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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  November 28, 2017 11:00am-1:00pm GMT

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11: a pledge to cut the number of deaths and serious injuries during childbirth. parents will be offered an independent investigation into what went wrong. pope francis is meeting the leader of myanmar, aung san suu kyi, and he's expected to highlight the plight of the persecuted rohingya minority. more details about prince harry and meghan markle‘s wedding are expected to be revealed. former coronation street star bruno langley pleads guilty to sexually assaulting two women at a manchester music venue. six former british soldiers held in prison in india forfour years have been released. also: fears a volcano on the indonesian island of bali may blow its top. mount agung continues to send gas, ash and smoke thousands of meters into the air.
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and another profumo affair revealed — this time spy decades before he resigned over his relationship with christine keeler. good morning. it's tuesday the 28th of november. welcome to bbc newsroom live. new measures are to be introduced to reduce the number of deaths and serious injuries during childbirth in england. for the first time, parents of stillborn babies are to be routinely offered an independent investigation into what went wrong. the uk has already reduced the mortality rate for babies but still lags behind many other european countries. here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes. losing twins during pregnancy, and then having baby
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hugo very prematurely, means rachel understands all too well the challenges childbirth can present. her experience has taught her that parents and medical staff need to be more aware of when things could go wrong. i think it's education of pregnant women to never be afraid to ask questions and raise concerns. and it's also the medical establishment in encouraging them to do so. now, the health secretary in england is announcing rather than hospitals carrying out their own investigations when things go wrong, an independent review will be carried out instead. when i talk to parents whose heart has been broken by something that has gone wrong, in those very small numbers of cases what they say is it's not about the money, theyjust want to know that the nhs has learned from what went wrong so that that the same mistake isn't
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ever going to happen again. the uk lags behind many other european countries when it comes to preventing baby deaths and premature births. there are around nine stillborn babies every day. roughly 50 women still die in england each yearfrom issues related to pregnancy. and around 50,000 babies are born prematurely. progress is being made, but there are concerns that difficult lessons are not being learned. pope francis has urged myanmar to respect human rights, justice and different ethnicities in a keenly—watched public speech on his visit to the country. myanmar is widely accused this year of ethnic cleansing of rohingya muslims. speaking in the last few minutes, he's called for the healing of wounds in myanmar and says people "continue to suffer" from the conflict — but he did not specifically mention the rohingya people in the address. the pope made the speech whilst on stage with the country's de—facto
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leader aung san suu kyi. it is incumbent on us to build a nation founded on laws and constitutions, guaranteeing each and everybody in the land justice and security. your holiness, the challenges that myanmar faces, call for strength and courage and patience. the nation is a rich ta pestry of patience. the nation is a rich tapestry of culture and culture and religion, to the backdrop of national protection. it is the objective of the government to bring out the beauty of the diversity and make it the strength by protecting recruiter, tolerance and sharing security. that was aung san suu kyi, and we will be speaking to our correspondent shortly.
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more details about prince harry and meghan markle's wedding are expected to be announced later today. the couple's engagement was announced yesterday by clarence house, who said the pair were planning to marry in the spring. the archbishop of canterbury has indicated the couple will have a church wedding, saying the couple had "chosen to make their vows to god" in a religious ceremony. 0ur royal correspondent, daniela relph, is at buckingham palace for us this morning. bathed in sunshine! perhaps reflecting the mood 7 bathed in sunshine! perhaps reflecting the mood? it has been a very sunny reaction to the interview. still some details about the wedding that we do not know. yesterday that statement said we would get more details in due course, but we are hoping that perhaps by the end of the day we will know more about the plans. we do not know the date and location. we have just been told spring 2018. march, april, may? with april, we
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already know that the duchess of cambridge is going to be having her third baby. does that rule out april? hopefully we will be finding that out. and the location, is good to bea that out. and the location, is good to be a grand occasion, westminster abbey, or something smaller? to be a grand occasion, westminster abbey, orsomething smaller? perhaps st george's chapel, or even something more different, more independent? those are the things that we are hoping we will get some clarity on shortly. how much do you think that decision rests with the couple themselves? and also gauging public mood? clearly, some other factors a re public mood? clearly, some other factors are going to be at play. it is going to have to be a secure location, the correct sort of place. but ultimately i think it is going to be down to them. prince harry is far enough away from the line of
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succession, to make his own choices. in terms of what he wants. meghan markle is going to have her own view. my think in consultation with the royal household, going to be able to make their own choices, what sort of wedding they want to have. thank you. britain's banks would be able to cope with the consequences of a disorderly exit from the european union — that's according to the governor of the bank of england, mark carney. his comments came as the bank published the results of its latest stress tests on the country's major banks, as well as its latest fiancial stability report. speaking this morning, he said households would feel the impact of a disorderly brexit. in that event, and economic impact
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on households. before markets have been found. and some pain associated with that. this is about dampening that, minimising that, doing what we can in terms of the financial sector. and i think the message from the fpc, we have been very focused on this alongside with the pra, over time we have been building up these reserves of strength in the banking system. there to be used, in the unlikely event that they will be used, but would help the economy adjust and move forward from that point. that was the governor of the bank of england. six former british soldiers who were held in prison in india forfour years have been released.
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the so—called chennai six were arrested on weapons charges. their lawyers say they will have to remain in india a little while longer before they can return home. 0ur correspondent has sent this update from prison. these high walls at the present, it is where six men have been held. the most difficult conditions imaginable, but today they were able to walk free, after all of the charges were squashed. we have got to read for a certified copy to be handed to the authorities. after that happened, they were met by the british consulate. the british consulate has said we have been in touch with british authorities, we understand a number of formalities have to be completed. it is a process that could take several days, perhaps even several weeks. but the main relieved, happy to be out, they have beenin relieved, happy to be out, they have been in touch with families and
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hoping they can get home for christmas. earlier, the sister of one of the men told us how it feels to learn that her brother is going to learn that her brother is going to be released. when we got the building yesterday we never dream for one second that he would be released in a few hours. we got the telephone call about three hours ago. he said i am out! ijust could not believe this. i expected him to call me as soon as he got out but certainly not today. i thought we could been waiting, but he is free, out for good. it is just the most phenomenal, phenomenal news i could ever have got. just some breaking news coming to us from the high
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court, regarding the family of private jeff gray, court, regarding the family of privatejeff gray, who was 17 from hackney, who died at the barracks. they have won the high court action for fresh they have won the high court action forfresh action. the they have won the high court action for fresh action. the young soldier died at deepcut barracks in september 2001. and the corner recorded an open verdict following an inquest in march 2002, but the family an inquest in march 2002, but the fa m ily followed an inquest in march 2002, but the family followed this up and applied to the high court for a new inquest. the attorney general said he was satisfied that fresh evidence had come to light. the family concerned about the circumstances of his death. 0ne about the circumstances of his death. one of a number of soldiers who died at the barracks. some concern rentals. fresh inquest into
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the death of private geoff gray. 11 british 0verseas territories are to receive £70 million of funding to help them rebuild after the recent hurricanes in the caribbean. the money is to be provided by the british government to help rebuild schools, hospitals and ports. the leaders of the territories are to meet theresa may today to update her on the progress made so far. woman has won a landmark case at the court of appealfor woman has won a landmark case at the court of appeal for unmarried couples who suffer bereavement. her partner of 16 years died after an infection was missed, but because she was not married she did not receive any damages. she argued that her inability to clean the payment was a breach of human rights. 0ur correspondent is at the court of justice. this news hasjust broken. give us a sense of what you heard?
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jackie smith brought this case because she was not married to her long—term partner and she thought it was wrong that when he died as a result of negligence at hospital, she thought it was wrong that she was not entitled to any encouragement from the state. these are only meeting people who lose our partner as a result of negligence but at the moment the only people who attended those are people who are married or if it is a civil partnership. jakki smith said that people had long—term partnerships and they should also be included in this. by this is interesting, because she has won this case, lawyers have said that this matter is going to have to be looked at by parliament. they do believe an appetite under the coalition government to actually expand this to include people like jakki smith pot as a subject of interest it had weaned. they are hoping that this is going to be back on the political
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agenda and other people in this position are also going to be entitled to this award. it is £12,980. does this have any wider implications? it comes up in various cases. people often mistakenly think they have entitlements? jakki smith had been living with her partner for 16 years, obviously a solid relationship and she thought she would be entitled to the same things as if they had been married. but after he died, she found out that what was the case. he died as a result of an infection that was not detected. jakki smith thought she had to take this even farther and get some recompense from the state, that other people are entitled to. this is a very significant decision.
