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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 29, 2017 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm ben brown. today at 2pm: britain is prepared to pay more to settle its brexit bill — up to 50 billion euros, according to reports. the foreign secretary says now let's move on to trade talks. the offer that the prime minister is able to make at that council will be one that guarantees sufficient progress — i think that's what everybody round the table — all the 27 plus us — wants to achieve. president trump has been accused of retweeting inflammatory anti muslim posts from a british far right group. north korea test fires another missile — and claims the entire us mainland is now within its range. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — hugh has that and the big news, alan pardew‘s back in the premier league. yes, good afternoon. he is. alan
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pa rd ew yes, good afternoon. he is. alan pardew appointed as the new manager of west brom with a two and a half year deal. and ben stokes is down under. we will let you know how close he is to playing some part in the ashes, maybe. thanks, hugh. and it's chilly out there — thomas schafernacker, getting any warmer? cold for the next few days, and in the countryside tonight it could dip to -60 the countryside tonight it could dip to —60 minus seven degrees. thank you very much indeed. —— —6 minus seven. also coming up — how to stop millions of tonnes of perfectly good food being needlessly thrown away. hello everyone — this is afternoon live — i'm ben brown. what will be the final price of the brexit divorce bill? the haggling has gone on for months, but now it's understood
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the government's offered a significant increase in what it's prepared to pay — between 40—50 billion euros, we understand. the hope is that a deal on this brexit bill will finally trigger crucial trade talks. eu leaders will meet soon to decide whether the uk has done enough — and offered enough — for those talks to start. our political correspondent leila nathoo reports. she hopes she is on her way to the divorce deal, after rounds of meetings, more money now on the table to leave the eu. it is understood that could be up to 50 billion euros, paid over a number of years, to allow trade talks to begin. the government won't get into specific numbers but insists the uk will meet its financial obligations. the prime minister is going to go forward to the european council with a think a very fair offer, and what we want to see is progress towards the second phase of the negotiations, and that's really what i think
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everybody now wants to do. for now, the eu is refusing to confirm anything has already been agreed. do you welcome britain's position to pay more, mr barnier? we are still working. what does the uk have to pay for? things that we signed up to as eu members that have not yet been delivered, including investment projects in poorer regions, pensions for eu staff, and guarantees of loans to countries like ukraine. it wasn't so long ago brexiteers we re it wasn't so long ago brexiteers were talking tough on money. now it appears some are prepared to think longer term. as we leave, if you compare the two together over a a0 year period, even on the net terms, that would amount to about £360 billion saving to the uk exchequer as we leave because we will not make contributions after that two—year period. getting money back from the eu was one of the main pitches of the leave campaign and now remainers claim
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voters were mis—sold. they never said there was going to be this big bill to pay and secondly we are not seeing the central pledge that they made in that campaign to win it, to persuade your viewers who voted leave to vote leave, it is not being delivered on. the divorce bill is just one of three areas on which brussels wants to see sufficient progress before allowing talks to begin on a future trading relationship. eu leaders will meet in a fortnight to formally decide whether britain has offered enough. money may no longer be the sticking point, the focus now is on the irish border. they are inching towards a breakthrough but there is still a long way to go before the shape of britain's departure becomes clear. leila nathoo, bbc news, westminster. our chief political correspondent vicki young is at westminster for us now. we saw the foreign secretary in that report. not that long ago he was saying the eu could go and whistle if it wanted a big settlement? that's right, and that's what many
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mps here, particular those on the remaining side of the argument point out. it is a difficult moment for people like boris johnson, out. it is a difficult moment for people like borisjohnson, promising millions could come back to the united kingdom and go to the nhs, instead they say we will now have to fork out billions. i have been talking to some other so—called brexiteers, they make the point, one said to me this is a pinprick of money compared to what we have paid to the eu in the past and what we would pay to the eu if we continued oui’ would pay to the eu if we continued our membership beyond 2019. kirsty blackmanjoins me our membership beyond 2019. kirsty blackman joins me from the snp. don't they have a point? if we stayed in the eu we are paying a net 10 billion a year so we would be handing over this money anyway? absolutely, if we stay in the eu we have to pay a contribution to be pa rt of have to pay a contribution to be part of that club at the benefits we get are unbelievable. so notjust in terms of the single market and customs union, much better ability to trade on studies have shown for a free—trade agreement, services, you
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do not get the level of services trade you doing something like the single market. so things like that. also things like the universities, the horizon 2020 programmes, all the benefits we have of that and of immigration. the construction industry in london, for example, one third of the workers from the eu. we get all of those benefits, even though we have to pay a contribution. it's a worthwhile contribution. it's a worthwhile contribution to play for the —— pay for the economic benefits we receive. if this extra money, so—called divorce bill, if that was conditional on a free—trade agreement, would you go along with it? i don't think we should pay the divorce bill because i don't think we should come out of the eu. yellow pensions may be, which we are obliged to pay? i think we should stay pa rt of obliged to pay? i think we should stay part of the eu. i think what the government has totally failed to do is to be transparent about how much money there is, what it's for, where it's coming from as well. there was a budget last week and the
