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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 29, 2017 6:00am-8:30am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. a doubling of the brexit divorce bill. the government offers to substantially increase its offer to the european union for brexit. the bbc understands the uk could pay between £35 and £49 billion. good morning, it is wednesday 29 november. also this morning: the children with autism being let down by the system. half of parents say they have waited more than a year for the help they need. it isa it is a fight. it is a constant fight. you wouldn't think you would need to fight so much for something that you should be able to access so easily. the murders of lin and megan russell. lawyers for the man convicted of killing them say they have
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uncovered new evidence that could prove his innocence. there are big plans to change our railways to ease pressure points for passengers. we will be speaking to the transport secretary about the details. good morning. in sport: england's women maintain their perfect start in world cup qualifying, super sub fran kirby scoring with her first kick of the game, in a 5—0 win over kazakhstan. and a new drive to get us to reduce the amount of food we throw out. items that should be stored in the fridge will get new labels. and it may be freezing, but that hasn't stopped matt. he is out and about with the weather. good morning. good morning, and we are at hampton pool in west london, with foakes a little bit raver than myself. —— folks. a few showers to the north and east but for many of you a lot of sunshine as well. your full forecast is coming up. good morning. first our main story: the bbc understands that the government has significantly increased the amount
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of money it is offering to the european union as part of the brexit divorce bill. the figure is believed to be between £35 and £49 billion. the original offer was just under £18 billion. if confirmed, the move could clear the way for moving brexit negotiations on to the issue of trade next month. let's talk to our political correspondent leila nathoo, who is in westminster. leila, this is a much bigger sum than theresa may had originally offered. what is likely to be the reaction? well, the main reaction is what brussels is saying about this increased offer, and it seems to have gone down pretty well. the idea that the uk is going to be offering to pay more to leave the eu is certainly will not play well in some quarters, but even within the cabinet, brexiteers had agreed last week with theresa may that she
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needed to up this offer to get the talks on to the second phase, on to theissue talks on to the second phase, on to the issue of the trade deal, something which is absolutely crucial now for britain to get from the eu side. so we have this idea that we will have an increased offer. this is over and above what theresa may had put to the eu, of promising to pay the money into the budget until 2020. so this covers things like pensions, it covers things like pensions, it covers things like pensions, it covers things like project that have already been agreed to, but the money has not been spent. but there is still no specific figure. we are still talking about a very broad range. no ball park. certainly the eu side are not confirming anything has been agreed, let alone a specific number, and we are still a long way off agreeing on a specific figure. but what we do seem to have his movement towards agreement, ahead of a crucial summit in the middle of december, where the eu side will decide whether there has been enough progress on key divorce matters. the bill was one major sticking point. but just
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matters. the bill was one major sticking point. butjust because this offer seems to have been made behind and seems to have gone down well, there is still no guarantee that trade talks will be given the green light, it is there is still the crucial issue of the irish border to make significant headway on. children with autism in england are being let down by the education system, according to a report by the all party parliamentary group for autism, seen exclusively by breakfast. this is harley. he is now in a specialist school. but his mum, natalie, says it was a struggle to get the support he needs. it isa it is a fight. it is a constant fight. you wouldn't think you would need to fight so much for something that you should be able to access so easily. natalie is not alone. more than 2,000 parents were surveyed, and nearly three in four said they waited more than six months for the support their child is entitled to, while half said they waited more than a year. it is shocking that 50% of those
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children are not happy in school. 50% of teachers are not comfortable teaching those with autism. we have to do teaching those with autism. we have todoa teaching those with autism. we have to do a lot better, because if one in100 to do a lot better, because if one in 100 have got this actually very special feature about them, but they need additional help, then we're giving them if we don't give them that help. —— then we are failing them if we don't give them that help. the all party parliamentary group is now calling for a national autism and education strategy by the end of 2019, with more training for staff, and a curriculum tailored for individual needs. the department for education says all schools have a duty to support children with special educational needs. it says it has given councils £223 million in extra funding to introduce reforms. we will be looking at this issue all morning, so please do send us your stories or questions by e—mail, at bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk, or tweet us using the hastag #bbcsend. lawyers for a man found guilty of murdering a mother and daughter
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in kent in 1996 say they will release significant new evidence today that casts doubt on his conviction. lin russell and her six—year—old daughter, megan, were attacked as they walked along a quiet country lane near the village of chillenden, in kent. 0ur correspondent wyre davies has this report. it was a notorious murder. a brutal, unprovoked attack in the kent countryside, onafamily walking home from a school swimming gala. 45—year—old lin russell and her six your old daughter, megan, were killed in the frenzied hammer attack. but nine—year—old josie survived, despite suffering terrible injuries. michael stone, a known criminal and drug addict, was arrested a year later, in1997, and found guilty of the russell murders. he is serving a life sentence, but has always
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protested his innocence. there is no forensic evidence against him. he was convicted on a disputed confession to a fellow prisoner. his legal team say they have compelling new evidence linking this man to the murders. the killer of schoolgirl millie dowler and others is serving two full life sentences. many say he has committed dozens of similar crimes. the similarities you've got, it's a woman, an attack with something heavy like a hammer. those features make it an extremely rare crime. in the absence of other facts, he would be a good suspect. two decades after the murders, lawyers will release new evidence that the bbc has seen, and which they say means his case must now go to the court of appeal. north korea has carried out another ballistic missile test, its first for two months. pyongyang says the missile which landed injapanese waters is a new type of weapon, and its most powerful yet. experts believe that north korea has
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demonstrated for the first time that it could now hit most of the american mainland. president donald trump was briefed while the missile was still in the air. thank you very much. as you probably have heard, and some of you have reported, a missile was launched a little while ago from north korea. i will only tell you that we will take ca re of will only tell you that we will take care of it. we have general mattis in the room with us, and we had a long discussion on it. it is a situation that we will handle. railway lines which were closed in the 1960s could reopen if they boost the economy. it is part of the government's rail strategy, which will be unveiled today. the transport secretary, chris grayling, says the new rail lines could unlock jobs, encourage house—building, and ease overcrowding, but labour says the ideas are flimsy re—announcements. apple says it is working to fix a serious bug in its most recent mac operating system.
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the flaw in the high sierra software makes it possible to access a mac computer or laptop without a password, and gain powerful administrator rights. manufacturers and retailers are being urged to make labelling on food products clearer, to stop millions of tons of edible food being thrown away unnecessarily. the waste agency wrap says food labels use too many different terms, prompting people to throw away usable produce. it claims a third of the uk's two million tons of annual food waste is due to confusion over date labels. you could make that into a nice suit. that is exactly what i was thinking. do you make soup? yes, but not as often as i should —— nice soup. we will be getting some tips
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on cutting down on food waste just after 6:30 a.m.. a restored white fiat 126p crowd—funded by residents in a town in poland has finally arrived in the us, destined for the actor tom hanks as a birthday present. one of his fans, monica jaskolska, who is from the town where the classic car was made in the 1970s, noticed the star's obsession with the make, and decided to raise money to send him one. the car was showcased at a party for the star's birthday, injuly, with excess money raised going to the local hospital. it may be a belated birthday present, but for the forrest gump actor, it was definitely worth the wait. it is 6:10 a.m., i was about to say it isa it is 6:10 a.m., i was about to say it is a ten a.m.. that would be nice! here isjohn with the sport. england's women have not conceded a
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goal, winning three out of three, and a good audition for the interim boss who came in to replace the sacked mark sampson. if she keeps winning matches, with the interviews due to take place next week, she could stand a good chance of getting a job on could stand a good chance of getting ajob ona could stand a good chance of getting a job on a full—time basis. as substitute appearances go, fran kirby's was up there. she scored with her first touch of the game, converting a penalty, and had a hand in two of nikita parris's goals in a 5—0 win over kazakhstan. manchester united beat watford 4—2, but managerjose mourinho blamed his wasteful side for not scoring more. jesse lingard with the pick of the goals, to narrow the gap on rivals city to five points at the top of the premier league. manchester united are a little bit closer to manchester city at the top of the premier league this morning. they won 11—2 on a freezing night in watford, to cut the gap to five points, but city play this evening. look who has arrived down under — ben stokes, who is set to play some domestic cricket in new zealand, fuelling rumours he could be in line to help england's ashes campaign.
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and feeling fantastic — not words we have heard tiger woods mutter, but he says he is. after a back operation in april, he says he is ready to return to action at the hero world challenge event in the bahamas. we have heard a lot about this return to full fitness for tiger woods. over how many years? exactly, it has been going long time now. is he trying to kid himself? 6096 tiger woods would be great for golf. it would be great to see him back and contending. shall we have a look at the papers? we will start with the telegraph, still talking about the royal wedding to be, and they have done lots of different things in the papers. i like this particular picture we will show you in a minute. this is meghan markle. and
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the brexit breakthrough, they seem to have doubled the offer on the table. we will be talking about that throughout the programme. would you like to see a 15—year—old meghan markle posing outside buckingham palace? their shears. they dug that up. she is there with herfriend. home! this is 21 years ago, and no doubt she will be standing on the balcony at some stage. they are getting married at windsor, we do know, at some stage. at some stage means at some stage. at some stage in the next few years. the sun, this is day two, and we are going over lots of details. we don't quite know the day. she will be baptised before the day. she will be baptised before the big day, and then the daily mirror, she is also going to become a british citizen as well, and
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thrilled to brits. the daily express, a magical may wedding in royal windsor, and diabetes, a new health alert. a big rise in sufferers developing cancer. steffe, good morning. good morning. let's casually move on. we are going to be talking about the railway industry today because the railway industry today because the government after 7am is expected to announce a reform. they say they wa nt to announce a reform. they say they want to make things better for passengers. we have heard this before. things are not brilliant. that's what a lot of the papers have picked up on this morning and the daily mail is going with this idea that perhaps we might see certain lines reopened. this was back in the
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605, a line5 reopened. this was back in the 605, a report by the british railway chairman 5ugge5ted 605, a report by the british railway chairman suggested that we should close the lines which were losing million5 close the lines which were losing millions of pounds a year, so that's what happened. so what they are 5aying what happened. so what they are saying is some of these lines could reopen again, but of course that will depend on what type of money is on the table to be able to do that. but it is one of a number of 5ugge5tion5 but it is one of a number of suggestions that —— of what might be announced. more on that after 7am. thi5 announced. more on that after 7am. this is really interesting. we've 5poken this is really interesting. we've spoken about a car5. this is really interesting. we've spoken about a cars. we could now see spoken about a cars. we could now 5ee electric planes. britain could become the global centre, because three of europe's bigge5t engineering companies have teamed up to start flying hybrid aircraft by 2020. rolls royce, airbu5 siemens.
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0bviou5ly 2020. rolls royce, airbu5 siemens. obviously there are a lot of very clever engineers who are working on thi5. clever engineers who are working on this. before i make that walking... —— booking... this. before i make that walking... -- booking... we were talking about england's women olivine for the world cup. the requisite photos have come out. i know footballers are used to a glamorous lifestyle, but even this looks a little grim. this will be the base, about 45 minutes from st petersburg. this is the beach. in the trip adviser comments, says it it has a pool with lots of chemicals. and the rooms... it looks lovely. i'm not selling it. we are talking quite a bit about food today. apparently pig's trotters are
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back on the menu. pig's trotters, because the revival of cheaper cuts of meat. we are talking about food waste today. what you should throw away. should you keep onions in the fridge? yes or no? know is the right answer. they go soggy. where should you store food that needs the most chilling, the top or bottom? the bottom. john, you are two out of two wrong. should you keep potatoes in the fridge? yes. no. it turns the starch into sugar. pineapple in the fridge? no. yes and no. yes if it is cut, though if whole. i will be eating at yours,
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notjohn'5. if whole. i will be eating at yours, not john's. you are welcome any time. we throw away a lot of food, so there is a reason for that weird quiz, thatjohn did terribly at. matt's out and about this morning. people have been swimming already! good morning. good morning. i good morning. i have good morning. i have to good morning. i have to say good morning. i have to say they good morning. i have to say they are good morning. i have to say they are i have to say a good morning. i have to say they are a little bit braver than me, but it is more inviting than out here. its 28 degrees in there at the moment and about two celsius here. hopefully i will be chatting to some of them later in the programme to find out what drives them to get in there. i think getting out will be difficult today. wherever you are this morning, it's another cold start. we've got that cold wind, especially in eastern parts. while
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most are dry today there will be a few showers, especially in northern scotland. the odd flurry of snow. the south—west of scotland should be dry. much of north—west england dry. we have heavy showers to the east of the pennines. there is some snow with that rain as well. a good covering in the north york moors and potentially the pennines. mainly rain as you head further south, through the midlands and east anglia. the greater chance of more showers here today than yesterday. the south coast is dry and sunny. temperatures drop as low as “i! in the exeter area. widespread frost and of course be wary of showers through the night. there could be ice around. not as many showers for cornwall and west wales, but there will be some towards the extreme west coast. showers continue to come and go across northern ireland. maybe rain will stop over the hills there might be sweet mixed in. through the day most of you will
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stay dry, cold and sunny, but we continue to have showers in eastern parts of england. they will come well and truly inland. as far as the midlands. a few showers to the north of scotla nd midlands. a few showers to the north of scotland as well top temperatures down on yesterday. the air has been getting colder each day of the week. into the night, it looks like there will be a shift in the wind direction. showers in the east go back to the coast. if you are in pembrokeshire and across cornwall showers become more abundant. like last night we could have snow mixed in as well. the night there will be a widespread frost. where we've seen showers it will be a slippery start to tomorrow. another crisp and bright one for many. windy tomorrow in eastern areas and while it will be dry to begin within eastern england showers come in later and there will be increasing sleet and snow, especially in the north—east of england. 0r showers to the far
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south—west and temperatures tomorrow are south—west and temperatures tomorrow a re close south—west and temperatures tomorrow are close to —2, —3 a cross eastern areas, thanks to the windchill. that windchill will ease into friday. perhaps a little less cold. showers mainly in east anglia and the south—east corner. even here we could have a bit of sleet and snow. showers eventually fading from southwest wales and the south—west of england but through friday it gets cloudier and less chilly from the north—west, so the cold will be at its worst tomorrow before things get a little less cold for the weekend. that's how the weather is looking. more throughout the morning. back to you. i am very impressed by all those people swimming behind you. it is full! unbelievable. absolutely amazing. it would be a nice temperatures you met this morning. it looks nice. a p pa re ntly it looks nice. apparently the british say lee—do.