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lawyers have been successful this morning. thank you. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: new measures are to be introduced to reduce the number of deaths and serious injuries during childbirth in england. pope francis has delivered a keynote speech in myanmar, saying its people "continue to suffer from civil conflict and hostilities", but without referring specifically to its rohingya people. more details on the royal wedding between prince harry and meghan markle are expected to be revealed later. in sport... england was like ben stokes could be playing cricket in new zealand in the next few days after talks with club side canterbury. speculations he was on his way tojoin canterbury. speculations he was on his way to join the ashes squad but the ecb have said that is not the case. one of england's veteran forward to being recalled ahead of
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the game with australia, going to be on the bench. and wenger said that alexis sanchez and mesut 0zil are still going to be at arsenal after the january transfer window unless something unbelievable happens and he is going to fight to keepjack wilshere. more rumbles after half past. thank you. pope francis has urged myanmar to respect human rights, justice and different ethnicities in a keenly—watched public speech on his visit to the country. of rohingya muslims. we can cross to our correspondent. the eyes of the world watching the speech. it was going to be down to language? it was. the pope had been advised not to use the word
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rohingya, she had done that previously, referring to them as brothers and sisters. he has not done that. he has had a number of other meetings with aung san suu kyi and some outspoken monks. those meetings were private. the language could have been stronger. it was a great appeal not just for tolerance but also to celebrate religious unity. he made the point that a more graphic order had to be built, all groups and non—excluded. rohingya have been excluded. they do not have citizenship. that was as close as he got to any reference. he has avoided any sort of tension here, possibly a negative reaction if he had used that term, rohingya, complaining
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specifically. in that sense, he could regard as diplomatically as successful. but a lot of activists for the rohingya are going to be disappointed. they would have said that using the name, the government refuses to do that, would have ensured rights to an identity. on the one hand, this moral debate but also people looking for some practical progress. talk about how this could be resolved. expecting any announcement about the return of rohingya muslims from bangladesh? no... an agreement already with the bangladesh government but the myanmar government has said they can come back but it is an immense task. they are terrified, villagers have been burned down. limited international presence. it would be
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impossible to guarantee safety. most of us do not believe it is possible that any significant return can happen for any months. it is an ongoing, diplomatic process. what the pope has done, reminding people that he and other key figures believe you should be encouraging tolerance and diversity, not fighting against it. that is what so many myanmar buddhist monks have been doing. we do not know if this is going to have any effect. these conversations with significant figures could prove to have some effect but we do not know the content effect but we do not know the co nte nt of effect but we do not know the content of the conversations. for now, thanks. former coronation street star bruno langley pleads guilty to sexually assaulting two women at a manchester music venue. what do we know about this? bruno
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langley was on coronation street for 16 years. very famous because he was the first openly gay character. also in two dr who episodes. this relates to an evening out in manchester, it was on the 1st of october, early sunday morning, a funk and soul night, and what the magistrates' court held this morning, he has admitted two accounts of sexual assault. two different women. 0ne grabbed at the crotch, one at the back and backside area. he was described as being drunk but was not charged with the other two offences. the districtjudge has as for probation reports, to decide whether
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he will sentence him, or if the case needs to be sent to the manchester crown court, the defendant could face a longer sentence. it was said that he could actually these are possible jail sentence. coronation street, itv ended his contract last month after an internal investigation. thank you. the leaders of ireland's two biggest political parties are resuming talks today to try to avoid a general election. 0pposition mps are demanding that the deputy prime minister, frances fitzgerald, resigns after revelations about a plan to discredit a police whistleblower. 0ur ireland correspondent, chris buckler, is in belfast. it is quite complicated situation, a lot riding on it? complicated ride, simple outcome. potentially a general election before christmas. as you mention, the two main
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parties, have been meeting this morning. they met late last night. planning to do that again this afternoon to avoid a general election taking place. but a real sticking point. it has been going on for several days. the main opposition party won't rid of the deputy prime minister frances fitzgerald. all of this relates to a row when she was the justice minister. she received e—mails outlining an aggressive legal strategy against a police whistle—blower. in simple terms, critics have said they were trying to discredit that whistle—blower. and they have said that she knew about this. she has denied about it but it seems clearer that she knew something about it. that has put more pressure on the government
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party and the republic of ireland to get rid of her. the two sides have been clear. not backing down. we have a real standoff. frankly, if they do not come up with a compromised by this evening, we are looking towards a general election. what do we know about the negotiations? talks ongoing? the two sides are trying to avoid a general election. you get the impression from both that neither want to go back to the polls. the issue is that the party in government and the republic of ireland, it is a minority party. it relies on the support of the main opposition. if they were to take this no—confidence motion against the deputy prime minister, effectively no—confidence motion against the government. if it is taken to the irish parliament, in
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simple terms, they likely lose. at the moment, it is building pressure on the deputy prime minister. pressure on frances fitzgerald to stand down. at the moment, the prime minister has been very clear that he is standing by her. but pressure is growing, and some said pressure in his own party. you will be monitoring developments. thank you. cases of scarlet fever have reached a 50 year high in england. newly published research shows there were over 19,000 cases of the illness reported last year — mostly in schools and nurseries — although it's not clear what's behind the increase. when it comes to aspiration and opportunity, england is becoming increasingly divided according to a new report. the social mobility commission says london and the south—east are still the best place for disadvantaged children to progress, whilst some rural and coastal areas are frequently left behind.
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adina campbell reports. it all started with me wanting to do something... more than a third of children here at this school in nottingham claim school meals and, overall, young people face some of the biggest barriers to succeeding in life according to the social mobility commission. but the school is working hard to change that. it makes me so proud to have this medal! we have learning mentors in school, families have support with attendance, and reading at home, it all comes together to give the children a springboard into the rest of the curriculum. in its latest report the commission says prospects for young people vary in almost all parts of the uk. it says two thirds of the areas in which young people have the best prospects of success are now in london while many rural, coastal and former industrial areas are being left further behind. with the midlands the worst performing region in england. it's notjust children from poor
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backgrounds here in the east midlands who may face some challenges. only a fifth of those in work have senior or professional jobs. you're not really pushed in, i wouldn't say colleges are that good, i didn't feel they encouraged me. around here not many people want to give opportunities to people, if you are already in the job you can progress higher but if you are not and haven't got any background, people are like, sorry. relax your shoulders... the government says it is making progress and social mobility with 1.8 million more children in good or outstanding schools than 2010 and the national living wage helping to boost salaries. a 1a carat vivid pink diamond could fetch in excess of £30 million when it goes up for auction in hong kong today. the ‘pink promise' is the most expensive piece ofjewellery ever offered by christie's in hong kong, and has been described as "the picasso of the pink diamond world".
