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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 28, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. the royal wedding — we should find out more details later today. prince harry and meghan markle are expected to get married in a church. we should find out the venue and date later. and we'll be live outside buckingham palace getting all the latest and we'll also be finding out how the united states is reacting. good morning. it's tuesday, november 28. also this morning: a hugejump in the number of parents fighting to get educational support for their children. there's been a 28% increase in the last year alone. it has taken every fibre in my body
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to fight, and i will never, ever give upfor to fight, and i will never, ever give up for what my daughter needs and is legally entitled to. your christmas dinner is going to cost more this year. the highest prices for turkey and all the trimmings in eight years, according to one piece of research. i'm taking a look at festive food prices. in sport, who will be the bbc sports personality of the year? last christmas, andy murray won it for a record third time. i'll have the list of this year's12 candidates just after 6:30am. excellent, thank you. and matt is out and about with the weather. good morning. good morning. i good morning. iam good morning. i am at good morning. i am at the good morning. i am at the yorkshire good morning. i am at the yorkshire museum. let's see if we can brighten up museum. let's see if we can brighten up your tuesday morning. a lot more sunshine around, wintry showers and to start the morning it is cold with frost and ice. i've got all the details coming up in 15 minutes. hopefully we can see matt later. good morning. first, our main story. more details of prince harry and meghan markle's forthcoming wedding are expected to be announced later today. the archbishop of canterbury has indicated the couple
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will have a church wedding, saying the pair had "chosen to make their vows to god" in a religious ceremony. the couple went public with their engagement yesterday. i fell ifell in i fell in love with meghan so incredibly quickly was confirmation to me that all the stars were aligned, everything was perfect. this beautiful woman tripped and fell into my life, ifell this beautiful woman tripped and fell into my life, i fell into this beautiful woman tripped and fell into my life, ifell into her life. and the fact that she will be unbelievably good at the job part of it as well is obviously a huge relief to me because she will be able to deal with everything else that comes with it. let's talk about the wedding itself. our correspondent ian palmer is outside buckingham palace. it is on the front of all of the papers in the uk and i expect across the world in many places. we need more details about the wedding. will we get some today? it won't be hard.
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we know very little about the plans so we know very little about the plans so far. we know that it will be spring next year and little else. we are expecting some details later this afternoon. what could we find out? a date would be nice of course. the wedding couple would have to ta ke the wedding couple would have to take into the fact that the duchess and duke of cambridge are expecting their third child. will it be before their third child. will it be before the third child is born, or after? certainly from kate and william's point of view it would be easier to look after two small children rather than three. if they delay it until may then the weather will be kind and the day even longer. the venue, where will it be? will it be a small affair, like in the guard's chapel? or will it be a grand affair in westminster abbey, or indeed st
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paul's cathedral? these are two people in their 30s, and of course they have a shared interest in humanitarian charitable work. they have collected a lot of people over the years. there will be many people they would like to invite.” the years. there will be many people they would like to invite. i am sure there will be. people are asking for invitations. thank you. so many things we don't know. we will talk about it later. we will show you the papers later. it isjust pictures basically of the royal couple. yes, absolutely. new measures are to be introduced to reduce the number of deaths and serious injuries during childbirth in england. for the first time, parents of stillborn babies are to be routinely offered an independent investigation into what went wrong. the uk has already reduced the mortality rate for babies, but still lags behind many other european countries. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. losing twins during pregnancy and
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then having baby hugo very prematurely means rachel understands all too well the challenges childbirth can present. her experience has taught her that pa rents experience has taught her that parents and medical staff need to be more aware of when things could go wrong. i think it is education of pregnant women to never be afraid to ask questions and raise concerns. and it is the medical establishment and encouraging them to do so. now the health secretary in england is announcing rather than hospitals carrying out their own investigations when things go wrong and independent review will be carried out instead. when i talk to pa rents carried out instead. when i talk to parents whose heart has been broken by something that has gone wrong in those very small numbers of cases, what they say is it is not about the money, they just want to what they say is it is not about the money, theyjust want to know what they say is it is not about the money, they just want to know that the nhs has learned from what went wrong so the nhs has learned from what went wrong so that same mistake is not ever going to happen again. the uk
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lags behind many other european countries when it comes to preventing baby deaths and premature births. there are around nine stillborn babies every day. roughly 50 women still die in england each year from issues related to pregnancy. at around 50,000 babies are born prematurely. progress is being made, but there are concerns that difficult lessons are not being learnt. the only airport on the indonesian island of bali has been closed for a second day amid concerns of a volcanic eruption. massive plumes of smoke and ash have been spewing out of mount agung over the past few days. earlier the bbc‘s rebecca henschke sent this report from near the volcano. mount agung is sending out thick clouds of ash, smoke, and gas, behind me, with increasing intensity. the airport here in bali has been closed for a second day because of this threat of an imminent eruption from the volcano.
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last night, you could see a red glow in the crater, which we're told means that the lava and the molten rock has now reached the summit. people have been told to get out of an area, i2—kilometre radius around the volcano, but people are still staying in their homes there. officials today are going to move in and forcibly take people out of this danger zone. at the moment, there are still farmers down below in their rice paddies, and the balinese are still going about their life. they revere this mountain as a sacred site, but now they're watching it very carefully, and are on high alert for an imminent eruption. and a little later we will speak to an expert in volcanoes to find out. they cannot say for definite what is
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going to happen. the different from when at last erupted in the 1960s is there is a huge evacuation area. still no idea as to when it might go boom. when it comes to aspiration and opportunity, england is becoming increasingly divided, according to a new report. the social mobility commission says london and the south—east are still the best place for disadvantaged children to progress, while those in the midlands and coastal areas have the least opportunities. the government has handed over its analysis of the impact of brexit on parts of the economy, but the reports are not complete. the brexit secretary david davis says the documents have been redacted to leave out commercially sensitive market information. but labour are inisiting they should be given all the detail. 11 british overseas territories are to receive £70 million of funding to help them rebuild after the recent hurricanes in the carribean. the money is to be provided by the british government to help rebuild schools, hospitals and ports. the leaders of the territories are to meet theresa may today to update her on the progress made so far. it was one of the uk's greatest
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conservation success stories. over 30 years, red kites went from the brink of extinction to being a common sight in many parts of the uk. but their recovery could be derailed because of poisoning by humans, according to research published in the european journal of wildlife research. postmortem tests revealed thousands of the birds of prey died after consuming substances, including lead shots and pesticides. the rspb has described the findings as a worrying development. those are some of the main news stories today. if we look at the front pages, only one story in town. on the back pages, one of the topics is that thing. yes. i have to say oui’ is that thing. yes. i have to say our top story was affected by the top story on the front of all the newspapers this morning. harry and
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meghan. last night on the one show, there was a big extravaganza, a big plan they devoted time on, then a p pa re ntly plan they devoted time on, then apparently there was a royal engagement. quite a big interview. we had gaby logan racing through the nominees last night. a little bit more detail on that this morning. 0k, more detail on that this morning. ok, good. more detail on that this morning. 0k, good. some clever people joining us 0k, good. some clever people joining us in the studio in a virtual reality way. don't get too excited. laughter. a little bit like star wars. yes, anyway. so who will be this year's bbc sports personality of the year? andy murray lifted the trophy last christmas, winning it for a record third time. the live ceremony is on december the 17th in liverpool. i'll have the list of this year's12 candidates in around 20 minutes. england all—rounder ben stokes is apparently on his way down under, but not tojoin up with the ashes squad. he was spotted at heathrown airport but the ecb said he was flying to new zealand to visit his family.
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jonny bairstow won't face disciplinary action after he "bumped heads" with australia's cameron bancroft a month ago. england's director of cricket andrew strauss said it was something bairstow did with his rugby mates, but the players have effectively been grounded. the second test begins in adelaide on saturday. the former england manager sam allardyce is the leading contenderfor the evertonjob. he had been an early candidate to succeed ronald koeman, but publicly withdrew after everton were slow to make an offer. that might now change. karen carney has withdrawn from the england squad for today's world cup qualifier against kazakhstan in colchester after injuring an ankle. england have won their first two qualifiers. lots more detail on the nominees coming up in 20 minutes' time. thank you. and details weather with matt. i think it is going to get really cold, isn't it? good morning. it is
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certainly cold this morning here. good morning. we have not mentioned the c—word just yet. it is christmas at the york gardens. there are illuminated installations playing along with music surrounding the location in the grounds of a 13th century abbey. and these colourful balls will twinkle away through the forecast. let's brighten up the forecast. let's brighten up the forecast with your weather conditions today. if we look at the forecast, it will be bright for many, and quite cold, increasingly chilly wind across the country and showers around turning increasingly wintry later on. to start this morning in scotland, northern ireland, wales, the midlands, there will be ice around after overnight showers. a little frost elsewhere. showers at the moment mainly contained in the far north and west of the country. most start the day dry with sunshine, and plenty to come through this morning. through
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the day the wind will strengthen across eastern scotland and england, showers become frequent across eastern counties through the afternoon, some of those will be sleet and snow, mainly over the hills to begin with, most places will have some rain and the odd rumble of thunder closer to the coast. further inland, it will be dry. much of the midlands and southern england will stay dry through the day. parts of east midlands will have showers later. showers on and off in south—east england, not as lengthy as yesterday —— south—west england. the same in wales with gaps between them and sunshine. if anything, the showers will be fewer into the afternoon. showers come and go through the day in northern ireland. sunshine in between. and uk wide today, temperatures down on yesterday, at best around 4—7, maybe eight or nine in the far south. in the evening, showers inland will fade away. they continue across northern and eastern
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coasts and one or two across western wales and south—west england. that will give the risk of ice through the night. it is frosty elsewhere and raw wind blowing into the start of wednesday morning across eastern scotla nd of wednesday morning across eastern scotland and eastern england. eastern scotland and england will see showers through the day. some turning increasingly into sleet and snow even not just turning increasingly into sleet and snow even notjust on the hills into the afternoon. further west, west of wales and south—west england most likely to see showers. many other parts will be dry as you can see. and again temperatures drop and the wind starting to have even more of an impact. it will be an east— west split on thursday. eastern counties of england to the south—east and east anglia by this stage might have the odd flurry of snow mixed in with rain. but it will be bitterly cold along the eastern areas. the wind will make it feel more like sub zero. so, yes, it will be a cold
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rump of weather but for some of you a good deal of sunshine over the next couple of days. showers on the western fringes, the east of scotla nd western fringes, the east of scotland and parts of eastern england too. i think everybody is lucky to watch at this time of the morning because the lights look spectacular. it will becoming lighter later, but they look perfect, don't they? thank you. i am slightly mesmerised by those gorgeous globes. shall we look at the pages. we mentioned they are slightly dominated. i think they are having a page off. 25 pages of unrivalled coverage over harry and meghan. the daily mail has a souvenir pullout. yes, in the middle, and massive amount. we are fully covered
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with harry and megan. the daily telegraph, a mere 16 pages of coverage, again with a souvenir supplement. so many details in that interview they gave to the bbc last night. a rather wonderful interview. it was the details about the corgis liking the first time they met her, a p pa re ntly liking the first time they met her, apparently they have been barking at prince harry for 33 years. from his point of view it was love at first sight. he proposed after they had had a roast chicken at home. that's nice. that is a great way to propose. nobody says no after a roast chicken. you are not necessarily going to guess that that will be the moment, either. the one picture... i've got it. the close-up of the ring. nobody really got a proper close—up. of the ring. nobody really got a proper close-up. no, it is not very good. if you watch royal weddings, over the years, the close—up of the ring has always been a big part of the story, i suppose. there you go. that is her ring. a diamond that he wrought back from botswana. and some
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of diana, princess of wales' jewellery, included in that.” of diana, princess of wales' jewellery, included in that. i am looking for the pullout poster. there it is. if you are really into it all, you can put that on your office wall or your bedroom wall. on the refrigerator, maybe. you must have a double door refrigerator. remember, we were talking to the relatives of the so—called chennai six, the sixth edition and who were jailed in india, and they were very optimistic when they were speaking to us on the sofa yesterday. —— six british men who were jailed in india. at we have good news, they will be back in time to christmas. brilliant stuff. i can see that steph has a turkey. yes, a paper one, not a real one. that would be awkward. just carrying around
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chickens and turkeys, in case anybody wants to propose. we are talking about the christmas dinner. it isa talking about the christmas dinner. it is a bit of bad news. because we import so much food, and the fall in the value of the pound, it means our christmas dinner will be more expensive this year. just to give you an idea of the key components, a turkey will cost £1 more than last year, potatoes have gone up by about £1 as well. brussels sprouts, who on earth like them? well, they have gone upi earth like them? well, they have gone up i 30p. you have to have some, just because. i say keep it clea n. some, just because. i say keep it clean. go turkey, pigs in blankets, staffing. done. no sprouts? am i the only person here who will be buying sprouts? they are forced on me, to be honest. there is nothing you can do with a sprout that makes it nice. adding bacon, honey, all those things... i had cheesy sprouts are a few years ago. dear me. what kind of
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cheese? it took me until the few years ago. dear me. what kind of cheese? it took me untilthe new year to get rid of that. my word. my word! cheesy sprouts! i have never been a fan of the sprout, and that cemented my troubles. don't worry, nobody is listening. i'm sure nobody will pick up on that. i forgot i was on television for a moment. will pick up on that. i forgot i was on television for a momentlj will pick up on that. i forgot i was on television for a moment. i know you did. i will rescue with this. talk about naivete. the cricketers are being called naive now. andrew strauss, all of them, they have been told off for being naughty, they will have to stay in at night and not go out. i would think if you are on an ashes tour, i know you are away for a long time and you want to have fun and experience to place you are in, but actually, shouldn't you bea are in, but actually, shouldn't you be a little bit careful about going out to be bars that we talked about yesterday, and being seen? stay in with a box set. yes! you are away for a long time. you need a bit of fun. i know, i am joking.