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so we are going to go with that. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: the bbc understands that the government has increased the amount of money it's offering to the eu as part of the brexit divorce bill to between £35 and £49 billion. autistic children in england are being let down by the education system, according to a report seen exclusively by this programme. more detail now on that. when we send our children to school we expect them to get the best start in life, but sadly for some with special educational needs that isn't always the case. there are around 120,000 school—aged children in england with autism, and the vast majority go to mainstream schools. yet many are being failed by the education system. a new report by a group of mps found 70% of parents believe the support their child needs is not being put in place quickly enough, with half saying they had to wait for more than a year, and 40% say their child's school
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does not meet their needs. television presenter and vocal coach carrie grant and her husband david have four children with special educational needs. they told me about the fight they've had to get their children the education they deserve. i feel desperate for my children. i feel really desperate. we failed them as parents because we can't get them as parents because we can't get the services that we need. we can't get the education that these children deserve. thank you so much for inviting me to your house. just run me through the family. this one is 0livia, our elde5t, who has dy5praxia, adhd. talia is autistic. she has really
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struggled at school. this is the region, with 11 going on 12. she is auti5tic and she also has adhd. region, with 11 going on 12. she is autistic and she also has adhd. and your young boy, he is adopted, isn't he? this is nathan. he was adopted when he was two. and he has attachment difficulties, which is quite common with children who have been adopted. four children and seven. . . been adopted. four children and seven... seven conditions! yeah. there's this new parliamentary report out and how does it affect them at school? it had a big impact, hasn't it? i think the challenges at school are biased because some schools just aren't even looking at sen and they don't want to look at it. the biggest fight would be trying to access services and often sadly trying to get the school to understand what it is you need. that
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said ina understand what it is you need. that said in a report. 70% of parents say support in place quickly enough or their child i nearly 70% waiting for nearly six months. what are the biggest issues for you? certainly without children the biggest issues are anxiety, the fact that they're not a one size fits all and so much of school education is geared toward5 of school education is geared towards one size fits all. our children don't necessarily have learning disabilities, they are super intelligent, but they are also sick. we can'tjudge the quality of our parenting on the happiness of our parenting on the happiness of our children. that's so true! you have to find a different yardstick if your children are on the auti5tic spectrum. what is yourjudgement of a good day, that you got through it? a good day is that all the kids are alive. yeah. and they all go to bed a5leep, alive and not feeling as though they don't want to see the morning. that'5 though they don't want to see the morning. that's a really good day.
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we talked about so much and one of the things they brought up with me was that they've got this wonderful children and they said their perception of their life... a talk about grieving about what they thought it would be like. they thought it would be like. they thought they would be the perfect family, all sitting around at a restau ra nt family, all sitting around at a restaurant or whatever the children eating. and they do this with humour. and the children might be on the floor or throwing food and they talk about the loss of what you expected to live to be and perhaps how it turned out. they are very happy, but it's a 24—hour day concern for them. it's a really powerful thought. to think about how you judge the quality of your parenting on the happiness of your children. and perhaps how you need to change that. we are playing a longer interview gator. —— later and carrie grant
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says they are putting the functional ina says they are putting the functional in a dysfunctional. the department of education say it is carefully considering the report and told us "all schools have a duty to support children with special educational needs". it says it's given councils £223 million in extra funding to introduce reforms and support families. keep your comments coming in. we have already had two days of people getting in contact with really positive stories, but also the darker times you share as a family and your worries about the future and your worries about the future and your worries about the future and your children's education. we might not be able to read them all on the programme, but our team are reading absolutely everything that comes in and some of that interaction has been fantastic. we shall be back with more on that and the headlines in a few minutes. good morning from bbc london news. the mayor is calling for more homes to be built,
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at a greater density, in the capital's suburbs. sadiq khan's london plan is released today, calling for taller residential blocks and more housing to be built around transport hubs. city hall says the capital needs 66,000 new homes a year. the mayor's target is for half of those to be classed as affordable. in the future there will be developments where we don't want people to have car parking because we are promoting walking, cycling and taking public transport and certainly also we want to protect green space and make sure that we keep the quality of life good in london, even if it's a more densely developed city. two football stewards have been taken to hospital after a disturbance outside crystal palace's derby clash at brighton last night. brighton have released a statement, saying a minority of palace fans had come to the falmer stadium "intent on causing disorder". palace supporters complained on social media, claiming hundreds were prevented from getting into the ground.
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a new yoga centre has opened in north london offering classes specifically for people with disabilities. the mahadevi centre in islington offers bespoke therapy for children with a variety of conditions, such as cerebal palsy and autism. let's have a look at the travel situation now. the tube is looking fairly looking good this morning. just those ongoing works on the 0verground — it's closed between gospel oak and barking. there's been an accident on the a5 kilburn high road. it's closed by kilburn high road station. in vauxhall, there are lane closures on parry street for roadworks. and let's take a look at the a13. the usual rush hour queues there, building into town from rainham to dagenham. time for the weather with kate kinsella good morning. another cold start this morning. for today and tomorrow at least we are hanging onto this very cold air. we should have sunny spells through the course of the
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day, but also a little bit of cloud and on that cloud we could see one or two showers drifting south are coming down from east anglia. falling as rain. sunny spells in between and a north—westerly breeze. that breeze is what's things feel very cold. the maximum cabbage in central london is six celsius but it is likely to feel colder than that. the cloud then retreats eastwards, leaving a widespread frost under clear skies. the minimum cabbage in towns and cities is zero. dipping below that out towards the suburbs. —— minimum temperatures. a frosty start tomorrow. cloud moving through in the afternoon, but again factor ina in the afternoon, but again factor in a north—westerly breeze and it will feel very cold. 2—4 celsius is the maximum, but likely to feel colder. a little bit of respite. this warm front moves south overnight on friday and into saturday. it is going to still be cold and introduces quite a bit of cloud, at its worst call them today
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and tomorrow —— less cold. so temperatures recovering a little, but still chilly. that's it for now. more from us in half an hour and of course you can catch up on the latest news, travel and weather on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. we will bring you the latest news and sport injust a moment. coming up this morning: in just over half an hour, the government will announce changes to how the railways work. we will look ahead at the pressure points that affect millions of commuters who travel on the network every day. in 1996, josie russell survived a brutal hammer attack in which her mother, lin, and her sister, megan, were killed. more than 20 years on, we will look at the evidence that casts doubt on the conviction of michael stone. and we will meet the man tasked with clearing up space. he will tell us why old rockets and fragments of spacecraft are putting vital satellites in danger of being damaged.
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good morning. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. the bbc understands that the government has significantly increased the amount of money it is offering to the european union as part of the brexit divorce bill. the figure is believed to be between £35 and £49 billion. the original offer was just under £18 billion. if confirmed, the move could clear the way for moving brexit negotiations on to the issue of trade next month. let's talk to our political correspondent leila nathoo, who is in westminster. leila, this is a much bigger sum than theresa may had originally offered. it is double the original sum, it is a significant increase on the offer that theresa may made in her major florence speech. she has since got the cabinet on side. even brexiteers in the cabinet have accepted an increased offer to the eu is necessary to try and unblock those brexit talks, to persuade the eu to move them on to the second phase of
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trade in december. now, the figures being touted today are around £40 to £45 billion, and downing street does not recognise the upper end of that estimate, there is no figure put on it and neither side will confirm that any settlement has been agreed. we won't really get a final figure for some time. at i think that certainly this is a gesture from the uk to the eu side to say, look, we are prepared to pay more, and it seems to have been well—received. i think that on the bill that has certainly been enough movement to persuade the eu that they are serious about this offer and can move on to trade. but there does seem to be now the major stumbling block of the irish border, towards wish progress has not been made —— towards which. it has the potential towards which. it has the potential to still hold up trade talks in december. thank you very much. children with autism in england are being let down by the education system, according to a report by the all party parliamentary group for autism, which has been seen
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exclusively by breakfast. nearly three in four parents said they waited more than six months for the support their child is entitled to, while half said they waited more than a year. the department for education says all schools have a duty to support children with special educational needs. it says it has given councils £223 million in extra funding to introduce reforms. north korea has carried out another ballistic missile test, its first for two months. pyongyang says the missile which landed injapanese waters is a new type of weapon, and its most powerful yet. experts believe that north korea has demonstrated for the first time that it could now hit most of the american mainland. president donald trump was briefed while the missile was still in the air. railway lines which were closed in the 1960s could reopen if they boost the economy. it is part of the government's rail strategy, which will be unveiled today. the transport secretary, chris grayling, says the new rail lines could unlock jobs,
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encourage house—building, and ease overcrowding, but labour says the ideas are flimsy re—announcements. apple says it is working to fix a serious bug in its most recent mac operating system. the flaw in the high sierra software makes it possible to access a mac computer or laptop without a password, and gain powerful administrator rights. an entire road of homes in hampshire has been decorated with festive lights, by a man who really loves christmas. ged hollyoake started the tradition of working with his neighbours to decorate their homes 13 years ago. this year, hundreds of people turned up in byron road to see the switch—on of the lights, which have gained international prominence in recent years. mr hollyoake has raised about £50,000 for charity, and the lights attract thousands of people across the festive period. that has become quite an event.