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an awful lot of money! time now for a look at the weather. we have got some sparkling skies across the united kingdom at the moment. lovely with what it is cold. displayed that, temperatures below average. we will continue to get some showers across west wales, and showers for north—east scotland. increasingly this afternoon. elsewhere, dry weather, temperatures about 5—8. brisk north wind. it is going to be feeling colder than temperatures suggest, about 1—4. this evening, showers continuing to
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fade in across northern scotland and east england, but in between songs clear weather and the chance of some frost. wednesday, cold start, showers across northern and eastern areas. again, showers for cornwall. bye bye. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: pope francis has chosen not to use the term rohingya to identify the country's persecuted minority in his main speech during his visit to myanmar. but he called for a commitment to justice and respect for human rights. new measures aimed at reducing the number of deaths and serious injuries during childbith in england have been announced. the health secretary, jeremy hunt, says he wants to end a blame culture in the nhs and allow lessons to be
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learned. more details about prince harry and meghan markle's wedding are expected to be announced later today. the archbishop of canterbury has indicated that the couple will have a church wedding the government has handed over its analysis of some of the economic impacts of brexit — some details are missing. the brexit secretary david davis says the documents have been redacted to leave out commercially sensitive market information. labour say it could be contempt of parliament. bali's airport remains closed for a second day as mount agung continues to send gas, ash and smoke as high as two miles into the air. officials raised the alert to the highest level on monday, fearing an imminent major eruption. and... another twist in the profumo affair — this time with a glamorous nazi spy — decades before the conservative
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minister resigning over his relationship with christine keeler. now, a look at the sport headlines. england all—rounder ben stokes could be playing cricket in new zealand in the next few days. he's on his way there are talks with club side canterbury. after he was spotted at heathrow airport, there was speculation on social media that he was going to join the ashes squad in australia but the ecb say that's not the case. our sports correspondent andy swiss is following the tour. welcome to adelaide airport where england's players have arrived from brisbane. plenty for them to think about before the second test gets underway on saturday. while they we re underway on saturday. while they were flying here, the big talking point was another cricketer making a plane journey, a picture point was another cricketer making a planejourney, a picture appearing on twitter which it was claimed was ben stokes at an airport. that prompted fevered speculation he was
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on his way to austria, the england cricket board say he is not but on his way to new zealand. it is said he is making a private trip to new zealand to spend time with his family but it seems he wants to buy cricket out there because the new zealand side canterbury say they have held initial formal zealand side canterbury say they have held initialformal discussions with him over his availability for forthcoming matches. although he is suspended from england duty, it is understood they would be happy for him to play for a side in new zealand. another intriguing development on this ongoing saga. veteran forward chris heighington has been recalled by england for saturday's rugby league world cup final against australia. he played in the first two matches — including defeat to australia in their opening game. he takes a spot on the bench, with james roby starting at hooker. the former england manager sam allardyce is the leading contenderfor the evertonjob. he had been an early candidate to succeed ronald koeman, but withdrew after everton were slow to make an offer. they've lost five out of their last
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seven games under caretaker boss david unsworth, so their search for a new manager is taking on some urgency. arsenal manager arsene wenger says striker alexis sanchez and midfielder mesut 0zil will still be at arsenal after the january transfer window "unless something unbelievable happens". both players' contracts expire at the end of the season but they're key figures for wenger. 0zil has more assists than any other player in the premier league. and sanchez has scored 56 goals since arriving from barcelona three years ago. he almost moved to manchester city on the final day of the summer window, before wenger pulled the plug. wenger also says he'll fight to keep jack wilshere at arsenal. he spent last season on loan at bournemouth. and has yet to make a premier league start this season. it is best interest to stay here we
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will fight 100% for him to stay here because he is a guy who is top quality. he is back it now. —— back to fitness. when you have a top—quality player, you wanting to be at arsenal —— you want him to be at arsenal. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, has suggested the government may be in contempt of parliament by withholding information on how sectors of the british economy could be affected by leaving the eu. sources close to the brexit secretary, david davis, have accused labour of pressing for material that could compromise the national interest. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is in westminster. we seem to be facing another showdown between mps and ministers over brexit yet again. which has scarred this whole brexit process.
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now the latest row over documents which are meant to illustrate the impact of brexit on different parts of the economy. the government have handed over 850 pages. i understand they have been photocopied by the committee and they are deciding what to do with them. they are not happy because they have not got all the information. the government has withheld key elements of those documents which are commercially sensitive, others which they believe might give eu negotiators and advantage. the mps say, no, the house of commons voted to see all the documents, you must hand it over and this morning the shadow exit secretary suggest, was threatening to pursue david davis for contempt of court if he does not hand over all the paperwork. i think the government is treating parliament with contempt. parliament voted that these documents should be handed over. at the 11th hour, david davis says, i am not going to hand them over. that is treating
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parliament with contempt. what does the government says? they say they do not have 58 separate impact assessment reports. looking at the detailed consequences for those 58 different bits of the economy once we leave the eu. instead, they say we have lots of documents, lots of thorough analysis, but not the information the mps want. however, many people, reporting an interview that david davis said on the andrew marr show, he clearly said they did have the impact reports, have a listen. you make the decisions based on the data. ido i do not make decisions. that data is being gathered, we've got 50, nearly 60 sectoral analyses already done. customs. we've got planning work on 22 other issues which are critical.
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127 all told. all of them have got to be grounded before we come to the conclusion what it looks like. a tedious task of the paperwork? no, not quite. a clash over who is running the show when it comes to brexit. is it ministers shaping the sort of brexit deal we should have? 0r sort of brexit deal we should have? or should parliament have all the information so they can shape it? that has been the story of brexit since day one. article 50, the high court decision forcing ministers to how they vote in parliament. then, the row over the eu withdrawal bill. the row over a... and now a row over the paper detailing the impact of brexit. a tussle between parliament and government. a yougov survey for bbc five live suggests that more than a third of mums have experienced mental
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health issues related to motherhood. this includes things like postpartum depression, acute stress, severe anxiety. that's compared to 17% of dads. nearly a third of working mums feel discriminated against at work because they are a parent — compared to 14% of working dads. this lunchtime five live is hosting a debate about mums and mental health live from blackpool tower — called mumta keover they'll be discussing the challenges faced by mothers of all ages. alison freeman reports. having fun together, but it has not always been so easy for lauren. she has been suffering from postnatal depression since she had her first child six years ago. medical issues meant mum and her new baby were separated during that vital time after birth and they struggled to bond. lauren had another two children, but the mental health problems continued. i wouldn't go out. the curtains, the blinds,
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i didn't want people passing, i thought they could see i was a bad mum. so i would keep the blinds and curtains shut. i wouldn't answer the door. i wouldn't go shopping. at one point it was really bad where i just wouldn't leave a certain room in the house. lauren is certainly not alone. a survey for bbc five live found that more than a third of mums said they had experienced mental health issues related to motherhood. more than two thirds say they had sought professional help as a result. 15% of mums, around one in seven, said they didn't get any emotional support for their parenting. suicide is one of the leading causes of death amongst new mothers and, unlike physical causes like infections, it isn't showing and, unlike physical causes like infections, it isn't showing signs of improving. in fact, it is getting worse. and that is why experts are saying
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more needs to be done to show new mums that help is out there. lauren is one of the lucky ones who has been helped by a support group at her local children's centre. but it is a problem that can often be unrecognised and untreated. if you are living with a mental illness, you are not just living with the stigma and the thought that, if you come forward, you might have social services breathing down your neck. but you are also living with the stigma where you are expected just to get on with it. campaigners say mental health services have been long underfunded across the uk. but while there have been pledged increases, they believe there is still a long way to go. let's head over to blackpool tower — where we can talk to our reporter jo black at the mumtakeover event... this is where the mumtakeover will
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be taking on this afternoon. preparation is going on furiously, mothers turning up with their babies. the sets, rehearsals, make up. celebrity mums like stacey solomon and rachel humans. it is supposed to be the uk's biggest conversation about parenthood. talking about a five life survey out today in relation to parenthood. this sophie, a mother of two, she is a freelance journalist. and a broadcaster, mum of one. and claire, mum of two. all have suffered mental health issues with regards to parenthood. that is what the five
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live commission has come out with today. around a third of mums suffering mental health issues in relation to parenthood. dog us through the issues you have had —— talk us through the issues. since i was pregnant with my first child i suffered from anxiety and depression. that's developed when i was pregnant with my second child and experienced an episode of psychosis. it made sense that throughout my life i had been having these psychotic episodes. i found that pregnancy really highlighted it, made it worse. as well as the vulnerable times, the early days of having children. making them have a good start. you have so much pressure, coupled with a mental illness, it can be difficult. this survey highlighted of the 38% of mums who had suffered mental health