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for a long time. you need a bit of fun. i know, i amjoking. but the warning is the them to be more careful. i love that both of you are wearing hearts on your shirts. yes, wearing hearts on your shirts. yes, we have cove red wearing hearts on your shirts. yes, we have covered ourselves. it is almost as though we had a stylus. they said we were loses. now, that was something i said injest. and you have shared it with the nation. that is up there with sproutgate, that. research by bbc breakfast has discovered than an increasing number of parents of children with special needs are taking their local councils to tribunal, in order to get the right support for their child. the number of cases in england increased by nearly a third last year with parents winning 80% of cases. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has more. cruel, traumatic, heart—wrenching. diane describes the process she has just gone through. two years fighting to tribunal is to get the right support for her disabled daughter. aaron was left with
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serious disabilities after being born prematurely. —— erin. a statement, a legal document, outlined exactly what support erin received. new legislation in 2014 meant erin's statement had to be scrapped and turned into a new education, health and care plan. that is when their fight began. they have stripped out everything. all of erin was make provision? switch therapy, one, occupational therapy... all gone? all gone. they appealed the plan in october 2015. in may 2016 they lost at the tribunal, appealed again and injuly this year won a new plan. you basically got everything back to her? yes, and more. how can you summarise the process you have been through? i can't, i can't. it doesn't make sense, what we have been through, as a family, to get erin needs and is entitled to. it does not make sense. erin's council,
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redbridge, told us they made 1500 decisions last year. only 20 ended in tribunal. the reforms were designed to offer that is support for children but we found almost 3400 for children but we found almost 340 0 pa re nts for children but we found almost 3400 parents had to fight for that support last year. what it tells me is that there is a system which is under massive strain. council simply do not have the money to give pa rents do not have the money to give parents what they think their children deserve. this isn't what pa rents children deserve. this isn't what parents think their children deserve. this is what the law says children are entitled to. that is very different. councils are doing their best to do that, in impossible financial circumstances. the law also says that councils cannot overspend their budget each year. the department for education told us they have given councils in extra $223 million —— £223 million in extra funding to help them introduce these reforms successfully. many pa rents tell these reforms successfully. many parents tell us that they too have had to pay. the cost of independent
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financial reports, lawyers and experts, emotional costs which cannot be quantified. of course, there are many parents who cannot afford to pay anything. there are of course those situations where local authorities will come along to the hearing armed with a range of professional supporting their case, and that inevitably creates an inequality of arms. this can be a brutal experience. many parents, like deanne, will go through it more than once. it has taken every fibre in my body to fight. and i will never, ever give up, for what my daughter needs and is legally entitled to. and we were hearing about this yesterday, jane. so many people getting in touch with so many different concerns. let's talk specifically about this. it is a stark increase in the number of people taking them to tribunal? let's go through the numbers we discovered with this data mac. 28% increase, in england, in families taking their fight for provision to tribunal. how many of those cases
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are actually won by local authorities? let's look at this number. only one in five. that number. only one in five. that number tells us a story. behind that number tells us a story. behind that number is another number which tells another story, because not all councils will take it, will fight to the bitter end. councils will take it, will fight to the bitterend. in councils will take it, will fight to the bitter end. in many cases, councils are conceding, and they are saying, 0k, we will not follow through with this. but the parents or withdraw this turmoil. here is another number for you. the amount of money being spent by local authorities fighting these cases, at the very, very, very least it is £6 million in the last five years, at the very least, because not all local authorities provided us with data mac. — — local authorities provided us with data mac. —— data. we did go to northern ireland, scotland and wales to ask them for their data in all of these areas. northern ireland didn't give us anything. scotland and wales said. interestingly they didn't show the same levels of conflict of these cases going to tribunal. before anybody shouts at the television and says, why on earth are you not
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talking to us about that, we will be, later in the week. we will be doing a piece from scotland later in the week, looking at why they do things differently. in england we have seen this sharp increase. the department of education said they survey the 13,000 people involved in this reform. three quarters of those people said they thought the new plans were getting the health of their children. and i suppose, listening to you there, that is one of the reasons we decided to do this report through the week. as louise was saying, so many families feel let down but are also articulating that yesterday, today... honestly, honestly, my phone has not stopped ringing. although yesterday, it didn't stop, with stories coming through from people. it affects so many people, which is why we are shining a light on this area. tomorrow, big news if yourfamily is affected by autism. we have been waiting a very long time, throughout the all—party parliamentary report, to learn more about autism services. we will have that exclusively from the breakfast sofa tomorrow.|j
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we will have that exclusively from the breakfast sofa tomorrow. i did an interview with david and cary grant about their children. it really gave me a very stark idea of what life is really like, living with and caring for children with autism. yeah, it will be fascinating. do keepjoining the conversation. we really appreciated. and we will be reading out as many of those comments as we can through the programme. and you'll be back later? yes, but if you are watching, government, we still want an interview with a government minister. yes, we have been asking for several weeks. the invitation is still open. yes. whenever you like. if you'd like to get in touch with us about your stories, email bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk, or tweet us using the hastag #bbcsend. you can email us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk, or share your thoughts with other viewers on our facebook page. and you can tweet about today's stories using the hashtag #bbcbrea kfast, or follow us for the latest from the programme. the shortlist for the 2017 bbc sports personality of the year has good morning from bbc
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london news. there are calls today to introduce regulations for au pairs, so they're better protected from exploitation and abuse most of the uk's au pairs are thought to work in the capital. but they're not classed as employees. instead they receive "pocket money" in return for light housework and childcare. one leading academic says she's come across many cases where they're being mistreated and exploited the government needs to be quite firm about what hand au pair years, so firm about what hand au pair years, so somebody can say, 70 hours a week isn't au pairing, i should so somebody can say, 70 hours a week isn't au pairing, ishould be so somebody can say, 70 hours a week isn't au pairing, i should be paid minimum wage, employed as a nanny or a housekeeper, and that is a job and i have rights as a worker if i am doing that. they also need to think about knowing where au pairs r. nobody knows where they are at the
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moment, they are not registered in any way. the family of a psychiatric patient who died in a fire at a berkshire hospital say they are struggling to cope because investigations into her death are taking so long. sarah williams was found dead in her room at prospect park hospital in reading in december 2015. her sister tracey says it took the authorities well over a year and a half to handover their reports, and herfamily are still waiting for a date for a full inquest to take place. the mayor of london will today set out new plans to increase the number of people who cycle in the capital. the plan will double cycle parking in new developments, and will require new housing and offices to be built near public transport links to encourage people to go car—free. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tube — apart from the overground, no service between gospel oak to barking because of ongoing work. on the roads, slow on the m25 after a collision, anticlockwise atjunction 15 to the m4. let's ta ke
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let's take a look at the weather with kate kinsella. a cold start this morning. not to spots with a sparkle of frost but most spots with a sparkle of frost but m ost pla ces spots with a sparkle of frost but most places without. 12 showers this morning, clearing away to sunshine. it will still feel quite cold. showers clearing away quickly, blowing through on the chilly north—westerly wind. then sunshine, and later on this afternoon we will see more cloud working its way in. the temperature between six and eight celsius. factor in that north—westerly wind. it will feel a couple of degrees colder than that. showers at first overnight. fairly cloudy again. further west and north you could get one or two clearest bells. you make a little bit of frost, it will get chillier, but further east under the cloud, 3—5 the minimum. a similar day tomorrow. still very cold. the north—westerly wind, would showers blowing through from the north. maximum reaching seven. again, that north—westerly wind will make things feel a bit colder. this cooling trend
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continues. a cold day still as we head through wednesday. —— thursday. the wind and northerly will make things feel chilly. showers working in from the east. it is likely they could turn wintry in nature through the cause of friday. —— course. a couple of cold days that north—westerly wind making those temperatures feel a little bit colder. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: as tens of thousands of people are forced to leave their homes and hotels close to the balinese volcano, we'll speak to a volcanologist about the impending eruption. it's the engagement talked about around the world, we'll compare the reaction to prince harry and meghan markle's upcoming marriage on both sides of the atlantic. # she's walking on by...
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and we hearfrom noel gallagher about that song, "don't look back in anger", becoming an anthem of solidarity after the manchester bombing. good morning. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. more details of prince harry and meghan markle's wedding are expected to be announced today. the archbishop of canterbury has indicated the couple will have a church wedding, saying the pair had "chosen to make their vows to god" in a religious ceremony. the couple went public with their engagement yesterday. i don't think that i would call it a whirlwind in terms of our relationship, obviously there have been layers attached to how public it has become, after we had a good five, six months or most ofjust privacy, which was amazing. but no,
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i think we were able to really have so i think we were able to really have so much time just to connect, and we never went longer than two weeks without seeing each other, even though we were obviously doing a long—distance relationship, so we made it work. new measures are to be introduced to reduce the number of deaths and serious injuries during childbirth in england. for the first time, parents of stillborn babies are to be routinely offered an independent investigation into what went wrong. the uk has already reduced the mortality rate for babies but still lags behind many other european countries. when it comes to aspiration and opportunity england is becoming increasingly divided according to a new report. the social mobility commission says london and the south—east are still the best place for disadvantaged children to progress, while those in the midlands and coastal areas have the least opportunities. the government has handed over its analysis of some of the economic impacts of brexit, but the reports are missing some details. the brexit secretary david davis says the documents have been redacted to leave out commercially
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sensitive market information. but labour are insisting the public should be given all the detail. it's been one of the uk's greatest conservation success stories. over the last 30 years, red kites went from the brink of extinction to being a common sight in many parts of the uk. but their recovery could be derailed because of poisoning by humans, according to research published in the european journal of wildlife research. postmortem tests on thousands of the birds of prey revelaed that many died after consuming substances, including lead shot and pesticides. 11 british overseas territories are to receive £70 million of funding to help them rebuild after the recent hurricanes in the carribean. the money is to be provided by the british government to help rebuild schools, hospitals and ports. the leaders of the territories are to meet theresa may today to update her on the progress made so far. so, you are up—to—date with the
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latest news. sally is here. i think she has brought some virtual friends. look at what is going on behind us all. cubes of doom. no, they are more like columns. an old microphone. yes. it would take a while. yes. it is that time of year, the nominees for the bbc‘s sports personality of the year in liverpool. now we are used to andy murray winning it. they are world beaters and record breakers who have reached the top of their game and won some of the biggest sporting accolades going. between now and the 19th of december, 12 british sport legends are concentrated onjust one thing, winning the public vote for the bbc sports personality of the year 2017. the list was out last night, let's look at the runners and riders. are you ready? i am excited about this. oh, look, there is mo.
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what a year it has been for mo farah. he retired from the track in style, didn't he? he won gold and silver in the 10,000 and 5,000 metres at the world championships in london plus he became sir mo. he is also very tall. yes, huge, in fa ct. northern ireland'sjonathan rea made motorbike history in september when he became the first rider ever to win three successive world superbike titles. jonathan's dad — johnny rea — was a succesful road racer too. he gotjonathan involved racing when he was just five! he has done well for himself. he has done all right, hasn't it? someone who is properly big. he stands tall at 6 foot 6, plays chess in his spare time and can also run the 100 metres in under 11 seconds. however, it was anthonyjoshua's world heavyweight title win against wladimir klitschko that really made the former bricklayer's name this year. lewis hamilton, we have had him here, became the most successful british f1 driver ever last month with four world titles to his name now. what you might not know, though, is that lewis became vegan this year
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—he — he would love a cheesy sprout! oh, no, he wouldn't, because it has cheese. and he likes to write a u nicycle cheese. and he likes to write a unicycle — fun fact. now, i bet this man can write a unicycle. chris froome won his fourth tour de france title this year and the climbing specialist followed it up with a win at the vuelta a espana in september. froomey is the first british cyclist ever to win in madrid. adam peaty‘s nan will be sat at home cheering because the 22—year—old swimmer also makes the shortlist. is she on the list? she should be! i bet she will be voting. he won breaststroke gold over both the 50 and 100—metre distances in the world championships, smashing his own world record in the process, plus his nan mavis made it to hungary to cheer him on. well done. no andy murray on this year's list but british tennis is still represented in johanna konta. the world number nine had an amazing wimbledon, didn't she? she made it to the semi finals remember where she lost to venus williams. i wonder if she will be baking some of herfamous muffins to bring to the ceremony?