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imagine if there was just one house which didn't want to be part of it! everyone has a house near them. i am convinced you go and visit, they a lwa ys convinced you go and visit, they always go bonkers, don't they? shall we drive past the christmas house? yes, go on, let's do it. it is a bit early still, isn't it? do you go big? just a few lights outdoors. not like chevy chase, falling off the roof and all of that. what a great win for england in world cup qualifying. they are absolutely flying. sorry, we have distracted you. they will be enjoying christmas, certainly. they have played three world cup qualifiers,
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and won all three. it is especially good for mel lawley, is she going to get thejob good for mel lawley, is she going to get the job full—time? —— mo good for mel lawley, is she going to get thejob full—time? —— mo mali. mel lawley scored the only goal in the first half, before scoring four in 12 minutes in the second. super sub fran kirby scoring a penalty, before setting up nikita parris for her first and england's third. 5—0 they won, three wins out of three under interim boss mo marley, so will she get the job permanently. 0bviously obviously there was a process, and application process, on the 17th. that is when obviously the time was when i first did it. i agreed to put the cd in and we said we will have a look at it at the end of it. i think now it is about letting the players enjoy it. hopefully the players are pleased with their own performances -- cv. and pleased with their own performances —— cv. and then we will all sit down and have a look and decide what is
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right for the team moving forward. but wales will end 2017 top of the group, after they beat bosnia herzegovina 1—0, kayleigh green the scorer. laura 0'sullivan saved a penalty, to ensure wales took all three points. they have played a game more than england. it appears scoring four goals isn't enough to pleasejose mourinho, who blamed his side for not scoring more in a 4—2 win over watford. and look how good they were — ashley young with this beauty. watford managed to bring it back to 3—2, butjesse lingard scored a brilliant solo goal, and they are now five points behind city at the top of the table. we now have three victories in a row. we one, 2... matches at home. that was important, not to lose ones. and we came back here and did 9.3 matches, and we go match—up the
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match. here we are, we are second in the table, and it is good to be there. we will see what can happen. leicester are into the top half of the premier league, after a two —1win at home to spurs. first—half goals from jamie vardy and riyad mahrez put them 2two up. harry kane pulled one back for spurs, but the defeat leaves them fifth. manager—less west bromwich albion were 2—0 up at home, but newcastle came back through ciaran clark, and an own—goal from jonny evans made it 2—2. england's cricketers have set themselves a curfew of midnight, after recent talk about the team's inappropriate drinking culture. the players have also welcomed the news that ben stokes is potentially going to be back playing. the all—rounder has flown to new zealand to visit family, and has held talks with canterbury cricket club about playing for them. stokes has been stopped from playing for england in the ashes series as he is investigated by police for an alleged assault outside a nightclub in bristol in september. the good thing for him is that he is a little bit closer to australia,
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it's that time was to come that he was to be able to come and join the squad. but we know no more than that, and hopefully if he can get some cricket under his belt that would be good for him, having had a couple of months away from the game. imean, couple of months away from the game. i mean, there is a curfew of midnight, but that doesn't really affect us a huge amount. very rarely are we up affect us a huge amount. very rarely are we up at that time anyway. personally, it doesn't affect me in anyway. as i mentioned, we are grown men, we are allowed to drink at times. wejust men, we are allowed to drink at times. we just know that we are not allowed to overstep the mark. former world number one tiger woods says he is feeling fantastic, as he prepares to return to action at the hero world challenge in the bahamas. the 41—year—old has had multiple back operations in recent years, and withdrew from his last tournament in dubai in february with back spasms. the 14—time major winner says surgery in april has cured the pain. the neatest thing for me is to be able to get up out of bed and i can grab able to get up out of bed and i can gmba able to get up out of bed and i can graba club able to get up out of bed and i can grab a club and not use it as a
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crutch. so now i am able to take a swing. that... that's so exciting. you have no idea how exciting that is, and! you have no idea how exciting that is, and i am just so thankful that... you know, i have had this procedure and i have gotten to this point. finally, if you needed any reminding of how powerful a scrum is, just ask the teams that play against hinckley rugby club. the east midlands side drove opponents luctonians back towards their own tryline. not content with that, they also managed to wipe out the goalposts, as well. the match continued on another pitch, as hinckley won — but at a price. replacing the posts will cost £7,000. did the try stand? that i don't know. sorry, i was just did the try stand? that i don't know. sorry, iwasjust wondering whether. .. know. sorry, iwasjust wondering whether... it is, if you touch the ball against the post, it goes down asa ball against the post, it goes down as a try. but i don't know whether that was the balljust as a try. but i don't know whether that was the ball just several as a try. but i don't know whether that was the balljust several burly men ploughing into that post. ——
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ball orjust. have on § as well. this gives a egg—97:51:38“ t5115»??? % ”s”? good indication. some of this is... we have got the best before date on the bread and the peppers and the onions. the apples are display until, and on the salad it is use—by. here is a good indication of three different terms on five different items. it can be confusing, can't it? it can be very confusing. and that is the idea with the new guidance coming out. it will be really straightforward. you will
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be really straightforward. you will be able to pick up something in its packaging and know exactly what to do with it. so the z r e 3: i any if, an 41 food safety implications, whereas best before is just about quality, so you have a bit more of a judgement on that. the other thing they are talking about is they might change labels to say when something should be put into the fridge. is that a good idea? i think so, because people get confused. don't put your bananas in the fridge, they go black and horrible. unless you specifically want to ripen your other fruit, don't put the near other fruit, don't put the near other fruit. bananas you other fruit, don't put the near otherfruit. bananas you need other fruit, don't put the near other fruit. bananas you need to leave by themselves. my mother's advice from many years ago is you never put bananas in the fruit bowl. she knows something is, my mum. 0ther she knows something is, my mum. other things, for example, we had a discussion about onions and you don't put those in the fridge either. a nice cool, dark place. like a fridge? no. it sounds sort of
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basic, doesn't it? i think like a fridge? no. it sounds sort of basic, doesn't it? ithink part like a fridge? no. it sounds sort of basic, doesn't it? i think part of the problem is we are so overloaded with information, and we go and buy stuff like this because it is really convenient. and you get there and there are so many different pieces of information. and that is part of the idea with the new stuff. you are able to pick it up, it has a picture ofa able to pick it up, it has a picture of a fridge on it, you know that means it goes on the fridge. so you can get rid of all at confusion, very simple, very easy to do. and the other thing i particularly like is the idea about bringing back the snowfla ke is the idea about bringing back the snowflake label around the freezer. lama big snowflake label around the freezer. i am a big fan of the freezer. freezer and soup are some of my big anti— food waste techniques. freezer and soup are some of my big anti- food waste techniques. and if you don't keep it in the fridge, quite a few people will throw that away if they have not frozen it on the day of purchase. i would freeze ita the day of purchase. i would freeze it a couple of days... is that the right thing to do? yes, as long as
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it is before or on the use by date, freeze it. you basically stopped the clock and when you take it out of the freezer, use it on the day you defrost it, defrosted overnight in the fridge, that sort of stuff. and the fridge, that sort of stuff. and the things to watch out for from a health point of view is the use—by, so this kind of thing. that is what you have to watch out for. yes, use—by could be a food safety issue if you don't take note of it. it is especially important if you are pregnant or immunocompromised. and a list of the most influential people in waste management. list of the most influential people in waste managementlj list of the most influential people in waste management. i do, i am very proud to have come second to her, the lady of the micro beads. anyplace in the west management top 100 is a great place to be. and your a nswer to 100 is a great place to be. and your answer to everything is soup. soup or freezer, pretty much. we were
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talking about lidos earlier. what do you put on your kitchen floor? lie—no, or lee—no? definitely lie—no. but apparently we have to say lee—do. either way you say it, it is pronounced freezing! welcome to the pool pronounced freezing! welcome to the pool, which opened in 1922, it's been 95 years. during the summer, it was packed. but it is proving to be just as popular in winter. it is 28 degrees in the pool at the moment, but much cooler poolside. two degrees. there is a windchill, as many but much cooler poolside. two degrees. there is a windchill, as many of but much cooler poolside. two degrees. there is a windchill, as many of you but much cooler poolside. two degrees. there is a windchill, as many of you will but much cooler poolside. two degrees. there is a windchill, as many of you will notice. but much cooler poolside. two degrees. there is a windchill, as many of you will notice. let's but much cooler poolside. two degrees. there is a windchill, as many of you will notice. let's get on with the forecast. cold wind will be noticeable in eastern areas. maybe not as strong as yesterday. with it a few showers, mainly in
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northern and eastern areas. in the northern and eastern areas. in the north of scotland showers continue to come in. an ice risk this morning. much of scotland will be dry and bright, especially towards the south—west. while northwest england will avoid the showers today, the pennines and eastwards will have plenty of showers to get you through the rush—hour. you could be snow at times in the north york moors and the pennines. rain showers through the east midlands towards east anglia. more showers than yesterday. further west it's a frosty start. temperatures down to —4 in parts of devon this morning. lots of sunshine around. you were showers to west cornwall and western parts of wales compared to yesterday. they've moved offshore. showers come and go in northern ireland. a bit of rain and sleet over high ground. through the day it is eastern england most prone to see the showers throughout. some of those heavy and thundery. sleet and know as well. a few more showers
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towards east anglia and the south—east compared with yesterday. not a bad day for most. 0ut south—east compared with yesterday. not a bad day for most. out in the breeze not that. but still temperatures down on what they were yesterday, in single figures for the vast majority. to get you into the night most of the showers fade back to the coast. there's a subtle change in wind direction. in eastern parts showers will be confined to the coastal strip. showers then move back inland. last night was wintry, similar today. an ice risk into tomorrow morning, with a widespread frost. a cold start to thursday and it will be the coldest day of the week by and large. the wind is stronger in eastern areas but like today the showers are mainly confined to eastern coastal counties. then they move into eastern scotland tomorrow. to the more showers than today. encryption and in the cornwall. temperatures
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tomorrow at the lowest. 0nly 3—4 degrees for many and it will feel more like —3 in the wind for parts of eastern england. for friday, showers more likely to coastal parts of east anglia and the very far south—east of england. some will be heavy around the coast. showers in west wales. through friday we have more cloud into scotland and northern ireland and eventually northern england and that will ring some chilly air into the start of the weekend. 0verall some chilly air into the start of the weekend. overall it still stays cold for the next couple of days and i'm sure for those in the pool it a lot easier to get in then it is to get out. i'm sure it is. absolutely. at a unimpressed by them and slightly jealous! looks nice with all of that steam coming off. just after 7am, the government will announce big plans for our railways. we will be talking to chris grayling, the transport secretary, later about this.
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steph‘s taking a look at what they could be. a lot of people are still annoyed with him. let me give it a details. the number of people using the railways has doubled over the last two decades, since they were privatised. for over 1.7 billion passengers, punctuality and over—crowding are the top concerns. in fact, 2016 saw the worst level of punctuality in a decade, with more than one in every ten trains failing to arrive on time. now the government wants to shake up the railways so they work better for passengers. so what might that involve? joining me now is philip haigh, who is a rail expert. good morning to you. what do you think we might hear?|j good morning to you. what do you think we might hear? i hope we will hear something about reopening old railway lines so that we can better travel around the country, so that people can get to and from their homes to theirjobs and that sort of thing. and really make a bigger and
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better railway. hopefully at the same time performs better so that trains turn up on time. when you talk about reopening all blinds, these are lines that were closed in these are lines that were closed in the 50s. tell us about that. —— old lines. back in the 60s there was this chap who closed many lines of railway lines. any needed closing as no one was using them, but one or two good the reopened usefully now. there are lines between places like skipton up in the north—west that could reopen. tavistock down in the south—west. they've been talking about reopening these railways for yea rs about reopening these railways for years and now is the time to get on with it. will that involve money for this to happen and where is that going to come from? it will involve money. some of these schemes are good example, the one in tavistock as an example, the one in tavistock as an example, they are linked to housing. so more houses need to be built and it's
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so more houses need to be built and its reasonable that they also contribute to reopening railways, so that people who live those houses can get to and from work. that could be one element. there's also talk about who runs which bids. can you explain how the franchise system works? the government sets out the framework for franchises and decides which areas of the country they cover, which lines are included within them. they are now talking about redrawing that map so that franchises cover different areas. they may split up some of the bigger franchises into smaller and really to try to get a better handle on the costs that are involved with them, because some of the smaller lines need a subsidy because they don't have enough passengers and if you split franchises you get a better view of which lines need money and actually which lines generate surpluses that can pay for the other ones. overall jeev singh this will make our trains more punctual and less overcrowded ? —— make our trains more punctual and less overcrowded? —— do you think
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this will. if the government actually does what it promises. we've had too many ministers talk about this in the past and they never get on with it. let's find out. we will be talking to chris grayling, the transport secretary, later. that's it for now. thank you. this morning we've been hearing about how living with a special educational need can be hugely challenging. for those living with autism, an extra obstacle can be trying to overcome other people's attitudes towards the condition. with that in mind, here's a guide of what not to say to someone on the autistic spectrum. i touched the ball. i'm so eager! what have we got? i get this a lot. you know what it's like? that's how i feel. you don't look autistic. great. because autistic people all look the same. yeah, i've got that one, i've got people saying to me, you look fine next mac if i had a pound for every time someone said to
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me you don't look autistic, i could have bought a pound. they mean well because i think what that means is i have this preconceptions and you just broken them, so i find that interesting. but how it comes out is quite stigmatising. they think of someone with autism and you think of someone with autism and you think of someone who doesn't speak to anyone, is rude, is a genius and that simply isn't the case. there's definitely a media image of how autistic people arbitrate. always men or children. it's like, where are the girls? everyone is a little autistic. we are taught at school we have five centres. wrong. the six is our theory of mind. the ability to understand everyone else's thought processes . understand everyone else's thought processes. we rely on people's body language. if you have the ability to do that, please don't ever say you could be a little bit autistic. just
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stop. autistic people don't feel empathy. i believe autistic people feel to much empathy. we do feel empathy. we understand emotions. for me it's very hard to sometimes put myself in another person's shoes and people mistake that for a lack of empathy. i will no they have leather shoe laces, so i do have that and i like that. we can just be ourselves. and being ourselves is a blast. it's nice. it's a rollercoaster because you see all these things that other people don't see. it's something of a unique gift. we've got gifts that we can actually give to the world.|j had someone genuinely say to me, if you could get into it, would you? no! it was like, what? no, that's like saying, would you change yourself as a person? your whole identity? we are winners! we are
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winners! high-5! thank you to all of them. that was really excellent. thanks to our colleagues at bbc three for that short film. we will make sure it is now social media as well. keep your comments on. we are looking at special education needs throughout the week. if you'd like to get in touch with us about your stories, email bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk, or tweet us using the hashtag #bbcsend. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. headlines at 7am good morning from bbc london news. the mayor is calling for tall —— taller tower blocks to be built in the suburbs, to tackle the housing shortage. sadiq khan's london plan is released today, calling for taller residential blocks and more housing to be built around transport hubs. city hall says the capital needs 66,000 new homes a year. the mayor's target is for half of those to be classed as affordable.