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problems, 69% went on to get help. was it easy for you to get up? i was lucky, i have always had some sort of mental illness are always support from my mental health nurse. my gp would not help me. they wanted me on more medication. things were getting really bad with my psychosis. luckily, one of the doctors at the hospital gave me the help i needed after flagging me up. hospital gave me the help i needed afterflagging me up. my hospital gave me the help i needed after flagging me up. my gp did not do anything. you said you were lucky, already in the mental health system, so you could access help? there are still other barriers to help. even though i am in the mental health system, childcare is a massive barrier to support for me. that is something i still face today. i was lucky because i have beenin today. i was lucky because i have been in the mental health system for quite a while but other mothers in deep, dark times might not have that
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support. also it takes so long to get that support. i was one of the lucky ones. without it, i would have been removed from my children or my children removed from me. serious, then. you have suffered from postnatal depression. all three of you are here, very open about your mental health issues, lots of people talking about that today. is itjust me or are people quite willing and open at the moment? we have all realised the more you open up the conversation, you feel free. it is a real weight off, you feel. i was a workaholic. i fell pregnant and took one year off. i felt lonely and isolated. i had a slipped disc, back surgery, after my daughter was born. that time, those challenges, sent me
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under, mentally. iwent that time, those challenges, sent me under, mentally. i went for a holistic way of healing, acupuncture every week and fortnight. i did not need medicate it. i had great family and friends around me. but opening up and friends around me. but opening up and talking about it has spurred me on to feel better and wants to help other new mothers. we are all in this together, we all go through the things mothers go through with their children. it is about using their children. it is about using the internet for good. searching for the internet for good. searching for the right things, getting people the support they need and be there for each other. today is such an important event. what about the pressures a re important event. what about the pressures are parenthood today? used it to people, women from a much older generation, ladies today, they say, they have it easier than what it used to be back in the day? nowadays, women have so many more challenges. balancing work and in particular is a really tricky. there are lots of women want to go out to
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work now. to have your own identity is something i have struggled with since my first child, you lose a sense of food you are. work, for me, it gives me that sense of who i am, and self—worth. —— a sense of who you are. juggling everything around that. working full—time, two children. i rely heavily on my social support network. for women who do not have that or a supportive partner, it is incredibly difficult. the conference yesterday, we will hear from these three ladies and other mothers and fathers like them who have suffered mental health problems as a result of becoming a pa rent problems as a result of becoming a parent and the big conversation that is taking place here today will be streamed live on facebook between 1pm and 3pm this afternoon. this afternoon's debate — called ‘mumta keover‘, will be streamed live on bbc radio five live's facebook
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page between one — 3pm this afternoon — as well as highlights and streaming at bbc. co. uk/mumta keover. and you can find out more, watch highlights and get involved by going to bbc.co.uk/mumtakeover. 0r searching for the hashtag #mumtakeover on social media. for support or advice on any of the topics discussed, go to the bbc actionline web page. bbc.co.uk/actionline. the irish deputy prime minister has resigned, reports say. what more can you tell us? the cabinet meeting is still ongoing. the national broadcaster is saying she has given an indication she will resign. it
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tends to force a general election it has centre on. e—mails about legal strategy to discredit a police whistle—blower intended to be taken by the irish police force. increasing pressure on her over the weekend to avoid the legal crisis. if she wasn't prepared to do it, they would have forced a general election. government sources have told rta that frances fitzgerald is going to stand on this afternoon to avoid a political crisis and a general election. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour. but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live: pope francis has delivered a keynote speech in myanmar, without referring specifically to
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the rohingya people but are saying there were still conflict and facilities. —— hostilities new measures are to be introduced to reduce the number of deaths of deaths and serious injuries during childbirth in england. more details on the royal wedding between prince harry and meghan markle are expected to be revealed later. now, the business news. the uk's banks could cope if britain leaves the european union in a "disorderly brexit". that's the finding of the bank of england's so—called "stress tests". for the first time since the financial crisis, all of the uk's biggest lenders have passed the criteria to cope with an economic downturn. the number of new office buildings getting under way in london has fallen by nearly 10% in the past six months, according to a study by consultants deloitte. it says political uncertainty has been holding back development. a massive £1.11 billion
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was spent in online sales in the uk on black friday — up nearly 12% on last year. trade body imrg says online was the winner, with high streets, shopping centres and retail parks faring badly with visitor numbers down 3.6%. if the uk left the eu in a disorderly brexit, our banks are prepared. the bank of england has published the results of its stress tests to measure how well they would cope. it's the first time since the financial crisis that all uk banks have passed tests — designed to see how well they cope with a varying degrees of a downturn in the economy. bank governor mark carney said the banks would withstand the "unlikely event" of no deal when brexit happens. despite the severity of the test,
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for the first time since 2014 since the bank began testing, no one has two strengthen... the banking system can continue to support the real economy even in the unlikely event ofa economy even in the unlikely event of a disorderly exit. at the same timea of a disorderly exit. at the same time a series of actions have been published, institutions and authorities to look at crosscutting financial stability risks in relation... joining us now is frances coppola, independent banking commentator. talking about the potential for a disorderly brexit, the banks have to be ready? we hope it will go smoothly but in the event it doesn't
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happen it is reassuring to know the banks, it seems, are fire walled from any problems. what do the banks need to be prepared for? in a no deal brexit, loss of access they need to be prepared for. to the european union. the bank of england talks about it quite a bit in the financial stability report issued today, talking about things like dealing with insurance contracts. and things, like access to cross—border payments. that is not what they have covered in the stress test. they have looked at the bank's ability to withstand an economic downturn that might include a
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colla pse downturn that might include a collapse in the value of pounds sterling and the market. those are out with the possibility of a disorderly brexit. talking about credit. personal indebtedness was that it credit. personal indebtedness was thatitis credit. personal indebtedness was that it is on their radar, if the economy slips into a recession whether we would be able to pay back what we owe. that is a risk. the bank of england highlights unsecured consumer credit. historically, it says, people are more likely to pay the mortgage than unsecured credit like credit cards. banks would suffer from unsecured consumer credit. they say the stress test showed the banks can absorb the losses which is reassuring. news that the banks have passed the
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stress test, the first time since the financial crisis they are resilient. back to westminster. we know now roughly what is going to happen, the committee are going to summon david davis to appear before him to explain why he has not handed over all the documents they are demanding. steven kinnock is a labour member of the committee. we have the urgent question, kerr starmer will ask david davis searching questions about what is going on. we will constantly remind the secretary of state there was a unanimous most —— unanimously agreed motion for the government to provide the committee with un—redacted,
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un—edited information. their failure to do so is looking like a breach of parliamentary privilege potentially in consent of parliament. is that just labour members turning on david davis or is that wider unease?“ you look at the quotes in the press today, jacob made it clear there was a vote of parliament, the motion is binding, the speaker has ruled it is binding, the speaker has ruled it is binding and it therefore looks like there is serious grounds for contempt of parliament. there is cross—party contempt of parliament. there is cross— party consensus. it contempt of parliament. there is cross—party consensus. it is not often i agree withjacob but he is spot on. state of play is the committee will resume this afternoon to have a look at the 850 pages, summoning david davis to appear before them and warning him if he
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does not hand over all the documents they demand, david davis could be in consent of parliament, which could bea consent of parliament, which could be a extraordinary turn of events for a government minister to be found potentially in contempt of parliament. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two — first we leave you with for a look at the weather... you don't need me to tell you that if you have been outside it is cold. the air is coming all the way from the arctic. coming down across the uk, the situation is with us for much of this week. as the air comes from the north, crisp, cold, also cleaner air mass. blue guys, sunshine. —— blue skies. showers
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producing rainbows. showers across west wales, south—west england. north eastern scotland, the eastern side of england will stop sunshine in between. the area is going to field goal. this evening, showers around is amateur, cornwall. for most, dry with clear spells, turning joe quickly. —— turning chile quickly. showers lincolnshire, yorkshire. wintry across the north east of scotland. accumulations of snow above 200 metres. feeling bitterly cold. risk of ice developing. tonight in the north east of scotland... showers on the strong northerly wind. temperatures close to freezing to start off
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wednesday. a cold start with patchy frost. these showers continuing. perhaps on wednesday the showers further south towards london and the south east. fewer across scotland. 0ne ought to matter in pembrokeshire and cornwall. temperatures 3—7. the situation at the moment, this high—pressure system towards the west blocking weather systems coming from the atlantic, giving us a northerly airstream. bringing us a cold day on thursday. for the showers on the east of england, south—west england. 3—5 celsius. in the wind, feeling more like freezing if not alone. a particularly cold day on thursday. for the rest of the week, the cold wind, a lot of sunshine, wintry showers towards eastern coasts and the north west of
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scotland. more on the website. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 12pm: pope francis delivers a keynote speech in myanmar but doesn't refer specifically to its rohingya people. the irish deputy prime minister is reported to have quit to save the minority government from being forced to call a snap election. a pledge to cut the number of deaths during childbirth, and parents are promised full independent investigations in future. a woman wins a landmark battle for greater legal recognition for unmarried couples who suffer bereavement if a person dies as a result of negligence. also: fears a volcano on the indonesian island of bali may blow its top. mount agung continues to send gas, ash and smoke thousands of metres into the air. and another profumo affair revealed, this time with a glamorous nazi spy decades before he resigned over his relationship with christine keeler.