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chancellor said nothing about this money and he's made, he's not said where it's coming from. we're asking for the chancellor to put forward an emergency budget to explain where this money is going to come from, so that we know which public services are going to lose out as a result of the chancellor's government of my decision to pay bill. and you are and others being slightly disingenuous question on this won't bea lump disingenuous question on this won't be a lump sum of money, this is over many, be a lump sum of money, this is over any be a lump sum of money, this is over many, many years. some of it is stored the pensions of people who have worked, british people who have worked in the eu. that will be paid very much into the future. this is in one lump sum that will be going out of the office next year? that's a thing, we don't have the transparency, the government haven't said what time period or how much it's going to be. they happens at the time period it will be paid for and how much of the obligations we've already committed to an much it is punny money as part of the future trade bill or to allow a to the transition period. none of those things have been made clear. if the government is going to do these things, the first thing it should do
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is come and tell parliament. if you come and tell parliament all of the ramifications of decisions, and it should be absolutely clear whether money is coming from and which public services are going to be impacted as result. of course, this isa impacted as result. of course, this is a negotiation. maybe you should expect the government to openly tell everybody what is going on. this is not necessarily the final figure, the government saying this is all speculation, all about negotiation, to move on and talk about the next level which is trade talks?m to move on and talk about the next level which is trade talks? if the government was honest with us and told us exactly what was happening and exactly how much they were committing too, there wouldn't be speculation. the other thing is, the eu has been much more open about their negotiating position than the uk has. as far as i can see, the their negotiating position than the uk has. as faras i can see, the eu has conceded very little and the uk has conceded very little and the uk has conceded very little and the uk has conceded a lot. perhaps the negotiating tactics of the uk government are not working particularly well. we must leave it there. thank you very much indeed. after prime minister ‘s —— after
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prime minister's questions this afternoon the prime minister's spokesman was asked about this and he said it was speculation and also said that the talks are ongoing, nothing is decided and, crucially, when asked whether this money would be conditional on some future trade deal, he said it's important that nothing is agreed until everything's agreed. many thanks indeed for that, vicki young. don't forget, you can let us know what you think, tweet us using #afternoonlive. all the ways to contact us on screen right now. president trump has used his twitter account to share inflammatory videos which were were posted online by the deputy leader of the far—right group, britain first. the footage purports to show muslims committing acts of violence. many have ta ken many have taken to social media to criticise president trump for spreading hatred. the labour mp chukka ummuna has called for mr trump's uk state visit invitation to be withdrawn. let's talk to our correspondent richard lister. he has been taking a closer look. mr
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trump's use of twitter has caused consternation, surprise, ever since he became president that this is taking it into a whole new direction. what exactly has he reaped —— retweeted ? direction. what exactly has he reaped -- retweeted? a bizarre thing to share. three videos, as you say they were posted originally from the account of the deputy leader of the far right group, britain first. 0ne pushing a boy of a roof and beating him to death. it turns out after an investigation from the press association this is a video taken in 2013 in alexandria in egypt, in which several men were pushed off a roof. 0ne which several men were pushed off a roof. one man was executed for murder as a result of that. another retweeted video says is a muslim destroying a statue of the virgin mary. this came from you tube more than four years ago and was posted saying that was what had happened
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but gave no context. impossible to judge exactly what the situation is. the last is a video saying it is a muslim migrant beating up a dutch boy. this was posted on a dutch viral website earlier this year. there were two young men charged in relation to this bad in all reporting there was no mention of the religion of any one of old. it is very and clearly circumstances under which these videos came about. and it is completely unclear why the president would want to promote them. what has been a reaction to them. what has been a reaction to the fact he has re—tweeted this? quite a furious reaction, is very measured on from the mayor of london who said it is a hateful organisation whose view should be condemned and not amplified. another said trump has legitimised the far right in his own country and now it's trying to do it in hours. spreading hatred has consequences and the president should be ashamed of himself. david lammy, the labour
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mpfor of himself. david lammy, the labour mp for tottenham said he is no ally 01’ mp for tottenham said he is no ally orfriend of ours, talking about donald trump. you are not welcome in my country, in my city. this will feed into the debate about is expected visit to the uk next year. lots more reaction to come but for the moment, thank you, richard lister. it's the nightmare scenario — north korea in possession of nuclear weapons that can reach the us mainland. well pyongyang now claims it's a step closer to that with the successful testing an powerful new intercontinental ballistic missile. paul adams reports from seoul. the face and the voice of north korean defiance. the announcer with news of pyongyang's latest and boldest missile test. kim jong—un photographed giving the order. "i approve this test launch", he writes. "for the party and the country, courageously fire." this was the 23rd missile test this year. the first since mid—september. it took off in the early hours of the morning north of the capital, pyongyang.