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in the future there will be developments where we don't want people to have car parking because we are promoting walking, cycling and taking public transport and certainly also we want to protect green space and make sure that we keep the quality of life good in london, even if it's a more densely developed city. two football stewards have been taken to hospital after a disturbance outside crystal palace's derby clash at brighton last night. brighton have released a statement, saying a minority of palace fans had come to the falmer stadium "intent on causing disorder". palace supporters complained on social media, claiming hundreds were prevented from getting into the ground. a new yoga centre has opened in north london, offering classes specifically for people with disabilities. the mahadevi centre in islington offers bespoke therapy for children with a variety of conditions, such as cerebal palsy and autism. let's have a look at the travel situation now. the tube is looking good this morning.
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just those ongoing works on the 0verground. it's closed between gospel oak and barking. a lorry has broken down on the m25 in essex, causing clockwise queues. there's been an accident on the a5 kilburn high road. it's closed by kilburn high road station. and let's take a look at the a13. the usual rush hour queues there, building into town from rainham to dagenham. time for the weather with kate kinsella good morning. it's another cold start this morning. for today and tomorrow at least we are hanging onto this very cold air. we should see some sunny spells through the course of the day, but also a little bit of cloud. and on that cloud we could see one or two showers drifting south, coming down from east anglia. falling as rain. sunny spells in between and a north—westerly breeze. that breeze is what's making things feel very cold. the maximum temperature in central london is six celsius, but it's likely to feel colder than that. 0vernight that cloud then retreats eastwards, leaving a widespread frost under clear skies. the minimum temperature
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in towns and cities is zero. dipping below that out towards the suburbs. so a cold, crisp, frosty start tomorrow. cloud moving through in the afternoon, but again factor in a north—westerly breeze and it will feel bitterly cold. 2—4 celsius is the maximum, but likely to feel colder. then a little bit of respite. this warm front is wriggling south overnight friday and into saturday. it is going to still be cold and introduces quite a bit of cloud, but it's less cold than it is today and tomorrow. so temperatures recovering a little, but still chilly at just six celsius. that's it for now. more from us in half an hour and of course you can catch up on the latest news, travel and weather on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. a doubling of the brexit divorce bill. the government substantially increases its offer
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to the european union. the bbc understands the uk could pay at least £35 billion. good morning, it is wednesday 29 november. also this morning: the children with autism being let down by the system. it's a fight, it is a constant fight. you wouldn't think you'd need to fight so much for something that you should be able to access so easily. the murders of lin and megan russell. lawyers for the man convicted of killing them say they have uncovered new evidence that could prove his innocence. there are big plans to change our railways, to ease pressure points for passengers. we will be speaking to the transport secretary about the details.
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good morning. in sport: england's women maintain their perfect start in world cup qualifying, super—sub fran kirby scoring with her first kick of the game, in a 5—0 win over kazakhstan. and it may be freezing, but that hasn't stopped matt. he is out and about with the weather. good morning. proving that the appeal of a lido isn'tjust in the summer. it is a cold start to your wednesday morning uk wide. showers mainly across eastern areas but for most the sun will shine. your full forecast in 15 minutes. see you then. good morning. first our main story: the bbc understands that the government has significantly increased the amount of money it is offering to the european union as part of the brexit divorce bill. the figure is believed to be around £35 billion. the original offer was just under £18 billion. if confirmed, the move could clear the way for moving brexit negotiations on to the issue of trade next month. let's talk to our political correspondent leila nathoo, who is in westminster.
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leila, this is a much bigger sum than theresa may had originally offered. what is likely to be the reaction? well, i think that it has been broadly welcomed in brussels. theresa may had managed last week to get her cabinet on side, even brexiteers within her cabinet, on side to the idea that she had to up the financial offer to brussels in order to persuade them to move those talks the second phase and get on to discussing trade. this was supposed to have happened in october. now, there is a crucial summit in a of weeks' time when eu leaders will gather to decide whether there had been enough progress made on the divorce matters, and the bill, the financial settlement, was one of the main sticking points. so at the moment we know that the government has made this offer behind—the—scenes. there is some attempt now to try and get it down in writing. in the range of figures we are talking about here, up to
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around £49 billion, that upper end of the scale that is believed to have been talked about has been dismissed by downing street. certainly no figure has been put on the settlement by either side. there is still much wrangling behind the scenes going on about calculating the exact amount, and the exact amount won't be known for some time. but i think the main aspect of this is that the government has made a gesture which has apparently been well received in brussels. so the hope is that that would be enough to persuade them that the divorce bill is on its way to being sorted. but certainly that doesn't mean that the green light will necessarily be given in december, because one of the main sticking point is now is whether enough progress has been made towards getting the irish border sorted after brexit, and certainly there does not seem to have been much headway on that up until now. children with autism in england are being let down by the education system, according to a report by the all party parliamentary group
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for autism, seen exclusively by breakfast. this is harley. he is now in a specialist school. but his mum, natalie, says it was a struggle to get the support he needs. it's a fight, it is a constant fight. you wouldn't think you'd need to fight so much for something that you should be able to access so easily. natalie is not alone. more than 2,000 parents were surveyed, and nearly three in four said they waited more than six months for the support their child is entitled to, while half said they waited more than a year. it's shocking that 50% of those children are not happy in school. 50% of teachers are not comfortable teaching those with autism. we have to do a lot better. because, if one in 100 have got this actually very special feature about them, but they need additional help, then we're failing them if we don't give them that help. the all party parliamentary group is now calling for a national autism and education strategy by the end of 2019, with more training for staff, and a curriculum tailored for individual needs.
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the department for education says all schools have a duty to support children with special educational needs. it says it has given councils £223 million in extra funding to introduce reforms. we will be looking at this issue all morning, so please do send us your stories or questions by e—mail, at bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk, or tweet us using the hashtag #bbcsend. to read you a couple of those comments, my daughter has been struggling for months to get my granddaughter diagnosed. we spent hours in a&e. it is a nightmare for pa rents hours in a&e. it is a nightmare for parents and a daily struggle. robbins as i am a nursery manager andi robbins as i am a nursery manager and i completely agree. parents get and i completely agree. parents get a diagnosis for their child, and the
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community, paediatricians, say come backin community, paediatricians, say come back in one year. parents come to us for help because they don't have any support. we have managed through our own funding to buy resources and training, but it is so frustrating. thank you for those comments this morning. the government is considering breaking up two of the country's biggest train operators, as part of a new rail strategy. the franchises are great western and gtr, which combines southern, thameslink, and great northern. steph is here with more details. i know you have loads of paper, but what can you tell us so far? is his news which has just come out, the government's plan to try and make things better for passengers using the rail system. 1.7 billion passengers are using it, and if you look at the record over the last few decades, since they were privatised, it is not great. it is not great for punch relative or overcrowding. in fa ct, punch relative or overcrowding. in fact, last year 1 punch relative or overcrowding. in fact, last year1 in ten trains failed to make it on time, which is the worst in a decade. the
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government has announced this morning they want to try and shake things upa morning they want to try and shake things up a bit. a lot of it is around who runs which bits of the line. network rail are in charge of track maintenance and some of the stations. then you have the train operating companies which have the franchises to run trains on different bits of the line. so part of this strategy is about splitting up of this strategy is about splitting up these big franchises so they can concentrate on, you know, different parts of the system. for example, you mentioned there is going to be a consultation on splitting the great western franchise, so that potentially one company could run the intercity links, linking london with the south—west and wales, while another company focused on running the more local services across devon and cornwall. that is one of the ideas. another area around this is reopening some of the old lines which were closed in the 60s, a 1960s. smaller lines in the south—west and south—east as well which were deemed to be loss—making.
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they were loss—making but now there is an idea of reopening them to give the system more capacity, to get people around more, make the links better and make things betterfor passengers. but the big question about all this is how much money it will involve. there is no talk of money in any of the press detail we have so far. i am sure you will put that to chris grayling, the transport secretary, when he comes in. anyone who uses the railways will know they can be stressful when you are using them to commit to and from work. thank you very much, so you a little bit later. —— see you a little bit later. north korea has test—fired a ballistic missile which travelled 1,000 kilometres before falling into the sea of japan. the pentagon said it probably had intercontinental capability. it is the first such launch in more than two months, and comes despite continuing international pressure on pyongyang to desist. 0ur seoul correspondent paul adams is there for us this morning. very good morning to you. so much concern when this sort of thing
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happens. what more details do we have about this particular missile? good morning, louise. what is interesting about this is this is a missile which flew longer and higher than any of its processors. and that is why the americans have already concluded that this was an intercontinental ballistic missile, probably capable of hitting most of the continental united states, barring perhaps florida. and so that does not mark a step forward, it is something the north koreans have been moving towards and threatening repeatedly through the course of the year, but now it seems as though they have the technical capability. it is worth remembering this is not a missile yet capable of carrying a nuclear warhead and delivering it over those great distances, but that is what the north koreans are aiming for, and that is the next step, if you like, along their controversial nuclear road. thank you very much. manufacturers and retailers are being urged to make labelling on food products clearer,
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to stop millions of tons of edible food being thrown away unnecessarily. the waste agency wrap says food labels use too many different terms, prompting people to throw away usable produce. it claims a third of the uk's two million tons of annual food waste is due to confusion over date labels. a restored white fiat 126p, crowd—funded by residents in a town in poland, has finally arrived in the us, destined for the actor tom hanks as a birthday present. one of his fans, monica jaskolska, who is from the town where the classic car was made in the 1970s, noticed the star's obsession with the make, and decided to raise money to send him one. the car was showcased at a party for the star's birthday injuly, with money left over going to the local hospital. some interesting facts have been
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sentin some interesting facts have been sent in about that car, apparently it is exactly the same size as the originalmini. it is it is exactly the same size as the original mini. it is quite a cute little beast. schools are required by law to provide an education for all pupils, regardless of their ability or special needs, yet fewer than half of children on the autistic spectrum in england say they are happy at school. a report by the all parliamentary group on autism says many children feel misunderstood by their peers, and that there is a lack of support from teachers. we have been speaking to natalie. her son, harley, has special educational needs, and she has been telling us about her fight to find him a school place. i don't think many people understand, unless you are a parent ofa understand, unless you are a parent of a child special education needs, how much of a battle it actually is
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to get the appropriate support for your child. it is a constant battle. you have to be patient, because you arejust met you have to be patient, because you are just met with a battle all the time to get that support. and it is such a shame, because a lot of pa rents a re such a shame, because a lot of parents are feeling let down by that. i want blue! parents are feeling let down by that. iwant blue! before parents are feeling let down by that. i want blue! before he was here, harley was noncommunicative. he couldn't communicate with his siblings, with us. we didn't understand what he was going through ourselves. since he has been here, it isa ourselves. since he has been here, it is a complete turnaround for him. he has friends, he can count now, he is recognising signs, he is trying to read. things that they told us he would never be able to do, and that is because of the right education, with the right support, in the right educational setting. we are joined now by jane harris from the national autistic society. and there is so much in that report
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that sort of a bit shocking, really. what do you think of the... what are the main issues for you, with children with autism going to schools? well, children with autism can be really overwhelmed in school settings. they might be bright lights, a lot of noise. it isjust settings. they might be bright lights, a lot of noise. it is just a new environment for children to get used to, and it might not be clear to autistic children what the rules are in that environment. so for some children it might be obvious, where they are meant to go, what they are meant to do at playtime, particularly. and that is why it is really important that teachers understand autism, that the head teacher takes a really proactive approach to this. but unfortunately, as this report shows, the education system is holding these children back. these children are not getting the right support. so many frustrated parents getting in touch with us today. i am sure you have heard many of these before. samantha
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says i am a single mum of an autistic teenager. everyday i am in with either the school or the education department to help my son. they make him feel isolated, mad, and the only person experiencing this. is that a familiar frame?” and the only person experiencing this. is that a familiar frame? i am really sad to say that it is. at the national autistic society we run an education rights service to help people in that specific situation so i would suggest to your listeners that they go on our website and find the number and call us, because we can help in that situation and give some advice. as this report shows, many, some advice. as this report shows, any some advice. as this report shows, many, many people are waiting more than a year for the right education support. that is the year when those children are not getting basic lessons in maths and english, the skills they would need to live independently. that is an enormous cost to those children. often autistic adults tell us they are very traumatised by those early experiences in schools. it is not just that year that it is a problem for. it can be a problem for those people's whole lives.|j for. it can be a problem for those people's whole lives. i wanted to pick you up on that, at the start,
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the really important part of your education, if things aren't going right for you, it can have a lifelong impact, presumably? absolutely, it means people don't get the skills to live independently, they are less likely to get a job, and that is an enormous cost to those children and their parents, they are not excluded from school and parents have to stop work in order to home—school them, as you have been talking about earlier this week. that is a cost to the children, it is a cost to those families, it is also a massive cost to the taxpayer. can i pick up a thought from natalie, whose son is now getting the help that he needs, and she has seen a big difference. when children start getting the right help, do you see that echoed across the spectrum ? right help, do you see that echoed across the spectrum?” right help, do you see that echoed across the spectrum? i can think of one child who couldn't walk from the taxi to the school the first day she came. it took two hours to help her to walk that distance because it was such an unfamiliarand to walk that distance because it was such an unfamiliar and overwhelming environment. i saw that child couple
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of years ago and she was running down the corridor. it makes a massive difference. but the problem is that while we have that good practice in some areas it is not across the country and what we need isa across the country and what we need is a national strategy that sets out how many places we need in mainstream schools, because most autistic children go to mainstream schools, what support there will be the teachers and head teachers all the teachers and head teachers all the way through their career, how many special schools we need and how many special schools we need and how many units in mainstream schools we need. we are involved in all of those things. we run the special schools and provide support for teachers and thanks to the generosity of a donor we work with some units in mainstream schools. but what we don't have is that across the country. it is left to chance at the moment and it shouldn't be. we will have a government minister coming into talk to us this week. angela, my ten—year—old girl has adhd. her
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school supports her and the reason she is improving is down to the specialist knowledge and expertise. that leads me onto another question about balancing the needs of autistic children with those who don't have autism. how is it best to make sure that balance isn't that? some of the things autistic children need help all children. one thing that can help autistic children was shown last night on bbc one, visual support. having a visual timetable which says, we will do maths at this point, then they will be playtime, then a break and you will eat something, then yoga or whatever the timetable is. express it in pictures. that can help lots of children understand what's going on in the day. our experienced is most things you put in place for autistic children are good for the children and they don't usually cause
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problems. thank you so much and thank you for getting in touch. just coming back to what we said earlier for stops the matter has an autistic teenager and she says he is a little miracle. she says, you've made me feel human and stronger. thank you for getting in touch. the sense is that you are not alone. this is what we are getting at. margaret says it's a constant struggle. i removed my son from school after being threatened with legal struggle because he wouldn't attend. now he is at university and on course for a first. well done. you know how to get in touch. but just well done. you know how to get in touch. butjust in case you have forgotten, you can e—mail us or tweet us. we will get through as many as we can. 0ur breakfast team are looking at everything that comes through. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. he is out and about and it's a rather wonderful site. good morning.