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good afternoon. it's tuesday the 28th of november. welcome to bbc newsroom live. pope francis has called for respect for all ethnic groups and a healing of wounds in myanmar — but during a speech in the country's capital, he avoided referring to the persecuted rohingya people by name. myanmar is widely accused this year of ethnic cleansing of rohingya muslims. the pope had faced calls from human rights groups to raise myanmar‘s treatment of the rohingya muslims during talks with the de—facto
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leader, aung san suu kyi. myanmar doesn't recognise the rohingya as a distinct ethnic group. it is incumbent on us to build a nation founded on laws and constitutions, guaranteeing each and everybody in the land justice, freedom and security. your holiness, the challenges that myanmar faces are many. each calls for strength and courage and patience. the nation is a rich tapestry of people, culture and religion, to the backdrop of national protection. it is the objective of the government to bring out the beauty of the diversity and make it the strength by protecting rights, tolerance and sharing security. 0ur correspondentjonathan head who's in yangon has been explaining
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to me pope francis' use of diplomatic language which stopped short of explicit reference to the rohingya people. the pope had been advised not to use the word rohingya, he had done that previously, referring to them as brothers and sisters. he has not done that. he has had a number of other meetings with aung san suu kyi and powerful armed forces and some outspoken monks. those meetings were private. the language could have been stronger. it was a great appeal not just for tolerance but also to celebrate religious unity. he made the point that a more demographic order had to be built, all groups and non—excluded. rohingya have been excluded from public life. they do not have citizenship. that was as close as he got to any reference. he has avoided any sort of tension here, possibly a negative reaction if he had used that term, rohingya, complaining specifically.
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in that sense, he could regard this as diplomatically as successful. but a lot of activists for the rohingya are going to be disappointed. they would have said that using the name, the government refuses to do that, would have ensured rights to an identity. 0n the one hand, this moral debate but also people looking for some practical progress? talk about how this crisis could be resolved. are we expecting any announcement about the return of rohingya muslims from bangladesh and so on? no... an agreement already with the bangladesh government but it has difficulties. the myanmar government has said they can come back but it is an immense task. 6,000 people. frankly they are terrified, villages have been burned down.
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limited international presence in the state. it would be impossible to guarantee safety. most of us do not believe it is possible that any significant returns can happen for any months. it is an ongoing, fraught diplomatic process. what the pope has done, i supppose, is remind people that he and other key figures believe you should be encouraging tolerance and diversity, not fighting against it. that is what so many myanmar buddhists and leading monks have been doing. we do not know if this is going to have any effect. these private conversations with significant figures could prove to have some effect long term but we do not know the content of the conversations. in the last few minutes, we have had unconfirmed reports that the irish dignity minister frances fitzgerald
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has resigned. over the handling of a police whisteblower. coalition parties had been holding crisis talks this morning to prevent a snap election over the affair. the cabinet meeting is still ongoing. but rte, that irish national broadcaster has said she has given an indication she is going to resign. that is the deputy prime minister, frances fitzgerald, and it is over her that the potential general election has really centred on. she knew about legal strategy that was apparently intended to discredit a police whistle—blower, and an increasing pressure on her over the weekend to stand down and avoid this political crisis. the main opposition party have made clear that if she was not prepared to do that they would force a general election. it seems clear
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that government sources have told rte that frances fitzgerald is going to stand down this afternoon. that is going to avoid a political crisis and general election. chris buckler there. the duchess of cambridge is visiting a museum in central london this morning and we have been listening to what she has said. great news. how do you feel about yesterday's announcement? william andl yesterday's announcement? william and i are thrilled. it is a very happy time for any couple. we wish them all the best. just a very short comment from the duchess of cambridge, arriving for a royal visit this morning. 0ur royal correspondent, daniela relph, is at buckingham palace for us now. that was just a short comment what
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we are expecting some more details later? it is interesting listen to the duchess of cambridge because nobody knows more than horror what this feels like. she is somebody who has been in exactly the same position, the photo calls, the television interviews, talking about the relationship. she knows exactly what made him —— meghan markle must be feeling. yesterday we were just told that the marriage would be sprang, spring 2018. we do not have an exact date. for most people that probably means, march, april, may. but the issue with april is that the duchessis but the issue with april is that the duchess is going to have her third baby in april. could that rule april
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out? hopefully we will find that out later. and the venue. going to go for the traditional wedding in london, perhaps westminster abbey has been done on many occasions? 0r something different? it could be st george's chapel in windsor. it is smaller, more intimate, perhaps something like that. perhaps even something like that. perhaps even something completely different. those are the biggest pieces of information we are still waiting on. thank you very much forjoining us. what have you made about the public address or pope francis? it is an important contribution. he has this extraordinary profile, and is
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respected around the world. the fact he is talking about respecting human rights and protecting minorities, different ethnic groups, it is an important step. a few years ago when i visited myanmar, over 100,000 people had been displaced. very little national attention can put to the recent escalation of violence. it is appalling. but one thing that we can take comfort in, leading figures such as the pope are highlighting this. i hope it makes a difference to this visit. i hope that the burmese government, both military and civilian, take this message of protecting all the communities and making sure that rights are protected. making a contribution to the success of the country. should the message have been more explicit? some people hoping he would use the world
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rohingya, despite the difficulties of that? i can understand that. but the fact that he was spending that time, having those discussions with the head of the military and other sections of the government, i understand he could also be visiting bangladesh. 1 million people have been displaced. concern about repatriation. but that has to go hand—in—hand witha repatriation. but that has to go hand—in—hand with a political settlement. and that requires action by the barneys, —— burmese military. so far, the interventions that the international committee has applied have not worked. you mentioned the civilian government. a huge amount of criticism about aung san suu kyi.
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some disappointment that she has not been vocal on this. what do you make of that? it is incredibly disappointing. i believe that she should have used her voice. she has this huge democratic mandate. she has historically been a very important voice in standing up for human rights. and also the pro—democracy movement. from being under house arrest, she has transformed the country. i can understand that and i can feel the sense of disappointment. having gained power, she has not been able to stand up for the minorities that have been persecuted. and the fact that genocide and ethnic cleansing have gone on an horror watch. i also think it is important we continue to apply pressure on the military who are prosecuting these crimes against humanity. that requires the united
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nations and also bans on travel, sanctions against business interests. the military is still keeping the wheels of the country, benefiting. benefiting as they have been prosecuting genocide. that requires the international committee to keep applying pressure on the military and take action. it is important these visits happen and the media continue to highlight what has gone on and to go on, continues it is vital that our government and other governments take action against the one military. thank you. new measures are to be introduced to reduce the number of deaths and serious injuries during childbirth in england. for the first time, parents of stillborn babies are to be
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routinely offered an independent investigation into what went wrong. the uk has already reduced the mortality rate for babies but still lags behind many other european countries. here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes. losing twins during pregnancy, and then having baby hugo very prematurely, means rachel understands all too well the challenges childbirth can present. her experience has taught her that parents and medical staff need to be more aware of when things could go wrong. i think it's education of pregnant women to never be afraid to ask questions and raise concerns. and it's also the medical establishment in encouraging them to do so. now, the health secretary in england is announcing rather than hospitals carrying out their own investigations when things go wrong, an independent review will be carried out instead. when i talk to parents whose heart has been broken by something that has gone wrong, in those very small numbers of cases what they say is it's not about the money, theyjust want to know that the nhs has learned from what went wrong
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so that that the same mistake isn't ever going to happen again. the uk lags behind many other european countries when it comes to preventing baby deaths and premature births. there are around nine stillborn babies every day. roughly 50 women still die in england each yearfrom issues related to pregnancy. and around 50,000 babies are born prematurely. progress is being made, but there are concerns that difficult lessons are not being learned. the family of a soldier who died at an army barracks 16 years ago have won their high court action for a fresh inquest. 17—year—old private geoff gray was found with two gunshot wounds to his head in september 2001 at the deepcut army barracks in surrey. an inquest six months after his death recorded an open verdict. fresh evidence now means there can be a fresh inquest. the headlines on bbc newsroom live:
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pope francis has delivered a keynote speech in myanmar, without referring specifically to its rohingya people but saying there was still suffering "from civil conflict and hostilities". new measures are to be introduced to reduce the number of deaths and serious injuries during childbirth in england. the duchess of cambridge says she and prince william are "absolutely thrilled" about prince harry's wedding to meghan markel. plenty more to come. but time for a look at the sport now... good afternoon. england all—rounder ben stokes could be playing cricket in new zealand in the next few days. he's on his way there following talks with club side canterbury. after he was spotted at heathrow airport, there was speculation on social media that stokes was going to join the ashes squad in australia but the ecb say that's not the case.