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it flew for 53 minutes, landing in the sea 600 miles away. crucially, it flew higher than any previous missile. 2,800 miles up into space. experts say this means north korea now has missiles capable of hitting almost anywhere in america. after a pause in testing that lasted 75 days, this is a stark reminder of the determination of the north korean leader to pursue his nuclear and missile programme. today's statement from pyongyang that the programme poses no threat to anyone provided the country's interests are not infringed, will come as little comfort. a missile was launched a little while ago from north korea. i will only tell you that we will take care of it. a fresh challenge for president trump and his administration. little doubt here that this represents something new. it went higher, frankly, than any previous taken. it's a research and development effort on their part, continuing
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to build ballistic missiles. they could threaten everywhere in the world. korea's president on the phone to donald trump this morning. the test took his government by surprise and he called it a reckless provocation. south korea responded with a missile test of its own, but warnings, threats and pressure appear to be having little effect. kimjong—un says north korea now has its own nuclear force. a bold claim but only partially true. he has the bombs and the missiles — putting one on top of the other and making it work, that's still some way off. how worried should we be? with me now is paul ingram, executive director of british american security information council, an independent think tank promoting nuclear disarmament and transatlantic security. first of all, does this take us a step, does it take pyongyang a step
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closer if they wanted to to firing a missile that could hit the mainland united states? it certainly is an indication they are well on their way, and as paul said of your clip just then, they are a step closer. but we just don't know. it would be complacent to say that there are a long way off. i think we are probably looking at months, a large number of months, 2a, 36, rather than many years to them being able to launch and deliver a nuclear warhead on to the us. technically, the problem for them is they have the problem for them is they have the missile and warhead, the trouble is the warhead on the end of a missile means the missile has a lower range. so we don't know if the missile could been launched yesterday and could have hit the us if they had put it on a different trajectory would have gone far enough if it had had a warhead on. the other problem is the warhead coming into the atmosphere undergoes a huge amount of challenge,
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technically. it could blow up beforehand. then there is the a ccu ra cy beforehand. then there is the a ccu ra cy of beforehand. then there is the accuracy of the missile. so all these things are technical challenges the north koreans, we suspect, still have to overcome, but i think it be complacent to sit back and say nothing to worry about. i think it be complacent to sit back and say nothing to worry aboutm you are writing is 2a, 36 months away whatever it is, the united states, what is their position? they can't allow that to happen, can they? to live under that threat? donald trump said, we will take care of it. how do they do that? politically it's extremely difficult. it is problematic now because we don't know but it is quite likely the north koreans could deliver a nuclear warhead on south korea, japan or other us allies in the region. they already have a nuclear deterrent in the united states, i think. nuclear deterrent in the united states, ithink. whether we nuclear deterrent in the united states, i think. whether we know will not, the dow should be enough to stay the hand of the us president in launching any nuclear attacks. we
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are now in a deterrent situation and that needs to be accepted and then we need to engage in talks. there have been no serious talks with the north koreans since president clinton was in power 17 years ago. the bush administration walked away the moment it was elected. this is what we need to do. we don't know what we need to do. we don't know what the north koreans want out of such talks, because we haven't engaged in them. would it be possible to compromise with someone like kimjong—un? possible to compromise with someone like kim jong-un? it is possible to compromise with everybody. there are a lwa ys compromise with everybody. there are always common interests. the other thing that has to be acknowledged as the current state of the nuclear weapons world globally is not a sustainable one. it was all is going to be the case that a regime like the north koreans, or others, were going to acquire nuclear weapons and we we re going to acquire nuclear weapons and we were going to have to accept a deterrent relationship with them. after all, we the british, the americans, the russians, all believe in nuclear deterrence, the official line. this is an extremely