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good morning. doesn't it look appealing? the steam is coming off the lido. it is a two degrees outside of the pool. there is a bit of frost on the rooftops. it hasn't stopped the swimmers. the lido isn't just for summer. a little bit cold when you get out and that's the case across the uk. the cold air remains with us. let's have a look at the forecast for today. it will be cold and windy today in eastern areas and still a few showers, mainly in the north and east. an ice risk in northern scotland this morning. a couple of showers. they are wintry over high ground. the west of the pennines will stay dry. eastwood is there will be lots of showers. especially this morning. lots of
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snow on the tops of the yorkshire moors and pennines. rain in the showers to lower levels and in the east anglia. more cloud in the south—east compared to yesterday. across the rest of central and southern england it's a dry, sunny and frosty start. temperatures down to —4 in parts of devon. showers to the west of cornwall and the far west of wales. most of the showers off land at the moment. a couple of showers in northern ireland as well. big gaps in between the showers. some of you will stay dry. again, and ice risk for a couple. the vast majority of the uk stays dry. showers in northern ireland. the main risk remains across those parts of eastern england and again it will stay wintry on higher ground. the odd rumble of thunder close to the coast as well. temperatures down on yesterday's values. coast as well. temperatures down on yesterday‘s values. 3— coast as well. temperatures down on yesterday's values. 3— seven degrees at best for the vast majority. into the night, most of the showers
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inland will fade. a subtle change in wind direction. showers in eastern england fade back towards the coast and then we have the showers return across parts of western wales and cornwall. they could turn the sleet and snow over higher ground. a cold night uk wide. the greater chance of a frost into tomorrow morning and of course where we have the showers there is the risk of ice into tomorrow. into thursday, most stay dry and sunny. a better start in eastern england. showers late in the day come inland. for those in western wales and cornwall, a greater chance of showers. what we noticed tomorrow, stronger wind and it will feel colder. the cold day of the week tomorrow and it will be added to by the windchill. more like -3 added to by the windchill. more like —3 in some parts of eastern england. for friday, showers mainly towards coastal parts of east anglia. we can't rule out a bit obsolete. later in the day the cloud is over from the north—west. northern parts of
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england as well. it introduces slightly less cold air for the weekend. that's how the weather is looking. before we go, a lovely site here. it will be open on christmas day. 0pen every day here. on christmas day they get as many as 1500 customers come through in the four hours it is open. certainly appealing for some! thank you very much. it looks lovely. i wouldn't go after christmas dinner... early in the day! you're watching breakfast from bbc news. let's return to one of our top stories. more than 20 years ago, lin russell and her six year old daughter megan were attacked as they walked along a quiet country lane near the village of chillenden, south—east of canterbury. lawyers for michael stone, the man found guilty of murdering the mother and daughter say they'll release significant new evidence today that casts doubt on his conviction. let's get more detail from our correspondent,
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wyre davies, who is in our cardiff studio. many people will be familiar with the case. what happened to lin russell and her two daughters?m the case. what happened to lin russell and her two daughters? it is one of the most notorious crimes in recent criminal history. they were walking home in rural kent and were brutally attacked by a man with a hammerand brutally attacked by a man with a hammer and left for dead. sadly, lin, 45, and megan, six, were killed. the other survived and despite having terrible injuries she has rebuilt her life in north wales. a local man a year after the murder, michael stone, was arrested and eventually found guilty, there was no forensic evidence against him and he was basically jailed no forensic evidence against him and he was basicallyjailed on the alleged testimony of a confession from another prisoner through a wall. the legal team have long argued that his conviction was u nsafe argued that his conviction was unsafe and he didn't commit the crime. we are about to hear new evidence later today that they say
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helps their case. some of that new evidence points towards a notorious serial killer. what more can you tell us about that? he is one of the very few multiple killers, serial killers, in the uk and the only uk prisoner serving to full life terms for the murder of milly dowler and two other women between 2002 and 2004, but we now know his violent criminal career against women started back in the 1990s. at the same time the brussels were murdered. we've seen new evidence. —— russells. the legal team says that will put him in the frame. they say not only does that cast doubt on stone, but it put someone else firmly in the frame. that doesn't mean levi bellfield definitely killed the russells, 20 say he didn't, but it does throw
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significant doubt on michael stone's conviction. they are now searching for leave to appeal against the sentence. what are we expecting to happen today? this afternoon in central london there will be a press conference by michael stone's legal tea m conference by michael stone's legal team in which they will release these documents. it is very powerful. we are not making a judgement either way, but it is very powerful, the new evidence that i think will throw new light on the murders and it might, according to michael stone's defence, force or prompt the criminal case's review commission to send his case for urgent appeal and they are hoping the conviction will be overturned. really interesting developments. thank you. you can see more on that story on this story at 8:30pm on bbc 0ne, story on this story at 8:30pm on bbc one, in wales. that will be available on the bbc iplayer as well. the headlines in a few moments.
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time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the mayor is calling for taller tower blocks to be built in the suburbs as part of his solution to the capital's housing shortage. sadiq khan's london plan is released today, calling for more housing to be built around transport hubs. city hall says the capital needs 66,000 new homes a year, with a target for half of those to be classed as affordable. in the future there will be developments where we don't want people to have car parking because we are promoting walking, cycling and taking public transport and certainly also we want to protect green space and make sure that we keep the quality of life good in london, even if it's a more densely developed city. two football stewards have been taken to hospital after a disturbance outside crystal palace's derby clash at brighton last night. brighton have released a statement,
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saying a minority of palace fans had come to the falmer stadium "intent on causing disorder". palace supporters complained on social media, claiming hundreds were prevented from getting into the ground. a new yoga centre has opened in north london, offering classes specifically for people with disabilities. the mahadevi centre in islington offers bespoke therapy for children with a variety of conditions, such as cerebal palsy and autism. let's have a look at the travel situation now. no problems on the tube so far. just those ongoing works on the 0verground. it's closed between gospel oak and barking. and minor delays on tfl rail services as well. a lorry‘s broken down on the qe2 bridge, it's causing long delays clockwise on the m25 in essex. elsewhere on the m25, there's been an accident nearjunction 11 for chertsey. and here's how it looks in vauxhall. roadworks and lane closures on parry street between south lambeth road and vauxhall cross. time for the weather with kate kinsella good morning.
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it's another cold start this morning. for today and tomorrow at least we are hanging onto this very cold air. we should see some sunny spells through the course of the day, but also a little bit of cloud. and on that cloud we could see one or two showers drifting south, coming down from east anglia. falling as rain. sunny spells in between and a north—westerly breeze. that breeze is what's making things feel very cold. the maximum temperature in central london is six celsius, but it's likely to feel colder than that. 0vernight that cloud then retreats eastwards, leaving a widespread frost under clear skies. the minimum temperature in towns and cities is zero. dipping below that out towards the suburbs and beyond. so a cold, crisp, frosty start tomorrow. cloud moving through in the afternoon, but again factor in a north—westerly breeze and it will feel bitterly cold. 2—4 celsius is the maximum, but likely to feel colder. then a little bit of respite. this warm front is wriggling south overnight friday and into saturday. it is going to still be cold and introduces quite a bit of cloud,
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but it's less cold than it is today and tomorrow. so temperatures recovering a little, but still chilly at just six celsius. more from us in half an hour and of course you can catch up on the latest news, travel and weather on our website at the usual address. bye bye. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: the government has significantly increased the amount of money it is offering to the european union as part of the brexit divorce bill, the bbc understands. the figure is believed to be around double the original figure, which was just under £18 billion, although this morning downing street insists there is no agreed final figure, and that negotiations are still going on. if confirmed, the move could clear the way for the prime minister to move brexit negotiations on to the issue of trade next month. children with autism in england
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are being let down by the education system, according to a report by the all party parliamentary group for autism, which has been seen exclusively by breakfast. nearly three in four parents said they waited more than six months for the support their child is entitled to, while half said they waited more than a year. the department for education says all schools have a duty to support children with special educational needs. it says it has given councils £223 million in extra funding to introduce reforms. it's shocking that 50% of those children are not happy in school. 50% of teachers are not comfortable teaching those with autism. we have to do a lot better. because, if one in 100 have got this actually very special feature about them, but they need additional help, then we're failing them if we don't give them that help. lawyers for michael stone, the man found guilty of murdering a mother and daughter in kent in 1996, say they will release significant new evidence today that casts doubt on his conviction. lin russell and her six—year—old daughter, megan, were attacked
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as they walked along a quiet country lane near the village of chillenden, south—east of canterbury. north korea has carried out another ballistic missile test, its first for two months. pyongyang says the missile which landed injapanese waters is a new type of weapon, and its most powerful yet. experts believe that north korea has demonstrated for the first time that it could now hit most of the american mainland. president donald trump was briefed while the missile was still in the air. thank you very much. as you probably have heard, and some of you have reported, a missile was launched a little while ago from north korea. i will only tell you that we'll take care of it. we have general mattis in the room with us, and we had a long discussion on it. it's a situation that we will handle. two of the country's largest rail franchises, great western and govia thameslink, could be broken up, as part
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of a new strategy to improve services. ministers are also considering reversing railway line closures introduced in the 1960s. it is part of the government's rail strategy, which will be unveiled today. labour says the ideas are flimsy re—announcements. manufacturers and retailers are being urged to make labelling on food products clearer, to stop millions of tons of edible food being thrown away unnecessarily. the waste agency wrap says food labels use too many different terms, prompting people to throw away usable produce. it claims a third of the uk's two million tons of annual food waste is due to confusion over date labels. an entire street in hampshire has been decorated with festive lights, by a man who really loves christmas. ged hollyoake started the tradition of working with his neighbours to decorate their homes 13 years ago. this year, hundreds of people turned up to see the switch—on of the lights, which have gained international prominence.
