anthoney armour. he was 28, a father of two with a third child on the way. of the two 15—year—old boys arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving, one is understood to have been taken to hospital with serious, but not life—threatening injuries. police have described the crash as a tragic incident. they say their investigations to find out exactly what happened are continuing. andy moore, bbc news. theresa may has said the government will fund the full cost of dealing with the aftermath of the suicide bombing at the manchester arena, which killed 22 people in may. it comes after the mayor of greater manchester, andy burnham, said the government's initial offer was £5 million too
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low and estimated that £28 million would be needed. high—tech industries are set to receive millions of pounds in extra funding to boost skills and create jobs. it's part of the government's industrial strategy, which aims to increase economic performance post—brexit. sean is in coventry for us this morning. what's going on? good morning. these are the kind of ideas the government wa nts to are the kind of ideas the government wants to see implemented much more. this is the manufacturing technology centre in coventry. when you got something like this, a bit of innovation that may have gone on in one of our universities, the idea of this industrial strategy is to get businesses to invest in that, get the skills in that area, create a hub to enable more investment from around the world to make britain a leader in whichever area that might
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be. there are five areas this industrial strategy, this white paper, set of proposals by the government want to see implemented, fight areas they focus on. ideas, that's a big one, the big idea overall for all these different sectors, whether it is life sciences, the pharmaceutical sectors like we are hearing the big investment of today, getting those ideas, everyone talking and getting eve ryo ne ideas, everyone talking and getting everyone going. people, of course, with all the productivity issues we have, we know we need more investment in people, the skills and education and that will come through as well and they want those two to be co—ordinating. then you've got infrastructure, can people travel round the country getting to the jobs they need to and can businesses communicate in a good enough way? that's another thing. then there's business environment, finance, access to finance for businesses, how often have we talked about that one? all these things when put together, the idea is britain can become much better. then finally
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places, not just london become much better. then finally places, notjust london centric. that's a big part of this as well. we have the northern powerhouse and we've heard about the midland engine but it's across the country these ideas need to be in fermented and the investment from msd, a big pharmaceutical company, the idea is for them to create a research hub around the uk were nearly 1000 jobs can be lamented and that can help boost investment in that industry. through the morning i will be talking more about this to figure out what it is these robots do and the advantages it can have for the british economy. sean, thank you very much indeed, speak to you throughout the programme. i can't turn around because i have hurt my neck! that was really awkward for you. you have slipped in a bad place! word! iwill look you. you have slipped in a bad place! word! i will look around. you look around, i'm not being rude to sean! now how about this for a sweet annual tradition? this lifesize, two—storey gingerbread house stands
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in the lobby of the fairmont hotel in san francisco in the united states. it took 375 hours to assemble and is 25 feet high, and 35 feet wide. it is made from more than 10,000 pieces of gingerbread and has over a ton of icing! a full working clock as well. hope to lead that gets demolished and handed out to various charities to eat. —— hopefully. handed out to various charities to eat. -- hopefully. not after that amount of time! gingerbread lasts a long time, doesn't it? you're probably right. one ton of icing? if you had a little selection box after that, surely it lasts that long, like christmas cake, goes on for the? there's nothing worse than when it goes a bit soft and a bit soggy — goes it goes a bit soft and a bit soggy —— goes on for ever. it goes a bit soft and a bit soggy -- goes on for ever. just put it in your tea and it will be fine! so, the ashes. we knew this was going to be happening. no one predicted england would get anywhere winning
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the first test? nobody said england we re the first test? nobody said england were going to storm it from the start, you make a good point, so no surprise with this headline. england lost the first test in brisbane. australia got the runs they needed easily without losing a wicket. so despite some promising moments along the way, they were comfortably beaten in the end. for three days we played some excellent cricket. unfortunately when we got into good positions we didn't quite capitalise on that and if we'd done that we would have seen a very different scoreboard sat here right now. more on the cricket in the papers shortly. manchester city's unbeaten run at the top of the premier league continues. they beat huddersfield 2—1 to move eight points clear of rivals manchester united at the top of the table. celtic have won the scottish league cup, their fouth domestic trophy in a row after beating motherwell 2—0 at hampden park. and in the battle of rugby union's premiership top two, exeter chiefs ran out winners. the league leaders beat their nearest rivals saracens by just two points yesterday. please don't laugh at my voice!
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we're not laughing! it's all gone a bit gravel like? it has, i will sort it! let's catch up on the weather with matt. good morning from on top of the roof at broadcasting house in london, the likes of regent street twinkling behind and the ground is a bit damp. a bit of rain here and we'll see that through this morning in southern areas, but looking at the week, get ready, if you got a bargain this weekend with a warm jacket or a scarf, you will need it, a cold week. a mixture of sunny spells and showers with the showers turning wintry and we will see them today in the north of scotland. let's start in the south, it is the mildest morning of the week for many. temperatures to start the morning without breaks of rain in southern counties around 11 or 12, that's the highest they will get all day and a strong wind blowing across the south through the morning before the south through the morning before the rain eventually clears. north of
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mid wales, the midlands, sunny spells and a scattering of showers for the morning rush—hour. some showers will be a bit heavy. 0ver the tops of the hills in northern ireland, comrie and scotland, a mixture of sleet and snow and in the far north—east of scotland, a windy start to monday, with the winds gusting to 50 or 60 mph —— cumbria. windy through the day in the north—east of scotland. still breezy in the english channel, the rain spreads to the channel islands, that's where it sits in the afternoon. southern counties will brighten up compare to this morning but temperatures will be dropping, showers possible anywhere —— compared to. some rumbles of thunder, especially around the coast, and wintry over high ground in the north. temperatures dropping through the day, single figures in the afternoon, colder in the north—east given the strength of the wind. through the night the wind will remain strong nationwide but we will remain strong nationwide but we will see the showers becoming less numerous. a wet evening rush—hour in
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the south—west but elsewhere the showers confined to northern and western coasts in particular, clear skies inland. the breeze keeping temperatures up just about but a cold start tomorrow morning. some frost around here and there and even a bit of ice over fireground, showers continuing through the night. on tuesday, fewer showers around, better chance of sunshine. sunshine at its best in south—west scotla nd sunshine at its best in south—west scotland and north—west england, the midlands and south—west england. a few showers tomorrow in the west but more so few showers tomorrow in the west but more so in few showers tomorrow in the west but more so in eastern few showers tomorrow in the west but more so in eastern parts of england and eastern scotland, they will turn wintry. a strong wind and it will make it feel cold, temperatures made to feel more like freezing in some parts of eastern scotland and eastern england with the strong wind. it will remain windy and cold into wednesday with temperatures dropping day on day through the week. showers most likely in eastern areas, one or two in the west, those showers sleet and snow at times in eastern parts and they will spread inland to many eastern counties of
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england and scotland through the day. temperatures what you see on the chart, it will feel colder in the chart, it will feel colder in the wind. if anything feeling colder on thursday, thursday probably the cold est on thursday, thursday probably the coldest day of the week with temperatures only around three or fourfor temperatures only around three or four for many. maybe the winter jacket you got at the weekend will prove to be a bargain. that is a very important warning. set to get cold throughout the week. the big freeze is the last month. britain facing a new weather alert in the run—up to christmas and prince harry and meghan markle on the front page, many papers asking is tomorrow going to be the day when he officially announces their engagement, because his brother was engaged on tuesday. it is magical tuesday, everyone, if it happens. if i was them, i would put it off. the telegraph are talking about the armed forces
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possibly not receiving any extra funding asa possibly not receiving any extra funding as a result of a major national security review. administrative defence has been told that. sailors have taken over from the usual guardsman at buckingham palace as the royal navy performs the changing of the guard for the first time stop is the year of the navy. the front page of the guardian also have a seachange at the queen's card. also have a seachange at the queen's ca rd. safety fears also have a seachange at the queen's card. safety fears as junior doctors are card. safety fears as junior doctors a re left card. safety fears as junior doctors are left to run a&e. jonny bairstow on the front page, which i am sure sally will talk about later on. as well as the cricket in australia, there has been a bit of argy—bargy, as well. the times reports that thousands of children have been used by criminal gangs as drug runners in a criminal scandal with echoes of rotherham and rochdale. calls for the law to be changed and fault —based divorce. we will talk about
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the flu jab for children. it is not ajab, the flu jab for children. it is not a jab, though. no, the the flu jab for children. it is not ajab, though. no, the nasal spray, that thing. looking at the front page of the daily mirror, russia's lies over flu jabs in page of the daily mirror, russia's lies overflu jabs in britain. russia cyber units are spreading false information about flu and measles in the uk. the daily mail talking about ambulance crews being sent on 999 calls, sending cut—price tech regions instead of paramedics, according to an investigation they have done. you mentioned the ashes, and we mentioned jonny bairstow. it appears that around a month ago, in appears that around a month ago, in a nightclub, there was a little bit ofan a nightclub, there was a little bit of an altercation. shall we re—enact it? we are touching. was that it? no malice? no malice whatsoever. jonny ba i rstow malice? no malice whatsoever. jonny bairstow touched heads with a
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team—mate, ina bairstow touched heads with a team—mate, in a friendly way like we did. to be honest with you, that was unexpected. it came out of nowhere. thing i want to talk to you about, is the bar where it happened, a venue is the bar where it happened, a venue previously called club bayview, and it earned the nickname bayspew among patrons. isn't it funny that it occurred a month ago and it is being reported now. got any spare antifreeze? this is a photographer who took a picture in churchill, in canada, the polar bear poking out the window, and debbie mcgee, the secret behind the splits. 59 and then be as anything. —— bendy
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as anything. yoga is what is inspiring flexibility. we often talk about endangered species on this programme, but here is one that hasn't yet been filmed by sir david attenborough — the dancing british male. a survey by bbc 5 live has found more than three quarters of men either never dance at all or only do so rarely. most of them say they are too embarrassed. so, in a bid to reverse this worrying trend, we dug through the archives and went out to find some blokes who still like to boogie. if any teenagers are watching, we should warn you that this film does contain some images of dad—dancing which you may find disturbing. # i #ibet # i bet that you look good on the dance floor... can't # i bet that you look good on the dance floor. .. can't dance? # i bet that you look good on the dance floor... can't dance? no. no, there you go. i read some surveys
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that i am allowed to dad—dance, and idoat that i am allowed to dad—dance, and i do at every opportunity. it has to be done. i wouldn't be a dad if i wasn't dancing. i see a lot of people doing it. i like it. being known to move in a dancing sort of fashion. very pretty. what do you think? bad. i'm sexy and i know it. iama big i am a big fan of dad—dancing. we would love to see your dad—dancing videos. you can e—mail us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk, or tweet them using the hashtag #bbcbreakfast. iam i am looking forward to seeing some of those later on. we are taking some time this
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week to shine a light on what it is like to live with a special educational need. today, we have been hearing how an increasing number of children with complex needs are being educated at home. a bbc breakfast investigation has revealed a 133% rise in the number of pupils without a school place since 2013. to tell us more, we are joined by our education editor branwen jeffreys. branwen, what can you tell us about these figures? you hear them and you think that is a massive increase. it really is, and quite striking compared to the number of special needs children, which although it has been going up a little bit, hasn't been going up as fast as these figures. when you look at what we found, we found that around 1600 children with a statement or one of the new care plans were being home educated. around 1000 have no school place whatsoever and the average waiting time forfamilies whatsoever and the average waiting time for families for a school place was five months. that is across northern ireland, england and wales. in scotland it is slightly different
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so we couldn't make the same comparison. it is worth noting this is the tip of the iceberg. these are the children who have a statement or a care plan, and they have the most severe needs. there will be other families ina severe needs. there will be other families in a similar situation who haven't had the needs of their children recognised. haven't had the needs of their children recognisedlj haven't had the needs of their children recognised. i am sure many of our viewers will be able to a nswer of our viewers will be able to answer this question, but what is causing the rise in numbers? we no school budgets are under pressure, and if you have a child with a care plan in your school in england, you have to find the first £6,000 to give them the extra help they need out of their own school budget if you are a head teacher. so that is actually costing them money, it is only after that you can get some top up only after that you can get some top upfunding. that only after that you can get some top up funding. that is one thing, reducing the support. parents are then pulling their children out of schools because of that. but schools are measured by all kinds of accountability test. test results, league tables, and special needs children do not really fit into the
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world of league tables, test results and exam results. and i know you have been having a really good look at what impact it has been having on children and families, as well. for some families it will be a choice to home educate at some families feel so badly let down by the system, and they feel as though they have no choice, it was their child has been so miserable, so unsupported in school, they must take them out and teach them at home. and we will be looking at this subject in detail throughout the week. later in the hour, we will have a report from jayne mccubbin, who has been given rare access inside a special school in manchester, to see how they are coping with increasing demand on the system. if you want to get in contact with your stories, you can do so by emailing us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk, or you can tweet us using the hashtag #bbcsend. you are watching breakfast. still to come this morning: have
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you been struck down by flu this winter? well, doctors say children are super—spreaders of the disease, and they are urging parents to get their little ones vaccinated. we will get more on this shortly. do you live with some super spreaders? they are spreading everything all over the place. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. two men who were questioned by police over a fight that sparked panic on oxford street on friday have been released without charge. a number of people were injured, with nine taken to hospital, after people fled amid reports of a shooting. the men, aged 21 and 40, voluntarily went to a police station over the weekend. senior officers will meet oxford street representatives today to discuss how to deal with similar incidents in the future. a teenage girl is fighting for her life after a crash on the m1
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near watford at the weekend. she was in a vehicle that was hit by another car while parked on the hard shoulder. the 19—year—old from barnet had to be cut free, and two other teenage girls were hurt. a 28—year—old man from basildon has been arrested. the leader of essex county council says there needs to be an overhaul to the way local authorities are funded. figures released last week revealed that boroughs across london get twice as much money from the government as authorities in rural areas like essex and hertfordshire. david finch says councils like his are struggling to provide services like social care. london boroughs are getting £593 per person more than we are in essex. where we are getting £193 per person. that formula, that funding formula, is old—fashioned. it has not been up dated since 2013—14. travel now.