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attractive strategy for any country that seeks to challenge global order. what we have really seen his fiery rhetoric between donald trump and kimjong—un, mr trump calling him rocket man and so on. we haven't seen any hint of concessions or compromise or the prospect of talks. indeed, but if you provoke someone like kim jong—un over and indeed, but if you provoke someone like kimjong—un over and over again, you are going to get this sort of response. i'm saying, continuing the same strategy as president trump is doing, isjust going to have more of the same. so is he going to launch a war on north korea, which would be utterly devastating? 0r korea, which would be utterly devastating? or are we going to try different tact? 0k. very good to talk to you. paul ingram, thank you very much for your time. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the uk is understood to have offered between 40—50 billion euros to settle its divorce bill with the european union. president trump retweets videos originally posted
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by a british far—right group, claiming to show muslims committing acts of violence. north korea conducts another ballistic missile test, and claims it's now capable of reaching the entire us mainland. in sport, alan pardew says he is determined to take west bromwich albion forward after replacing tony pulis as the club's head coach. could ben stokes help spark an england ashes revival? he is in new zealand, where he could play domestic lee as soon as this week. fifa insists there is no widespread doping in russian football, following allegations to a report on state—sponsored doping. more on those stories after 2:30pm. thank you, speak to you later. lawyers for a man found guilty of murdering a mother and daughter in kent in 1996 say they'll release
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significant new evidence today that raises serious questions about his conviction. lyn russell and her six year old daughter, megan, were attacked as they walked along a quiet country lane near the village of chillenden in kent. michael stone, who's serving three life sentences, has always denied being involved in the attacks. here's wyre davies. it was a notorious murder, a brutal, unprovoked attack in rural kent on a family walking home from a school swimming gala. 45—year—old lyn russell and her six—year—old daughter megan were killed in the frenzied hammer attack. that one's quite heavy. butjosie russell survived, despite suffering terrible injuries. nine—year—old josie was left for dead at this isolated spot in the kent countryside on 9th ofjuly1996. she'd been walking along this country lane with her mum lyn and six—year—old sister megan, they were going home just on the other side of this copse. michael stone, a known criminal and drug addict, was arrested a year later and found
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guilty of the russell murders. he's serving a life sentence but has always protested his innocence. there's no forensic evidence against stone and he was convicted on the strength of a disputed confession to a fellow prisoner and stone's legal team say they now have compelling new evidence linking this man, levi bellfield, to the russell murders. the killer of schoolgirl milly dowler, amelie delagrange, and marsha mcdonnell, is serving two full—life terms. many say bellfield has committed dozens of similar serious crimes. the similarities you've got are a woman, a blitz attack with something heavy, like a hammer, you know, just those features make it an extremely rare crime. i think in the absence of other facts, he would be a good suspect. from the high security frankland prison, michael stone acknowledged his violent criminal past but told me that
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unlike bellfield, he had no history of attacking women. you've got a track record of violence, you hit a man with a hammer, you've got... yeah, but it'sjust desperate to link me to the crime. but it's not even similar, because i went to the house of someone who i found out was messing about with people and i went around his house to warn him not to do it and he grabbed my throat and i picked a mallet, it wasn't a hammer, it was a mallet, to strike him with it to get him off my neck. it's nothing like attacking a child or a mother and her child. there's no similarity, really. levi bellfield has always denied any involvement in the russell murders but later today, lawyers for michael stone will release new evidence that the bbc has seen and which they say means his case must now go to the court of appeal. wyre davies, bbc news. croatian state tv is reporting
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that the convicted war criminal slobodan praljak has died after taking poison at war crimes court in the hague. proceedings at the international criminal tribunalfor the former yugoslavia were suspended because the defendant drank something that he had said was poison. praljak consumed liquid from a small container, after his original 20—year prison sentence was upheld. slobodan praljak is not a war criminal, i'm rejecting the court's ruling. stop, please, please sit down. i have taken poison. we suspend, please, the curtains.