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of course. what, to try to wow? exactly! oh, and now, we have seen a lot ofjohnny, haven't we, in strictly ballroom? lot ofjohnny, haven't we, in strictly ballroom ? he lot ofjohnny, haven't we, in strictly ballroom? he is in the hunt, he is on the list. before the ballroom this year, peacock returned to the stadium where he enjoyed his famous 2012 triumphs to win another 100—metre gold. what an amazing year it has been for our female cricketers! they might have missed out on the ashes but injuly they won the world cup on home turf. vice—captain anya shrubsole took the crucial, final wicket in that fightback against india winning her a place on this shortlist. it has also been an amazing 12 months for this man, come on, move faster than that, harry kane. the tottenham striker signed a new deal with the club, became a dad for the first time, scored hat trick after hat trick, including in the champions league and won another premier league golden boot. could he follow it up with a win at sports personality of the year? chance.
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taekwondo heavyweight bianca walkden made up for disappointment in rio in the best possible way this year by successfuly defending her world championship title. bianca, who is known in team gb as queen b, good reason, she was actually born in liverpool where this year's award will be revealed. last, but certainly not least, we turn to the ice and short track speed skating. scotland's elise christie is currently gearing up for the winter olympics where she will be one of our big hopes after this year becoming the first european woman to win the 1,000 metre, 1,500 metre and overall titles at the world championships. the winner will be revealed at the bbc sports personality of the year 2017 award ceremony in liverpool on the 19th december. and you are going to be there as usual. go on. is it the end of the show? that is the short list, is it? that is the shortlist, yes. hang on, i have some sports news to carry on with. ok. will you be there on monday morning? i am there on sunday night and he on monday morning. i will come straight here in my sparkly dress, shall i do that? yes.
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the ecb say ben stokes is visiting family in new zealand and not heading to australia, after he was apparently spotted flying out of heathrow airport. stokes has been suspended since he was was arrested in september on suspicion of actual bodily harm after an incident outside a nightclub but the investigation is still on—going. nothing's changed — we are expecting a decision at some stage. it is not ourjob to pressure the police. it is theirjob to get that right and, you know, when there is a charging decision, obviously we can move forward , decision, obviously we can move forward, but until we hear anything from them, we are stuck in this limbo period. the players need to sharpen up their act. after details ofjonny bairstow‘s headbutt on cameron bancroft emerged, strauss says bairstow won't be disciplined and the "head bumping" is something he does all the time with his rugby mates — but the squad has effectively been grounded. and that is sam allardyce. i have just spotted that. we got so clever
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with all those people, we got the simple stuff wrong. the former england manager sam allardyce is back in the frame for the evertonjob, and he's now the leading contender. he had been an early candidate to succeed ronald koeman, but publicly withdrew after everton were slow to make an offer. his name is back in the frame. karen carney has withdrawn from the england squad for today's world cup qualifier against kazakhstan in colchester after injuring an ankle. the chelsea winger, who has been capped 134 times, joins demi stokes on the sidelines. england have won their first two qualifiers. and you can watch that game live on bbc two, kickoff at 7:05am. wales also play tonight, away to bosnia—herzegovina. and that really is all of the sports news. well, i thought that was amazing. thank you very much indeed. a very long shortlist. sorry. that is all right. it is important to remind everybody. yes. let's talk about the volcano in bali. there are increasing concerns this morning that a volcano on the indonesian island of bali may
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erupt, with authorities there evacuating the homes of 100,000 people in the area. mount agung has been sending dark clouds of ash into the air since last week, leading to the closure of the island's airport and stranding tens of thousands of travellers. when the volcano last erupted in 1963, people had just minutes to flee. lava flowed more than seven kilometres from the summit, killing more than 1500 people. the impact was global, with sulphur emissions from the eruption leading to a drop in worldwide temperatures of between 0.1 and 0.4 degrees celcius. so is it likely to happen again? we're joined by professor mike burton, a volcanologist at the university of manchester. volcanologist. oh, ithought volcanologist. oh, i thought it volcanologist. oh, ithought it was, then i thought... anyway. thank you for joining then i thought... anyway. thank you forjoining us. pleasure. tell us what you think is going on at the moment. well, as you mentioned, the 1963 eruption is a fair model of
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what we are using to see what could be expected from the volcano in the next few weeks and months. and in that case, it seemed that there was a sharper onset than in this case. this one seems to be a bit slower. the first activity that we saw was an increase in volcanic tremor two months ago and there was media interest in this volcano two months ago and then it went quiet. it is only in the last week as you said that the ashes were emitted. in the previous eruption in 1963 the onset was sharper which would suggest that the energy within the volcano at the moment may be somewhat less than that eruption. i am assuming that all volcanoes are individual and social what you're watching at the moment, i know that you are judging from what happened in the 1960s, you can't tell if it will erupt in a day, month, maybe even longer than that. a nice way to look at this is to say that corruption is don't repeat themselves, but they do rhyme, so the typical activity,
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style of activity will be similar, but the man in which it comes out with timing could be different. and this volcano, agung, is extremely well studied. we have volcanologists who have studied it to see the last 5000 years of activity and that has shown that the typical level of the maximum eruptions are able to interact people around ten kilometres to 12 kilometres around the volcano, which is why the indonesian authorities have evacuated that distance. so the impact is from lava flows, what is it from? it is multiple hazards. one of them is the lava flow — and in fa ct of them is the lava flow — and in fact the next thing we might expect to happen is lava to come out. and because it is steep, 3000 metres height, ten kilometres from the coast, so there is a very sharp gradient, which means when the lava comes down it could fall down and that creates a hot avalanche, which causes a flow which can be very
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dangerous and go far out. it is not really the lava flow, it is the breaking lava flow which causes damage, together with mudflow that we have seen already from the ash deposited on the slopes of the volcano and heavy rain we get every day in the tropics that mobilises the akhshtyr create mudflow. we have heard a couple of moments ago about the temperature change, what would happen locally to the environment and the global environment, the difference it might make? there is not going to be global impact unless it is bigger than at the moment. the ash plumes at the moment are three kilometres all four kilometres high at the most and that is quite less than what we saw in 1963. everything is indicating this is lower in intensity than before. it won't be until a major explosion, which occurred a month after the lava flow began last time, so some time from now, if it were to occur, that we would be able to see anything which
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could have a climatic impact. it has to get above ten kilometres before it can impact the climate. you may not be the person to ask. we have seen not be the person to ask. we have seen flights disrupted. it is likely to continue if the atkinjim is. seen flights disrupted. it is likely to continue if the atkinjim ism depends on the direction of the wind entirely. it is going to the south—west. if it moves away, it will open up again. it is fascinating to talk to you and i am sure we will talk to you again because it is a long—term thing. matthew is in york, with all sorts of colourful shiny stuff 19. that morning. —— behind him. good morning! we are in the york museum gardens this morning. ten acres of stunning botanical gardens during the daylight. at night, they have been trials formed into a cacophony of usable sound and colour. numerous light installations
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here, all the way through to new year's day. a hind me are the musical christmas trees. —— behind me. it is 6:45 a.m., so they have been muted. are the ones that sound first thing in the morning, especially when ijoin in. —— nobody wa nts especially when ijoin in. —— nobody wants that sound. these will all be under blue skies once the lights turn off this morning and through the day. it will be a sunny day here in yorkshire. looking at the forecast for the rest of the uk, we have got a cold winds coming across the country which will bring increasing amounts of showers to eastern areas today, compare to what we saw yesterday. still a few showers in the north and west. a bit of ice in the scotland this morning, and we have showers of the northern england and wales. a bit of sleet and snow in the higher ground in the north to go with that. it is a bit ofa north to go with that. it is a bit of a frosty start to the tuesday morning, and many will stay sunny throughout. southern scotland will farewell for sunshine, but northern
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ireland eastern areas, plenty of showers into the afternoon. wintry not just the showers into the afternoon. wintry notjust the hills but in lower levels later on, and a brisk and raw winds down the eastern coast. in the eastern counties of england, particular in the north—east, that is also true. even in york we could see a few showers later on after a sunny morning. north—western england not daring to badly. the west midlands doing all right, but parts of the east midlands could catch a shower later in the day. much of southern england will stay dry. dealing cold in the sunshine. not as warm as it was yesterday. temperatures have dropped across the uk, only eight or nine degrees at the best, instead of double figures. most around 7— four celsius. still a few showers in northern ireland and western england, but not as many as western england, but not as many as we saw yesterday. the chance of some sunshine. tonight showers and land will fade away. some will continue around the coast across eastern and northern parts of the uk and maybe to western parts of wales. most will
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have a clear night. where you see showers... (inaudible). throughout the day, we will see a cold wind blowing today into tonight and into tomorrow. it will strengthen across eastern parts as well. a touch of gale force along the north sea coast. on wednesday many counties of the thinning and will be prone to showers, turning wintry across the north—east. still some showers across the north—east of scotland and some running down the far west of wales and to cornwall. mostly a dry day, but a chilly one. the wind chill will become more noticeable, as it will do into thursday. thursday is much like wednesday, with eastern parts most prone to showers. even a few wintry showers, with a bit of sleet mixed into parts of east anglia and the south—east by thursday. silvers showers in the far west. most will have a dry day, but it will feel cold. temperatures feeling more like —1 or —3 across scotla nd feeling more like —1 or —3 across scotland and eastern england, especially in those strong to gale force winds. so we are into a cold
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spell, may be warming up a bit into the weekend. at overall, temperatures in the coming days remain lower than they should be for this time of year. at it all adds to that lovely crisp feeling as we head towards the beginning of winter.|j just noticed your gloves. i think they are brilliant. lovely and warm. apologies for the interference on the line. we will be back later. we are talking about turkey and trimmings, which are getting more expensive. far more expensive than they have in later? i'm not surprised that you don't ca re i'm not surprised that you don't care about the sprouts, admitting that you hated is browse. i think you have made us all feel a little bit sick this morning. we will move on. yes, we are talking about the price of your christmas dinner. this is research from good housekeeping magazine, and they've been looking at costs across all the major supermarkets for 11 essentials, from mince pies to veg. this year christmas dinner will set you backjust under £3 per person. that's up about 50p on last year,
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when the same lunch would cost you just under £2.50 per person. the key ingredients on the rise are turkey, potatoes and parsnips. but there is some good news — your christmas pudding should, on average, be a little cheaper. with us is retail analyst phil durrell. and good morning. lovely to see you. can you explain why food prices are going up generally? well, food prices are generally going up simply because of what is happening with inflation. we have lots of pressure on inflation, three major ones. one of them is the uk sterling, the value against the euro and against the us dollar is reducing. labour costs are escalating. and there is additional costs for retailers, servicing their retail estate. this
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adds to costs for retailers. explain that a bit more. it is the fact that we import lots of food, don't we? so when the currency isn't as high, it means it costs us more money to bring it in? absolutely. the ingredients and products that we are selling are costing us more money in foreign markets. even those products that we are making or producing in the uk, they are costing more, because the labour costs are going up. why? there are lots of ushers on labour costs, simply because of the additional national living wage, which has escalated it. —— lots of pressures . which has escalated it. —— lots of pressures. the reduction in labour force, as unemployment reduces, the amount of labour that is available becomes less, and therefore people pay a little bit more to get the people they want. and can you tell us people they want. and can you tell us about the third reason? that is about the cost of property, et cetera. servicing property. if everything goes up regarding deliveries, rates, rental
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properties, —— rent on properties, the retailers are currently putting out onto the customer. they add that onto the price of the product. generally, what happened last year was that they were facing lots of pressures . was that they were facing lots of pressures. what it was a difficult christmas for them. what's of them said, they didn't want to put any prices up, at this point in time, they wanted to keep it low. going into christmas, the most important period for them, they wanted to maintain low prices. this year they have taken a different tack and have said, we are going to put those prices up. inflation has been running at about 3— 5% on food all through the year. we have seen that reaching its peak as it is now. last year, you talked about potatoes. last year potatoes were 29p. that is a fantastic price for potatoes. this year they are £1.49, still not about price, but it looks bad based on last year. you mentioned, you think
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that it has peaked. do you think we will see prices starting to fall next year? what are your thoughts on that? unfortunately, i said last year, i said that we are probably just about to start our last cheap christmas. and i think that is right. i think this you will be more expensive than last year. i think next year we will escalate as it goes through the, as uncertainty in the pound and uncertainty with what happens with brexit means that prices will inevitably rise. it is just going to get, unfortunately, a bit sad. will you ever eat cheesy sprouts? that is the question. bit sad. will you ever eat cheesy sprouts? that is the questionlj sprouts? that is the question.” don't think anybody does. daniel walker does. i don't eat them any more. my point earlier was, to reduce the cost of the christmas dinner, you take sprouts out of the occasion. but the sprouts club have hit back. one viewer says, they are crucial on boxing day bubble and squeak. another says, mashed and with butter and pepper and they are
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perfect. another says, with a contentious parts they are a staple of the christmas dinner. see? you are missing out. what about this, have you tried serving them with a marmite glaze. no! this year i will be having mini sprouts, says rob. these. i can join be having mini sprouts, says rob. these. i canjoin the people. thank you, sprouts club. it's been quite a year for noel gallagher. his song don't look back in anger became an anthem of solidarity after the manchester bomb. he's turned 50 and relations with his brother liam have reached an all—time low. he's been talking to our entertainment correspondent colin paterson about his new album but also giving his opinions onjeremy corbyn, tattoos, his brother and baldness along the way. we meet just we meetjust after the midweek charts, and you are heading up to number one with the album who builds the moon. how much do things like that still matter to you?” the moon. how much do things like that still matter to you? i guess it is nice, it is better than being number two. it strikes me as a joyful arbon. what is going on? i
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guess i was on a voyage of discovery. i have written any of the songs before i went in. be careful what you wish for on the album is a song about you giving advice to your children. you have three kids. what is the hardest part about parenting? the hardest part, for me, is to be a responsible parent. i would be let in each chocolate and chips for brea kfast. in each chocolate and chips for breakfast. my 17—year—old daughter is brilliant. showers very, very cool is brilliant. showers very, very cool. showers not in any way... showers not a problem yet. she did get tattoos without saying anything, andi get tattoos without saying anything, and i was a bit disappointed in that. what were they? it was all right, one of them was my face. they we re right, one of them was my face. they were the brothers‘ initials on her hands, which is kind of a bit of a snide way of getting in through the backdoor, i‘ve these tattoos. i was like, what? then she showed me and i thought, well, that‘s cute, isn‘t it. but no more! the timing of the album has been interesting, coming
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one month after your brother‘s. what was your reaction when his album went to number one. did you send him a message of congratulations?” went to number one. did you send him a message of congratulations? i did indeed. yes, a did. no, i didn‘t. i didn‘t. indeed. yes, a did. no, i didn‘t. i didn't. why would i? one of the big news events of the year was the manchester bomb. it was dreadful. it made me feel so angry and continues to make me feel so angry. it was brutal. how did it feel, for don't look back in anger to become such a song of solidarity? at that time, you know, politicians‘ words were meaningless, alleges leaders‘ words we re meaningless, alleges leaders‘ words were meaningless, the experts on the news, what they said was meaningless. and that one girl, she sang that song and the people rallied around that song. and as a songwriter, not even the fact that it is my song, if it was a song, it would have reaffirmed my belief in the power of music and what it means to people. you turned 50 this year.