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our sports correspondent andy swiss is following the tour. and, england was more players have arrived. plenty to think about before the second test on saturday. when they were flying high, another creditor was making a planejourney. a picture appeared on twitter, ben stokes at their report. that prompted speculation he was coming to australia. the ecb have he is not. said on his way to new zealand. private trip to new zealand to spend some time with his family. it also seems he wants to play some cricket. the new zealand team canterbury have said they have been holding informal discussions about his availability for forthcoming
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discussions about his availability forforthcoming matches. ben stokes is suspended from england duty but it is understood they would be happy for him to play for a in new zealand. another intriguing development in this saga. veteran forward chris heighington has been recalled by england for saturday's rugby league world cup final against australia. he played in the first two matches, including defeat to australia in their opening game. he takes a spot on the bench, with james roby starting at hooker. to rugby union — and wales will be without lock jake ball and flanker justin tipuric for their final autumn international, against south africa on saturday. ball dislocated his shoulder in the defeat by new zealand at the weekend and needs surgery, so dragons' cory hill is favourite to partner captain alun wyn jones in the second row. tipuric has a thigh injury. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. thank you. the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, has suggested
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the government may be in contempt of parliament by withholding information on how sectors of the british economy could be affected by leaving the eu. sources close to the brexit secretary, david davis, have accused labour of pressing for material that could compromise the national interest. 0ur assistant ppolitical editor, norman smith, is in westminster. it seems to be something of a stand—off between david davis and the brexit select committee, david davis insisting he does not have the information that mps want, these 58 impact assessment reports. not going to hand over documentation because some of that is commercially sensitive. the committee have said thatis sensitive. the committee have said that is not good enough, parliament voted, telling david davis he has two handover documents. the committee have written to him, telling him to appear before them...
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pronto! they have also raised the prospect that david davis could possibly even be in contempt of parliament. i am joined possibly even be in contempt of parliament. iam joined byjacob rees—mogg. parliament. iam joined byjacob rees-mogg. it is breach of privilege. it is deemed to be binding. the government has an obligation to meet the terms of that address. it is not at the discretion, it has got to fulfil the demand of parliament. the government cannot provide information it does not have what it has to provide information on the terms set out in that motion passed weeks ago. what happens if david davis says i do not have that information, i cannot comply? if he does not have it, that is not what was demanded. 0n comply? if he does not have it, that is not what was demanded. on that, fine to say that. but what is much more difficult, is to say that this
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information is confidential. the motion does not differentiate between types of information. the government could have voted it down. they didn't. by accepting the motion they must accept the responsibility to provide information they have. what do you say to conservative supporters, saying hang on, you are an mp, landing david davis in deep doo doo! whips didn't ask us to vote it down. the government allowed this to pass unanimously. the government accepted this. having done that, it cannot turn round and say we won't do it. be fat is the position, it should have asked mps to vote it down, even putting down an amendment limiting the fate. it is down to the government to amend the humble
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address, protecting information it is concealed, concerned about. one of the central arguments of the leave campaign was taking back control to parliament. in that context, how damaging would this potentially be for the government and david davis, should any motion be put down, suggesting he had defied parliament? we are still a long way from that. the issue of breach of privilege can be raised privately with the speaker. it can then go to the four of the house, and committee privileges. we are a long way considering if it has been any breach. but where humble addresses have been ignored in other commonwealth parliaments, it is a serious matter. but for you, it is
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constitutional. you are not bothered about the documents?” constitutional. you are not bothered about the documents? i would happily have voted for these not to be made public. my concern, is that we will be in opposition one day. these protections exist to prevent governments from behaving in an arbitrary fashion. that is why the house of commons has rights. if in government, close rights are abused, we will not have a leg to stand on when we criticise governments. it is of critical importance. all precedent says this is binding. thank you very much, jacob rees—mogg. we could get more on this shortly. in the next few minutes david davis is going to be in the house of commons, and chewing questions about this. we will get
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the brexit secretary's responds in about five minutes. thank you. some breaking news. essentially confirming what we had got wind of. regarding the political situation in ireland. the tea deputy prime minister, frances fitzgerald resigning over this whistle—blower controversy. all of this led to a huge spat between the two key parties, threatening an election before christmas. you can see frances fitzgerald, the woman in question. it was about what she knew about whistle—blower, in the garda, who had made criticisms of police
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behaviour. we hear... she has agreed to resign. the threat of that snap general election has been averted. more on that to come. a woman has won a landmark case at the court of appeal for unmarried couples who suffer bereavement. her partner of 16 years died after an infection was missed, but because she was not married she did not receive any damages. she argued that her inability to clean the payment was a breach of human rights. we can speak to the water of jakki smith. thank you very much for taking the time to speak to us. talk us through the basis of appeal? this widely felt it was so important that was taken? when jakki smith came to me in relation to her damages crime, we had to inform her that as she was
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not married to her partner she would not married to her partner she would not be entitled to treatment damages in the same way that married couples would be. instantly, she told me that she felt this was unfair, something that lawyers in this area share. 0nce crimes had settled... we pursued the human rights challenge against the secretary of state for justice. that human rights challenge was today accepted. 0n justice. that human rights challenge was today accepted. on what grounds did you explore this? we argued it was in breach of respect for family life. that this meant she should not be discriminated against. in the way that married couples would be treated differently. this meant she should be able to at least argue
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that in the future those who are unmarried, but who have stable and committed relationships should receive arrangement damages.“ sounds as though this could have genuine long term impacts for other people in a similar position? absolutely. 0ne people in a similar position? absolutely. one of the issues before the court was that the number of those co—habiting, opposite six and same six, has risen significantly since this legislation was introduced. it could affect thousands of people and the court has also declare this piece of legislation incompatible. armament is going to have to look at this. hopefully they are going to take the steps to amend the law, sober people like jakki smith in the future can have relationships, commitment and loyalty recognised with treatment
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damages. thank you very much. thank you. newly declassified m15 files have revealed thatjohn profumo, the former conservative minister of war, had a long affair with a glamorous nazi spy. the politician was forced to resign in 1963 after he was found to have shared a mistress — christine keeler — with a soviet spy in london. we can talk about this new information. this is going to be a new chapter in the saga? absolutely fascinating. we have gotjohn profumo, older viewers may recall he resigned due to an affair with keeler. in these files... john profumo was basically having an
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affair with a glamorous german, and it transpired that she was walking with nazi intelligence. we have seen commons notepaper. the possibility thatjohn profumo could have been threatened with blackmail in the 50s. basically, history repeating itself. this predates christine keeler. it should have informed his behaviour at a later date. had an eye for ladies but not learning lessons! clearly, very bad judgment when it comes to women! the should have known better. the secretary of state for defence. basically, hooking up with these women, and we find out they had a part of intelligence. it was leaving him
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open to blackmail. it was dangerous and this demonstrates that somebody who should know better does not. really small question. the woman in question, there was a little bit about her and the story? she came to britain in the 30s, in the files, described as glamorous and she by all accounts had a number of relationships with high—ranking individuals of oxford. 0ne relationships with high—ranking individuals of oxford. one of these wasjohn individuals of oxford. one of these was john profumo. she individuals of oxford. one of these wasjohn profumo. she went back to germany, becoming the mistress of the german military general, then she was arrested after the war. falls in love with herjailer. disappearing from paris, and letters relating to john profumo found disappearing from paris, and letters relating tojohn profumo found in apartments where she lived. at that point, m15 concerned about how this
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looks. later, john profumo falling four basically somebody similar. amazing. it has been a thank you very much. it has been a busy morning, here is the weather. feeling cold and colder still to the next two days. dragging in cold air from the north. cold arctic air. temperatures dropping away, today sunny spells with showers. largely in the north—east. scattering of showers... temperatures not up to much. temperatures overnight extending further south. a future as for wales, the south—west, northern ireland. dry weather, clearspells
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allowing temperatures to fall away. tomorrow, sunny spells and showers, a cold start. showers extending further south. best of the brightness in the west, south—west scotland, wales, south—west of england. sunny spells and showers for northern ireland, giving cool with temperatures in single figures. this is bbc newsroom live, our latest headlines: pope francis has chosen not to refer specifically to the persecuted rohingya people during his speech in myanmar. he has met with the country's de—facto leader, aung san suu kyi, on the second day of his visit to the country. in the last half—hour ireland's
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digital minister has resigned to avoid a snap general election. frances fitzgerald was embroiled in a row over the handling of a police whistle—blower. measures to reduce the number of deaths and serious injuries during childbirth in england have been announced. health secretary, jeremy hunt, says he wants to end a blame culture in the nhs and allow lessons to be learned. more details are expected later on the wedding of prince harry and meghan markle. the duchess of cambridge says she and prince william are delighted by the news. william and i are absolutely thrilled. exciting news. a really happy time, we wish them all the best and hope they enjoy this happy moment. we will hear from mothers we will hearfrom mothers in blackpool about their experience of mental hill fog issues after giving birth. -- mental hill fog issues after giving birth. —— mental health issues.