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0n the tube, we have currently no victoria line running between walthamstow central and seven sisters. it is because of emergency engineering work. and, as i'm sure you know by now, the 0verground is still closed for ongoing works between gospel 0ak to barking. 0n the roads, well, it is mostly various works slowing things down. here is how it looks at chelsea embankment. it is closed westbound from chelsea bridge to battersea bridge until april. kensington high street is partly blocked, too, because of a burst watermain. and, in wembley, the high road remains closed eastbound for sewer works. it is due to reopen later this week. time for the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. now, we have had a little bit of rain overnight, but it has helped to keep the temperature perhaps a bit more mild that it has been for the last couple of nights. so damp start, still some water on the ground but it is going to get much brighter a bit later. we still have a bit of a breeze. it will be quite a windy day. that will help to
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break the cloud up. some bright and sunny spells. you could see some showers blowing through. the temperature feeling cool as well, eight or nine celsius. 0vernight tonight though showers fizzle out. we are hanging on to the breeze. the sky clears but because of that breeze the frost is kept at bay. there may be one or two spaces in the rural spots where you get patchy frost. minimum temperatures between three and five celsius. a bright but chilly start tomorrow. still quite pretty, though, so it is going to feel quite cold. the risk of a shower through the afternoon blowing ina shower through the afternoon blowing in a majorly north—westerly breeze. the maximum temperatures between four and seven celsius. it is going to get much colder as we had through this week. there is dry weather around, though. still quite easy, with the risk of a shower. —— quite breezy. that's all for now, but we will be back in half an hour. there is more on our website at the usual address. for now, it is back to dan and louise. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning:
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how a mince pie could help tackle loneliness. we'll find out about a new campaign from thejo cox foundation. these men aren't afraid to dance, but new research suggests more than three quarters of men are. so we'll be celebrating the joy of dad—dancing. hello, mother, how are you? oh, you know, not so bad. great, well, got to go. and he's introduced us to gangsta grannies and awful aunties, now it's the turn of bad dad. we'll be joined by comedian and children's author david walliams. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: authorities in bali have warned that a volcano on the island is in imminent danger of a full—scale eruption. mount agung has been sending clouds of thick ash and smoke thousands of feet into the air since saturday. the airport has been closed and locals have been ordered to leave their homes. these are pictures live coming to us
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from bali of the volcano. as you can see, there are more ash clouds than there has been in the last 2a hours, it's quite difficult to see it now but we'll keep you right up to date. there are fears children with special needs are being let down by the education system. a bbc breakfast investigation has revealed an increasing number of children have no school place. i think before there was people genuinely making a choice because that was the right thing for them and now there are too many families who are saying they don't feel like they have either option so they're having to resort to home education, that can't be right. the families of five people, including three children, who died when a stolen car crashed into a tree in leeds have paid tribute to their relatives.
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0ur reporter is in leeds where the vigil took place last night. police are still investigating the collision but have they released any more information about what happened? yes, good morning. not for the moment but there is still a police presence here and you could see where this incident happened on saturday night. this is stone to road, about three miles north of leeds city centre, it was cordoned off for most of yesterday and this is where the stolen renault clio collided with the tree. you can see last night local people have been laying floral tributes. the investigation is still ongoing into what happened. emergency services we re what happened. emergency services were called just before 10pm to what they say was a scene of complete carnage. officers on the scene say they were confronted by a very difficult situation, five people lost their lives, including three children, the youngestjust 12 years
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old. to 15—year—old boys and two men aged 2a and 28 were killed. the victims named locally as 15—year—old daniel hart, robbie meerun, 2a, and 24—year—old anthony aamer —— 28. the exact ci rcu msta nces 24—year—old anthony aamer —— 28. the exact circumstances are being pieced together. meanwhile 215 —year—olds are in custody on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving. thank you very much. theresa may has said the government will fund the full cost of dealing with the aftermath of the suicide bombing at the manchester arena, which killed 22 people in may. it comes after the mayor of greater manchester, andy burnham, said the government's initial offer was £5 million too low and estimated that £28 million would be needed. high—tech industries will receive millions of pounds of extra funding to boost skills and promote jobs as pa rt
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to boost skills and promote jobs as part of the government strategy to boost economic performance post—brexit. we will be investigating this more through the morning. sean is in coventry. a second inquest into the death of toddler poppi worthington will begin after the first hearing more shrouded in secrecy and lasted seven minutes. the 13 —month—old was found with serious injuries at her home in cumbria in december 2012. last year afamily cumbria in december 2012. last year a familyjudge ruled she had been sexually assaulted by her father, who always denied any wrongdoing. no one has ever been charged over her death. councils in england generated £819 million in profit from parking fees and fines during the last financial year, that's10% higher than in the previous one. figures obtained by the rac foundation showed four of the five councils with the largest surplus were in london. the local government association said income from parking went towards essential transport
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projects and repairs. idid i did some street parking in london a few years ago and i'm still recovering, £38 for about seven hours. chelsea! that will do it. a personal issue that i shouldn't have brought up on the programme. car thieves have come up with a new way of stealing cars in less than a minute without using keys. this from west midlands police shows us relay crime. they use boxes to receive a signal that tricks the system in the car to thinking the key has been used. quite high—tech, isn't it? quite high-tech, isn't it? snide. why are we sharing this information? don't try that at home by the way! you didn't see that, folks! good morning. not great news from
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australia on various levels. so far the aussies are winning the mind games, aren't they? the time. -- big time. england lost the first test in brisbane. australia got the runs they needed easily without losing a wicket. so despite some promising moments along the way they were comfortably beaten in the end. they go 1—0 down in the five match series. i think the most important thing is we stay strong and tight as a group of players and as a squad and we continue to keep doing the hard work we have done throughout the whole trip. for three days we played some excellent cricket. unfortunately when we got into good positions we didn't quite capitalise on that and if we'd done that we would have seen a very different scoreboard sat here right now. i think this team has the potential to do some really good things and we'll have to continue to play really good cricket. adelaide wicket might bring some of their bowlers into the game a little bit but
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having said that, it's probably one of the quickest wickets in the country. there has already been a bit of bother with cameron bancroft and johnathan bairstow. there were accusations bairstow head—butted cameron bancroft on a night out in perth before the tour. bairstow said the incident had been blown out of all proportion. we were just we werejust in we were just in the bar having a good laugh and a good evening out. it was very enjoyable. cameron and i enjoyed the evening and continue to do so. no intent or malice about anything during the evening. he connected with my head and, you know, with a force that would make me think, like, wells, that's a bit weird. and, yeah, that was it. manchester city manager pep guardiola has prasied his
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players as they came from behind against huddersfield to continue thier their unbeaten run at the top of the premier league. raheem sterling was the match winner for city with just six minutes left in the game. their lead at the top of the table now eight points over rivals manchester united. impossible to win every game easy because the premier league is so tough. today may be one of the worst times how much of a premier league game it was today. the guys competed amazingly so that's why we won and we're still there. everton are two points off the premier league relegation zone after suffering another heavy defeat under caretaker manager david unsworth, they lost 4—1 to southampton yesterday. charlie austin scored two second—half headers before steven davis beatjordan pickford from the edge of the box to wrap up the victory. everton have won just once in seven games under unsworth. it's killing me. it's really tough. but the situation's been tough for a
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while so i have to take responsibility and i will, i'll stand here and take responsibility as manager, but we've all got to ta ke as manager, but we've all got to take our responsibility as well. it's tough at the moment, we're in a tough place. things have to change quickly. arsenal move up to fourth in the table after a controversial injury—time penalty against burnley at turf moor. alexis sanchez scored the goal that moves them ahead of north london rivals tottenham. there is a lot of me inside that is raging, a lot. but it's ok, i will still look like this. my view is that it is highly unlikely that anything other than a penalty was going to get given. celtic have won their fourth domestic trophy in a row as they retained the scottish league cup this afternoon beating motherwell 2—1. james forrest scored the first for celtic just after the break and they doubled their lead with a controversial penalty that saw motherwell defender cedric kipre sent off. celtic go 65 domestic games now without defeat. hibernian completed the cup double for the second year running
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with a 3—0 victory over glasgow city in the women's scottish cup final. reigning champions exeter chiefs are five points clear at the top of the premiership after beating second place saracens by just two points yesterday. the chiefs scored two tries in the second half to come from behind against sarries. both teams were missing a number of players to international duty. elsewhere wasps beat london irish. england boss eddiejones has been named coach of the year at the world rugby awards in monaco. the australian guided england to a second successive 6 nations title in 2017, before an unbeaten summer tour of argentina and three wins out of three this autumn. jones is the first england head coach since clive woodward in 2003 to win the accolade. valtteri bottas took the honours ahead of mercedes team—mate lewis hamilton in the final race of the formula 1 season in abu dhabi. the finn completed the hat—trick of pole position, fastest lap and race win as he claimed his third victory of the year.
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sebastian vettel finished third which was enough to secure the german the runners up spot in the drivers‘ championship, which hamilton had already won. in netball, england have won the second match of the vitality netball international series against malawi. the roses won 61—53 at the copper box arena in london. they go 2—0 up in the three match series. great to see the copper box being used again, some brilliant memories of the olympics of course. proper venue! proper venue! thanks very much, see you later. for many older people, spending some quality time with grand—children or other young relatives is one of the greatest pleasures of the festive period. but nhs chiefs are warning that christmas cuddles could be a health hazard if the child is among the four in five who have not been vaccinated against flu. professor keith willett, nhs england's medical director for acute care, has described children as super—spreaders. we can speak to him now. good morning. good morning. super
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spreader, what does it mean? young children are very important influence, they catch it very easily and they also spread it very easily -- in flu. and they also spread it very easily —— in flu. the good news is the nasal spray vaccine we have four children now, which we're making available free for every child from two to nine, is not only highly effective at stopping them getting the flu but the evidence is it's one of the best ways of stopping older people, pregnant family members, perhaps grandparents or older family members with long—term conditions from catching flu themselves. for them it can be very serious and sadly occasionally fatal. which is a really stark message actually. what are the figures, how many are getting this vaccine? we make 21 million flu vaccinations available each year, that's more than a third of the whole population of england.