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how are you finding it? if my 50s are half as good as my 40s, professionally and privately, then i‘m going to be doing all right. professionally and privately, then i'm going to be doing all rightm your body telling you you are 50? no, no, i am all right. as long as this is here, no offence, but as long as this is thriving, which it is... geta long as this is thriving, which it is... get a close—up of that. long as this is thriving, which it is... get a close-up of that. that is... get a close-up of that. that is thorough. how would you feel if you went gold? i don't know what i would do. i would definitely retire from music, that is to shore. and it wa nts to from music, that is to shore. and it wants to see a ball that jagger. i think colin took that quite well. good morning to all our bald viewers. nor gallagher‘s new album is called who built the moon? time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m alpa patel. there are calls today to introduce regulations for au pairs, so they‘re better protected from exploitation and abuse most of the uk‘s au pairs are thought to work in the capital. but they‘re not
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classed as employees. instead they receive "pocket money" in return for light housework and childcare. one leading academic says she‘s come across many cases where they‘re being mistreated and exploited they also need to think about knowing where au pairs are. nobody knows where they are at the moment, they are not registered in any way. the agencies that placed them do not have to be registered. they are just this unknown population. i think we need to think about how vulnerable they are. they are young women inside people‘s homes. the family of a psychiatric patient who died in a fire at a berkshire hospital say they‘re struggling to cope, because investigations into her death are taking so long. sarah williams was found dead in her room at prospect park hospital in reading in december 2015. her sister tracey says it took the authorities well over a year and a half to handover their reports, and herfamily are still waiting for a date for a full inquest to take place. the mayor of london will today set out new plans to increase the number
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of people who cycle in the capital. the plan will double cycle parking in new developments, and will require new housing and offices to be built near public transport links to encourage people to go car—free. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. there‘s a good service on the tube — apart from the overground, no service between gospel oak to barking because of ongoing work. on the train, south—western railways have replacement buses between redding and working due to a power supply problem. on the roads, slow on the m25 after a collision, anticlockwise atjunction 15 to the m4. and on the a13, slow—moving heading into town around limehouse. let‘s take a look at the weather with kate kinsella. a cold start this morning. one or two spots with a sparkle of frost but most places without. one or two showers this morning, clearing away to sunshine. it will still feel quite cold. showers clearing away quickly, blowing through on the chilly north—westerly wind. then sunshine, and later on this afternoon we will see more cloud working its way in.
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the temperature between 6—8 celsius. factor in that north—westerly wind. it will feel a couple of degrees colder than that. showers at first overnight. fairly cloudy again. further west and north you could get one or two clearer spells. you make a little bit of frost, it will get chillier, but further east under the cloud, 3—5 the minimum. a similar day tomorrow. still very cold. the north—westerly wind, with showers blowing through from the north. maximum reaching seven. again, that north—westerly wind will make things feel a bit colder. this cooling trend continues. a cold day still as we head through thursday. the wind and northerly will make things feel chilly. showers working in from the east. it is likely they could turn wintry in nature through the course of friday. a couple of cold days with those north—westerly wind making those temperatures feel just that little bit colder. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it‘s back to louise and dan. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. the royal wedding — we should find out more details later today. prince harry and meghan markle are expected to get married in a church. we should find out the venue and date later. and we‘ll be live outside buckingham palace getting all the latest and we‘ll also be finding out how the united states is reacting. good morning. it‘s tuesday, november 28. also this morning: a hugejump in the number of parents fighting to get educational support for their children. there‘s been a 28% increase in the last year alone. it has taken every fibre in my body to fight, and i will never, ever give up for what my daughter needs and is legally entitled to. good morning. we are going to find
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out how the banks would cope if we we re out how the banks would cope if we were hit by another financial crisis. the bank of england is revealing the latest stress tests — i will have the results. in sport, who will be the bbc sports personality of the year? last christmas, andy murray won it for a record third time. i‘ll have the list of this year‘s 12 candidates just after 7:30am. and matt is out and about with the weather. good morning. iam among i am among the twinkling lights at the york museum gardens, with a twinkle of frost around. it is a cold start to your tuesday morning with more sunshine but showers around eastern areas today and over the next few days. i‘ve got all the details coming up in 15 minutes. it looks lovely, thank you. good morning. first, our main story. more details of prince harry and meghan markle‘s forthcoming wedding are expected to be announced later today. the archbishop of canterbury has indicated the couple
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will have a church wedding, saying the pair had "chosen to make their vows to god" in a religious ceremony. the couple went public with their engagement yesterday. i fell in love with meghan so incredibly quickly, was confirmation to me that all the stars were aligned, everything was perfect. this beautiful woman tripped and fell into my life, i fell into her life. and the fact that she will be unbelievably good at the job part of it as well is obviously a huge relief to me, because she will be able to deal with everything else that comes with it. so much information from the interview, including the engagement happened after they had roast chicken for dinner. our correspondent ian palmer is outside buckingham palace. we know lots of details, but there are more to come. what will we learn today? well, hopefully, louise, we
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will hear when the wedding is supposed to be. we already know that, of course, it is going to be next spring, but there is a royal baby scheduled in april. will the wedding be before the baby is born, or will it be after? from kate and william‘s point of view it would be easier to look for two small children at a wedding, rather than three, and if the couple hold their wedding in may the weather should be a little more kind and of course the day albert or longer. we should hear where the venue is. will it be a grand affair, something modest? if it is the latter, it could be at the guard‘s chapel a short walk from the awesome and george‘s chapel in windsor. if it is a grand affair than the obvious candidates are westminster abbey and st paul‘s cathedral. the money is on the grand affair because these are two people
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in love who are in their 30s, they have a shared common interest in humanitarian and charity work, they have collected lots of people over the years and they will want to invite many people. ian, thank you very much indeed, and so many details emerged with that interview with michelle from the bbc yesterday, and i like the little details, like the corgis. they were more open than i thought they would be. yes, he said 30 years of being barked at. they loved meghan, who of course has her own dogs as well. and all sorts of souvenir editions, posters, page after page after page, the daily mirror, she tripped and fell into my life, in the paper yesterday and they have a secret, well, not a secret, and meghan for you if you if you like that sort of thing. the daily telegraph, it is not often when the daily telegraph does a whole front—page photograph, but that is the telegraph. "she is
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the one" on the sun and another souvenir edition. disappointed with the daily mail, the sun have 25 pages, the daily mail have 24 pages, only 24, yes, the stars were aligned. they have photos, everything. she is american. we will speak with our correspondent in america to see how they are reacting to the news as well. if you are one of those people who is fed up with a royal news, we have plenty of other news to bring you and over the next couple of days as well. let‘s get to the other stories this morning. new measures are to be introduced to reduce the number of deaths and serious injuries during childbirth in england. for the first time, parents of stillborn babies are to be routinely offered an independent investigation into what went wrong. the uk has already reduced the mortality rate for babies, but still lags behind many other european countries. here‘s our health correspondent dominic hughes. losing twins during pregnancy, and then having baby hugo very
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prematurely, means rachel understands all too well the challenges childbirth can present. her experience has taught her that parents and medical staff need to be more aware of when things could go wrong. i think it‘s education of pregnant women to never be afraid to ask questions and raise concerns. and it‘s also the medical establishment in encouraging them to do so. now, the health secretary in england is announcing rather than hospitals carrying out their own investigations when things go wrong an independent review will be carried out instead. when i talk to parents whose heart has been broken by something that has gone wrong in those very small numbers of cases, what they say is it is not about the money, theyjust want to know that the nhs has learned from what went wrong so that the same mistakes won‘t ever going to happen again. the uk lags behind many other european countries when it comes to preventing baby deaths
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and premature births. there are around nine stillborn babies every day. roughly 50 women still die in england each yearfrom issues related to pregnancy. and around 50,000 babies are born prematurely. progress is being made, but there are concerns that difficult lessons are not being learnt. seven of our biggest banks have been put to the test by the bank of england today to see how they‘d cope in another financial crisis. steph‘s got the results. they are called stress tests. yes, exactly as you put it. the bank of england will put our banks in various scenarios and they have looked at things like whether they can cope with suffering major losses on profit and loss sheets, whether they can cope with the sterling falling against its lowest level against the dollar, whether they can
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cope with unemployment rising to when it was backing the financial crisis, and whether we can cope with interest rates rising to 4%. and the good news is they said this morning that our banks are three times stronger than ten years ago. that is good news. excellent news and stronger means they have money in the coffers if things go wrong. so, if things were as bad as they were in the financial crisis, they would still be able to lend us money, they would still be able to carry on as normal. lots of people talked about brexit and the uncertainty that has created as well. so as part of this the bank of england has tested them on that as well and they have said this morning that the banks can support the economy through a wide range of brexit outcomes. so what they are saying is overall our banking system is resilient at the moment. so they are suggesting that no matter what brexit throws at us the banking system will still be able to cope, which is really good news because we are an economy
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driven heavily by what goes on in financial services. we saw ten years ago when it was the financial crisis how much chaos it caused and that is why this has been going on to make sure the banks have enough money to cope if things go wrong. thank you for a little bit of good news. your christmas dinner might be going up, but the banks can cope if things go wrong. excellent to hear. the only airport on the indonesian island of bali has been closed for a second day amid concerns of a volcanic eruption. massive plumes of smoke and ash have been spewing out of mount agung over the past few days. officials have raised the alert to the highest level and are evacuating the highest level and are evacuating the homes of up to 100,000 people who live close to the volcano. the government has handed over its analysis of some of the economic impacts of brexit, but the reports are missing some details. the brexit secretary david davis says the documents have been redacted to leave out commercially sensitive market information. but labour are insisting the public should be given all the detail. it was one of the uk‘s greatest
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conservation success stories. over 30 years, red kites went from the brink of extinction to being a common sight in many parts of the uk. but their recovery could be derailed because of poisoning by humans, according to research published in the european journal of wildlife research. postmortem tests revealed thousands of the birds of prey died after consuming substances, including lead shots and pesticides. despite efforts to close gaps in income and opportunity, it seems how well you do in life still depends on where in the country you live. londoners continue to have the best chance of progression in life, while many rural, coastal and former industrial areas are being left behind. alan milburn is the chair of the social mobility commission and joins us from our london newsroom. good morning. thank you for your time this morning. remind us in this context, what does social mobility mean? the chances of getting on in life not correlating with where you start out, so if you have high social mobility, then the status and
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income of your parents is different from the status and income that you will get in life and what we want to see are the higher levels of social mobility so that your aptitude and ability rather than your birth or background determines where you get to in life. the quote from the report that jumps out to in life. the quote from the report thatjumps out is "the country is in the grip of a self reinforcing spiral of ever—growing division" — you seem to paint quite a grim picture. why is it so bad? the product of two things, geography partially and opportunity, so when we have looked at this, in the past there has always been the idea of a north— south divide, it is more complex than that. there is a social mobility postcode lottery where your chances of getting on depend on where you are born and where you live. london is steaming ahead, looking and feeling like a different country from the rest of the nation. meanwhile, too many coastal towns in