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bali's airport remains closed for a second day as mount agung many despite warnings are reluctant to move to safety. translation: what happens is in the hands of god. even primary schools are still open here its protects the health. tens
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of thousands of people have evacuated the area. many of these people months ago. they went back briefly to their home when things calmed down but now forced to get back into this makeshift shelter. for many, a tough and uncertain time. it has been months and now i have found out my house is covered in ash.
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i have two young children, what will be too. rivers are swelling with cold lava coming fox the volcano. bringing with it, fertile soil. the watch calmly to see what it will do next. let's cross live now to the house of commons where the shadow brexit secretary is asking an urgent question soon. he will have questions for the government and david davis... lets this intojohn government and david davis... lets this into john bercow. may or may not be later occasions for that matter to be discussed. this is the
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correct procedure. i know the house will trust me to know of what i speak. urgent question, so care starmer. —— will the secretary for exiting the european union make a statement about sectorial analysis carried out... on the 1st of november this house passed the motion asking for impact assessment acting for analysis. the government takes its responsibilities seriously. in the past week the bombers have work to collect and bring together the information in an accessible and informative way. i can confirm this information has been provided not
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only to the committee for exiting the european union but the house of lords eu committee and administrations. i can inform the house that we have initiated discussions with the parliamentary authorities to make this information available to all colleagues through available to all colleagues through a reading group. we were clear we would respond to the motion from the start but also the documents did not exist in the form requested. i make it clear, during the debate on the day i made it clear. but there has been a misunderstanding. it is not a series of 58 impact statements. it is quantitative analysis... the house itself recognised that whilst ministers should be as open as possible with parliament the government has an obligation to consider whether it would be if the material was published. it is important that we recognise in some cases that there are confidential
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analysis, underpinning ministers in negotiation options in various scenarios. such advice to ministers must remain private. in light of that, the secretary of state made a statement explaining that given the documents did not exist in the form requested it would take time to collate and present, within three weeks. in providing information to the committee yesterday, we have met the committee yesterday, we have met the commitment. it would undermine our negotiating position. contrary to assertions, the committee did not give firm assurances that what was asked of them would not be published in full. -- asked of them would not be published in full. —— passed to them. this had been on the basis of assurances received before material is shared bya received before material is shared by a clear set of rules on
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intelligence material. meeting the secretary of state the site... it would not be published and this is not in keeping with the usual practice in the centre division. the reports provided do not contain information that is commercially or market sensitive related to excellent negotiation. the overwhelming national interest of preserving our negotiations. 800 pages of analysis happen published, covering 58 sectors. this is loving satisfied. -- this has been satisfied. -- this has been satisfied. transparency and accountability, this government does not understand. on the ist of november after a three—hour debate this house voted in favour of a
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humble address, all of the reports to be presented. not redacted. it did not vote against devotion or seekto... did not vote against devotion or seek to... the motion was binding. it is not open to the secretary of state to choose to ignore it and you pass to the site committee the documents he chooses. weather he is in contempt of parliament we will come to add a later date but he is treating parliament with consent. the secretary of state says and the minister has reported he did not get assurances from the select committee about how the documents would be used. the minister therefore better and so some pretty blunt questions this morning. what assurances were sought that were not given? key better tread carefully because there will be an audit trail here. if he
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cannot answer that question, if he did not pursue the assurances, did not suggest the course of action that was rejected, his cover for not disclosing these will be blown. this is bigger, this is not a game. this is bigger, this is not a game. this is the most important set of decisions this country has taken for decades. they need to be subjected to proper security. the biggest mistakes are made when decisions are not scrutinised. can i remind the ministerand not scrutinised. can i remind the minister and the secretary of state that until this house passed the motion on the ist of november, it was motion on the ist of november, it was rigidly claimed they were expensive and authoritative, the motions. they answered a request, do you hold the material, the answer was you hold the material, the answer was yes. that causes... i am deeply concerned that the sum total of documents generated by the government's work on the impact of
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their approach to brexit on the economy could be squeezed into two lever arch files. that is the volume of paperwork i would have expected for a pretty routine crown court trial in my old world. if this is the case we should all be worried. is that the extent of the analysis? either way, a very sorry state of affairs. the shadow brexit secretary chloe unimpressed by what he heard from robert walker. saying it may yet be decided whether the government is formally in contempt of parliament but he said they have treated parliament with contempt and is not convinced about what he has heard why the documents were handed over in the format they were. and perhaps why things have been redacted. this could go on for some time, we will continue to monitor it and bring
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developments. a yougov survey for bbc five live suggests that more than a third of mums have experienced mental health issues related to motherhood. this includes things like postnatal depression, acute stress, severe anxiety. that's compared to 17% of dads. nearly a third of working mums feel discriminated against at work this lunchtime five live is hosting a debate about mums and mental health live from blackpool tower — called mumta keover they'll be discussing the challenges faced by mothers of all ages. there are hundreds of mothership today sharing their own experiences about post dramatic stress disorder, stress and anxiety after giving birth, and if it gets hard going, some of the young ones are having to play on their own. i do having a nice time? what colour is your toy? you suffer from post—dramatic stress
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disorder, postnatal depression, when you had your child. what triggered that? a difficult birth, emergency c section. ijust that? a difficult birth, emergency c section. i just felt that? a difficult birth, emergency c section. ijust felt no joy that? a difficult birth, emergency c section. i just felt no joy when she came. i was in love with her but felt no joy and everyone around me was getting so much joy for my child andi was getting so much joy for my child and i could not understand why i was not getting it. also my family live in durham. without having the support network around you, it is difficult. how do you get support? at the moment i havejust difficult. how do you get support? at the moment i have just gone out and made friends, close friends from nursery. close friends around the area i have met through coffee mornings and things like that. i did and nct before. when people move away from home when you are 18 and
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you do not realise the consequences when you have a child that your pa rents when you have a child that your parents will be so far away and you do not have the village around you to bring up the child any more. it is on you. women are expected to do everything. things are different, families move away, both parents work. my son was born seven weeks early and i had i had a big lead and nearly died. —— bleeding. isuffered from anxiety. i lodged a directory to help other mums. for people to go on, find people like me looking to make more friends and get out a bit more. you took control of the situation, sorted it out yourself.