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extraordinary developments in the hague. we haven't confirmed that he has died but we can bring you a tweet from our correspondent in the hague. quoting the war crimes tribunal press office. it says, we are aware of reports of his death. we cannot confirm if he is alive because we do not know. that is the press office of the war crimes tribunal. we'll try and bring you more from the hague on that breaking news, that croatian state television reporting general slobodan praljak has died after taking poison at that war crimes court in the hague. nbc has sacked one of its biggest stars. matt lauer — the host of the flagship morning news programme today — because of a sexual misconduct allegation. mr lauer, who's fifty—nine, has presented the programme for more than twenty years. a statement by nbc said he'd been accused by a colleague of "inappropriate sexual behaviour".
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they said it was the first complaint about his behaviour, but they were also given reason to believe it may not have been an isolated incident. a 15—year—boy has been remanded in custody at leeds youth court after he appeared charged with causing the deaths five people in a car crash in the city. two brothers of 12 and 15, as well as another 15—year old were killed — along with two men in their twenties when a renault clio hit a tree in the meanwood area of the city on saturday night. the european court ofjustice has ruled that a window salesman who was self employed but worked for the same company for 13 years — and didn't receive any paid leave — is entitled to claim his full backdated holiday. legal experts say it could have big implications for companies operating in the so—called gig economy. our personal finance correspondent simon gompertz reports. drivers, delivery riders, careers — are they workers or self—employed? and if they are workers,
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now there is the question of whether they are due back holiday pay. a judge said a briton who sold windows had not only been wrongly treated as self—employed, but should be compensated for the paid leave he had missed. it can't be challenged in terms of european law... his lawyer said the decision was highly significant. for him, it means he can potentially claim back for the holiday that he didn't take for a period of nearly 1a years of working for a business, and he didn't take that on the basis that he wasn't going to be paid for that holiday. so, if, like mr king, the sash window salesman, you want to get compensation for your right to paid leave, you have to get classified as a worker or employee wrote, rather than self—employed. if the time off was taken, that is ok and there is no limit
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on how much you can build up, then the employer has to pay you back for the leave that you missed. a group of uber drivers won tribunal case this month to be treated as workers. now bills for holiday pay threaten to make these cases much more costly. for too many people in the gig economy it is like a wild west, where employers dodge their responsibilities and routinely fail to pay them the minimum wage, the holiday pay, sick pay. but some argue that piling restrictions on so—called gig economy firms could be counter— productive. at the moment there is a lot of uncertainty and that uncertainty could deter firms from offering flexible working arrangements that have helped keep unemployment low and given people a greater degree of flexibility than they otherwise would have seen if we didn't have things like uber or deliveroo. the window salesman is likely to be due thousands of pounds, but who else?
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legal experts suggesting it could eventually be tens of thousands of people. we have just heard from the white house president trump has emphasised to china and their president they must use all available levers to convince north korea to end their provocations and to return to the path of denuclearisation. that is the latest in from the white house. president trump emphasising that china has the use all available levers to convince north korea to end its provocations. much more on that story throughout the afternoon but now, let's check out the latest weather. it is cold! it certainly is, that message could be any clearer. tonight we could dip down to —6 minus seven. we have had that so far this autumn. just like
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last week, we have air coming straight out of the arctic. you can see the true northerly wind and that is going to be with us for a few more days yet. what about the rest of europe? funny you should ask me that, i've got a weather map for the rest of europe. we are on a par with major european cities, paris at around five, we are five or six, walsall at three. now the uk this is what the satellite image looks like right now. we have some showers here around the eastern coast of the uk. some wintry showers around the norfolk more than pennines. let's look at the rush—hour today. six o'clock. rush for you might be five o'clock. rush for you might be five o'clock but i have picked six. temperatures on degree in glasgow, fourin temperatures on degree in glasgow, four in belfast. lots of three or 4
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degrees temperatures around the country. a couple of flakes of snow around the north york moors. for most of us, not old enough snow. that's what lots of people are asking me. for most of us it is not, but some of the showers will be affecting 12—macro areas during the course of the night when the temperature rarely drops away. it could be the case in one or two areas, leitgebjack doyle east anglia, first thing in the morning there could be just a little dusting off snow. but well inland in northern areas it could be minus six. we have had that already but another cold night to night. tomorrow, a similar picture. as long as they have these northerly winds, they keep dragging some of these showers to the east coast. cold. this is the feels like temperatures. basically the thermometer plus wind speed, that is what it will feel like the flesh of your face, your
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hands in the wind. friday, another chilly day. 4—6. what we are going to see edwards weekend is the something a little less cold coming oui’ something a little less cold coming our way. —— for the weekend. this area of eye pressure to the west, and the winds blowing clockwise, thatis and the winds blowing clockwise, that is going to drag in some milder air in ourdirection. that is going to drag in some milder air in our direction. look at these bridges. from 3—5, maybe up to 10 degrees at the weekend. that's it. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: the uk has agreed to pay more to settle the brexit bill — up to 50 billion euros. the foreign secretary said it would pave the way to move forward to the next phase of negotiations. president trump has shared tweets from the far—right group britain first which show inflammatory anti—muslim videos.