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rural areas and places that are former industrial areas in the midlands are being left behind economically and hollowed out socially. if it goes on like that we will have an ever greater divide in our country. it is interesting you mentioned this now, because virtually the same source of findings in the report from 2013 as well, you said long—standing regional imbalances, london forging ahead while other regions of struggle, that was a quote from four yea rs struggle, that was a quote from four years ago. is the government not listening, do you not have enough clout, will we continue to see the change and the difference between london and other parts of the uk? well, let‘s hope not. this is not either inevitable or unsolvable. if you think back 20 years ago, we would probably be discussing lamenting the fact that london state schools were among the worst in the country. now they are the best. in fa ct if country. now they are the best. in fact if you are a disadvantage young star, your chances of going to uni are twice as high as other parts of
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the country. so it can be sold. it can‘t be solved however through words. it needs deeds. there is word in the government about healing division and promoting social justice. but right now heads are consumed by brexit. understandably. and it doesn‘t seem to have the headspace to inject the necessary energy or focus into addressing these issues. what is needed is a plan for doing so in that plan in the end will have to find ways to read christie bute opportunity in employment, education and housing fairly across the country. the government would say they are progressing in areas with more children going to outstanding or good primary schools, record numbers attending university, the national living wage is boosting wages, but that seems at odds with what you are saying. yes, though there are good initiatives, for example what the education secretary has done to put money into areas with poor attainment in education, so they‘re
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attainment in education, so they‘re a good pieces, but overall there is not a frame or a shape and there isn‘t a national plan. so to take one example, the way public spending is distributed is exacerbating the divide rather than narrowing it. london to head of population gets a three times as much in transport spending as some of the moora mozart of the country, the east midlands, north—east, the south—west, so i know it is difficult to redistribute opportunity and free distribute resources . opportunity and free distribute resources. if we want a fair country, a genuinely in united kingdom, that is what has to be grasped. it is good to talk to you this morning. thank you. really interesting. matthew has the weather in york. it is looking magical. those lights are fantastic. good morning! it is one of those mornings why wish it could stay dark a bit longer. the botanical gardens here, around the york museum gardens, they are all emanated in
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the run—up to christmas. elimination in this installation in place until the first of january. many are eliminated to best effect. clear skies above us in york at the moment led to a chilly start. if we look at the forecast for today, it is a cold start uk wide. cold air with us for the rest of the working week. morning frosts becoming more common. sunshine and showers around the periphery of the uk. increasingly so in the eastern parts of scotland and eastern england over the next few days. parts of northern scotland, northern ireland and wales, just be careful. it will be a bit icy. a bit of frost here and there. many beginning the day dry. you can see the showers in northern ireland western areas to begin with, and in the afternoon, eastern scotland and eastern england begin to see them. the showers across scotland, sleet and snow over the hills, even flurries down to lower levels in the heavier showers. southern scotland stays largely dry. much of north—west england having a bright
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day. east of the pennines, expert showers in the afternoon. a cold wind developing as well. the breeze picking up in east anglia and the south—east. it is expected to stay dry too much of the daylight hours today. a fair amount of sunshine, cloudier later on. for the midlands, it is an east—west split, maybe the chance of a shower in the afternoon across eastern areas, western areas staying dry. much of south—western and will be dry, into the south—western across wales will continue to see one of the mainly rain showers pushing in. a bit of sleet over the higher ground. which is showers in northern ireland, in between the sunny spells. —— wintry. uk wide, colder than yesterday. 4— eight celsius at the very best for most of you. feeling colder in the wind, especially in the east. the winner will pick up the night, feeding showers across eastern district of scotland and england. a few showers in the far west of england and wales. many will be dry. clear skies. some frost around. where use either showers there is the chance of ice into tomorrow morning. on wednesday, a cold they
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install. especially when you have the showers coming and going all day long. they will turn increasingly wintry across parts of north—east england as well. further west, a few showers in the far west of wales in south—west england. many will be dry, with some sunshine again. chilly in the wind. temperatures down on today‘s values and down further on thursday. it is these eastern areas which are most prone to showers, even across east anglia and the south—east we could see one or two wintry showers by this stage. the wind hitting gale force at times along the east coast. where you have the showers, it will not only feel cold because of them, but the strength of the wind will make you feel more like —1 or minus three degrees. a very chilly few days in store. showers starting to drift towards eastern areas rather than the west. i will see you again in up. —— half an the west. i will see you again in up. —— halfan hour. i know it is a bad thing to say, but i felt a i know it is a bad thing to say, but ifelt a bit i know it is a bad thing to say, but i felt a bit is christmassy watching
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him this morning. why not? well, because it is in december. —— isn‘t. research by bbc breakfast has discovered than an increasing number of parents of children with special needs are taking their local councils to tribunal, in order to get the right support for their child. the number of cases in england increased by nearly a third last year with parents winning 80% of cases. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has more. cruel, traumatic, heart—wrenching. .. deanne describes the process she has just gone through. two years fighting two tribunals to get the right support for her disabled daughter. erin was left with serious disabilities after being born prematurely. a statement, a legal document, outlined exactly what support erin received. new legislation in 2014 meant erin‘s statement had to be scrapped and turned into a new education, health and care plan. that;s when their fight began. they have stripped out everything. all of erin‘s provision?
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switch therapy, one—on—one, occupational therapy... all gone? all gone. they appealed the plan in october 2015. in may 2016 they lost at the tribunal, appealed again and in july this year won a new plan. you basically got everything back to her? yes, and more. how can you summarise the process you have been through? i can‘t, i can‘t. it doesn‘t make sense, what we have been through, as a family, to get what erin needs and is entitled to. it does not make sense. erin‘s council, redbridge, told us they made 1,500 decisions last year. only 20 ended in tribunal. the reforms were designed to offer that is support for children but we found almost 3400 parents had to fight for that support last year. what it tells me is that there is a system which is under massive strain. council simply do not have the money to give parents what they think their children deserve. this isn‘t what parents think their children
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deserve. this is what the law says children are entitled to. that is very different. councils are doing their best to do that, in impossible financial circumstances. the law also says that councils cannot overspend their budget each year. the department for education told us they have given councils an extra £223 million in extra funding to help them introduce these reforms successfully. many parents tell us that they too have had to pay. the cost of independent financial reports, lawyers and experts, emotional costs which cannot be quantified. of course, there are many parents who cannot afford to pay anything. there are of course those situations where local authorities will come along to the hearing armed with a range of professionals supporting their case, and that inevitably creates an inequality of arms. this can be a brutal experience. many parents, like deanne, will go through it more than once.
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it has taken every fibre in my body to fight. and i will never, ever give up, for what my daughter needs and is legally entitled to. jayne joins us jaynejoins us in jayne joins us in the studio. a powerful report. we are getting many m essa 9 es powerful report. we are getting many messages again today, and lots of them are seeing about that brutal nature of the tribunal process, how frustrating and degrading it can be. people tell me it feels like walk. it can get so acrimonious, so nasty. there is some data we have exclusively. what we have learned as there has been a 28% increase in england's in the number of families who have to take this fight to tribunal. how many of those local authorities are actually winning? only one in five cases are one. —— are won by local authorities. behind
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that number is another story, in many cases local authorities will concede before it reaches tribunal, four in ten. there is another number. how much money a local authority spending on these battles? we have learned it is at least £6 million in the last five years. because not all local authorities provided us with data. you know we are spending all week looking at theseissues are spending all week looking at these issues on breakfast. we do not wa nt these issues on breakfast. we do not want to spend a whole week shining a light on all of the bad stuff, the stuff that is going around, because so stuff that is going around, because so much is going right for so many very many people. if you have in following this on social media, you will have seen the hashtag #bbcsend, and we want people to get in touch with us with the good stories as well. who has helped you with your life, who is making a difference? i wa nt life, who is making a difference? i want to show you a film. tissues at the ready. this is ryan, who has autism, and he wants to say thank you to his dad. i want to say thank
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you to his dad. i want to say thank you to his dad. i want to say thank you to darren john you to his dad. i want to say thank you to darrenjohn because he helped me through a lot. here's my pe teacher. when i was a kid the doctor told my mum and dad i couldn't never talk. but through the years, i got better because of this man, because he gave me my opportunities. he encouraged me to speak more. thank you, darren, for everything. for giving me my opportunities. my pleasure, mate. igot giving me my opportunities. my pleasure, mate. i got a hug! let‘s do that again. well done to you, mate. that‘s better, isn‘t it?
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that was actually brad, not ryan. we will be playing him later on. that message, it isjust will be playing him later on. that message, it is just wonderful that there is, you know, there are good news stories out of air, aren‘t there? there is so much stuff happening. tomorrow, if your families affected by autism, an exclusive report on services, you will not want to miss that. and we have in chatting to david and cary grant. yes, i was speaking to them, they have four children and two of them have autism. i went to their home to speak to them, it gave me a sense of what it is like to live with children with autism, how frustrating and also how... i mean, they have a positive message as well, they really do. it is a mixed bag, isn‘t it? the positive and negative. on the positive side of things, we have a message from shirley. she says her son is on the autism spectrum. he was diagnosed with asperger‘s at the age of 12. her local education department of the torch with his education, and they had a rotten time. through my
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family‘s hard work we educated my son at home. i also held down a full—timejob through son at home. i also held down a full—time job through this. he is now 21, a junior software engineer with a brilliant company. surely, thank you. we need fortified minutes to read out everybody‘s messages. there is so much more information on our social media. if you want to be in touch, as so many people are, you can email us. or you can tweet us using the hashtag #bbcsend. thank you for all of your messages. do keep them coming through. and we will pay you the film, ryan and his dad... you do have time now, don't you, to go and get the tissues ready. that is in the next half—hour. we will have the national headlines on this in the next few minutes. —— on breakfast. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m alpa patel. there are calls today to introduce regulations for au pairs, so they‘re better protected from exploitation and abuse. most of the uk‘s au pairs
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are thought to work in the capital. but they‘re not classed as employees. instead they receive "pocket money" in return for light housework and childcare. one leading academic says she‘s come across many cases where they‘re being mistreated and exploited. they also need to think about knowing where au pairs are. nobody knows where they are at the moment, they are not registered in any way. the agencies that place them do not have to be registered. they are just this unknown population. i think we need to think about how vulnerable they are. they are young women inside people‘s homes. the family of a soldier who died at deepcut barracks is going to the high court today to apply for a fresh inquest. 17—year—old private geoff gray from hackney was found with two gunshot wounds to his head in 2001. he was one of four young soldiers to die of gunshot wounds at the base in surrey between 1995 and 2002. his family have won the right to the hearing, as new evidence has emerged. how do you keep all my outside in
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winter? and this is one way. these igloos are winter? and this is one way. these i 9 winter? and this is one way. these p winter? and this is one way. these igloos are popping up on rooftops and along the river thames. they are seen as and along the river thames. they are seen as the new way to socialise during the chilly weather, but they can cost up to £600 to rent and evening. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. there‘s a good service on the tube — apart from the overground, no service between gospel oak to barking because of ongoing work. on the train, southwestern rail have replacement buses between reading and woking due to a power supply problem. on the roads, slow on the m25 after a collision, anticlockwise atjunction 15 to the m4. and on the a13, slow—moving heading into town around limehouse. let‘s take a look at the weather with kate kinsella. a cold start this morning. one or two spots with a sparkle of frost but most places without. one or two showers this morning, clearing away to sunshine. it will still feel quite cold. showers clearing away quickly, blowing through on the chilly north—westerly wind. then sunshine, and later on this afternoon we will see more cloud working its way in.