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that's all those groups i've talked about. and we need a certain level of take—up for it to be effective. at the moment we've only got about one in 62 to three —year—olds being vaccinated with the nasal spray, and we've only got 30% of children who are in the school age, from reception to year for. the messages to mum and dad is quite simple, get your two and three —year—olds booked into the gps for their nasal spray, and likewise make sure you've given consent so they can have the nasal spray at school. that way you're looking after the whole family, which is really important over this festive period. and it's free for children at those ages? absolutely. free for those and free for everyone over 65, free fall pregnant women and those who have long—term conditions or those who care for them and this year it's also free for care workers in residential homes and those who look after people in their own homes. why isn't
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it working, why are parents not taking their children to get vaccinated? it's taking their children to get vaccinated ? it's not taking their children to get vaccinated? it's not going to hurt because it's a nasal spray, isn't it crazy so why is it? yes, it's a lack of awareness and i'm delighted to make those mums and dads were this morning. for the two and three —year—olds you have to contact your gp and book in and make sure they get the spray from the practice nurse, and for the schoolchildren, make sure you're aware of the programme. if you are asked to give consent then do so and contact the school if you think you might not have had the note because perhaps the child hasn't given it to you. that the lego point, checked in their schoolbags. you are director for acute care at nhs england. —— that's a good point. —— check in their schoolbags. are you ready for this winter? we are the re- prepared this winter? we are the re- prepared this year, more so than ever before, we have more beds available —— we are very prepared. from a flu point
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of view the normanjo temperate zones of view the normanjo temperate zones in the northern hemisphere, it hasn't taken off apart from in canada —— from a flu point of view for normal temperatures own is. let's get everybody vaccinated. -- for it is cold this morning already. you will know that if you have emerged from the duvet already. believe it or not, out there this morning it is the marvellous start to the week. it will get colder as the week goes on —— mildest start. the overall story for the week is for cold air to dominate. it turns the wind into a northerly direction. temperatures dropping to their lowest by the time we get to thursday. a lot of sunshine but quite a few showers as well, and as well as being the mildest start, the web is start in southern counties, a cold front
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pushing colder air back to all parts later on —— mildest start. outbreaks of rain through many southern counties to get us to the morning rush hour. quite windy across the south, but note the temperatures. 11 to 12 degrees. lower as we push further north, a mixture of sunshine and a scattering of showers across many parts of uk to start with. some of the driest places east of the pennines and the eastern parts of scotland. showers across the hills of northern england and scotland will be wintry, sleet and snow here. a wintry start here, winds gusting 50 or 60 mph to begin with and it will remain windy in the north—east throughout. that will feed showers across many parts of the uk through the day. after a wet start, southern counties will brighten up. it stays wet in the channel islands throughout, but most areas at least seeing one or two showers pushing through. though showers get heavy with hail and thunder, and maybe a little bit of winter in this in the
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north. temperatures dropping for the day. for most in single figures as we go into the afternoon. it will feel colder in the wind in the wind will remain a feature tonight. quite a breezy night in store. a wet start to the south—east of england, which clears through. a few showers in coastal districts to the north and west in particular. inland we will see a touch of frost here and there but the wind will keep temperatures up but the wind will keep temperatures upa but the wind will keep temperatures up a little bit. it will not stop it feeling particularly cold tomorrow morning. tomorrow morning, a lot more sunshine around to start your day, especially southern and eastern areas to begin with. if anything, tomorrow, a few showers in the west. mainly rain and sleet but northern scotland, eastern scotland and eastern parts of england, more showers for eu compared with today. in the strongest of the winds is in the east. it will feel more like temperatures just either side of freezing as we go into the afternoon. a real wind chilled to tuesday, and that will remain
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especially across eastern areas on wednesday. eastern areas most prone to showers on wednesday. western areas always tend to be that bit drier and brighter but wherever you are it will feel cold. if anything, temperatures will drop into thursday, around three or four degrees at rest, and it will feel chillier than that in the wind. so a cold, wintry week in store to finish november. this morning we start with some wind and rain, especially across southern counties. we will have to prepare the gloves, the hats and the coats. bbc breakfast has learnt there has been a significant rise in demand for places in special schools across england, and we have heard of some parents forced to send their children hundreds of miles across the country in order to access the support they require. the government says it is investing hundreds of millions of pounds to try and ease the pressure. so why is specialised support so important? breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has been given exclusive access to one school in manchester to find out. we have been given rare access to
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spend the day with the children at the royal school, manchester. this isa the royal school, manchester. this is a special school for children with some of the highest needs. 200 staff support 48 children here, including chloe. we have just done mapmaking. she has sat beautifully the whole lesson, which she would never, ever have done when she first came here. that is fantastic. chloe has been here for 11 weeks. ever since her last school placement broke down. it was so difficult. i was very broke down. it was so difficult. i was very sad, i isolated myself, and ididn't was very sad, i isolated myself, and i didn't have a life. she would physically try and attack me, not to hurt me, butjust out of distress. the turnaround is above and beyond what i could have imagined. saying mummy every day, she only said mummy to me twice in six years, and now i get it every day. i have got my
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little girl back, she is so happy. at all of this cost, and there is a national shortage of places. james survived birth at 25 weeks. many more babies are surviving premature births, and conditions which previously would have killed, but many will have special needs because of that, and many willjoin a waiting list for a space. we've got a seven—year—old child who is starting here next week, and they're coming from hertfordshire. how many miles is that? a long, long way. is that a great sadness to you, that these children can't find the right vision on the doorstop? closer to home, yes. —— doorstep. vision on the doorstop? closer to home, yes. -- doorstep. when tv arrived, she couldn't walk or communicate. —— evie. arrived, she couldn't walk or communicate. -- evie. she used to slam the trays, and wouldn't make eye co nta ct. slam the trays, and wouldn't make eye contact. today, evie loves music, and her clothes, and it
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seems, cameras. and she loves hugs. she can make these choices now. the question is, where would evie be today if she had had this kind of specialist support right from the start? it costs a huge amount of money to have a child here. like, maybe £250,000 a year. if we can commit to investing that money much earlier in places like this, we can see children returning back to mainstream, and over the life of that child there will be a return on that child there will be a return on that investment, which will mean when they become adults, they get employment, they go on to live independently, and that will cost society much less. early intervention is everything. page for henry. henry is doing so well he may be able to move onwards and upwards to let specialist provision —— h for henry. the reality for most children, though, is that they will have to have struggled in other less specialist placements before they
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can finally get to the place where they make progress. can finally get to the place where they make progresslj can finally get to the place where they make progress. i nigh feel like she's got a future. she has a chance in life —— she's got a future. she has a chance in life -- i she's got a future. she has a chance in life —— i now feel. she's got a future. she has a chance in life -- i now feel. goodbye. we are going to let you go. see you soon. goodbye, see you soon. thanks so much to the children at manchester royal school for allowing us to visit. tomorrow, more in this series on special educational needs and disabilities, as we look at the record rates of tribunals where parents fight with local authorities to get the right support for their children. if you want to get in contact with your stories, you can do by emailing us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk, or you can tweet us using the hashtag #bbcsend. diane says teaching assistants are now a luxury and schools are unable to support children with sen properly. sean says we took our children out of mainstream education in 2016 after his primary school failed him continually. he has autism and sensory processing
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disorder and since then no one has taken an disorder and since then no one has ta ken an interest disorder and since then no one has taken an interest in him, despite having an educational healthcare plan. it shows if you are not a round peg in a round hole, things can go wrong. and sally says that it sounds like nothing much has changed for these young people. it doesn't get any easier. there is always a battle to be fought. keep those coming in, thank you very much for those. good morning to you. high—tech industries, from pharmaceuticals to robotics and biochemistry to engineering, are to receive a boost in funding and training. it is because the government believes the sector will provide the best opportunity to improve the uk's economic performance post—brexit. sean is in coventry for us this morning. good morning. iam having a good morning. i am having a very jolly time of it. staying away from the robots at the moment. you can see the huge manufacturing technology centre here in coventry. very reflective of the idea of what
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the government wants to achieve when it comes to the strategy. you have the innovation from local universities being fermented into machinery. all kinds of businesses will be here using this, trying to figure out how they can improve their own businesses with this —— being fermented. we will have a chat clive, the chief executive of the whole place. what can the government learn in implementing an industrial strategy to put skills together with business investment, all that kind of thing, and make britain great at some of this stuff. i think the key thing we have to think about is that this environment creates a place where we can bring industry and academia together with how other capabilities and use it as a sandpit to try things out. so take an industry out of its comfort zone, pushing forward new technologies,
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and giving them the opportunities to see how they can apply those to different applications in their industry. what kind of stuff have we got going on now? we can see a couple of lads at work on the 3d printing machines. how is that a good example of what we want to see more of? so what we see now is that 3d printing started out as a polymer 3d printing started out as a polymer 3d printing started out as a polymer 3d printing capability. we have moved that on the bee dance alloy powders that we use for 3d printing. we call it additive manufacture —— to be dance alloy powders. and having the same skills here as a bit ofa hub having the same skills here as a bit of a hub can mean more business is having a look at what you are doing. and we can have the cross—fertilisation of the different technologies you use ringing people together to look at how you can use 3d printing with robotics, with lasers. so there is lots going on. you have the lads on the 3d
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printers, and the dreaded robots. my nemeses are here as well. how much can these help business? let's have a chat to richard butler. this is really advanced technology here. a lot of businesses will be looking at this and thinking where can i get this and thinking where can i get this into my business? the government is trying to carry out a big industrial strategy at a time it is also trying to carry out big brexit negotiations, almost as crucial, if not more so, for business. can they do both?|j crucial, if not more so, for business. can they do both? i think it isa business. can they do both? i think it is a good question. addressing the industrial strategy is as important to brexit for moving the economy forward. when you talk about productivity, some of these robots are productivity, some of these robots a re clearly productivity, some of these robots are clearly doing the job of many people before. when it comes to productivity, this isn't going to help people get a pay rise next year, is it, which is what the big issue last week we were talking about was. you're right, if people
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expect immediate returns next year, thatis expect immediate returns next year, that is not going to happen. this is about longer term productivity, where companies can make bigger profits and as a result of that can pay their employees more in due course. if you look at the likes of rolls—royce, aerospace, jaguar land rover, these are companies at the top end of productivity, and the top end of pay scales. the idea is a big productivity boost. a white paper out today. we will talk about the proposals from government, but first, a bit of news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. two men who were questioned by police over a fight that sparked panic on oxford street on friday have been released without charge. a number of people were injured, with nine taken to hospital, after people fled amid reports of a shooting. the men, aged 21 and 40, voluntarily went to a police station over the weekend. senior officers will meet oxford street representatives today to discuss how to deal with similar incidents in the future.
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a teenage girl is fighting for her life after a crash on the m1 near watford at the weekend. she was in a vehicle that was hit by another car while parked on the hard shoulder. the 19—year—old from barnet had to be cut free, and two other teenage girls were hurt. a 28—year—old man from basildon has been arrested. the leader of essex county council says there needs to be an overhaul to the way local authorities are funded. figures released last week revealed that boroughs across london get twice as much money from the government as authorities in rural areas like essex and hertfordshire. david finch says councils like his are struggling to provide services like social care. london boroughs are getting £593 per person more than we are in essex, where we're getting £193 per person. that formula, that funding formula, is old—fashioned. it's not been updated since 2013—14.
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travel now. on the tube, we have currently no victoria line running between walthamstow central and seven sisters. it is because of emergency engineering work. and, as i'm sure you know by now, the 0verground is still closed for ongoing works between gospel oak to barking. on the roads, well, it is mostly various works slowing things down. here is how it looks at chelsea embankment. it is closed westbound from chelsea bridge to battersea bridge until april. kensington high street is partly blocked, too, because of a burst watermain. and, in wembley, the high road remains closed eastbound for sewer works. it is due to reopen later this week. time for the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. now, we've had a little bit of rain overnight, but it's helped to keep the temperature perhaps a bit more mild than it has been for the last couple of nights. so a damp start, still some water on the ground, but it's going to get much brighter a bit later. now, we've still got a bit of a breeze.
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it will be quite a windy day. that will help to break the cloud up. some bright and sunny spells. you could see some showers blowing through. the temperature feeling cool, as well — eight or nine celsius. overnight tonight, though, showers fizzle out. we're hanging on to the breeze. the sky clears, but because of the breeze, the frost is kept at bay. there may be one or two places out in the rural spots where you get a patchy frost in a rural spot. minimum temperatures between three and five celsius. a bright but chilly start tomorrow. still quite pretty, though, so it's going to feel quite cold. risk of a shower through the afternoon blowing in a mainly north—westerly breeze. the maximum temperatures between four and seven celsius. it's going to get much colder as we head through this week. there's dry weather around, though. still quite breezy, with the risk of a shower. that's all for now, but we will be back in half an hour. there is more on our website at the usual address. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast,
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with dan walker and louise minchin. eruption imminent. bali's airport is closed leaving thousands of tourists stranded as mount agung becomes increasingly volatile, with lava bubbling close to the surface. these area near the volcano is now on the highest state of alert and hundreds of thousands of people have been moved into shelters. good morning, it's monday the 27th of november.