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britain first was founded in 2011 by former members of the british national party. north korea says it has achieved its aim of becoming a nuclear state, following the successful test of a new long—range ballistic missile which its claimed can reach mainland usa. the bbc understands that new evidence is to emerge casting doubt over the conviction of michael stone for the murders of lin russell and her daughter megan. anti—waste campaigners are calling for clearer food labelling to prevent perfectly edible products being thrown away. sport now on afternoon live with hugh woozencroft. the ashes hasn't started too well. but is ben stokes going to to rescue them? ben stokes is under police
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investigation following an incident out a bristol nightclub. the ecb allowed him to play for the canterbury kings out in new zealand. he was flown out and greeted by his pa rents he was flown out and greeted by his parents in christchurch. that prompted plenty of backstage stories that stokes could be nearing a return, of course. he didn't play at the gabba. there was a ten wicket defeat for england in that match, but stokes, we don't know when the investigation will conclude, but he is out there. he is in the southern hemisphere so he could be playing some part in the ashes. let's talk about the premier league, a man who is back in the premier league, alan pardew? yes, he is back in the premier league. today he signed a two—and—a—half year contract signed a two—and—a—half year co ntra ct to signed a two—and—a—half year contract to become the new manager of west brom. he takes over from tony pulis who, of course, was sacked from his role last week. pa rd ew sacked from his role last week. pardew saying today that he's determined to make sure he can carry
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west brom forward. so, a new managerial appoint in the premier league today, alan pardew returning to football as the new head coach at west bromwich albion. sam allardyce will finalise his deal to become the everton manager this afternoon. he will visit the club's training ground to agree terms. the caretaker boss will remain in charge of the side for tonight's visit of sam allardyce's former side, west ham united in the premier league. after manchester united's win on tuesday in the premier league, their neighbours manchester city can move back to 8 points clear at the top of the table later. pep guardiola's side are at home against southampton in one of 6 league games tonight. and city have another landmark in their sight. never in the club's history have they won 12 premier league games in a row. training today was good. good recovery today and it is a tough
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game against southampton. there are many things about the records and all these things. that can confuse us all these things. that can confuse us and we have to be focussed on what we have to do. the fifa general secretary, fatma samoura, says that doping is not widespread in russian football and has defended their right to host the world cup. pressure is growing on fifa to do more to investigate russia — after the mclaren report revealed more than 30 footballers were among the athletes whose positive tests were covered up. samoura is in moscow ahead of the world cup draw on friday. normal procedure is for the investigation based on the report. what we are doing is we are collaborating every time that we are asked to send the samples with wada, but definitely whenever the reports come up with a positive result then we have to take action and we have
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to make sanctions on those players. that report has led to plenty of changes and plenty of medal changes over the past couple of years. great britain look set to win a bobsleigh bronze medal nearly four years after the sochi winter olympics the international olympic committee today banned three athletes for doping including two from the four man bob. with two russian crews now punished after ongoing hearings by an ioc commission into allegations of russian state sponsored doping and it should promote the british crew into a medal position. now there's not a lot left for andy murray to achieve normally when you go for a skydive the aim is tojump out of the plane and land on the ground safely. not the other way round. this is the beautiful jungfrau mountain — in the swiss alps. and two frenchmen have pulled off an audacious stunt. look at that — theyjump into the plane, not out! the real life inspiration came
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from the famous wing suit pioneer patrick de gayardon, who once jumped from a plane before re—entering it. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. it isa it is a bit like a james bond it is a bit like ajames bond movie, hugh, it is like you and me every day. thank you. let's get more now on the brexit negotiations. it's understood the uk has reached broad agreement on the financial framework of the divorce bill which is likely to be between a0 and 50 billion euros. let's get more now from our chief political correspondent, vicki young who's in westminster for us. lots of reaction there at westminster to the reported sums? yes and downing street saying that nothing has been agreed. that talk about the numbers is pure speculation, but ministers were dragged to the house of commons to a nswer dragged to the house of commons to answer an urgent question about all of this and you know many people