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the temperature between 6—8 celsius. factor in that north—westerly wind. it will feel a couple of degrees colder than that. showers at first overnight. fairly cloudy again. further west and north you could get one or two clearer spells. you make a little bit of frost, it will get chillier, but further east under the cloud, 3—5 the minimum. a similar day tomorrow. still very cold. the north—westerly wind, with showers blowing through from the north. maximum reaching seven. again, that north—westerly wind will make things feel a bit colder. this cooling trend continues. a cold day still as we head through thursday. the wind and northerly will make things feel chilly. showers working in from the east. it is likely they could turn wintry in nature through the course of friday. a couple of cold days with those north—westerly wind making those temperatures feel just that little bit colder. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom
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in half an hour. now, though, it‘s back to louise and dan. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. here‘s a summary of this morning‘s main stories from bbc news. more details of prince harry and meghan markle‘s wedding are expected to be announced today. the archbishop of canterbury has indicated the couple will have a church wedding, saying the pair had "chosen to make their vows to god" in a religious ceremony. the couple went public with their engagement yesterday. the only airport on the indonesian island of bali has been closed for a second day amid concerns of a volcanic eruption. massive plumes of smoke and ash have been spewing out of mount agung over the past few days. officials have raised the alert to the highest level and are evacuating the homes of up to 100,000 people who live near the volcano. when it comes to aspiration and opportunity england is becoming
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increasingly divided according to a new report. the social mobility commission says london and the south—east are still the best place for disadvantaged children to progress, while those in the midlands and coastal areas have the least opportunities. the chair of the commission believes things can be improved. this is not either inevitable or unsolvable. if you think back long enough, 20 years ago, we would be having a discussion and lamenting the fact that london state schools were among the worst in the country. now they are the best. if you are a disadvantage youngster in london your chances of going to university are about twice as high as other parts of the country. so this can be solved. the seven biggest high—street banks can survive the shocks of brexit according to the bank of england. we have the resources to cope with a
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high brexit, high unemployment and a colla pse high brexit, high unemployment and a collapse in the property market. the bank concluded there are three times more resilient than they were a decade ago. six men acquitted over weapons charges in india have been released. we spoke about this on the programme yesterday with members of the family. known as the chennai six, they were part of the crew seized by they were part of the crew seized by the indian coastguard on october 2013 and had been charged with entering india and legally and convicted last year. all charges we re convicted last year. all charges were dropped. and we were speaking to them on the sofa. the fiancee of one and a sister. and they were not feeling positive. so it is great news. and another story that you would have thought got more coverage. and then there was the engagement. everything else has been shoved to the side. including shortlist for the sports personality of the year. on earth did that happen? yes, another big story in
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town. look at that trophy behind your shoulders. it has some cracking names on it. i am trying to think what my earliest memory is and i might be wrong, but was red ron on? iam sure might be wrong, but was red ron on? i am sure there was a pause. that is vague enough. i will check.” i am sure there was a pause. that is vague enough. iwill check. idon't know that. andy murray broke the record, winning for a record third record, winning for a record surged time last year. the live ceremony is on december the 17th in liverpool. we‘ll be looking at this year‘s 12 candidates just after 8:30am. i love that shot of andy murray smiling into the camera. the ecb say ben stokes is visiting family in new zealand and not heading to australia, after he was apparently spotted flying out of heathrow airport. stokes has been suspended since he was was arrested in september on suspicion of actual bodily harm after an incident outside a nightclub but the investigation
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is still on—going. sorry, i don‘t know if you just heard that. shall we tell everyone what happened ? heard that. shall we tell everyone what happened? i turned on my phone to and what happened? i turned on my phone and siri said, sorry, i don‘t understand. can sally continue with sport? yes, you can. thank you very much. i love that. andy swiss has more. well, welcome to adelaide airport, where england‘s players have arrived from brisbane. plenty to see into that over the next few days before the second test on saturday. but while they were flying here, the big talking point was another cricketer making a plane journey — a talking point was another cricketer making a planejourney — a picture appeared on twitter which it was claimed was a ben stokes at an airport and that prompted speculation he was on his way to
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australia. england and wales cricket board says he is not. he is on his way to new zealand. the ecb say he is making a trip to new zealand to spend time with family. but it seems he wants to play some cricket. the new zealand team canterbury say they have been holding initial informal discussions with him over his availability for forthcoming matches. although ben stokes is suspended from england duty it is understood they would be happy for him to play for a team in new zealand. it is another intriguing development in this ongoing saga. and andrew strauss says players need to sharpen up their act after the details ofjonny to sharpen up their act after the details of jonny bairstow‘s headbutt. he says details of jonny bairstow‘s headbutt. he sastonny bairstow will not be disciplined and that is something that he does with his mates who play rugby. the team has been effectively... yes, i know, effectively grounded. the former england manager
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sam allardyce is back in the frame for the evertonjob, and he‘s now the leading contender. he had been an early candidate to succeed ronald koeman, but publicly withdrew after everton were slow to make an offer. but their search has become increasingly urgent — they‘ve lost five out of their last seven games under caretaker boss david unsworth. karen carney has withdrawn from the england squad for today‘s world cup qualifier against kazakhstan in colchester after injuring an ankle. the chelsea winger, who has been capped 134 times, joins demi stokes on the sidelines. england have won their first two qualifiers. and you can watch that game live on bbc two, kickoff at 7:05am. wales also play tonight, away to bosnia—herzegovina. and the horse at sports personality of the year was red rum. great memory! i was a big fan. sorry about the interruption. that's ok. the last time it happened i turned it off because i mentioned syria on the bulletin and if what i was asking question. i remember. live tv. you
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would think that you would have learned. i will learn one day. it‘s the story that‘s made headlines across the globe, the engagement of prince harry to the american actress meghan markle. they‘ve announced plans to marry in spring 2018 and have been talking to the bbc‘s mishal husain about how they met, what happened when harry propsed and their plans for the future. the friend who introduced you, what she tried to set you up? yes, a setup, a blind date, and it is so interesting because we talk about it now and even then because i am from the states, you don't grow up with the states, you don't grow up with the same understanding of the royal family, and so, while i understand clearly that there is a global interest, i didn't know much about him. and so the only thing i asked her when she said she wanted to set us her when she said she wanted to set us up her when she said she wanted to set us up was, was her when she said she wanted to set us up was, was he nice? it happened a few weeks ago, only this month,
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here at our cottage, just a standard, typical night. just a cosy night, what were we doing, roasting chicken? trying to roast chicken. and it wasjust chicken? trying to roast chicken. and it was just an amazing surprise. it was so sweet and natural and very romantic. he got on one knee. of course. was it an instant yes? yes, asa course. was it an instant yes? yes, as a matter of fact, i couldn't let you finish proposing. she wouldn't let me finish. the ring is yellow gold, because that is her favourite. and the main stone itself i sourced from botswana. and the diamonds either side are from my mother's jewellery collection to make sure that she is with us on this crazy journey together. it is beautiful. and he designed it. it is incredible. yes. yes. some of that scrutiny, you made public statements about it, some of the scrutiny was centred around your ethnicity,
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meghan. when you realised that, what did you think? of course it is disheartening, you know. it is a shame that that is the climate in this world. and we have never put any focus on that. we have just focused on who we are as a couple. and so when you take all those extra layers away and all that noise, i think it makes it really easy to just enjoy being together. have you met the queen? i have, yes. a couple of times. a couple of times. what was it like? it is incredible. i think, you know, a, to meet her through his lens, notjust through his honour and respect for her as the monarch, but the love he has for heras the monarch, but the love he has for her as his grandmother, all of those layers have been so important for me, so that when i met her i had a deep understanding and of course incredible respect for being able to have that time with her. and we have had a really... she is an incredible
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woman. and the corgis laughter. after 30 yea rs of laughter. after 30 years of putting up with them... just lying on my feet. it was very sweet. the corgis was the important thing. it was the detail that we got. we expect to get more details later today about where and when the next royal wedding will take place. this is a stroy being talked about around the world, so let‘s gauge reaction on both sides of the atlantic. royal historian kate williams is outside buckingham palace, and from los angeles we‘re joined by melanie bromley from e news. good morning. thank you forjoining us. good morning. thank you forjoining us. kate, outside buckingham palace, it was fascinating watching the interview. what did you make of what they had to say? well, it was a really wonderful interview. i think what really came over how this is a young couple in love, they are so engaged, so affectionate, and they see their future partnership engaged, so affectionate, and they see theirfuture partnership — engaged, so affectionate, and they see their future partnership — they we re
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see their future partnership — they were talking about how they see their partnership after marriage, how they want to do a lot of good for the world, work together. prince harry has been doing important charity work with the invictus games and meghan has worked for the un, studied international relations, worked with world vision, so interesting to see the future partnership, that there is a lot of work to do, and that is why they will have a very successful relationship. they are deeply in love and well—suited. it will be a working charity and working partnership as well which is what they both want. and do you think it will change the royal family?” think it is significant. i think meghan isa think it is significant. i think meghan is a breath of fresh air. she is very different. of course as they said they were some very cruel and difficult, harassment and abusive coverage of the relationship when it broke last year. some racism and misogyny. and really meghan has been a very powerful voice about feminism
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and particularly about racism and what she suffered as a biracial woman and the racism she suffered. so the fact that she will be on the balcony waving out as part of this league group seen as rather stuffy, people predicted prince harry‘s future brighter since he was little, and it was usually a british arista great. he has chosen someone com pletely great. he has chosen someone completely different. —— arista great. the royal family completely different. —— arista great. the royalfamily is completely different. —— arista great. the royal family is symbolic. this has a big symbolic significance i think. tell us a little about royal protocol from now on. there are so many royal protocol from now on. there are so many details we don‘t have at this point. yes, we expect a briefing today about when and where the wedding will be, the top choice is windsor, certainly because it won‘t be a bank holiday, it won‘t be a huge day or celebration as we saw with william and kate as a future king. at present what they will aim for is something quiet. i believe she is going for christmas at sandringham with the queen and the other royals. she will move into nottingham cottage in kensington so
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they are neighbours with william and kate. and we will see a small wedding. it will be a massive media extravaganza. they are incredibly popular. she gets so much coverage. he is so popular. a favourite rumour is serena williams might be bridesmaid and that would be marvellous to see one of the greatest tennis players walking up with meghan markle as a bridesmaid. what a great rumour. thank you. and there will be plenty more of those. prince harry and meghan markle‘s engagement has been big stateside. let‘s speak to melanie bromley who is the chief news correspondent at e news in los angeles. good morning to you, melanie. give us good morning to you, melanie. give usa good morning to you, melanie. give us a flavour of how it has gone down in the states. in america, it has been waiting for a royal family here. of course they have spoken about it for years. this is it really. having an american in the british royal family. and really. having an american in the british royalfamily. and meghan markle is somebody who has grown up. she has obviously been a tv actress. she has obviously been a tv actress.
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she has obviously been a tv actress. she has this very interesting lifestyle. so to capture the heart of the prince, who in america is someone of the prince, who in america is someone they really adopted, ever since the death of his mother, so for harry to pick an american bride is hugely significant over here. and she seems to have been preparing for this scrutiny that she will have had already and will continue to get through the rest of her life. she closed down her social media site. she stopped the lifestyle website she was running as well. seemingly in preparation for her new life, as pa rt in preparation for her new life, as part of the royal family. we saw the signs and one year ago when harry released the statement and then she started to fall in line with royal protocol. four were to continue on the tv show the idea that she might in her role as rachel zane be doing sex scenes or love scenes or whatever it might be really didn‘t fit in with her future role, whatever it might be really didn‘t fit in with herfuture role, which isa
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fit in with herfuture role, which is a new platform where she can help harry and also do good around the world, which of course, as an actress, she was also a massive philanthropist as well and was able to do that anyway. this is something thatis to do that anyway. this is something that is important for her. she is falling in line. she is doing exactly what she wants to do. she understands that by being with harry she will have a bigger platform and impactand she will have a bigger platform and impact and that is incredibly important to her. kate was talking about it as a historical significance and symbolism of prince harry marrying an ordinary american, i know she is famous and has been on tv and is well—known, but give us an idea from the american perspective, someone idea from the american perspective, someone outside the royal family, outside the typical circle of being a royal. we talked about kate being a royal. we talked about kate being a commoner and catching the heart of william, breaking down the class boundary. you know, with meghan,
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breaking down the racial divide, it represents the future of the monarchy. this future where we have this ideal world we would all like to live in. and i know there is much talk about the wedding being something small and much smaller than william and kate. in some ways there is a real hunger over here to see harry happy and to get that happy ever after. and for that reason i think we want a big wedding. when there is the clock choice at the moment, we want to see it meghan and harry on the balcony at buckingham palace waving. people are so at buckingham palace waving. people are so excited for her. and the future that she will have with harry. i am sure you will get all of those pictures soon. you know donald trump comments on everything these days, but nothing yet on twitter. while. we await with bated breath. matt is looking at the weather again. this is fabulous!
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that is beautiful. good morning. a very good morning to you. we are in york, we are at the christmas at york museum gardens festival. it is not just lights here, but york museum gardens festival. it is notjust lights here, but fire as well. this installation is a march to the vikings, synonymous with the area. “— to the vikings, synonymous with the area. —— is an homage. this is my favourite one yet because it is warming me up. it is very chilly here, as it is across the uk. quite a bit of sunshine to come for many of you today, but would all see more showers in eastern areas then we have induced you over past few days. we have seen a bit of ice with overnight showers and some frost. temperatures close to freezing in many parts. one isolated showers drifting across south—west england. they will quickly disappear and we will see sunshine about. northern scotla nd will see sunshine about. northern scotland and eastern scotland will see showers coming and going through
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the day. some of them heavy across the day. some of them heavy across the coast. hail and thunder as well, and we could see sleet and snow. south—west scotland stays dry, and across eastern parts of england we will see more showers developing in the afternoon. further and further in land, with a strong to gale force wind. we have the morning shower here and there are, most places will be dry in the afternoon. lots of sunshine across much of southern england. south—west england and across wales, waddleton mac showers coming and going through the day. a few showers to come in northern ireland as well. across the uk, temperatures down on yesterday, around 3— eight degrees. it will feel cold in the wind, especially across northern ireland eastern areas, where the wind will be at its strongest. into this evening and overnight, the showers will die back to coastal areas, many in land will be dry and clear. many will lead to a widespread frost developing. you
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have the showers, just be wary. there could be ice on the roads and into tomorrow morning. another chilly start tomorrow, especially in eastern areas. showers coming and going all day long. the showers for eastern england tomorrow, a few of them drifting into east anglia, maybe the south—east. parts of pembrokeshire, into cornwall especially, will have showers. the wind is making itself known. it is at its strongest along the north sea coasts. if anything, at its strongest along the north sea coasts. ifanything, it at its strongest along the north sea coasts. if anything, it will be getting colder still. some showers across eastern england will be prone to sleet and snow. (inaudible). well, we can see from the map what is happening in east anglia, but map has disappeared. —— matt has disappeared. we have lost, sorry. he is ok. but we have lost the line.