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also this morning: the five people killed when a stolen car smashed into a tree in leeds are named. three are children, including two brothers. desperate measures. fears that children with special needs are being failed by the system as increasing numbers of parents are home educting their children. good morning. the government announces its big plans to boost the economy today so i'm this high—tech research centre in commentary to see if the industrial strategy proposals will encourage business investment in the uk. in sport, england lose the first ashes test. australia get the runs they needed easily to win by ten wickets in brisbane. ican i can use you... youzhny? yeah, use you. —— use me.
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and matt has the weather. the modest start to the week but wet and windy weather for some. a warm jacket week. more details coming up soon that my oldest. —— mildest. good morning. first, our main story. authorities in bali have warned that a volcano on the island is in imminent danger of a full—scale eruption. mount agung has been sending clouds of thick ash and smoke thousands of feet into the air since saturday. the airport has been closed and locals have been ordered to leave their homes. andrew plant has the latest. bali's most sacred mountain, an ancient volcano rumbling back to life with billows of black smoke. mount agung has been sleeping for more than half a century, now awake and angry.
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experts believe a major eruption could be about to happen. translation: the volcano has entered the magmatic eruption phase. there is now the possibility of a strong explosive eruption. those living nearby were evacuated in september at the first signs of activity. now the exclusion zone is a circle 12 miles wide. the thick ash rising thousands of metres means many flights to and from this popular tourist destination have now been grounded. all the flights were cancelled so we're just now at the airport, we don't know what we're doing and we are trying to find another flight. in bali, no one is taking any chances. more than 150,000 people are in temporary shelters. when the volcano last erupted in 1963, more than 1,000 people were killed. this time the indonesian government says it is much better prepared. andrew plant, bbc news. bali is home to four active
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volcanoes and there are fears the largest could fully erupt within a day. indonesian authorities have put the island on the highest level of alert. elaine, thank you for talking to us this morning, i know you're a safe distance away outside the exclusion zone, but what is it like at the moment? everywhere is quite calm. the local population such as the farmers in the field are busy gathering in their rice, crushing it and laying it on the ground in big sheets. despite the ash that has fallen on all surfaces. further out there's a place i was at this morning and the ash on the leaves is quite thick and silvery. further out there is no sign of any ash on any
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surfaces, such as cars or streets. they cleaned it this morning and a small smattering has appeared again. we've been hearing many people have been moved away and evacuated, how are people generally reacting?‘ been moved away and evacuated, how are people generally reacting? a few local people who are not indigenous balinese, they have decided to leave voluntarily to head towards denpasar, the capital. but people such as myself, various other people who like using cameras, they are actually chasing the volcano! they are coming here specifically to this great mountain views hotel in order to have a clear view of the volcano when the clouds are not of skewering it. at the moment there's a tall of smoke rising in the air but it is pretty much of smoke rising in the air but it is pretty much obscured by the clouds at the base of the volcano. it doesn't appear that you are worried about this, elaine, our
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others worried? i think my family might be worried for me! —— are other people worried? i'm not the kind of person to get scared easily. the last time the mountain erupted in the 1960s, over 1000 died, i would imagine things have changed a bit since then, though?” would imagine things have changed a bit since then, though? i think nature will be exactly the same but the authorities have placed an exclusion zone around the volcano, which they hope will be enough to maintain life. good to talk to you, stay safe and hopefully you can take some nice pictures and we'll get an update with you over the next few days on bbc breakfast. thanks for talking to us, elaine. we will keep you up to date with what's going on with the volcano as well. the families of five people, including three children, who died when a stolen car crashed into a tree in leeds have paid tribute to their relatives.
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our reporter, phil bodmer, is in leeds where a vigil was held in memory of the victims last night. police are still investigating the collision, but have they released anything more about what happened ? that's right, louise. the circumstances of what happened here just before 10pm on saturday night are still very much unclear. as you mentioned, a vigil was held by many local people last night in memory of the victims and the growing pile of floral tributes is behind me as the police pieced together what happened. the victims have been named locally as brothers ellis and elliott thornton, ellis was 12 and elliott thornton, ellis was 12 and elliott was 15. they lead died alongside 15—year—old darnell harte and 24—year—old robbie meerun. father of two anthony armour, 28, he also died in the collision. police are appealing for anyone who may have been in the area on saturday night who may have seen anything or seen what happened in the buildup to
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the tragic crash to come forward. meanwhile two 15 —year—olds remain in custody, they were arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving but still a long way to go in this investigation and we're expecting further updates from west yorkshire police later today. phil bodmer, thank you very much. theresa may has said the government will fund the full cost of dealing with the aftermath of the suicide bombing at the manchester arena, which killed 22 people in may. it comes after the mayor of greater manchester, andy burnham, said the government's initial offer was £5 million too low and estimated that £28 million would be needed. high—tech industries are set to receive millions of pounds in extra funding to boost skills and create jobs. we have sent sean to a factory which makes machines for factories. we have sent sean to a factory which makes machines forfactories. that's right, sean, isn't it? he's wearing a very right, sean, isn't it? he's wearing a very rare right, sean, isn't it? he's wearing a very rare blue high—vizjacket? they aren't quite that rare here but it makes a change from the normal fluorescent yellow, very nice!
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industrial strategy, a white paper which is a lot of proposals from the government on what it wants to see implemented. advanced manufacturing would be one area where the idea of an industrial strategy is to make sure whoever comes up with the idea of the machine will get the business investment, the government policy around that and the skills to make britain very good at certain sectors. there are five key areas this industrial strategy is going to look at. first you have ideas. you need to come up with the ideas for these machines. how do we make sure those ideas in the uk are as big as they can be and everyone comes —— everyone who comes up with them talk to each other. you have people. infrastructure, getting around the country. all that needs investment. you have the business environment. lots of businesses and universities
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wa nt lots of businesses and universities want the cash involved and the government policy to enable them to do it. then the places. around the uk, that's one idea behind this, the investment we've heard about today from big pharmaceutical msd is outside of london, that's what the government wants to see more of, not just london centric. some businesses are concerned about the uncertainty of brexit being a distraction from this industrial strategy, it's not straightforward that it will help people tomorrow, this is investment for many years ahead. it might not help the economy in the near future, like we talked about last week, but this morning we will talk about what this morning we will talk about what this means for the british economy in future decades. thanks very much, sean. councils in england generated £819 million in profit from parking fees and fines during the last financial year, that's10% higher than
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in the previous one. figures obtained by the rac foundation showed four of the five councils with the largest surplus were in london. the local government association said income from parking went towards essential transport projects and repairs. you're up to date with the latest news. you're watching bbc news first. good morning. six former british soldiers imprisoned in india since 2013 will find out today whether they will be released on appeal. the so—called chennai six had been working on an anti—piracy ship when they were arrested four years ago. there were 35 sailors on the american—owned seaman guard ohio, which provided armed protection to vessels sailing through an area known as pirates alley between the indian ocean and the red sea. customs officials and police found 35 guns, including semi—automatic weapons, as well as nearly 6,000 rounds of ammunition on board the ship, which did not have permission to be in indian waters. the six brits were accused of illegally possessing weapons and jailed for five years, but have consistently
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denied any wrongdoing. we're joined now by family members of two of the men, yvonne machugh, who is billy irving's fiance. and joanne thomlinson, who isjohn armstrong's sister. i know you recently came back from visiting your family members, last sunday, how are they? they are surprisingly well. billy was in great spirits, obviously he's been overin great spirits, obviously he's been over in india and he was trying to keep me positive and trying to keep me happy and reassuring me that he's going to be ok and just to make sure i look after myself and our son and that everything will be ok. how old is he? blue he is two. has he seen him at this point? they were free men when all the charges were quashed, billy was still out in india unable to come home so i brought my son out to see him when
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he was three months and that was the first time he saw him and the other two times were in prison behind bars. that's really tough, isn't it? john, how is he doing? he's incredibly resilient, staying really strong and he's really the same person that left the uk over four years ago, which is incredible after everything these men have been through. they were originally held without charge, all the charges were dropped against them in 2014 after they were charged, held without charge for 18 months and then convicted so it's been a huge endurance test for the men and the families but they're doing really well. give us an idea of the conditions, you have to pay for clea n conditions, you have to pay for clean drinking water, quite a few have suffered from dysentery and other things injail? have suffered from dysentery and other things in jail? absolutely, they are in a shared cells, they sleep on the floor. they get one meal a day and they are reliant on the care packages the british public have been sending over to them to
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supplement their diet. what about the conditions, you have seen some of them? we have been over there to the prison. our visits are in the jailer‘s office so we don't get to see the cell but the smell when you walk into the prison hits you, it is disgusting. it is over 40 degrees without any air conditioning. they have s na kes without any air conditioning. they have snakes and rats, it is just while. are you hopeful that you will see them get out today? —— vile. while. are you hopeful that you will see them get out today? —— vilem is really up in the air. i am so apprehensive about it all. sorry, i didn't mean to interrupt you. basically i don't think there will bea basically i don't think there will be a chance they will get out today but we're hoping that the verdict will decide that they can be free men. it wouldn't happen immediately, though, because they will be processes. what help have you had from the foreign office? there's been criticism of the role boris
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johnson and others have played in this. definitely, they certainly haven't taken a strong enough stance on this. they have raised the case over 50 times with their indian cou nterpa rts over 50 times with their indian counterparts yet we have seen no progress from that. so there's a lot of talking, a lot of saying we're doing this, we're doing that, but we've seen no progress and no movement from the courts. we're now four years on and the men are still in prison so whatever they're doing isn't working and we need them to ta ke isn't working and we need them to take a stronger stance if this appeal doesn't go in our favour.” know you will be watching the verdict closely today. can you get in contact with them afterwards, what will happen? basically they will have to phone their lawyer today to find out the verdict, so it's very possible we could know for a few hours before the men. but we're hoping we will be able to speak to the lawyer quickly and we'll go from there. they were all in the armed forces? the six british
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men were. john was in the parachute regiment, as was clearly. parlay theirarmy training regiment, as was clearly. parlay their army training has taught them well in terms of dealing with the conditions and conditions —— clearly. —— conditions and conditions —— clearly. — — gilly. conditions and conditions —— clearly. -- gilly. i know you will be watching it with us on bbc brea kfast be watching it with us on bbc breakfast and good luck to you —— billy. we will get you a comment from the home office as well a little bit later in the programme. thank you for your time. it is going to be hats, coats, everything, isn't it? yes, good morning. we might be in november, but nature isjumping the gun, so it will feel more like winter. temperatures will drop and if we look at the forecast, it is summarised by the word cold, cold weather for just about all of us, not today, though. we will see the mildest conditions to start the week this morning. temperatures will drop
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through the day. the warmest of all, if you call it warm, across southern counties of england, 11— 12 degrees at the moment. some windy conditions with it and outbreaks of rain through the morning rush hour. clearing from the south of wales shortly and clearing away from london at around eight or 9am and north of that it is chilly weather with temperatures dropping across the midlands, east anglia and wales, sunshine, one or two showers, showers in north—west england into scotla nd showers in north—west england into scotland and northern ireland, some will be heavy and wintry, especially over high ground. the north—east scotla nd over high ground. the north—east scotland is a windy start on monday morning, 50 or 60 mph, and it will be particularly windy and feeling very cold and raw through the day. it will be breezy across the country and that wind coming from the north—west as we go into the afternoon will bring the drop in temperatures in southern counties. the rain band in the southern part of england into the channel island, temperatures holding into double