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so far, around £50,000 has been raised for charity, and the lights attract thousands of people in the run—up to christmas. and you can totally see why. everyone always gets involved.” love christmas drive by to inspect the lights. there is a house in sheffield half an hourfrom the lights. there is a house in sheffield half an hour from where we are, and they go full christmas lights. it is part of our christmas tradition. we have a little drive past, and they always clear a space in front so you can have a good old view. snowman, reindeer, the whole shebang. matt will bring us the weather in ten minutes' time. and good news. yes, england's women are flying in world cup qualifying. they have won three of their three matches so far, so they look odds—on
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to qualify, and more importantly for the manager, who has replaced mark sampson, a good audition for her, which arguably she has passed. fair to say it was her substitutions which really made the difference. fran kirby scored a penalty and set up fran kirby scored a penalty and set upa fran kirby scored a penalty and set up a couple of others as well. she is getting things right, isn't she? mel lawley scored the only goal in the first half, before scoring four in 12 minutes in the second. super sub fran kirby scoring a penalty, before setting up nikita parris for her first and england's third. 5—0 they won, three wins out of three under interim boss mo marley, so will she get the job permanently. obviously there was a process, an application process, on the 17th. that's when, obviously, the time was when i first did it. i agreed to put a cv in, and we said we'll have a look at it at the end of it. i think now it's about letting the players enjoy it. hopefully the players are pleased with their own performances, and then we'll all sit
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down and have a look, and decide what's right for the team moving forward. but wales will end 2017 top of the group, after they beat bosnia herzegovina 1—0, kayleigh green the scorer. laura 0'sullivan saved a penalty, to ensure wales took all three points. they have played a game more than england. it appears scoring four goals isn't enough to pleasejose mourinho, who blamed his side for not scoring more in a 4—2 win over watford. and look how good they were — ashley young with this beauty. watford managed to bring it back to 3—2, butjesse lingard scored a brilliant solo goal, and they are now five points behind city at the top of the table. 0ne concern is the lack of goals
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from their striker. i think in this moment he doesn't have a contract with any brands, that is why he is playing with the black boots. i think he needs a brand to go there, and to give him the right boots and to pay in the right money. so he goes back to goals. so if your children are pestering you for new boots, it is hard to deny them when even jose boots, it is hard to deny them when evenjose mourinho boots, it is hard to deny them when even jose mourinho is boots, it is hard to deny them when evenjose mourinho is saying the boots make a difference. any excuse you need for a new purchase. leicester are into the top half of the premier league, after a 2—1win at home to spurs. first—half goals from jamie vardy and riyad mahrez put them 2two up. harry kane pulled one back for spurs, but the defeat leaves them fifth. manager—less west bromwich albion were 2—0 up at home, but newcastle came back through ciaran clark, and an own—goal from jonny evans made it 2—2. brighton and crystal palace drew
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0-0. england's cricketers have set themselves a curfew of midnight, is potentially going to be back playing. the all—rounder has flown to new zealand to visit family, and has held talks with canterbury cricket club about playing for them. stokes has been stopped from playing for england in the ashes series as he is investigated by police for an alleged assault outside a nightclub in bristol in september. 0bviously obviously an ashes series is a huge pa rt obviously an ashes series is a huge part of anyone's careers, and we are here to win the series. the good thing for him is that he's a little bit closer to australia, if that time was to come that he was to be able to come and join the squad. but we know no more than that. and hopefully, if he can get some cricket under his belt, that would be good for him,
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having had a couple of months away from the game. finally, if you needed any reminding of how powerful a scrum is, just ask the teams that play against hinckley rugby club. the east midlands side drove opponents luctonians back towards their own tryline. not content with that, they also managed to wipe out the goalposts, as well. the match continued on another pitch, as hinckley won — but at a price. replacing the posts will cost £7,000. but having said that, great advertising. sheer power there. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: the bbc understands that the government has increased the amount of money it is offering to the eu as part of the brexit divorce bill. autistic children in england are being let down by the education system, according to a report seen exclusively by this programme. it is that time of year when retailers look to recruit extra christmas staff, and research
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suggests they could be in for a bit of a pay rise. steph is looking at what type ofjobs are out there, and what the money is like. this is some research about the pay people get at this time of year. yes that's right — retailers and other businesses are looking to employ extra staff for the busy christmas period. the royal mail is recruiting an extra 20,000 staff. and retailers are taking on tens of thousands of people. but research out today from the jobs website adzuna suggests that advertised pay for retailjobs is up 7% on this time last year. raj lal from totaljobs is here to make sense of it with me. good morning to you. tell us a bit about the type of work which is available. because this is such a critical time for so many businesses who trade and their peak performance time is over christmas, it means they have positions they have to
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fill which a time sensitive. industries such as hospitality, driving, logistics, warehouse, with record low employment for the last 42 years, it means these are positions they have to phil and they have to get a competitive edge. they may look at a associated with those roles. so what type of experience to people need for these jobs? again, it varies, but these are afoot in the door typejobs. it varies, but these are afoot in the door type jobs. used to have stu d e nts the door type jobs. used to have students outside of term time doing it and now people are looking at it for extra income, top up work. it can lead to permanentjobs, because of their nature, and if someone does well in thejob. of their nature, and if someone does well in the job. but yes, it is a case of we've got the national minimum wage, and we are driving prices up, and to get that competitive edge, employers are having to look at these type of roles. so is it the case that for some of thesejobs roles. so is it the case that for some of these jobs which might have been just some of these jobs which might have beenjust minimum some of these jobs which might have been just minimum wage some of these jobs which might have beenjust minimum wage in the past we are seeing companies having to pay more? absolutely, we have also
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got the hospitality industry, where they have relied on eu workers. that has been an industry for the next few weeks which has recruited heavily and is suffering with the looming brexit. in the case of getting into that, that is what companies are having to put themselves in a position for, and employers are having to look at benefits and flexible working times. you mentioned some of the jobs becoming permanent, but how long are these contract for? they start sort of mid—november. you have black friday, cyber monday, boxing day sales, people want to recruit over that period. at what we have seen is that period. at what we have seen is that january is a very busy recruitment period. so especially now we have had stagnation with wages due to inflation, you are looking for people who will look for work in january and looking for people who will look for work injanuary and if you do well in your temporaryjob you may be kept on a full—time job. january is
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often a busy time for recruitment. so for people out there who want to try and make the most of this, which area is the best one to try and get the best money? it depends on your skills. if your customer facing, retail and hospitality are good for that. —— you are customer facing. you have mentioned some of the retailers with online offerings and having to build new warehouses, but it does depend on your skill set. thank you for your time. thank you. matt is out and about. he was telling us earlier that 1500 people go to this out your swimming pool. he is not really dressed for a swim this morning, is he? no speedos budgie smugglers but you do have the weather. no, i don't want to put people on —— off their breakfast this morning. 1500 people in four
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hours on christmas day come here, andi hours on christmas day come here, and i can see the appeal. it is very tempting this morning. it is 28 celsius, 82 fahrenheit. much nicer to get in then get out. it is only two degrees poolside at the moment and a bit of a breeze is adding to the chill. it has not stopped the cloud this morning. notjust for summer, the crowds packing in for the winter months as well. if you are heading off yourself, it is getting out which will be the struggle. taking a look at the forecast, it is one of staying cold across the uk. we have that wind again across eastern parts of the uk as well. not quite as strong as yesterday. with a subtle change of wind direction, not as many showers towards the south—west of the country. the shower still packing in for north and north—east scotland. sleet and snow, notjust over higher ground. in the showers in north—east england dropping a coating across the likes of the north york moors
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and the pennines. rain in the east midlands towards east anglia, and a few more showers later on across the south—east compared with yesterday. come further west, frosty start, a lovely, sunny, crisp start for many. the shower is limited to the far tip across the isles of scilly, and not as many showers here as we had three yesterday. most of wales starts dry, sunny and frosty. watch out for a little bit of ice on the same in northern ireland. a bit of sleet over higher ground can be expected as well. through the day, as i said, more showers across eastern england compared with yesterday. coming into parts of the midlands as well. further west, most of you will stay dry and sunny, continuing in northern scotland, and for the vast majority the bulk of the day will be dry. colder than yesterday. temperatures around three to seven degrees at their very best, and that wind will make it feel a bit colder across the eastern coast. a subtle change in wind direction. the
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showers across eastern england become more confined to coastal counties. still an ice risk to go with it. showers in northern scotla nd with it. showers in northern scotland and northern ireland and it means that wind direction change. showers will push more into the south—western parts of wales and across cornwall. those will be a little bit on the wintry side. a cold start to tomorrow morning. widespread frost for many of you and fewer showers to begin with across eastern england. they will return through the day across the north—east, sleet and snow as well. showers for northern scotland, northern ireland, and south—west wales and the far south—west of england. you will notice uk wide tomorrow more of wind, and that will add to the chill. it feel more like -3 add to the chill. it feel more like —3 across eastern parts of the country. the winds easing down on friday. showers more confined to coastal parts of east anglia and the far south—east, and it is here we could see a bit of sleet mixed in with those. a few showers in the west but through friday the cloud
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increases across scotland, northern ireland and eventually northern england, and that will bring slightly less chilly air to take us into the weekend. 0verall slightly less chilly air to take us into the weekend. overall this week we stay with colder theme. temperatures below where they should be for the time of year but not stopping people here from having a little dip the waters. —— in the waters. thank you very much. as we've been hearing, the transport secretary chris grayling has announced plans to shake up the railway network so that they work better for passengers. measures include looking into the possibility of reopening lines closed in the 1960s as part of the beeching cuts in order to ease overcrowding, as well as splitting up two of britain's biggest rail franchises to improve their services. let's speak to the secretary of state for transport chris grayling who joins us from our westminster studio. let's talk first of all about these lines that were closed in the 1960s. you are talking about possibly reopening some of them. which ones? we are looking at a range. bristol
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where we are putting up a lot of new capacity, which opens up the potential to restart the old line to hendley and portishead. bristol desperately needs more commuter rail and that's part of our planned and it involves bringing back some of the routes that were lost in the 1960s. how are you going to pay for it? if you look at what we've got, we've just announced a £47 billion package to invest in the rails. we will have funds in that package to develop some of these schemes. we've also announced nearly £2 billion in the budget that will fund new investment in transport in our cities. that will inevitably be involving some rail investments. so we have the funds, but we want to find the right places where it can make life better for commuters open —— and open up potentialfor housing and ease congestion. is this new
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money? it is. over and ease congestion. is this new money? it is. 0verthe and ease congestion. is this new money? it is. over the past five yea rs money? it is. over the past five years we've been involved in the biggest investment programme in the ra i lwa ys biggest investment programme in the railways the steam age. that will open up with more investments and longer trains around the country funded by the private sector. people talk about the renationalisation of the railways. the private sector is paying for new rail carriages all around the country at the cost of billions of pounds, money that would otherwise be taken away from budgets for hospitals and schools. so this isa for hospitals and schools. so this is a good private investment programme. could you explain to people who have been affected by the scrapping of electrified schemes, why those have been scrapped and you are looking at other schemes?m why those have been scrapped and you are looking at other schemes? it is are looking at other schemes? it is a simple equation. should i spend £1 billion shaving a minute off the journey time to sheffield, taking longer to deliver new trains? they will arrive three years earlier than would have been the case, rather than reopening new commuter routes
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and creating new opportunities for new journeys around and creating new opportunities for newjourneys around the country? i think reopening routes is a greater priority than shaping a minute off the journey time priority than shaping a minute off thejourney time on priority than shaping a minute off the journey time on an express train. you are well-known brexiteer. that is making the headlines. we are hearing of a doubling of the so—called divorce bill. are those figures true? they are saying 35 million and and offer of £45 billion -- 35 million and and offer of £45 billion —— 35 billion. million and and offer of £45 billion -- 35 billion. there are no numbers to discuss this morning. what we simply said is that we will fulfil our obligations built up during the membership and we want to leave as good friends and neighbours and carry on trading with the eu. it is right and proper that we meet our obligations and that's what we intend to do. is 35 billion to much? is lots of speculation about numbers. what i'm saying is that the tale is up for negotiation and we are making good progress with that and we hope we will move on to
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discussions about trade shortly, but it is right and proper that we meet our obligations. very clear also that as the european union says nothing is agreed until everything is agreed, so this is all part of the package going forward. in any negotiations you make offers and you normally get something in return. if you are increasing the numbers, what are you getting in return? there's a lot of speculation about numbers and what i would say now is that we are concentrating on getting through the negotiation process, sorting out proper trading arrangements, fulfilling our obligations as they are current, not as a future member of the eu. so it's not about buying things, it's about fulfilling the obligations we built up. there have been obligations and liabilities built up and we will fulfil those and that's what we are going to do. and what about northern ireland? what will happen about the border? we've been clear from the start. we
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do not want and don't intend to have a fixed border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland. david davis put forward proposals early about how we could avoid that. it's irrelevant anyway because i believe we will end up with a sensible free—trade agreement. that's good for the eu and the uk. we are their biggest export market, so it makes sense for that to happen. there's no need for a border between northern ireland and southern island and we have to make sure there is no fixed border. thanks forjoining us. —— southern ireland. when we send our children to school we expect them to get the best start in life, but sadly for some with special educational needs that isn't always the case. there are around 120,000 school—aged children in england with autism, and the vast majority go to mainstream schools. yet many are being failed by the education system. a new report by a group of mps found 70% of parents believe the support their child needs is not being put in place quickly enough, with half saying they had to wait for more than a year. 40% say their child's school does not meet their needs.
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television presenter and vocal coach carrie grant and her husband david have four children with special educational needs. louise spoke to them about their fight and how they had to get their children the education they deserve. i feel desperate for my children. i feel really desperate. we failed them as parents because we can't get the services that we need. we can't get the education that these children deserve. thank you so much for inviting me to your house. just run me through the family. this one is 0livia, our eldest, who has dy5praxia, adhd. talia is autistic. she has really struggled at school. this is imogen, who's 11 going on 12. she is autistic and she also has adhd.