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the paper cup and the long piece of string let us down. it is going to be cold, though. more details in half an hour. thursday is the cold est half an hour. thursday is the coldest day of the week by some distance, so wrap up warm, that is the unofficial weather report for you. all of biggest high street banks could withstand severe economic shocks worse than the financial crisis a decade ago. it‘s good news. steph has been looking at the details. this is a bit of good news this morning. the bank of england has been undertaking these tests since 2014 — to make sure whatever the global economy throws our way, our banks will be stable and won‘t need bailing out. all seven of the big high street names passed, through scenarios including a hard brexit, big drops in the value of our currency the pound, high unemployment or a collapse in property prices. this is what mark carney had to say a moment ago. despite the severity
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of the test, for the first signs of the bank began stress testing in 2014, no bank needs to strengthen its capital position as a result. informed by the stress test and our own risk analysis, the ftc also judges the banking system will continue to support the real economy, even in the unlikely event ofa economy, even in the unlikely event of a disorderly brexit. that is the governor of the bank of england, mark carney. vicky prycejohn isner now to go over the results. i know these are fresh off the printer. what do you make of these results, it is good news that all the banks have passed? very reassuring, of course. the tests were very severe. some people are wondering why they needed to be so severe. there was a very substantial fall in the pound of about 20%. a fall in the gdp of more than 4%. an increase in interest rates of 2.4%. and the question was, would the banks be able to sustain the losses, which we re able to sustain the losses, which were likely to come as a result of that? all banks, including the royal
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bank of scotland, which people were concerned about, they seem to have passed the test. they are intended to strengthen the banks‘ capital base. why is it so important? well, of course we have brexit coming up. that is likely to create financial uncertainty and possess themselves seem uncertainty and possess themselves seem to suggest that certainly that volatility that happened because of brexit can be sustained by the banks. what the bank of england ‘s have said, even where we are, it will be easily covered, but they will be easily covered, but they will review that. there will be some other thoughts next year in terms of whether they need to raise more capital. remember, of course, no individual bank has to raise capital right now. but what to think as —— what the bank has said, in the case
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of any serious situation, they need to increase from 4.1% to 4.5%. that is an increase, but there is much capital but they want what they term a regular tree buffer. they cannot use it in any way except to ensure that they have it in case of need. it is good to know it is there. you mentioned rbs, people were worried whether rbs would pass. of course, it is majority—owned by us, the taxpayers, through the government? it will be interesting to see what happens to rbs shares in the future. the chancellor, in his budget on november 22, said that he intended to sell about £15 billion worth of rbs shares. so that would decrease the share that is actually still held by the public. but of course there would still be huge losses, if you look at the value of whether shares were when they were still doing reasonably well, we‘ll be losing quite a of money on this.
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actually, the royal bank of scotland is out of its problems, it has other problems and issues to deal with, and maybe there will be an impact on shares. might actually lose a little bit less than they are sold. we will find out what is happening with the share price later this morning. thank you for talking to us this morning. that is it for me. now, the reaction to a series of special educational needs this week has been overwhelming. thank you to everybody who has been in touch with all your stories. the emails as a coherent on zone is that it —— of the emails were still coming in yesterday. i know we are being inundated again today. many people wa nted inundated again today. many people wanted to say thank you to a family member or carer who did so much to help them. earlier, we said we would play ryan‘s story. he has autism and wa nted play ryan‘s story. he has autism and wanted to thank his dad. make sure you keep your eyes on ryan‘s dad. i would like to thank my dad. if it we re i would like to thank my dad. if it were not to him i wouldn‘t be able to do other things i have done
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today. he taught me how to cook, how today. he taught me how to cook, how to use a washing machine, how to iron. if it were not the him i wouldn‘t be able to do things like that. he pushed me to my limits, doing things i never imagined i would do. if it were not the him i would do. if it were not the him i would never be other to speak to anybody like you. he taught me social skills, i struggled talking to people, he taught me how to look and how to keep calm in front of normal people, and people that i have never met. i‘m very lucky, very lucky. he has made it easy for me, he isa lucky. he has made it easy for me, he is a good light. he is my man. that is ryan and his dad nick. all this week hollywood is —— all this week, we have got messages all week, but when people get the care they need,it but when people get the care they need, it is so uplifting. what is lovely as hearing ryan there, sometimes you are not able to say
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thank you and he just says it so beautifully as well. one other message i would like to read you. a teacher who wanted to remain anonymous said, i am a teacher at a special needs school and i feel like i have doors shut in my face unidentified pupils with extra needs. one of my pupils, in order to put in therapy and one—on—one support to enhance that the have the allotment, i was told by senior development —— senior leadership that the burrow do not have any ability to do this so they will not be pursuing this. after sternly making my evidence as to why this boy needed that additional support, i was begrudgingly told, "we will think about it". needless to say i will one had a percent support the pa rents will one had a percent support the parents should they decide not to ta ke parents should they decide not to take this on and to tackle the burrow at the tribunal. if i was one of these parents i would cry. as their teacher, i do cry. they need a voice and they need a champion to fight for what they need. that is what we got, a real sense, particular today in this series, all these parents particular today in this series, all these pa rents really particular today in this series, all these parents really having to fight to get their children looked after.
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thank you for your stories. let's get the news, travel and weather where you are. we will see you few minutes. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m alpa patel. there are calls today to introduce regulations for au pairs, so they‘re better protected from exploitation and abuse. most of the uk‘s au pairs are thought to work in the capital. but they‘re not classed as employees. instead they receive "pocket money" in return for light housework and childcare. one leading academic says she‘s come across many cases where they‘re being mistreated and exploited. they also need to think about knowing where au pairs are. nobody knows where they are at the moment, they are not registered in any way. the agencies that place them do not have to be registered. they are just this unknown population. i think we need to think about how vulnerable they are. they are young women inside people‘s homes. the family of a soldier who died at deepcut barracks is going to the high court today to apply for a fresh inquest.
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17—year—old private geoff gray from hackney was found with two gunshot wounds to his head in 2001. he was one of four young soldiers to die of gunshot wounds at the base in surrey between 1995 and 2002. his family have won the right to the hearing, as new evidence has emerged. this is what way to stay warm in the winter months. these igloos are impping up winter months. these igloos are popping up on rooftops and along the river thames. they are seen as the new way to socialise in the chilly weather. but they can cost you up to £600 to rent for an evening. there‘s a good service on the tube — apart from the overground, no service between gospel oak to barking because of ongoing work. on the train, southwestern rail have replacement buses between reading and woking due to a power supply problem. on the roads, slow on the m25 after a collision, anticlockwise
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atjunction 15 to the m4. and on the a13, slow—moving heading into town around limehouse. let‘s take a look at the weather with kate kinsella. a cold start this morning. one or two spots with a sparkle of frost but most places without. one or two showers this morning, clearing away to sunshine. it will still feel quite cold. showers clearing away quickly, blowing through on the chilly north—westerly wind. then sunshine, and later on this afternoon we will see more cloud working its way in. the temperature between 6—8 celsius. factor in that north—westerly wind. it will feel a couple of degrees colder than that. showers at first overnight. fairly cloudy again. further west and north you could get one or two clearer spells. you make a little bit of frost, it will get chillier, but further east under the cloud, 3—5 the minimum. a similar day tomorrow. still very cold. the north—westerly wind, with showers blowing through from the north. maximum reaching seven. again, that north—westerly wind will make things feel a bit colder. this cooling trend continues. a cold day still as we head through thursday. the wind and northerly will make things feel chilly.
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showers working in from the east. it is likely they could turn wintry in nature through the course of friday. a couple of cold days with those north—westerly wind making those temperatures feel just that little bit colder. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it‘s back to louise and dan. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. the royal wedding — we should find out more details later today. prince harry and meghan markle are expected to get married in a church — we should find out the venue and date later.
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we‘ll be live outside buckingham palace getting all the latest and we‘ll also be finding out how the united states is reacting . good morning. it is tuesday the 28th of november. also for you on the programme this morning... a huge rise in the number of parents fighting to get educational support for their children — there‘s been a 28 per cent increase in the last year alone . it's it‘s taken every fibre in my body to fight and it‘s taken every fibre in my body to fightandi it‘s taken every fibre in my body to fight and i will never, ever give up for what my daughter needs and is legally entitled to. good morning. all of our major banks could withstand a majorfinancial crisis — from a no—deal brexit to a collapse
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in house prices. in fact today the bank of england says they‘re in better health than a decade ago. i‘ll have all the details. morning — who will be the bbc sports personality of the year? last christmas, andy murray won it for a record third time. i‘ll have the list of this year‘s 12 candidates. that will be just after 8:30am. and matt is out and about with the weather. brightening up your morning this morning, cool start here, and across the uk, increasing chance of showers especially in the east. i‘ll have your full forecast in 15 minutes. you have been brightening things up. hankey. good morning. first, our main story. more details of prince harry and meghan markle‘s wedding are expected to be announced today the archbishop of canterbury has indicated the couple will have a church wedding, saying the pair had "chosen to make their vows to god" in a religious ceremony. the couple went public with their engagement yesterday. i don‘t think that i would call it a whirlwind in terms
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of our relationship, obviously there have been layers attached to how public it has become, after we had a good five, six months almost ofjust privacy, which was amazing. but no, i think we were able to really have so much time just to connect, and we never went longer than two weeks without seeing each other, even though we were obviously doing a long—distance relationship, so we made it work. that is a small part of the interview they did yesterday with our bbc reporter michelle hussain. our correspondent ian palmer is outside buckingham palace ...ian what more can we expect to find out today ? they will. people waiting on tenterhooks for any snippet of how this day is going to go. obviously
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it will be in the spring, we don‘t know the exact date. lots of royal events have at that time. the third royal baby for william and kate, will the royal wedding bb for or after? it might be slightly easier attending a wedding with two small children rather than a third. if it we re children rather than a third. if it were to be around the month of may it might be warmer. the venue itself we might hear about, people don‘t know if it‘s going to be a grand wedding or something more modest. it could be at the guards chapeljust a small walk away from here or even st george‘s chapel at windsor. if they go for the grander scale of wedding it could be westminster abbey or indeed st paul‘s cathedral. this will be a massive cultural event, as we know. megan morkel is of mixed race and because of that, millions of people will see a little bit of
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themselves in a royal wedding for themselves in a royal wedding for the first time. —— megan mako. people will take part in this ultra—event. this is a moderate marriage for a modern time. —— meghan markle. and in a social media age. if you wanted to get away from this amazing love union over the next few months, it will be very difficult! that you so much. one thing that has not changed with royal weddings is the intense interest from the papers, for example. souvenir edition is out today. not often that the telegraph has one picture dominating the entire front page and that is there. 16 pages of coverage, they are competing. even if you don‘t want to talk about it, you are talking about it. you could be talking about why you don‘t want to talk about it.
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souvenir edition of the daily mirror, page after page in the daily express, 24 pages inside the daily mail, 35 inside the sun newspaper, with a poster! another tradition is a picture of the engagement ring, inside the daily mail, photographers trying to get a close—up of that, there you go. more coverage of that over the next few months. i was reading that the coat sold—out immediately. the exact copy is not even available. they are coats. there are other news stories this morning. let‘s bring you some more of those. new measures are to be introduced to reduce the number of deaths and serious injuries during childbirth in england. for the first time, parents of stillborn babies are to be routinely offered an independent investigation into what went wrong. the uk has already reduced the mortality rate for babies but still lags behind many other european countries . here‘s our health correspondent, dominic hughes. losing twins during pregnancy,
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and then having baby hugo very prematurely, means rachel understands all too well the challenges childbirth can present. her experience has taught her that parents and medical staff need to be more aware of when things could go wrong. i think it‘s education of pregnant women to never be afraid to ask questions and raise concerns. and it‘s also the medical establishment in encouraging them to do so. now, the health secretary in england is announcing rather than hospitals carrying out their own investigations when things go wrong an independent review will be carried out instead. when i talk to parents whose heart has been broken by something that has gone wrong in those very small numbers of cases, what they say is it‘s not about the money, they just want to know that the nhs has learned from what went wrong so that that same mistakes isn‘t ever going to happen again.
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the uk lags behind many other european countries when it comes to preventing baby deaths and premature births. there are around nine stillborn babies every day. roughly 50 women still die in england each yearfrom issues related to pregnancy. and around 50,000 babies are born prematurely. progress is being made, but there are concerns that difficult lessons are not being learned. seven of our biggest banks have been put to the test by the bank of england today — to see how they‘d cope in another financial crisis. orfor example orforexamplea or for example a new deal on brexit. —— a new deal. steph‘s got the results. they are three times stronger than
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they were ten years ago, these tests have found, they are called stress tests. one scenario was a massive rise in unemployment, big rise in interest rates, property price crashing, the value of the pound falling to the lowest level against the dollar, that type of thing. worst case scenario. this is what the governor mark carney of the bank of england had to say. oh, we don‘t have a clip, but he did say... he basically said since they had been doing these tests back in 2014, when they started, this is now the first time all of the banks have passed them, it‘s good to see, including rbs, some people were worried rbs might struggle with this. interestingly he talked about brexit as well and what that might mean, some people are worried about that uncertainty and further it will cause a case of vic financial system and he says the banks are prepared
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for possible brexit outcomes but he said the banks will need a two—year transition period in order to be able to deal with brexit in the best way possible and have a deal as soon as possible and know the details. i‘m very glad to say you have passed your stress test, you listened, you remembered, you told us.” your stress test, you listened, you remembered, you told us. i am not sure i would cope so well with the bank of england governor‘s job. when it comes to aspiration and opportunity england is becoming increasingly divided according to a new report. the social mobility commission says london and the south—east are still the best place for disadvantaged children to progress, whilst those in the midlands and coastal areas have the least opportunities. the chair of the commission, the only airport on the indonesian island of bali has been closed for a second day amid concerns of a volcanic eruption. massive plumes of smoke and ash have been spewing out of mount agung over the past few days. officials have raised the alert to the highest level and are evacuating the homes of up to one hundred thousand people who live close to the volcano.