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figures. foremost in the afternoon around seven, eight or nine at the best, and then cold when showers come your way and they will turn increasingly wintry over the high ground of northern england, scotland and northern ireland. this evening it is wet in south—west of england with showers dotted around the country, though they will fade across the uk tonight, confined into northern and western coasts in particular. with clear skies inland we might see a touch of frost into tomorrow morning. because of the breeze through the night, temperatures falsely kept above freezing. it won't feel like that in the morning. it will be very cold as you step out thanks to the wind. lovely start in fact for southern and eastern areas with sunshine out. but through the day we will see some showers, though they will be fewer than today, certainly in the west, not as many around, but more in eastern scotland and england, turning wintry quite readily through the afternoon. and with the strong wind, it will feel more like
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temperatures are close to freezing for eastern counties in the second half of the day. and the chilly wind will be with us into wednesday. eastern areas prone to the showers across wednesday. further west, sunshine, only one or two showers and with temperatures dropping showers turn increasingly wintry to lower levels in the east. and on thursday we could even see showers across south—east england. and temperatures on thursday at best around three or four degrees, temperatures this time of year should be around seven or 10 degrees. so, certainly cold weather this week in store after what is a relatively mild start. thank you very much. we will prepare. good morning. let's return to one of the main stories this morning. there are fears children with special needs have been let down by the education system. an exclusive report has found a 57% increase in students taught at home. we have been told by
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some that it is the only option. today we are looking at what life is like for the most vulnerable children. and in the first of our reports, our education expert looks at some of the challenges faced. for more than a year emily has been learning at home. she has been diagnosed with autism and adhd. school felt noisy and overwhelming. a bit stressful. because i don't really like a lot of loud noises, because it just makes really like a lot of loud noises, because itjust makes me really upset and i want to learn things that i'm interested in, but it is like i can't learn anything because i don't know how to and they don't tell me how. emily would get angry and lash out. now she is on medication, at home. her mum lorna decided to home educate after trying three schools. i couldn't cope with her going to school and then coming back with her. so stressed out, so
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angry at me. and then not wanting to go to school the next day. the meltdowns were horrendous. and i can't put her in the car and physically take her to school. lorna is not the only parent to reach this decision. a growing number of families with children with special needs are deciding to home educate. the fear is they are doing that because they feel let down by the school system. between 2013 and 2017 there was a 57% increase in children with special needs home educated and thatis with special needs home educated and that is just children who have a statement or equivalent in england, wales and northern ireland. it is a 64% increase if you just look at england. scotland has a different system, making comparison difficult. i think before they were children genuinely making a choice because it was the right thing for them and now there are too many families and young people for whom they say they don't feel they have any other
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option and so they have to resort to home education and that cannot be right. emily is learning differently with some extra classes. she is happier at school, but she misses herfriends. in happier at school, but she misses her friends. in england happier at school, but she misses herfriends. in england the government says more special education places are being created and it is putting money into the system to make it work better. and we are hearing so many people getting in touch with us about what's going on and some people really finding this is the only option. what more can you tell us about the figures? you heard the experience from emily and lorna but we investigated what was happening to children who had already had their needs investigated with a statement and in place and when you look at the figures it is really interesting. around 1600 across england, wales and northern ireland are being home educated for a variety of reasons. but we have heard part of it is pushed out of the system they feel. around 1000
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don't have a school place at all which means that they have simply not been able to find somewhere that suits their child's needs. and the average waiting time for a place now is five months, that is an awfully long time to be managing a child at home if really you think they are missing out on all the support that they can get that makes a real difference. and those figures are just the tip of the iceberg. these are children with severe, complex needs. there are plenty more families like lorna and emily that are not even in these figures. so a large rise in numbers and so many people getting in contact this morning. lots of people pointing to funding issues. is that what it comes down to? some of it is about money. if you have a child in your school with a care plan and you are a head teacher in england you have to find £6,000 for that child to meet the extra needs, which could be a teaching assistant, one—on—one, to help in class, extra support,
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learning aids if they need it, before you go to the local council to get a top up through the central system. that is a lot of money and it creates the disincentives for schools to have these children with ca re schools to have these children with care plans, though they have to take them. and of course having a child at home, trying to educate them, has at home, trying to educate them, has a massive impact on families, pa rents a massive impact on families, parents trying to work, on the children themselves. as you have heard this morning, a lot of families getting in touch with us have said this is not their choice. home education can be a positive choice for some families. but a lot of people are telling us that is not what it was like for them. it has impacted their ability to work. if you work, you need to be there. home educated children are involved in a lot of activities. emily, who you saw, goes to science club, alternative provision for one day a week, film club. her mother is desperately trying to find things
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for her to do. and to manage it to support her education. but it is tough on families. and, as i say, we are inundated with messages. thank you very much. you are doing facebook live later. we want to hear the good, bad and ugly to see who has made a difference for them. if they have been through the system, how can they help someone with a young child? everyone has expectations of how their child should... a child arrives. they have additional needs and then suddenly you are thrust into a world of having to navigate a very complicated system. you can put your questions later on on facebook. just a couple of comments. lou says, i fought to keep my children in mainstream school. they have a full statement. they have done the entire school career. the school used the funds not for one—on—one but to fund a class teaching assistant to help a number of children who are not with state m e nts number of children who are not with statements and since being in secondary school teachers lack any
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understanding of their needs. nicholas as we took our daughter out of school, she has asd, dyslexia and selectively mute, we tried two schools, who could not meet her needs, and i feel the schools, who could not meet her needs, and ifeel the budget was the heart of any decisions made not to support her at school. so many have you told us your stories, similar stories, different stories as well. thank you very much indeed. we are talking through this through the week. later in the hour, we will have a report from jayne mccubbin, who has been given rare access inside a special school in manchester, to see how they are coping with increasing demand on the system. if you want to get in contact with your stories, you can do so by emailing us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk, or you can tweet us using the hashtag #bbcsend. there are loads of extra videos on our social media accounts as well. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we will have the headlines here at 7:30am. good morning from bbc london news.
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i'm sonja jessup. two men who were questioned by police over a fight that sparked panic at oxford circus on friday have been released without charge. a number of people were injured, with nine taken to hospital, after people fled amid reports of a shooting. the men, aged 21 and 40, voluntarily went to a police station over the weekend. senior officers will meet oxford street representatives today to discuss how to deal with similar incidents in the future. a teenage girl is fighting for her life after a crash on the m1 near watford at the weekend. she was in a vehicle that was hit by another car while parked on the hard shoulder. the 19—year—old from barnet had to be cut free, and two other teenage girls were hurt. a 28—year—old man from basildon has been arrested. the leader of essex county council says there needs to be an overhaul to the way local authorities are funded.
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figures released last week revealed that boroughs across london get twice as much money from the government as authorities in ruralareas, like essex and hertfordshire. david finch says councils like his are struggling to provide services like social care. london boroughs are getting £593 per person more than we are in essex, where we're getting £193 per person. that formula, that funding formula, is old—fashioned. it's not been updated since 2013—14. travel now. the central line has been part suspended westbound, more on that when we get it. and the hammersmith & city line also has minor delays westbound between barking and hammersmith. and there's currently no victoria line between walthamstow central and seven sisters because of emergency engineering work. the 0verground is still closed for ongoing works between gospel oak to barking. on the roads, well, it's mostly various works slowing things down. here's how it looks at chelsea embankment. it's closed westbound
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from chelsea bridge to battersea bridge until april. and kensington high street is partly blocked, too, because of a burst water main. time for the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. now, we've had a little bit of rain overnight, but it's helped to keep the temperature perhaps a little more mild than it has been for the last couple of nights. so a damp start, still some water on the ground, but it's going to get much brighter a bit later. now, we've still got a bit of a breeze. it will be quite a windy day. that will help to break the cloud up. some bright spells, some sunny spells. you could see some showers blowing through. the temperature feeling cool, as well — eight or nine celsius. overnight tonight, though, showers fizzle out. we're hanging on to the breeze. the sky clears, but because of the breeze, the frost is kept at bay. there may be one or two places out in the rural spots where you get a patchy frost in a rural spot. minimum temperatures between three and five celsius. a bright but chilly start tomorrow. still quite pretty, though, so it's going to feel quite cold. risk of a shower through the afternoon, blowing in that chilly breeze. the maximum temperatures
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between four and seven celsius. it's going to get much colder as we head through this week. there's dry weather around, though. still quite breezy, with the risk of a shower. that's all for now, but we'll be back in half an hour. there's more on our website at the usual address. for now, it's back to dan and louise. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: authorities in bali have warned that a volcano on the island is in imminent danger of a full—scale eruption. mount agung has been sending clouds of thick ash and smoke thousands of feet into the air since saturday. the airport has been closed and locals have been ordered to leave their homes. these are pictures live coming to us from bali of the volcano. you can see the clouds above the bowl kane, loads of ash has been coming out of mount a gun for the
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last few days, since saturday and thousands of people have been removed from the evacuation zone around that volcano —— volcano. high—tech industries are set to receive millions of pounds in extra funding to boost skills and create jobs. it's part of the government's industrial strategy, which aims to increase economic performance post—brexit. sectors including robotics, artificial intelligence and medical research will be targeted, but some critics say more should be done to help traditional skills. theresa may has said the government will fund the full cost of dealing with the aftermath of the suicide bombing at the manchester arena, which killed 22 people in may. it comes after the mayor of greater manchester, andy burnham, said the government's initial offer was £5 million too low and estimated that £28 million would be needed. councils in england generated £819 million in profit from parking fees and fines during the last financial year, that's10% higher than in the previous one. figures obtained by the rac foundation showed four of the five councils with the largest surplus were in london. the local government association said income from parking went
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towards essential transport projects and repairs. we will have all the weather with matt later. this might be a surprise, matt was saying it's the mildest morning of the week, it will get much colder. unseasonably cold. thursday is the beast so wrapped up warm for that. we also have ashes test number two to look forward to —— wrap up. nobody expected england to win the first one. exactly. shall we get through it? i need to talk to you about head butts later as well.” have some information on the head butt later as well. england lost the first test in brisbane. australia got the runs they needed easily without losing a wicket. so despite some promising moments along the way they were comfortably beaten in the end.
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they go 1—0 down in the five match series. david warner and cameron bancroft both made half centuries as they reached 173 without losing a wicket. i think the most important thing is we stay strong and tight as a group of players and as a squad and we continue to keep doing the hard work we have done throughout the whole trip. for three days we played some excellent cricket. unfortunately when we got into good positions we didn't quite capitalise on that and if we'd done that we would have seen a very different scoreboard sat here right now. i think this team has the potential to do some really good things and we'll have to continue to play really good cricket. adelaide wicket might bring some of their bowlers into the game a little bit but having said that, it's probably one of the quickest wickets in the country. our sports correspondent andy swiss is in brisbane for us. good morning, andy. we were expecting the defeat going into the fifth day but another story has emerged involving jonny bairstow. what's behind that? yes, sally, as you say the big
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talking point today wasn't really the cricket but the details that emerged of this incident in a bar in perth four weeks ago involving jonny ba i rstow perth four weeks ago involving jonny bairstow and also the australian batsman cameron bancroft, who scored the winning runs in today's and at. both players had their say today, both players agreed there was no malice in what happened, but cameron ba ncroft malice in what happened, but cameron bancroft said that whatjonny ba i rstow had bancroft said that whatjonny bairstow had done was unusual, particularly his way of saying hello. just greeted me with a head—butt. i was expecting a handshake but wasn't the greeting of choice i was expecting. that was the way that i took it. there was certainly no malice in his action and we continued on having very good conversations. we were just in the bar having a good laugh and a good evening out.