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and your young boy, he is adopted, isn't he? yeah. so this is nathan. he was adopted when he was two. and he has attachment difficulties, which is quite common with children who have been adopted. four children and seven... seven conditions! yeah. there's this new parliamentary report out and how does it affect them at school? it had a big impact, hasn't it? i think the challenges at school are vast because some schools just aren't even looking at sen and they don't want to look at it. the biggest fight would be trying to access services and often sadly trying to get the school to understand what it is you need. that's said in the report.
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70% of parents say support isn't in place quickly enough for their child and nearly 70% waited for nearly six months. what are the biggest issues for you? certainly with our children the biggest issues are anxiety, the fact that they're not a one size fits all and so much of school education is geared towards one size fits all. our children don't necessarily have learning disabilities, they are super intelligent, but they are also sick. —— they're autistic. we are conditioned tojudge the quality of our parenting on the happiness of our children. that's so true! that's so true. and actually you have to find a different yardstick if your children are on the autistic spectrum. what is yourjudgement of a good day? that you've got through it? a good day is that all the kids are alive. yeah. and they all go to bed, asleep, alive and not feeling as though they don't want to see the morning. that's a really good day. you really get a sense of how it is.
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thank you to them for talking to us. this is a 24—hour thing they are dealing with. we are getting lots of m essa g es dealing with. we are getting lots of messages about teachers and talking about how perhaps they can help as well. because there is a difficult conversation. teachers are trying to help, say many, and they are being hampered by the system. just to give you a flavour, lee says all the schools she has worked at have been dedicating themselves to getting the right support. at underfunding has affected how schools work. staff being overworked and stuffing children into class of over 30. carrie talked about training. i am a
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teaching assistant working with a severely autistic five—year—old child. iam severely autistic five—year—old child. i am one to one with her. she is not communicating and often kicks out and bites me and others. she says she has very limited training in autism, as have other staff. but if pa rents in autism, as have other staff. but if parents wish their children to be ina if parents wish their children to be in a mainstream school, the school has no option to accommodate these children in the best way they can. that's interesting because that parliamentary report also talks in little bit about training and access to training. 0ne to training. one more from claire. she says she feels for parents trying to get appropriate education for special children, but she says stop promoting the idea of the school let me down. she is a maths teacher and she knows how hard they work to accommodate all children, especially those with special education needs. thank you for all of the comments. we are reading them all. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the mayor is calling for taller
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tower blocks to be built in the suburbs as part of his solution to the capital's housing shortage. sadiq khan's london plan is released today, calling for more housing to be built around transport hubs. city hall says the capital needs 66,000 new homes a year, with a target for half of those to be classed as affordable. in the future there will be developments where we don't want people to have car parking because we are promoting walking, cycling and taking public transport and certainly also we want to protect green space and make sure that we keep the quality of life good in london, even if it's a more densely developed city. two football stewards have been taken to hospital after a disturbance outside crystal palace's derby clash at brighton last night. brighton have released a statement, saying a minority of palace fans had come to the falmer stadium "intent on causing disorder". palace supporters complained on social media, claiming hundreds were prevented from getting into the ground. a new yoga centre has
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opened in north london, offering classes specifically for people with disabilities. the mahadevi centre in islington offers bespoke therapy for children with a variety of conditions, such as cerebal palsy and autism. let's have a look at the travel situation now. tfl rail services have minute delays because of a faulty train. and ongoing works on the overground. it's closed between gospel oak and barking. a lorry‘s broken down on the qe2 bridge, causing long delays clockwise on the m25 in essex. elsewhere on the m25, there's been an accident nearjunction 11 for chertsey. and here's how it looks in vauxhall. there are roadworks on parry street. it's slow back towards stockwell, 0val and victoria. time for the weather with kate kinsella good morning. it's another cold start this morning. for today and tomorrow at least we are hanging onto this very cold air. we should see some sunny spells through the course of the day, but also a little bit of cloud. and on that cloud we could see one
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or two showers drifting south, coming down from east anglia. falling as rain. sunny spells in between and a north—westerly breeze. that breeze is what's making things feel very cold. the maximum temperature in central london is six celsius, but it's likely to feel colder than that. 0vernight that cloud then retreats eastwards, leaving a widespread frost under clear skies. the minimum temperature in towns and cities is zero. dipping below that out towards the suburbs and beyond. so a cold, crisp, frosty start tomorrow. cloud moving through in the afternoon, but again factor in a north—westerly breeze and it will feel bitterly cold. 2—4 celsius is the maximum, but likely to feel colder. then a little bit of respite. this warm front is wriggling south overnight friday and into saturday. it is going to still be cold and introduces quite a bit of cloud, but it's less cold than it is today and tomorrow. so temperatures recovering a little, but still chilly at just six celsius. that's it for now.
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more from us in half an hour and of course you can catch up on the latest news, travel and weather on our website at the usual address. bye bye. good morning it's wednesday, 29th november. the bbc understands the uk could pay £35 billion. good morning. it's wednesday, 29th november. also this morning: the children with autism being let down by the system — half of parents say they've waited more than a year for the help they need. it's a fight. it is a constant
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fight. you wouldn't think you'd need to fight so much for something that you should be able to access so easily. the murders of lin and megan russell — lawyers for the man convicted of killing them say they've uncovered new evidence that could prove his innocence. there are big plans to change our railways. the transport secretary says passengers deserve a more reliable and efficient service. i'll be explaining how he plans to do it. good morning. in sport. england's women maintain their perfect start in world cup qualifying. super sub fran kirby scoring with her first kick of the game in a 5—0 win over kazakhstan. and a new drive to get us to reduce the amount of food we throw out — we'll have some top tips. and it may be freezing but that hasn't stopped matt. he's out and about with the weather. it is two celsius out here, but the appeal of the lido for winter as well as summer. if you are outdoors, it isa
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well as summer. if you are outdoors, it is a cold day today once again. fewer showers around across many western areas, but it is a wetter day for some in the east. a bit of snow mixed in. i will have the full forecast in 15 minutes. see you then. good morning. first our main story. the bbc understands the government has significantly increased the amount of money it's offering to the european union as part of the brexit divorce bill. the figure is believed to be around double the original figure which was just under £18 billion — although this morning downing street insists there is no agreed final figure and that negotiations are still going on. earlier the transport secretary, chris grayling told this programme they are making good progress in negotiations. there is lots of speculation about numbers. what i'm saying now is that detail is for the negotiations. we're making good progress in those negotiations. we hope we will move on to discussions about trade shortly, but it is right and proper that we meet our obligations, but very clear also that as the european
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union itself often says, nothing is agreed until everything is agreed. so this is all part of a package going forward. let's get reaction to that from our political correspondent, leila nathoo who's in westminster for us. it seems the government line this is very much part of an on going negotiation process? yes, ministers are negotiation process? yes, ministers a re clear negotiation process? yes, ministers are clear they don't want to be pinned down to any specific figure. nor do they want to reveal, confirm for now that any agreement has been reached, but what is clear there has been an acceptance on the uk side, the cabinet is agreed, last week, that an increased offer has to be made to brussels. that offer is being made behind the scenes and it seems to have been warmly, broadly welcomed by those on the eu side. now, the figures we are talking about, the upper end of those figures has been dismissed by downing street, but it is clear this
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is significantly more than theresa may had initially said when she made her offer of about £18 billion in her offer of about £18 billion in her florence speech. now, the idea that brussels is welcoming this as, although nothing has been pinned down, brussels is welcoming this as a sign that progress is being made towards sorting out that particular matter b, but in december, in a um can have weeks' time, there is a meeting of eu leaders when they will decide whether to give the green light to beginning trade talks this. is what the uk has been calling for for sometime. the divorce bill seems to have been sort of broadly agreed on. certainly the principles of it and afigure, on. certainly the principles of it and a figure, a road range, but the irish border, resolving that, how about the irish border work after brexit, that appears to be the main stumbling block. certainly the obstacle standing in the way for the eu to give the green light for trade talks to begin in a couple of weeks'
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time. children with autism in england are being let down by the education system according to a report by the all party parliamentary group for autism, seen exclusively by breakfast. this is harley — he's now in a specialist school but his mum natalie says it was a struggle to get the support he needs. it's a fight. it is a constant fight. you wouldn't think you'd need to fight so much for something that you should be able to access so easily. natalie is not alone. more than 2,000 parents were surveyed, and nearly three in four said they waited more than six months for the support their child is entitled to, while half said they waited more than a year. it is shocking that 50% of those children are not happy in school. 50% of teachers are not comfortable teaching those with autism. we have to do a lot better because if one in 100 have got this incredibly special feature about them, that they need additional help then we're failing them if we don't give them that help. the all party parliamentary group is now calling for a national autism
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and education strategy by the end of 2019 with more training for staff and a curriculum tailored for individual needs. the department for education says "all schools have a duty to support children with special educational needs". it says it's given councils £223 million in extra funding to introduce reforms. we will be looking at this issue all morning, so please do send us your stories or questions by email bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk or tweet us using the hashtag #bbcsend. we are reading as many as we can on air, but we have got a dedicated tea m air, but we have got a dedicated team who are going through everything because so many stories from all sorts of people, including pa rents from all sorts of people, including parents and teachers as well are getting in contact us with about our week—long coverage. thank you for
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being involved. lawyers for a man found guilty of murdering a mother and daughter in kent in 1996 say they'll release significant new evidence today that casts doubt on his conviction. lin russell and her six—year—old daughter, megan, were attacked as they walked along a quiet country lane near the village of chillenden in kent. 0ur correspondent wyre davies has this report. it was a notorious murder. a brutal, unprovoked attack in the kent countryside, on a family walking home from a school swimming gala. 45—year—old lin russell and her six—year—old daughter, megan, were killed in the frenzied hammer attack. but nine—year—old josie survived, despite suffering terrible injuries. michael stone, a known criminal and drug addict, was arrested a year later in 1997 and found guilty of the russell murders. he's serving a life sentence, but has always protested his innocence. there's no forensic evidence against him and he was convicted on a disputed confession to a fellow prisoner and stone's legal team say
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they now have compelling, new evidence linking this man, levi bellfield, to the russell murders. the killer of schoolgirl millie dowler, amelie delagrange and marsha mcdonnell is serving two full life terms and many say bellfield has committed dozens of similar serious crimes. the similarities you've got are, a woman, a blitz attack with something heavy like a hammer. just those features make it an extremely rare crime. i think in the absence of other facts, he would be a good suspect. two decades after the appalling russell murders, lawyers for the man convicted of the killings will today release new evidence that the bbc has seen and which they say means his case must now go to the court of appeal. the government is considering breaking up two of the country's biggest train operators as part of a new rail strategy. the franchises are great western and gtr which combines southern,
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thameslink and great northern. ministers are also exploring the possibility that some of the lines closed during the 1960s could be re—opened. they say new rail lines can unlock jobs, encourage house building and ease overcrowding on the existing network. north korea has test—fired a ballistic missile which travelled a thousand kilometres before falling into the sea of japan. the pentagon said it probably had intercontinental capability. it's the first such launch in more than two months and comes despite continuing international pressure on north korea to desist. 0ur seoul correspondent paul adams is there for us this morning. good morning paul. 0f good morning paul. of course, so many people would like to know the details about this missile and it's capabilities? good morning, louise. i think the key things to note about this missile are it flew longer and higher than any of its predecessors and led many experts and including
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the us defence secretary james mattis to conclude it is an intercontinental ballistic missile capable of hitting all of the continental united states. that represents a leap forward on the pa rt represents a leap forward on the part of the north korean, they have a missile capable reaching much further than their previous efforts, but what they lack is the ability to put a nuclear warhead on top of the missile and still fire it successfully over a very long—distance. successfully over a very long-distance. paul adams, successfully over a very long-distance. pauladams, thank successfully over a very long-distance. paul adams, thank you very much. apple says it's working to fix a serious bug in its most recent mac operating system. the flaw in the high sierra software makes it possible to access a mac computer or laptop without a password, and gain powerful administrator rights. a restored white fiat 126p crowd funded by residents in a town in poland has finally arrived in the us destined for the actor tom hanks as a birthday present. one of his fans, monica jaskolska,
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who is from the town where the classic car was made in the 1970s, noticed the stars obsession with the make and decided to raise money to send him one. the car was showcased at a party for the star's birthday injuly with money left over going to the local hospital. if you see mr hanks in that car, it is the sort of car you would nobble around in. i think i know is the sort of car you would nobble around in. i think! know what is the sort of car you would nobble around in. i think i know what you mean! let's hope it works at least. the wonderful thing about being on live tv, sometimes you make up words that don't make much sense! when it comes to the food in your kitchen do you know the difference between the use by, best before and sell by dates? the waste agency wrap, says people are throwing away edible food because too many different terms are used on packaging. let's get more detail on this
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from margaret bates, professor of sustainable waste management at the university of northampton. if you through that together, margaret, it wouldn't make the greatest meal in the world, but if you see the difference. we've got a bit of a best before here on the bread. best before on the peppers and also best before is on the onions. on the apples you have got display by, i think. onions. on the apples you have got display by, ithink. display onions. on the apples you have got display by, i think. display until. display until. this one is i can't find it, use by. three different things to look at. well, the key ones are the use by and the best before. so, use by means use it by then or there might be food safety issues. best before isjust advice. i like really mature cheese so i always eat my cheese after the best before date. display until, sell by, i don't see the point of those. that's just a message i don't see the point of those. that'sjust a message presumably i don't see the point of those. that's just a message presumably to the shop that's selling it, isn't it? we don't need to know that. i
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agree. but it's really important that people understand that use by is the sort of killer one. that's the bit you stick to. best before is just guidance. ignore it if you want. you talk about the killer one. if you ate that, you could get yourself into serious problems? you could get ill. i would probably be fine especially with my cooking! i'm pretty immune. some people are saying smell it, if it is ok, you can eat it. but it is confusing for many others the difference in terminology and one thing that might help to clear it up, you are talking about stickers which say whether you put it in the fridge or freezer? going back to the smell thing, if it smells off then don't eat it, but if it doesn't smell off, that doesn't mean it is still safe to eat. listeria doesn't smell. so, don't assume because it smells 0k, listeria doesn't smell. so, don't assume because it smells ok, it's fine. if doesn't smell 0k assume because it smells ok, it's fine. if doesn't smell ok then you can assume it's not. but the idea as
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well is that when you pick it up with the new guidance that's been recommended, it should go in the fridge, it will have a nice clear picture of a fridge on it. you don't need to hunt through, where is the label, where is the data i need? the other thing that i think is really good, they are calling for the reintroduction of this snowflake label. the one that says that you can freeze it because if you freeze it, your best before, your use—by dates, that clock stops. you put it in the freezer and it slows everything down and it gives you the opportunity to take chance of those bargains, the opportunity to take chance of those bar gains, the reduced price bread so you can buy it and put it in your freezer. as long as you freeze it by its use—by date? freezer. as long as you freeze it by its use-by date? exactly. we were having a discussion about freeze on day of purchase. let's say you leave some chicken two days in the fridge and put it in the freezer, when you defrosted that, how long can you leave it before you have to throw
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that chicken out? i would defrost it when you want to eat it, i wouldn't leave it for too long. i think the advice is 24 hours. freeze on day of purchase, it's not really that important. the key thing is to freeze before the use by date. the figures are staggering about how much food we throw away. over 7 million tonnes. the thing i think is important for householders is better food waste management. reducing our food waste can save householders on average £700 per year. can you can save householders on average £700 peryear. can you imagine can save householders on average £700 per year. can you imagine the impact that would have on your christmas budget if you could save £700? at lot. onions, you don't put them in the fridge. 0ur £700? at lot. onions, you don't put them in the fridge. our team were confused. onions and potatoes, a cool dark place. not a cold dark place. the other thing with fridges, the temperature of your fridge is important. 5 degrees or less. for
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every degree above five, you lose a day of product life. check the temperature in your fridge, as well. that's useful. i got shot in a fridge once in a burgerjoint which was a bit colder. one of those big industrial fridges. was a bit colder. one of those big industrialfridges. i was a bit colder. one of those big industrial fridges. i escaped. was a bit colder. one of those big industrialfridges. i escaped. there was a tiny gap at the bottom and i put a line of cheese slices out through the gap. no! honestly! it was soundproofed. suddenly walked past, saw the line of cheese singles and let me out. that fridge was not working because they shouldn't have been a working because they shouldn't have beena gap! working because they shouldn't have been a gap! i had to force the rubber bottom up. that's one of my worst nightmares! have you got clammy hands again? here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. he's at a lido in south west london.