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and you set up a support group? i figured there was nobody out there that went through what i did. when i started looking for support, i figured there was. then, i thought, what is there to help us, support us? i thought the nearest panda support group was miles away. i scratched my head and wondered what i would do and set up my own support group and affiliated with panda's foundation and... you put up posters on the lamp post in your village and got things started? yes. has it helps women in your situation?” hope so because you do not want to be alone with a mental illness
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especially because it is something you never bring upon yourself. it is a safe place for women in our local area to meet. thank you for sharing your experiences with us, which is the point of today, women coming to blackpool tower to talk about their experiences and share that with other people and give advice. not just about women because this survey said while a lot of mothers set up support groups reach out for advice, fathers do not. apparently, 26% of men say they get no emotional support at all. this afternoon's debate — called ‘mumta keover‘, will be streamed live on bbc radio five live's facebook page between one — 3pm this afternoon — as well as highlights and streaming at bbc. co. uk/mumta keover. and you can find out more, watch highlights and get involved by going to bbc.co.uk/mumtakeover. or searching for the hashtag #mumtakeover on social media. for support or advice on any of the topics discussed, go to the bbc actionline web page.
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pope francis has delivered a keynote speech in myanmar, without referring specifically to its rohingya people but saying there was still suffering from civil conflict and hostilities. new measures are to be introduced to reduce the number of deaths and serious injuries during childbirth in england. the duchess of cambridge says she and prince william are "absolutely thrilled" about prince harry's wedding to meghan markel. various members of the royalfamily out and about. the duchess of cornwall has just been giving her reaction to the news that prince harry and making mark—up are to be married. absolutely thrilled. brilliant. we are all delighted.
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sometimes, you know, in a climate where we are surrounded by a lot of bad news, it is a realjoy to have good news for once. we are delighted. that response from the duchess of cornwall this morning. when it comes to aspiration and opportunity england is becoming increasingly divided according to a new report. the social mobility commission says london and the south east are still the best place for disadvantaged children to progress, whilst some rural and coastal areas are frequently left behind. adina campbell reports. it all started with me wanting to do something. more than a third of children here in nottingham claim here in nottinghamshire claim school meals and overall young people face some of the biggest barriers to succeeding in life according to the social mobility commission. but this school is working hard to change that. it makes me so proud
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to have this medal. we have learning mentors in school, families have support with attendance, reading at home, it all comes together to give the children a springboard into the rest of the curriculum. in its latest report the commission says prospects for young people vary in almost all parts of the uk. it says two thirds of the areas in which young people have the best prospects of success are now in london while many rural, coastal and former industrial areas are being left further behind. with the midlands the worst performing region in england. it's notjust children from poor backgrounds here in the east midlands who may face some challenges. only a fifth of those in work have senior or professionaljobs. you're not really pushed in, i wouldn't say colleges are that good, i didn't feel they encourage me. around here not many people want to give opportunities to people, if you are already in the job you can
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progress higher but if you are not and haven't got any background, people are like, sorry. relax your shoulders... the government says it is making progress and social mobility with 1.8 million more children in good or outstanding schools than 2010 and the national living wage helping to boost salaries. it's been quite a year for noel gallagher. his song "don't look back in anger" became an anthem of solidarity after the manchester bombing. he's also turned 50 and relations with his brother liam have reached an all time low. he's been talking to our entertainment correspondent colin paterson... we meetjust after the midweek charts, and you are heading up to number one with the album who built the moon.
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how much do things like that still matter to you? i guess it's nice. it's better than being number two. it strikes me as a joyful album. what's going on? i guess i was on a voyage of discovery. i hadn't written any of the songs before i went in. be careful what you wish for on the album is a song about you giving advice to your children. you have three kids. what is the hardest part about parenting? the hardest part, for me, is to be a responsible parent. i would be let them eat choc ice and chips for breakfast. my 17—year—old daughter is brilliant. she's very, very cool. she's not in any way... she's not a problem yet. she did get tattoos without saying anything, and i was a bit disappointed in that. what were they of? it was all right, one of them was my face. they were the brothers' initials on her hands, which is kind of a bit of a snide way of getting in through the back door, "i've got these tattoos." i was like, "what?" then she showed me and i thought, aw, that's cute, isn't it? but no more!
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the timing of the album has been interesting, coming one month after your brother's. what was your reaction when his album went to number one? did you send him a message of congratulations? idid indeed. really? yes, idid. no, ididn't. i didn't. why would i? one of the big news events of the year was the manchester bomb. it was dreadful. it made me feel so angry and continues to make me feel so angry. it was brutal. how did it feel, for don't look back in anger to become such a song of solidarity? at that time, you know, politicians' words were meaningless, religious leaders' words were meaningless, the experts on the news, what they said was meaningless. and that one girl, she sang that song and the people rallied around that song. and as a songwriter, not even the fact that it's my song — if it was a song, it would have reaffirmed my belief in the power of music
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and what it means to people. you turned 50 this year. how are you finding it? if my 50s are half as good as my 40s, professionally and privately, then i'm going to be doing all right. is your body telling you you are 50? no, no, i am all right. as long as this is here — no offence — but as long as this is thriving, which it is... get a close—up of that. that is thorough. how would you feel if you went bald? i don't know what i'd do. i would definitely retire from music, that's for sure. nobody wants to see a bald mick jagger. a fourteen—carat vivid pink diamond could fetch in excess of £30 million when it goes up for auction in hong kong today. the "pink promise" is the most expensive piece ofjewellery ever offered by christie's in hong kong, and has been described as "the picasso of the pink diamond world". in a moment, the news at one with sophie raworth. first, the weather.
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are getting cold, arctic air was that temperatures dropping if you degrees. today, sunny spells and showers. through the rest of the day, a mixture of sunny spells and showers. showers largely in the north and east and a fuel for northern ireland, wales and the south—west. through rush hour, a scattering of showers for northern ireland, northern scotland, the east coast of scotland. wintry at times, showers, particularly for north east england. temperatures in mid—single figures. scattering of showers wales and the south—west. drier weather in central and southern england. temperatures in the single figures. breezy. overnight, showers extending
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further south. wintry in nature. a scattering of showers for northern ireland, wales, the south—west. i weather, close bells, allowing temperatures to fall away. a touch cooler really, fast forming, hu patches of ice where we see some showers through the night. a cold start to the day tomorrow. touch of frost particular to the north. a day of sunny spells and showers. best of the sunshine in the west, western parts of england, south of scotland. showers for northern ireland and down the east coast. wintry in nature. a touch cooler with highs of seven celsius. the pressure chart into wednesday, high pressure to the west, straight isoba rs. into wednesday, high pressure to the west, straight isobars. dragging in the north—easterly wind and a touch cooler still. sunny spells and
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showers. dry, bright weather down the spine of the country about showers in the east and a futurist for wales and the south—west, northern ireland. showers wintry in nature and a touch cooler. the house for thursday, but add in the wind and it will feel noticeably cooler with temperatures in the figures. —— low single figures. the pope urges myanmar to respect human rights and different ethnicities — but stops short of naming the rohingya muslims — on a visit to the country. pope francis met myanmar‘s de facto leader aung san su chi during his visit to the country, which has been widely accused of ethnic cleansing. translation: i would like my visit to embrace the entire population of myanmar and to offer a word of encouragement to all those who are working to build a just, reconciled and inclusive social order. and i am
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at the kutupalong refugee camp in bangladesh, where the continuing cramped and sanitary conditions are leading to the increased spread of disease. also this lunchtime: new measures are announced to try to reduce the number of deaths and serious injuries during childbirth. more details of harry and meghan's wedding are due to be released this afternoon, as the duchess of cambridge adds her good wishes.
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