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it was very enjoyable. cameron and i enjoyed the evening and continue to do so. no intent or malice about anything during the evening. the england cricket board said there will be no action against jonny ba i rstow will be no action against jonny bairstow but this is the last thing they need particularly given the ongoing controversy around ben stokes, who isn't here, and it raises more questions about the behaviour of the england players and it distracts from their issues on the field and they've got plenty of those because although they were competitive for the first three days they were really blown away yesterday, a ten wicket victory is pretty emphatic. england have lots of things to look at, not least getting their batsmen to transfer good starts into big score is because steve smith's 141
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good starts into big score is because steve smith's141 not out, the australian captain, that was because steve smith's141 not out, the australian capt‘ the that was because steve smith's141 not out, the australian capt‘ the two was because steve smith's141 not out, the australian capt‘ the two sides because steve smith's141 not out, the australian c if; test 'wo sides because steve smith's141 not out, the australian c if; test starts es because steve smith's141 not out, the aust on in c if; test starts i:“—:"" ' because steve smith's141 not out, the aust on saturday. ;t starts i:“—:"" ' because steve smith's141 not out, the austi on saturday. andy, s be= because steve smith's141 not out, the austi on saturday. andy, lovely — adelaide on saturday. andy, lovely to talk to you and see you. talk to you shortly. andy swiss in brisbane. in terms press conferences, the cricket press conferences over the last 24 hours have been so funny. the transcript is brilliant. it is here on my phone, this is cameron bancroft, he was asked, when we imaginea bancroft, he was asked, when we imagine a head—butt, we imagine, another journalist imagine a head—butt, we imagine, anotherjournalist motions a head—butt, knocking someone over and head—butt, knocking someone over and he said, he didn't knock me over, i've got the heaviest head in the western australia squad, it's been measured, there's an actual measurement, so i took the blow well andi measurement, so i took the blow well and i moved on. it was a good hit, let's move on. he said there was no malice, it's hard to imagine a head—butt without. .. you malice, it's hard to imagine a head—butt without... you don't playfully head—butt. head—butt without... you don't playfully head-butt. head-butt as a greeting perhaps? that's what
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dinosaurs used to do and it didn't go well for them! let's move the football. manchester city manager pep guardiola has prasied his players as they came from behind against huddersfield to continue thier their unbeaten run at the top of the premier league. raheem sterling was the match winner for city with just six minutes left in the game. their lead at the top of the table now eight points over rivals manchester united. impossible to win every game easy because the premier league is so tough. today may be one of the best examples how much of a premier league game it was today. the guys competed amazingly so that's why we won and we're still there. everton are two points off the premier league relegation zone after suffering another heavy defeat under caretaker manager david unsworth, they lost 4—1 to southampton yesterday. charlie austin scored two second—half headers before steven davis beatjordan pickford from the edge of the box to wrap up the victory. everton have won just once in seven games under unsworth. it's killing me.
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it's really tough. but the situation's been tough for a while so i have to take responsibility and i will, i'll stand here and take responsibility as manager, but we've all got to take our responsibility as well. it's tough at the moment, we're in a tough place. things have to change quickly. arsenal move up to fourth in the table after a controversial injury—time penalty against burnley at turf moor. alexis sanchez scored the goal that moves them ahead of north london rivals tottenham. celtic have won their fourth domestic trophy in a row as they retained the scottish league cup this afternoon beating motherwell 2—1. james forrest scored the first for celtic just after the break and they doubled their lead with a controversial penalty that saw motherwell defender cedric kipre sent off. celtic go 65 domestic games now without defeat. hibernian completed the cup double for the second year running with a 3—0 victory over glasgow city in the women's scottish cup final. valtteri bottas took the honours
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ahead of mercedes team—mate lewis hamilton in the final race of the formula 1 season in abu dhabi. the finn completed the hat—trick of pole position, fastest lap and race win as he claimed his third victory of the year. sebastian vettel finished third which was enough to secure the german the runners up spot in the drivers‘ championship, which hamilton had already won. interesting, isn't it, in that race we know what happened, we know hamilton has done it and it's a little bit of an anti—climax. there you go, they still sprayed champagne and enjoyed it. people over the weekend were wondering about pep's yellow ribbon, it's about imprisoned cata la n yellow ribbon, it's about imprisoned catalan officials. yellow ribbons
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are traditionally about supporting troops but he has gone for it for that reason. shall we have a look at some of the front pages? or shall we talk about dad—dancing? dad—dancing. we often talk about endangered species and this is one that hasn't yet been filmed by attenborough, the dancing british male. a survey for bbc radio 5 live has found three quarters of men either never dance at all or do so rarely and most of thatis at all or do so rarely and most of that is down to embarrassment.” think that's a great shame! in a bid to reverse the worrying trend we dug through the archives and found some blokes who still like to pepboogy, and if teammates —— boogy —— if teenagers are watching then maybe your dad is teenagers are watching then maybe yourdad is in teenagers are watching then maybe your dad is in this video and you mightfind it your dad is in this video and you might find it disturbing! doi
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do i dance? no. there you go. i've got to a certain age and i'm allowed to dad dance and i make the most of it at every opportunity. can be a bit embarrassing at times but it's all good fun. i wouldn't be a dad if i wasn't dancing. i see a lot of people doing it. i like it. been known to move in a dancing sort of fashion. very pretty. what do you think? bad. i'm sexy and i know it. ijust think it's i just think it's all great. you like to throw a few shapes? i'm not saying i'm good at dancing but i like it. enjoyment is the key. we've been asking to see your videos. thank you, tracy from north yorkshire has sent this classic.
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this is her her and her husband dancing to michael jackson's thriller. in the pjs as well. absolutely brilliant! good job! i was talking to you about the power of the kitchen disco. some friends of the kitchen disco. some friends of mine do monday night disco in the kitchen. it just cheers of mine do monday night disco in the kitchen. itjust cheers you up, doesn't it? a pyjama zombie is going to put a smile on anyone's face. thanks for sending that in, we would love to see more videos. send us those videos on twitter or by e—mail. i think dad—dancing is fantastic. just dancing generally is the way to go. you don't need to be good at it! high—tech industries from pharmaceuticals to robotics to engineering are to receive a boost infunding and engineering are to receive a boost
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in funding and training. the government believes the sector will provide the best chance to improve economic performance post—brexit. sean is at a factory that makes production lines for other factories. good morning. that's effectively what they do. these guys will be working on machinery here that other businesses will look to use and implement on their floor. these huge will look to use and implement on theirfloor. these huge chunks will look to use and implement on their floor. these huge chunks of metal which have been very finely designed have been printed by a 3d printer, which started with an alloy powder in it, the next thing you know there's a huge hunk of it very intricately designed so it can go in aeroplanes and cars around the world, there is an example of a 3d printer with some plastic in the middle of it. this is part of the industrial strategy the government wa nts to industrial strategy the government wants to see implemented so we have much more of this in many different sectors bringing together skills, people, investment in business around the country and the key part
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of people is apprentices and we can talk to a couple now. this is ritchie and gemma. ritchie, you're coming to the end of your apprenticeship at the manufacturing technology centre, what got you into this kind of thing? i was finishing my a—levels and i came across the company. i didn't know state of the places like this existed around here andl places like this existed around here and i met with the manager and he told me about the apprenticeship and i applied straightaway really. i was either going to go to university and do engineering or do an apprenticeship and i thought this would be the best route. gemma, when you were looking at what you might do next, what was the deciding factor between university or a couege factor between university or a college or hear? the key factor was the debt really. you can do your hnc and then your hnd and a degree if you want to, but you don't get into
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any debt, which is big for people of any debt, which is big for people of a younger generation. you still come out with skills that you feel you can use? yeah, it's more hands-on compare to uni, it is more theory side and a lot of people do learn better with more hands—on experience, especially in a workshop and a working environment, you get a feel for how it is. do you feel you are working with the latest technology and it is something we all have to get used to? absolutely, we have things not even in the industry yet so we are at the forefront of manufacturing and it is exciting to work with these kind of things before they are even out. yes. this is what we will look at. there is a pineapple behind you. i don't know why. can this all be executed, nick davies, from the institute for government? you look at how government functions. they have brexit to sort out. are you convinced a big industrial strategy
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to get investment in can be executed? i think it will be very difficult. implementing brexit is probably the biggest peacetime challenge the civil service has faced. department is already extremely stretched. it is a very good question about how what is hopefully going to be an ambitious industrial strategy is going to be implemented and the other brexit issueis implemented and the other brexit issue is an effective industrial strategy should be taking a view on the opportunities of what a pose brexit world will look like that is difficult to know before we know what the final trading relationship is going to be —— post brexit. what the final trading relationship is going to be -- post brexit. thank you. iam is going to be -- post brexit. thank you. i am not sure what this chap is up you. i am not sure what this chap is up to. it is the height of technology, i am sure, you can see. he is cleaning something at the moment. we will have a look later this morning, much more high—tech than this. there is plenty going on around here. there are some little helper robots, which i am keen to
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learn from later on, and i know dan will be particularly excited about that. i genuinely cannot wait. thank you. it went so well last time, didn't it? yes, i think he might be. if you are a regular, you might remember last week. there was an issue with a robot. yes, it didn't work. this time it will, hopefully. matt has a look at the weather and it is raining in london? certainly it is raining in london? certainly it is, good morning. a wet start to monday morning across southern counties of england, but it is comparatively mild, 11 in brighton, for degrees in aberdeen. but wherever you are, temperatures this week are on the slide. let's have look at the forecast. the week will be typified by the word cold, below where temperature should be this time of year. sunshine and showers for much of the week, today is wettest of all widely, wettest across southern counties of england with a cold front introducing cold airto the uk with a cold front introducing cold air to the uk through much of the
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day and that means we have outbreaks of rain through the west of the —— rest of the rush—hour into southernmost counties of england. it is brightening up in wales, the midlands and northwards of that. showers to go with it, the odd heavy one, and over the hills of northern scotland, some sleet and snow too. a chilly start here. temperatures higher than the rest of the week at this time of the morning. strong winds in the north—east of scotland, 50- 60 winds in the north—east of scotland, 50— 60 mph gusts, it will be raw feeling, with showers turning increasingly wintry. elsewhere, sunshine and showers foremost into the afternoon with one or two showers through the afternoon. sunshine in between, the best of which is in eastern areas, the wettest in the channel islands with the cold front here to finish the day. in the afternoon double figures in the channel islands. the rest of us, though, the highest, this morning, dropping into single
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figures. that will take us into a cold night. into the far south—west, we will see heavy rain for a time before that clears. then overnight showers across northern and western areas mainly into coastal counties. inland it will be dry, clear and chilly. a touch and frost —— a touch of frost here and there. most places starting just above freezing. don't be fooled. it will be colder than that with the cold wind. it will be a bright start uk wide. showers for northern and western areas initially. tomorrow, fewer showers around, unless you are in some parts of england. it could be heavy with hailand of england. it could be heavy with hail and thunder and sleet and snow mixed in. and we have wind strongest tomorrow, touching gale force at times, making it feel particularly raw, temperatures much closer to freezing with the wind factored in. but for many of you it will be dry and sunny in south—west scotland, the midlands, southern england, the
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same on wednesday, these are the brightest areas with showers frequently eastern england. into wednesday, we still have the cold wind which will add to the chill through the day and, if anything, temperatures drop on thursday. uk wide, highs of three orfour degrees, adding the windchill it will be colder than that and to put it into perspective at this time of year we are usually looking at temperatures ranging from seven or eight in aberdeen to around ten in london. so, yes, it is a cold week in store. thank you very much indeed. we will be prepared with hats, coats, gloves and everything else. thank you. we were not ignoring matt. we were distracted by our next guest. if your child has a book on their christmas wish list this year, it could very well have been written by our next guest. it's a decade since, david walliams, published his first children's novel and in that time he's sold millions of copies world—wide. from gangsta grannies to demon dentists, he's already introduced us to an eclectic mix of characters.
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and david joins us now to tell us about his newest additions, bad dad and boogie bear. you have to make more books out, bad dad and boogie bear. bad dad is for the children, and a picture book with tony watt, that is called boogie bear, children who are three orfour. boogie bear, children who are three or four. ten years ago, when you started writing... even more. that is correct. if someone came to you and said in a decade you will have the top five kids books in the country, they will be yours, people will be reading your books in huge volumes and writing will basically ta ke volumes and writing will basically take over your career, would you have believed anybody?” take over your career, would you have believed anybody? i thought i was going to have more success, to be honest with you. laughter no, everything takes me by surprise andi no, everything takes me by surprise and i pinch myself every day how lucky i am. it felt like some kind of offshoot from little britain and then i wrote
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this book called boy in a dress, which we explored in the show, and it was a modest success, not an immediate success, not like gangsta granny, then i had an audience of kids who were not interested in me asatv kids who were not interested in me as a tv personality but as an author. and some of these children are starting to read because of your books. ijust want are starting to read because of your books. i just want to make the are starting to read because of your books. ijust want to make the books entertaining. i know how important it is to get children reading. it is so important. if they read great literature, fantastic. it is important that they read something. if you don't read as a child, you generally don't read as an adult. and you meet many adults who don't read books and think they are boring. lots of children who read your books might be watching now and your books might be watching now and you will come to chat later on. yes, if you want, i can stay and not go away, have a little kip while you carry on the show. can you do the sport? i know nothing about sport. if you have to go to school and you
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have a question, send it through and watch the answers later on on iplayer. that was clever. interesting, boy in a dress seems a head of its time. a lot has happened in ten years. hasn't it? the issues coming back. and you have been dealing with it on this show. yes, it was interestingly prophetic in a way. and actually there was quite a lot of resistance at the time to the theme of the book was on people who felt it was, i don't know, too difficult for children's book. now it isa difficult for children's book. now it is a much bigger thing and it is in most schools in the country, there is someone dealing with the issue of that sort. have you -- as you say you know nothing about sport... yes, well, there you go. i hope you would ensure that! and on tv this christmas you've got
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ratburgers on sky. and grampa's great escape with sheridan saunders. and sheridan smith. in ratburgers. tell us a little bit about the bad dad story. that is about a boy who finds out his father is a getaway driverfor finds out his father is a getaway driver for a finds out his father is a getaway driverfor a bank finds out his father is a getaway driver for a bank robbery. finds out his father is a getaway driverfor a bank robbery. he has to get his father out of prison for one night to put the money back into the bank that was stolen. so it is a story about good and bad and making the right choices in life. there is often a moral theme running through things in the book. yes. deliberately so. it is important to have something to say if you are going to take kids on a journey. some kids may take weeks or months to read it. at the end of it i hope there is something to take away from it. this is about trying to make the right choices in life. one of my favourite characters is gangsta granny. thank you. it was based on you. thanks, not yet. i amjoking.