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a very good morning from hampton pool to the west of london. a lovely shot showing the pool is full and has been since 6am all stop the pool openedin has been since 6am all stop the pool opened in 1922 and other than five yea rs opened in 1922 and other than five years when it is closed by the council, it has been open every since. still pulling in the cloud, open every day of the year. about 14 people in there at the moment. looks lovely. 28 degrees in the pool. pool side it is colder. let's take a look at the forecast. a chilly start and the forecast for the uk is staying cold again across the uk is staying cold again across the country and with a bit of a chilly wind across eastern parts of the country, as well. a mixture of sunshine and showers again. showers most likely across northern and eastern areas today. a few showers across scotland, winter in nature. fine crisp and cold across central
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and southern scotland. we have snow showers across north—east england at the moment giving a covering over the moment giving a covering over the hills. rain showers further south. showers more abundant across eastern part of this morning, compared with yesterday. the western half of the country, fewer showers in cornwall. 0ne half of the country, fewer showers in cornwall. one or two in wales but not as many as yesterday. much of western england and wales bright, crisp and sunny this morning with a frost. little bit of ice in one or two spots, as there may be in northern ireland. the main ice risk is in northern scotland. northern ireland will see a few showers this morning and through the day. mainly rain buta morning and through the day. mainly rain but a bit of sleet and snow for the high ground can't be ruled out. we'll continue to see showers in particular the north—east of england, wintry at times with cold air in place. it will feel chilly down the eastern coast with the strongest winds. a lot of you will stay dry through the day, with western england, much of wales and south—west scotland, but even here tempered his are down on yesterday. three to 7 degrees at best. this
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evening and overnight, a subtle change in wind direction. those more north—westerly and that means eastern part of england, the showers will become confined to the coast. in south—west wales, cornwall, more showers again and they may have a bit of sleet and snow. in between, temperatures drop below freezing. a cold start to thursday morning. frosty but also with more of a breeze, so an added wind chill. tomorrow, eastern england, not as many showers. more showers to the west of the country but through the day, showers and start to bush in through north—east england again. eastern parts of scotland. more snow with those, stronger wind and an added wind chill tomorrow. the cold est added wind chill tomorrow. the coldest feeling day of the week, it will feel like —3 across some parts of eastern england. wind eases in friday, showers across the coastal parts of east anglia and the south—east of england. don't be surprised if you see sleet and snow mixed in. generally most places will be dry, clouding overfrom the north—west through the day and that
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will eventually bring in something a little less chilly to take us into the weekend. thursday looking the cold est the weekend. thursday looking the coldest day of the week. nothing u ntowa rd. coldest day of the week. nothing untoward. it is the end of november tomorrow, but certainly something. let me introduce you to daniel, one of the lifeguards. if you're feeling sorry for us standing out here, feel sorry for us standing out here, feel sorry for us standing out here, feel sorry for him. sits outside for 40 minutes in the hour. he has a lovely day ahead of him tomorrow. minutes in the hour. he has a lovely day ahead of him tomorrowm minutes in the hour. he has a lovely day ahead of him tomorrow. it is quite extraordinary to see you standing there dressed in a big coat and people swimming behind you. it is fantastic. i feel a bit of a wimp! 28 degrees in there is probably much nicer than out here. stay out of the water! he hasn't got his swimmers with him. he says! the government is considering breaking up two of the country's biggest train operators as part of a new rail strategy.
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the franchises are great western and gtr — which combines southern, thameslink and great northern. steph is here with more details. this is the government's rail strategy, trying to make services more efficient and reliable for passengers. something like 1.7 billion people use the trains, the rail system, so the government has said they want to make things better for people and there's lots of ways they want to do this. a lot of it is about who runs which bits of the system. you have network rail in charge of maintenance and some stations. then the train operators run the different trains on different lines. they operate as franchises essentially. they want to break up some of the bigger ones to make it easier for the company is to be able to offer more reliable services because they'll be concentrating on smaller bits of the system. they‘ re concentrating on smaller bits of the system. they're also one about reopening some old lines, as well. you might remember back in the 1960s, a few lines were closed,
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called the beaching lines. dan's looking at the floor, saying, neither of us were alive then! that's one of the plans and they are asking councils to give them an idea of which routes would be best to promote the local economy. you asked chris grayling where the money would come from. we've announced a £47 billion package to invest in the railways in 2024. will have funds in that package to develop some of these schemes. we've also announced nearly £2 billion in the budget that will fund new investment in transport in our cities. that will inevitably involves some rail reopening, investments. we have funds available to bring some of these routes back into use. what we wa nt these routes back into use. what we want to do is find the right places where it can make life better for commuters, it can unlock the potential for housing developments. congestion in city centres. good
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question, thanks. i have to remind you to remind us. i forgot earlier. next week we are doing a series on kids learning about finance and doing jobs. i know you both had jobs as teenagers and so did i so i want pictures of people from when they we re pictures of people from when they were a child doing thesejobs or pictures from notes teenage years. we'll print it out and make a big display. please sent in what your job was and your name and a picture from that time. preferably doing the job, although that may be tricky.” won't send you a picture, i was picking up manure. i can't send you a picture of me stuck in a fridge because it was pitch black. i can recreate it. that's next week, please send them in by twitter, e—mail, the usual. this morning we've been hearing about how living with a special educational need can be hugely challenging. for those living with autism, an extra obstacle can be trying to overcome other people's attitudes towards the condition. with that in mind, here's a guide of what not to say to someone on the autistic spectrum.
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i touched the bowl. i'm so eager! what have we got? i get this a lot. you know what it's like? that's how i feel. you don't look autistic. what? great. because autistic people all look the same. yeah, i've got that one. i've got people saying to me, oh, you look fine, leanne! i think if i had a pound for every time someone said to me "you don't look autistic", i could afford a real tan. they mean well because i think what that means is i have this preconceptions and you just broken them, so i find that interesting. but how it comes out is quite stigmatising. they think of someone with autism and they think of your typical sheldon cooper type, or someone who doesn't speak to anyone, is rude, who is a genius and that simply isn't the case. there's definitely a media image of how autistic people are portrayed. always men or children! it's like, where are the girls? everyone is a little autistic.
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this is where i want one of those eye roll emojis. so we're taught in school we've got five senses. wrong. we've got six. the sixth one being our theory of mind, the ability to understand everyone else's thought processes. you don't have that instinctive understanding of body language. we rely on people's body language and they lie with their body language and that just makes me angry. so if you have the ability to do that, please don't ever say you could be a little bit autistic. just stop. autistic people don't feel empathy. i actually believe autistic people feel too much empathy. we do feel empathy. we understand emotions. if anything, we feel things much harder. for me, it's very hard to sometimes put myself in another person's shoes and people mistake that for a lack of empathy. yeah. i will know, you know, i remember their shoes, they were brown, they had the blue shoelaces, so i do have that and i really quite like that. we canjust be ourselves. and just being ourselves is, like, a blast. it's nuts.
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it's like being on a permanent roller—coaster because you see all these things that other people don't see. it's something of a unique gift, i reckon. we've got gifts that we can actually give to the world. yeah! i had someone genuinely say to me, if you could get it cured, would you? no! it's like... what? i was like, what? no, that's like saying, would you change yourself as a person? your whole identity? we are winners! high five! thanks to our colleagues at bbc three for that short film. if you'd like to get in touch with us about your stories, email bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk, or tweet us using the hashtag #bbcsend. you know mr olympia is coming on? kelly you told me that a moment ago. with his big muscles. six times! same as arnold schwarzenegger. you'll be live later. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. if you have been out
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over the last couple of days or so, you don't need me to tell you that it's cold, but it's going to stay cold over the next few days. our air is coming all the way from the arctic. streaming down on the northerly winds and this is the situation we keep for wednesday. 0n that northerly wind, we will continue to see some showers coming in towards mainly coastal areas of eastern parts of england, eastern scotla nd eastern parts of england, eastern scotland and a few showers still towards west wales and the far south—west, but during this afternoon, the showers becoming few and further between across scotland.
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plenty of dry and sunny weather. temperatures struggling at two or three celsius. a few showers still for northern ireland and we will continue to see a few showers down the eastern side of england. still perhaps a little bit wintry over the higher ground say the north york moors, but the showers become fewer through the afternoon. lots of sunshine for wales, the midlands and the south—west of england. perhaps the south—west of england. perhaps the odd shower around cornwall. we will continue to see showers around pembrokeshire, a few showers brushing the eastern coast, but for most of us with clear skies it will bea most of us with clear skies it will be a cold night. colder than last night. temperatures below freezing. thursday will be the coldest day of this week. further wintry showers down this eastern side of england with a strong wind and showers across west wales and swention, but lots of sunshine in between. add on the wind—chill, these are the temperatures it will feel like, minus one to minus four celsius
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tomorrow afternoon. now, as we go through thursday night and into friday, there will be a subtle change. notice the wind direction comes back round to a north—westerly. we are cutting off the arctic air. so it will become less cold as we go through friday and certainly into the weekend. more cloud around. the temperatures up to really where they should be for the time of year. more details available on our website. that's all from me. bye— bye. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. a focus on the future. a major summit between leaders from the eu and africa kicks off in ivory coast, but will it really boost development? live from london, that's our top story on wednesday, 29th november. can eu money give africa the
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economic boost it needs? britain makes a significantly higher offer to settle its brexit divorce bill so says the media, so will this clear the way
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