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11 british overseas tour tree or to receive money to help them rebuild after recent storms and tornadoes. the leaders of the territories are to meet theresa may today to update her on the progress made so far. six british men acquitted over weapons charges in india have been released. known as the chennai six, they were part of a crew on board an american ship seized by the indian coast guard in october 2013. they‘d been charged with entering india illegally with weapons and convicted last year. all charges were dropped yesterday. we spoke to two members of their family and they really didn‘t think that would happen, they were so nervous thinking about the prospect of thejudgement nervous thinking about the prospect of the judgement and it‘s so great it‘s gone that way. it‘s been one of
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the uk‘s greatest conservation stories, red kites went from the brink of extinction to being a common sight of the recovery could be derailed because of poisoning by humans, that‘s according to the europeanjournal of humans, that‘s according to the european journal of wildlife research. postmortem tests on the birds said many died after consuming lead shots and pesticides. you are up—to—date. good morning, you are watching breakfast. every day in the uk nine babies die before, during or soon uk nine babies die before, during or soon after birth. the reasons why can be complex and varied, but some grieving parents feel they never really know exactly what went wrong. now, for the first time, the nhs will offer an independent investigation for every stillborn child over the age of 24 weeks. research suggests more than half of these deaths could have been prevented. joining us now is rachel corry, whose twin boys died during premature birth. her son hugo was later born with severe complications. and, in our london newsroom, dr alexander heazell, clinical director of the tommy‘s stillbirth research centre. good morning to you both and thank
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you so much forjoining us and rachel, particularly, thank you so much forjoining us. so many parents have so many questions unanswered. tell us what happened to you.” have so many questions unanswered. tell us what happened to you. i had a child born very easily, no complications, all went to plan, excuse me. if you use later i became pregnant with twins, having already gone through pregnancy, ijust took it all in my stride, i felt different at times but i dismissed it. just under 23 weeks i went into labour prematurely and both my twin boys were stillborn. so sad to hear that. would you ever given an explanation about what happened? not really, we had a debriefing session with the consultant and the bereavement midwife who were supportive of they said they couldn‘t explain why it happened,
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essentially having had a full term birth. would it have helped you if you had been able to get the answers to presumably lots of different questions? it would have helped hugely, when you lose a baby you wa nt to hugely, when you lose a baby you want to know why, why has it happened, what can i do to stop it happening again? those for myself and other people because she would not wish this on your worst enemy. let‘s put some of these points to our medical expert, croatia, poland, the czech republic at better rates and it comes to things like stillbirth than the uk, what is the extra nation? varied range of courses of stillbirth. —— what is the explanation? we know women from black and ethnic minority groups have a higher risk of stillbirth, the more diverse your population the greater the variance of stillbirth you might see. we know things like
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social inequality and access to health care play a role. so there are many come placated factors and i think one of the encouraging thing is that we have seen in the uk in the last few years is quite a significant fall in the rates of stillbirth and that shows us that improvements can be made. it seemed extrod to me that a lot of these things that go wrong are not fully investigated because presumably you can learn so much from things that happen? absolutely. it is important for parents to have access to as many of the answers with regard to their care as possible and certainly if where theircare possible and certainly if where their care could have been improved it's important that we learn lessons. in every case, we won't find an answer, but it is important that parents have a knowledge that
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their case has been taken on board and any lessons that can be learned are. every day in the uk nine babies die before, during or soon after birth. there will be many families going through this and who will go through this this week as well. the investigation, you don‘t want anybody to go through what you and yourfamily anybody to go through what you and your family have been through and the difference that could make and it would make to so many others. the difference that could make and it would make to so many othersm there was a proper investigation we would understand what the risks were and what we could do about them because it is terrifying going knee another pregnancy thinking we don‘t know why things went wrong last time. how can we prevent them happening again? it‘s just very harrowing. it‘s all to do with dealing with the death as well. dealing with the bereavement is really, really ha rd dealing with the bereavement is really, really hard and at least if you have some answers, you can try and make some sense out of it. you did fall pregnant again and you have
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a beautiful son, hugo. did fall pregnant again and you have a beautifulson, hugo. we did fall pregnant again and you have a beautiful son, hugo. we can see a picture of hugo now.” a beautiful son, hugo. we can see a picture of hugo now. i had brilliant antenatal care and i can‘t fault it. i was monitored closely and given all the help available. how much did he weigh? 1lb 8. despite the brilliant treatment i got, it looked like history was going to repeat itself. my antenatal team put me on a bed tilted downwards to keep him in as long as possible. he was born at 24 weeks and six days. two weeks further on than my second twin and luckily for us, he made it. every day can make a big difference. professor, when do you think we will start seeing results and things changing a little bit more?” start seeing results and things changing a little bit more? i think there is a series of initiatives. there is the saving babies lives ca re there is the saving babies lives care bundle. in the last few years
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there has been a fall, we hope that carries on and we can meet the secretary of state's target that we reduce still births by 50% by 2030. i think the investment particularly in investigating and trying to prevent pre—term birth is welcome as is the support for reviewing all of these deaths. ok, professor alexander and rachel, thank you very much for coming to tell us your story. hugo is two now, isn‘t he? much for coming to tell us your story. hugo is two now, isn't he? he is. give him a big cuddle from us. more details on the royal wedding of prince harry and meghan markle are expected to be revealed later on today. new measures to drastically cut the number of still births and maternal deaths in england have been announced by the health secretary. matt is in a sleigh now! well, dan
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said he was feeling festive. how is this for my mode of transport? i could do with a cover on because it is cold outside and the forecast for the whole of the uk is for the cold weather to dominate. just not through today, but through the rest of this week. cold with a mixture of sunshine and showers. some of you seeing more of one than the other. there is ice too across parts of scotland, northern ireland, parts of wales, and north—west midlands and north—west england, but the showers have faded. one or two showers this morning in the south east of england. they will disappear. we will have sunshine through the day, but we will see more showers develop, east of scotland and through eastern parts of england. by the time we hit the end of the afternoon, head towards the school journey home and into the rush hour
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and we will have plenty of showers, northern and eastern scotland and into the north—east of england. there will be sleet and snow over the higher ground too. a cold wind making it feel raw as well. but that said, south—west scotland, not a bad day for you. lots of sunshine. north—west england staying dry too. after a dry morning and clear morning across much of the midlands, more cloud through the afternoon, east midlands could catch one or two isolated rain showers. much of east anglia and the south east, once we‘ve lost the isolated shower we have at the moment, most will have a dry and bright day ahead, but it will feel colder than yesterday across will feel colder than yesterday a cross m ost will feel colder than yesterday across most of the uk. temperatures well down on what we saw. at best in southern most counties. even with the sunshine around eight celsius. south—west england, still showers to come through the day as we will see in wales. not as many as yesterday. mainly of rain too. there will be a wintry element to the showers in northern ireland. some hail and sleet mixed in with them and temperatures in the northern half of the uk around three to five celsius for many. into tonight, most of the
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showers are inland will fade away, but we will see the showers continue around the coast. a chilly and raw wind will dominate across eastern parts of england. where you have got the clear skies, there will be a frost. where you have got showers, followed by clear skies, the chance of ice on roads af pavements into the morning. that takes us into wednesday. colder wind. more the morning. that takes us into wednesday. colderwind. more showers across eastern england, eastern parts of scotland where an increased chance of sleet. snow to the higher ground. central and western areas a lwa ys ground. central and western areas always drier and brighter, pembrokeshire and cornwall, there will be a few showers. feeling colder still into thursday, still with plenty of showers across eastern areas. that‘s how it‘s looking. i‘m off to get this on the go! i will be back in half an hour. .it is go! i will be back in half an hour. .itisa go! i will be back in half an hour. . it is a perfect sleigh. thank you so . it is a perfect sleigh. thank you so much, matt. wonderful. thank you very much. we‘ve had an overwhelming reaction to our series shining a light on special educational needs this week and lots of you have been
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in touch with your stories. we‘ve tackled some of the big issues facing families living with special needs and disabilities but we also wanted to hear from some of the young people at the centre of these stories. so we went to oakwood academy, a special school in eccles. i have muscular dystrophy. learning difficulties and autism.” i have muscular dystrophy. learning difficulties and autism. i have adht. autism. asperger's. kbg syndrome. i have down syndrome. i have a speech impairment. when people give me wrong instructions i tend to forget or ask questions. socially i‘m very shy round people and if! socially i‘m very shy round people and if i talk to someone i know my body feels like it‘s in flames. and if i talk to someone i know my body feels like it's in flames. when
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i get upset ijump up and down in frustration. i struggle with reading, telling the time, spelling and at times with my writing.” don‘t have strong muscles like eve ryo ne don‘t have strong muscles like everyone else. i can't concentrate. i'm bouncy like tiger. some muscles don't work like other people's. people may think i don‘t understand things, but i do. other people may struggle i struggle with everything, but i don't. sometimes in public i get a lot of people staring. people say to me, "can you take the mick out of me?" i want to be a dancer when i'm older. a costume designer. i would like to work with children when i leave sixth form.” i would like to work with children when i leave sixth form. i want to do something industry to do with sport. personal trainer
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do something industry to do with sport. personaltrainer or do something industry to do with sport. personal trainer or in do something industry to do with sport. personaltrainer or in pe. right now, i want to be a professional wrestler. my mum and dad are my inspiration. they helped mea dad are my inspiration. they helped me a lot and get me where i am today. my brother, ben because he has the same. disability as me. he's 22 years old and he goes to university. my inspiration is whitney houston. to be a volunteer at youth club. getting my first job. to represent the country playing wheelchair football. when i was a kid the doctor told me i would never talk. so, through the years it got better. so i'm proud of that. amazing.
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they are all from the oak—wood academy. you can tell how much they cared about making sure they got across the right message there. it isa across the right message there. it is a subject matter that‘s touched so is a subject matter that‘s touched so many of our viewers and thank you to so many of you who got in contact. if you‘d like to get in touch with us about your stories, e—mail bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk, or tweet us using the hastag #bbcsend. i will be speaking to carey and david grant who has got children with autism and finding out what life will be like. lay and sarah got in contact to say, "our child is nine years old. we are going through the tribunal process. we spent approximately £10,000 to date. the tactics by the local authority have employed have been shocking and under hand.
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this is anonymous. "it was a fight with the authority to access appropriate support for some of my pupils. i tried very hard in support of the parents, but not always successful. the authorities had a limited budget and since i‘ve retired the budget has deceased again. the resulting stress on families and teachers is truly sad." that‘s the sense you get today from what we have been doing. we have been talking about how many parents had to go to tribunal to get educational support. they are having to fight to get the support they need and they have got notjust pa rents, need and they have got notjust parents, but teachers and special needs co—ordinators all in the battle to get the support they need. we have been talking about the royal wedding and cheese. it is a strange link. i have been reading that when victoria and albert were married in 1840, they celebrated by having a nine—foot cheese! that‘s a big old
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cheese. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. if you thought it was cold yesterday, today will be colder. this wind coming from the arctic, the cold air is staying firmly in place for the rest of this week. temperatures below where they should be for the time of year, a cold feel to the week. this morning some showers, some ice across scotland, northern ireland, north—west england, north wales. we go through the day, the showers confined to the north and east of scotland, strong if not gale force northerly wind making it feel bitterly cold. western and southern scotla nd bitterly cold. western and southern scotland is drier, showers continuing in northern ireland, increasingly showers down the eastern side of england, norfolk and into the midlands. western and southern areas dry and bright, showers in the far west of wales and the south—west of england. through
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this evening and tonight, turning cold and potentially frosty, wintry showers continuing down the eastern side of england, snow over the higher ground, the pennines, down to lower levels. some sleet perhaps first thing on wednesday. this northerly wind again, continuing with showers on the eastern side of england, continuing into london, further west, showers in cornwall and pembrokeshire, otherwise dry, bright and cold. cold start on thursday, the showers down the eastern coast around wales and the south—west of england, those are the temperatures, 5—7d, factor in the wind, feeling much colder, temperatures feeling freezing if not alone. for the rest of the week cold wind, sunshine, wintry showers. that‘s it from me. goodbye. this is business live from bbc news
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with ben thompson and sally bundock. uber faces more scrutiny over it‘s huge data breach. will europe take the pressure up a gear? live from london, that‘s our top story on tuesday the 28th of november. it‘s just one of the crises that‘s prompted japan‘s softbank to slash its offer as it tries
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to buy a big chunk of the ride—hailing app. also in the programme... the bitcoin bandwagon rolls on. the virtual currency passes the $10,000 on some exchanges but is it too good to be true?

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