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that is the most successful book and it is the one that really took off. i don't know if it was the title or the story or whatever it was. it has been a fantastic success and it carries on. and i think that story had for the first time, i think i had for the first time, i think i had all of the elements are needed, it was an adventure story with humour, sadness and i think for some reason it just humour, sadness and i think for some reason itjust took off. humour, sadness and i think for some reason it just took off. luiz you a lovely compliment and you just screwed it up and shoved it back into herface. screwed it up and shoved it back into her face. —— screwed it up and shoved it back into herface. —— louise. iam sorry, i am just trying to be funny, jeez! we might have to change the running order. fine by me. i've got a busy day! it is really lovely to see you. bad dad is the book and you will be back in about one hour's time. we would love to talk about roald dahl, your hero. yes, let's slap the sofa. yes, don't touch the
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sofa, it isn't queen. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. i think that went well. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. two men who were questioned by police over a fight that sparked panic at oxford circus on friday have been released without charge. a number of people were injured, with nine taken to hospital, after people fled amid reports of a shooting. the men, aged 21 and 40, voluntarily went to a police station over the weekend. senior officers will meet oxford street representatives today to discuss how to deal with similar incidents in the future. 29 people have been charged after an investigation into the misuse of electronic tags in new. an offender was arrested when they should have been under curfew. —— newham. some employees of the monitoring service
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we re employees of the monitoring service were taking money to fit tags loosely so they could be removed. the leader of essex county council says there needs to be an overhaul to the way local authorities are funded. figures released last week revealed that boroughs across london get twice as much money from the government as authorities in ruralareas, like essex and hertfordshire. david finch says councils like his are struggling to provide services like social care. london boroughs are getting £593 per person more than we are in essex, where we're getting £193 per person. that formula, that funding formula, is old—fashioned. it's not been updated since 2013—14. travel now. the central line is running with severe delays after a signal failure. and the hammersmith & city line also has minor delays westbound between barking and hammersmith. and the victoria line has minor delays. the 0verground is still closed for ongoing works between gospel oak to barking.
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here is how it looks on the chelsea embankment. it's closed westbound from chelsea bridge to battersea bridge until april. and part of north and road is closed because of waterworks, adding to the usual delays on the a4 coming into town. time for the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. now, we've had a little bit of rain overnight, but it's helped to keep the temperature perhaps a little more mild than it has been for the last couple of nights. so a damp start, still some water on the ground, but it's going to get much brighter a bit later. now, we've still got a bit of a breeze. it will be quite a windy day. that will help to break the cloud up. some bright spells, some sunny spells. you could see some showers blowing through. the temperature feeling cool, as well — eight or nine celsius. overnight tonight, though, showers fizzle out. we're hanging on to the breeze. the sky clears, but because of the breeze, the frost is kept at bay. there may be one or two places out in the rural spots where you get a patchy frost in a rural spot. minimum temperatures between three and five celsius. a bright but chilly start tomorrow.
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still quite pretty, though, so it's going to feel quite cold. risk of a shower through the afternoon, blowing in that chilly breeze. the maximum temperatures between four and seven celsius. it's going to get much colder as we head through this week. there's dry weather around, though. still quite breezy, with the risk of a shower. that's all for now, but we'll be back in half an hour. there's more on our website at the usual address. bye— bye. hello this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. eruption imminent — bali's airport is closed leaving thousands of tourists stranded, as mount agung becomes increasingly volatile, with lava bubbling close to the surface. the area near the volcano is now on the highest state of alert, hundreds of thousands of people have been moved into shelters.
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good morning it's monday the 27th of november. also this morning: the five people killed when a stolen car smashed into a tree in leeds are named — three are children, including two brothers. desperate measures — fears that children with special needs are being failed by the system as a breakfast investigation reveals that increasing numbers of parents are home educating. good morning. the government announces its big plans for our economy today. i'm at this high tech research centre in coventry to see if plans for investment in the uk as pa rt if plans for investment in the uk as part of the industrial strategy will work out. in sport — england lose
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the first ashes test, australia get the runs they needed to win easily by ten wickets in brisbane. ican i can use you. use me? yeah, use you. from comedian to one of the country's best loved children's authors, david walliams will be here to share the secrets behind his success. and matt has the weather. good morning. quite a wet and windy start of the week. the view but it is actually the milder start to the morning this week. cold weather set to dominate. a full forecast is coming up in15 to dominate. a full forecast is coming up in 15 minutes. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. authorities in bali have warned that a volcano on the island is in imminent danger of a full—scale eruption. mount agung has been sending clouds of thick ash and smoke thousands of feet into the air since saturday. the airport has been closed and locals have been ordered to leave their homes. andrew plant has the latest.
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bali's most sacred mountain, an ancient volcano rumbling back to life with billows of black smoke. mount agung has been sleeping for more than half a century, now awake and angry. experts believe a major eruption could be about to happen. translation: the volcano has entered the magmatic eruption phase. there is now the possibility of a strong explosive eruption. those living nearby were evacuated in september at the first signs of activity. now the exclusion zone is a circle 12 miles wide. the thick ash rising thousands of metres means many flights to and from this popular tourist destination have now been grounded. all the flights were cancelled so we're just now at the airport, we don't know what we're doing and we are trying to find another flight. in bali, no one is taking any chances. more than 150,000 people
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are in temporary shelters. when the volcano last erupted in 1963, more than 1,000 people were killed. this time the indonesian government says it is much better prepared. andrew plant, bbc news. there are fears children with special needs are being let down by the education system. an exclusive investigation for bbc breakfast has found a 57% increase in the number of children being educated at home. we have been told that some families believe this is their only option. today, we launch a week long series looking at what life is like for our most vulnerable children. in the first of our special reports, our education editor branwen jeffreys looks at the challenges faced by some of these young people. for more than a year, emily has been learning at home. she's been diagnosed with autism and adhd. school felt noisy and overwhelming. a bit stressful because i don't really like, like, a lot of loud noises because itjust makes me
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really upset and i want to learn things that i'm interested in, but, it's like i can't learn anything because i don't know how to and they don't tell me how. emily would get angry and lash out. now she is on medication at home. her mum, lorna, decided to home educate after trying three schools. i couldn't cope with her going to school and then coming back with her so stressed out, so angry at me and then not wanting to go to school the next day. the meltdowns were horrendous and i can't pick her up and put her in the car and physically take her to school. lorna isn't the only parent to reach this decision. a growing number of families with children with special needs are deciding to home educate. the fear is they're doing that because they feel let down by the school system. between 2013 and 2017,
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there was a 57% increase in children with special needs being home educated, and that's just children who have a statement or equivalent in england, wales or northern ireland. it's a 64% increase if you just look at england. scotland has a different system, making comparisons difficult. i think before there was people genuinely making a choice because that was the right thing for them and now there are too many families who are saying they don't feel like they have either option so they're having to resort to home education, that can't be right. emily is learning differently with some extra classes. she's happier out of schools but misses her friends. in england, the government says more special education places are being created and its putting money into the system to make it work better. branwen jeffreys, bbc news. more on that throughout the morning
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for you. the families of five people — including three children — who died when a stolen car crashed into a tree in leeds have paid tribute to their relatives. a vigil was held in memory of the victims last night. police are still investigating the cause of the collision. our reporter phil bodmer is in leeds. police are still investigating the cause of the collision. they are still trying to find out what happened, aren't they? what happened here at ten o'clock on saturday night is still unclear at this stage. as daylight dorms this morning, you can feed a growing number of floral tributes to the victims of this awful incident on saturday evening, and indeed people have been coming down, looking at the surrounding area of where this crash happened. about three miles north of the city centre. five people last their lives after the stolen renault clio collided with the trees just beyond us, you can see where the trunk was scarred. the victims have been named named as
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15—year—old elias and elliott, alongside a 15—year—old and 24—year—old. father of two, anthony, was also killed. police are appealing for anybody who was in the area on saturday night or may have information leading up to the circumstances about what happened here to get in touch with them. meanwhile, two 15—year—old boys remain in custody, held on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving. ok, thank you. theresa may says the government will fund the full cost of paying for the fallout of the manchester bombing. it comes after the mayor of greater manchester, andy burnham, said the government's initial offer was five million pounds too low and estimated that £28 million would be needed. we have been talking about millions of pounds which is going to be spent on high—tech industries to boost skills and create jobs. it's part of the government's industrial strategy, which aims to increase economic performance post—brexit. sean is in coventry
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for us this morning. good morning. good morning. it is a pretty good example of what the government would like to see replicated right across the country. the manufacturing technology centre here, they have innovation here that will have come from universities, working with businesses who are on this floor. they will be trying out a lot of this machinery. trying to get that investment into their companies to try and grow their own business and the sectors they are in. there are five key areas in this industrial strategy, the white paper has looked at. first of all his ideas. they want people to have those ideas. the businesses and the universities to talk a bit more and get them out there. ideas is a key starting point. after that, people, investment in skills, training, making sure businesses have the people they need to carry out all
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the ideas that they've got. also the fa ct the ideas that they've got. also the fact that people need to be doing different jobs, fact that people need to be doing differentjobs, if so many of these robotics will be taking over, a lot of the roles people are doing at the moment. after that, of the roles people are doing at the moment. afterthat, ideas... of the roles people are doing at the moment. after that, ideas... you have people, you've got a bit of infrastructure as well. infrastructure is obviously important. people are going to get around the country to these jobs per at the same time, businesses need to be able to communicate with each other. if you are in a rural area you might need a bit of investment in yourfloral you might need a bit of investment in your floral broadband. business environment, access to finance, all that kind of stuff is needed. government policy, as well. once government has had these ideas they need to make sure —— need to know what they'd need to put in place. here in coventry today, west midlands is one area, but northwest, the northeast, scotland, wales, all of these areas outside of london particularly will be very crucial to this industrial strategy. businesses are little concerned may be brexit will prove too much of a distraction. we've heard a lot of this thing before, infrastructure
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commissions on all that kind of thing. will the government actually stick to the plans they have now? thank you very much, see you in about half an hour. scotland yard says 29 people have been charged after an investigation into the misuse of electronic tags. employees are accused of taking money so that tags can be fitted loosely and thus removed easily. we are going to show you a very large gingerbread house. it is life—size, two stories, standing in the lobby of a hotel in san francisco in the united states. it took 375 hours to assemble, nearly eight metres high and 11 metres wide. it was 10,000 pieces of gingerbread, over time of icing. i checked earlier, somebody apparently says you can eat it after a month. gingerbread is fine. one thing you definitely can eat, mince pies!
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talking about mince pies in a moment. it is 8:10am. for many of us, christmas is a time to show our friends and loved ones how much we care, but what about the thousands of people spending the festive period alone? well, simply sharing a mince pie with a neighbour could make all the difference. that's according to thejo cox foundation, which has launched a campaign to get communities talking in order to tackle loneliness. jo's sister, kim leadbeater, is here to tell us more. with some mince pies and baubles. mince pies and baubles, what more could you want? this is the christmas get—together. many viewers will remember the one that happened over the summer. give us an update. you are on talking about planning it. how did it go? it was really well—received across the country. we did the great get—together on the anniversary ofjo's murder. over 9 million people did some sort of get—together, a barbecue, street party, sports day whatever. what it showed if there is an appetite there for events such as that, where
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people can come together over something simple like sharing food or doing some sort of activity. 75% of people who we asked said we should do this more often, so we are. 9 million, an extraordinary amount of people. how did that make you, as a family, feel? it was clearly a difficult weekend for us and it got us through costa resort to throw ourselves into the community and were scooped up by people who looked after us. i think just creating something positive, knowing that's whatjo would have wa nted knowing that's whatjo would have wanted and knowing that, like i said, most people seemed to want it. there is so much negativity at the moment and people feel divided, often people just want an opportunity to get together, that's what the get—together did and hopefully what the christmas one will do. i spoke to you before and you said that is the legacy wanted forjo, shared values, that is at the essence of it. that is why you have now brought around the christmas version, based on mince
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pies but an important message nonetheless. don't panic, if you don't like mince pies you can have christmas cake or whatever you fancy! the thing is, afterjo was murdered, the world felt like a very hostile place in a very divided place. i think forjo's husband, myself and the family we thought we needed to counterbalance it with a different narrative which was about bringing people together. that's what the foundation is all about. i have been involved with them working on loneliness. we have a perception that christmas, the adverts are wrong with families around the table, lots of food and presents, but the reality is for a lot of people it's not like that at all. we need to make sure we reach out to people who want lucky enough to have that situation and encourage people to come together. you mentioned loneliness. we do talk about it quite a lot here on breakfast. it can be devastating on people's lives. absolutely. i felt extremely lonely at times in this past 17 months. when you personally
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experienced that, you come to understand it. if you choose to be on your own, that's very different, but if you are lonely, whether through loss or because you are socially isolated or you're a carer ora socially isolated or you're a carer or a new parent or whatever it is, and are lots of reasons why people feel lonely and we should be embarrassed to talk about it. christmas can feel extremely lonely, because we are meant to be having this fantastic time and it's not a lwa ys this fantastic time and it's not always like that. i thinkjust reaching out to people who might be feeling right that all been reaching out if you are the person feeling lonely. the idea behind the mince pie, what is the hashtag? hashtag mince pie moments. that is a conversation starter, something to share with someone else, offer them a mince pie, have a chat and bring them together in that way? absolutely. it's like thejune get—together, it can be whatever you wa nt get—together, it can be whatever you want it to be. if you wanted to be simple like... i haven't seen so—and—so down the street for a few days, knocking the door and see if they won a mince pie and e. or big scale events like big lunches to
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feed people who are homeless or isolated at christmas, we hope we will get 200 people to come to one of the churches where we lived for a big event. it could be anything big or small. it might be people you haven't seen for ages, people who haven't seen for ages, people who have lost loved ones, it's about reaching out and connecting with someone. and christmas is a particularly difficult time for your familyi particularly difficult time for your family i imagine. will that help things, in some way? absolutely. it's a way of coping. me and my mum and dad sat down and said what will we do christmas day? we said we wa nted we do christmas day? we said we wanted to do something that would make a difference to people. we could sit there and be sad and i'm sure we will have those moments, but to throw yourself into something like this is much more positive.” have met so many times. you have really been very much againstjohn major, thrown into the spotlight, haven't you? it has been a bit nonstop and i get nervous when i come and do things like this but i feel i have to do it. what i think
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is,jo feel i have to do it. what i think is, jo was alive for 40 years and achieved an awful lot, but she would've achieved so much more in the next 40 years of her life. i think if every person who knew and loved jo, who met her always inspired by her do something to create something good, then that is something she would be extremely proud of. thank you. thank you very much and for bringing those in. you can keep those mince pies! they won't last long. once we've shared them out among the crew they will be you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories: authorities in bali have warned that a volcano on the island is in imminent danger of a full—scale eruption. a charity has warned bbc breakfast that an increasing number of parents who have children with special needs believe home education is their only option. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. the weather has not been
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particularly rosy in london this morning. matt is on the roof there. i sporks matt, the bad news if —— i suppose matt, the bad news if people think today is chilly, it will get worse? yes. good morning. it is a week that will be dominated by the word "cold". on regent's street it is nine celsius. that's probably as high as the temperature will get this week. it is a week which will be dominated by colder weather. todayis be dominated by colder weather. today is probably the mildest day of the week if you can call it that, but for many it will be chilly and it will be a story of sunshine and showers. some of you seeing more sunshine than showers. but out there this morning, not only the mildest start, but for some of you the wettest start. the rain spreading towards the english channel and the channel islands. the temperatures 11 or 12 celsius. it is as the rain clears southwards and back into the clearer air, mid—wales, this is
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where the temperatures will be starting to drop. a few showers around. most frequent across parts of north—west england and scotland and northern ireland. some of the showers wintry with hail and thunder as well. across the north—east of scotla nd as well. across the north—east of scotland this is where we have got some very strong scotland this is where we have got some very strong winds, raw feeling day with winds gusting 50mph to 60mph. through the day, the heaviest of the rain becomes confined to the channel islands. then for the rest of you, sunshine here and there. there will be a few showers coming and going. most frequent north—west england and north and west scotland. that's a mixture of sleet and snow and hailand that's a mixture of sleet and snow and hail and thunder possible. parts of south—east scotland and eastern england will stay dry. make the most of it, because the rest of the week more showers to come. temperatures will drop into single figures. evening rush hour, swention will be wet, but elsewhere, the showers that wet, but elsewhere, the showers that we have will fade quickly. showers confined to coastal counties in the
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north and the west overnight. clearer skies elsewhere. winds will keep the temperatures up in towns and cities, one, two, three celsius. some this the countryside will drop below freezing if the breeze falls light enough, but tomorrow morning, a colder start to the day compared with today, but it should be a drier and brighter one. a few showers to begin in northern and western scotla nd begin in northern and western scotland and through the day it is east of scotland and eastern parts of england who will start to see more of the showers and they will turn wintry. temperatures, it is meant to feel closer to freezing with the strength of that wind down eastern coastal counties in particular. some of you will get away tomorrow with staying dry all day long. and the same again on wednesday. parts of southern england, the midlands and north—west england, the midlands and north—west england, best favoured for staying dry. showers across the west. the main showers on wednesday. again,
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eastern scotland, eastern england, and still that strong wind down north sea coasts, and it will make it feel raw and the cold wind and the cold conditions into thursday. by the cold conditions into thursday. by thursday dan and louise, temperatures only three or four celsius. back to you both. officially brrr. it is. bbc breakfast has learnt there's been a significant rise in the demand for places in special schools across england. some parents have even been forced to send their children hundreds of miles across the country in order to access the support they need. the government says it's investing hundreds of millions of pounds to try and ease pressure. as we launch a week—long series looking at life for our most vulnerable children, brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin has this report. we have been given rare access to spend the day with the children at the royal school, manchester. this is a special school for children with some of the highest needs. 200 staff support 48 children here including chloe.
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we've just done map—making. she's sat beautifully the whole lesson, which she would never, ever have done when she first came here. that is fantastic. chloe has been here for 11 weeks, ever since her last school placement broke down. it was so difficult. i was very sad. i isolated myself and i didn't have a life. she would physically try and attack me, not to hurt me, butjust out of distress. the turnaround is above and beyond what i could have imagined. saying "mummy" every day — she only said "mummy" to me twice in six years, and now i get it every day. i've got my little girl back. she's so happy. but all of this costs, and there is a national shortage of places. james survived birth at 25 weeks. many more babies are surviving premature births and conditions which previously would have killed.
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but many will have special needs because of that and many willjoin a waiting list for a space. we've got a seven—year—old child who is starting here next week, and they're coming from hertfordshire. how many miles is that? a long, long way. is that a great sadness for you, that these children can't find the right provision on their doorstep? closer to home, yes. evy had to wait until she was eight. she used to surround herself with cuddly toys. today, evie loves music, and her clothes. and, it seems, cameras. and she loves hugs. she can make these choices now. the question is, where would evie be today if she had had this kind of specialist support right from the start?
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it costs a huge amount of money to have a child here. like, maybe £250,000 a year. if we can commit to investing that money much earlier in places like this, we can see children returning back to mainstream and over the life of that child there will be a return on that investment, which will mean, when they become adults, they get employment, they go on to live independently, and that will cost society much less. early intervention is everything. h for henry. henry is doing so well he may be able to move onwards and upwards to less—specialist provision. fantastic. well done. the reality for most children, though, is that they will have to have struggled in other, less—specialist placements before they can finally get to the place where they make progress. i now feel like she's got a future. she has a chance in life. i'm very excited what the future holds. goodbye. we are going to let you go.
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see you soon. goodbye, see you soon. thanks so much to the children at manchester royal school for allowing us to visit. and disabilities. thank you for everyone who got in touch. victoria says this is a subject she is really passionate about. my son is 19 and studying at derby university. i cannot believe he is doing this as when he was seven he was diagnosed with severe dyslexia. i knew something wasn't right from an early age. pre—school and primary school teachers didn't wa nt to and primary school teachers didn't want to know and would suggest he just played in the sand. victoria, thank you for getting in contact. just played in the sand. victoria, thank you for getting in contact] "we had 140 pupils, received an outstanding judgment from ofsted. three times running it was was and isa three times running it was was and is a successful local authority school. we provided the activities
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and opportunities you showed on the film this morning." good news for people like david who says we have two brand—new purpose—built special educational schools. each having places for 180 students." one thing is clear, there is lots of people struggling and finding it hard, but when you get help, the difference it makes is enormous. tomorrow, our report is about the number of disputes between parents and local authorities over the level of support offered. so we will talk about that tomorrow. diane in oxford, "my son who is now 21 went to mainstream school, co nsta nt 21 went to mainstream school, constant problems and difficulties over the years. it is a fight and battle with the education department. after three tries trying it get statement, the only option was to remove him from the system." thank you. we are talking about dad dancing! thank you... there was a survey
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which says people are just dads. thank you... there was a survey which says people are just dadsm is embarrassment. that's why people never dance or rarely dance even with their children and family members. here are famous dads who have danced. we will talk about that later. three—quarters of men either never dance at all or only do so rarely which is just a great shame. do send in your videos. we have had beauties already this morning! thank you for your questions for david walliams. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. feeling cold. showers on a fairly brisk north—westerly wind. could be fairly heavy, particular for the north—westerly wind. could be fairly heavy, particularfor the north and west, the rdram bowl of thunder not out of the question. something wintry over high ground. here we are this afternoon, a good scattering of showers for wales and harvesting them. temperature is largely in single figures, perhaps just reaching 10 degrees in the
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south—east. northern england, northern ireland, scotland, a mixture of sunny spells and showers. the greater chance of wintry showers over higher ground. for degrees in inverness and despite a wet and windy start in the south this morning, perhaps even the mildest temperatures we will see this week. replacing milder air with cold air for the north as we seem the wind swinging from a north—westerly to a northerly. rain clearing towards a south—east this morning and with the northerly wind direction, temperatures dropping off as we move through the next few days. a cold start to the data mathematically in the north. a touch of frost is possible, some ice. a mixture of sunny spells and showers. showers largely for northern and eastern areas, particularly as we start the day. they will spread further south as we move into the afternoon. a few showers for wales and the south—west, temperatures between 5-9dc. a south—west, temperatures between 5—9dc. a similar story on wednesday. a cold start to the day, a mixture
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of sunny spells and showers, showers largely the eastern coastal counties and a few for wales and the south—west. northern ireland is seeing a mixture of sunny spells and showers. temperatures feeling fairly cool showers. temperatures feeling fairly cool. highs of eight celsius. asimilar cool. highs of eight celsius. a similar story as we move into the state. a mixture of sunny spells and showers. this is business live from bbc news with jamie robertson and sally bundock. boosting britain after brexit: the uk government sets out its plans for an industrial strategy to transform the economy. live from london, that's our top story on monday the 27th of november. a billion dollar deal for pharmaceuticals reasearch kicks of the new focus on development and technology. but can the government really prescribe the right medicine
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for britian's economy? also in the programme.... tourism in trouble. one of asia's most popular destinations is closed as the indonesian authorities prepare for a major volcanic eruption in bali.
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