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asking difficult questions about whether this money was just going to be handed over? whether it was going to be conditional on some kind of trade deal and whether we should be paying it at all? let's speak to the conservative mp john paying it at all? let's speak to the conservative mpjohn redwood. 0ne paying it at all? let's speak to the conservative mpjohn redwood. one of your colleagues said to me this one isa your colleagues said to me this one is a pinprick compared to what we have paid over to the eu since our membership began. do you think that? well, that maybe true, but we don't know any sums because we're assured by the government they haven't agreed any sums. the proper negotiations haven't started yet because the proper negotiations will include comprehensive talks on our future arrangements, free trade arrangements and the things that britain has proposed for the full partnership and until you get into negotiations, it is silly to comment on what might not be or will in the final package. it is only that they demonstrate that no deal works fine
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that they can avoid being strong armed at the end of the negotiation into accepting a very bad deal. i'm sure most people watching this want britain to get a good deal. you need to prepare for no deal in order to have any chance of doing that. but from your point of view, you seem, relatively relaxed about going to wto rules, that's world trade 0rganisation rules, not having a deal with the european union if it comes to that. what would persuade you of the merit of a deal? well, it needs to be better than no deal and the government has always rightly said no deal is better than a bad deal. going to wto rules, that option gives you control of your money with no divorce payment and control of your laws and control of your borders and allows you to take free trade negotiation with the rest of the world. it doesn't give you a free trade agreement with the eu. so theissue free trade agreement with the eu. so the issue will be come any possible agreement what is a sensible price for a free trade agreement? is it better than no deal? do you think
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the government has been right to in principle offer to increase the amount that theresa may had previously said which was 20 billion euros in order to get to the talks, to the next stage to talk about a trade deal? i am assured by the government that they haven't offered any numbers... they have said they will increase. the government haven't agreed any numbers. they haven't agreed any numbers. they have been talking about areas where they might take a contribution to they might take a contribution to the eu if there is a really good partnership arrangement. i don't wa nt partnership arrangement. i don't want to prejudge that, but i start if the proposition that we don't owe them anything by law, otherthan if the proposition that we don't owe them anything by law, other than our contributions up to the date when we leave and that's the starting point by which we willjudge any agreement. so you would not want the government to write down anywhere or say we owe this money legally. you are of the view legally we don't owe them a penny? notjust me. the government expressed the view that we don't owe them legally, it is
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about meeting so—called obligation. it is not leurplts and it is always in terms of the future partnership and so if there isn't going to be a warm and generous future partnership there would be no reason to pay them any money. john red wood, thank you very much indeed. there are some who say that although this sounds like a lot of money, 50 to 50 billion euros for example, it's the workings of the economy. it is what happens to the economy. it is what happens to the economy. it is what happens to the economy once we leave which will actually mean more to people and their livelihoods and what happens to the broader uk economy than whether we pay a divorce bill or not. vicki young there, our chief political correspondent. the final rulings had to be suspended after a prisoner drank liquid which he claimed was poison. he swigged from a small glass or
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bottle after his 20 year sentence was upheld. the court has been declared a crime scene by dutch police. 0n the line is martin bell who tved against him. martin, before we go into what this man is alleged to have done, just tell us how surprised are you by this extraordinary development in the hague? i am not surprised at all. he was not only a senior croatian officer, but he had been a theatre director. i met him in the croatian warandi director. i met him in the croatian war and i wondered whether one of the battles had been a bit stage managed, but then he was in charge of the hvo, the bosnian croats on the day that the wonderful bridge was blown up which is the 9th november 1993 and about five years ago, i got a call from one of his lawyers asking me to help him with an alibi because he said that on
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that day i had been meeting him in central bosnia. i checked my notes and he was one day out and that was the end of the alibi. he was always a man with a sense of drama and i'm sure this was premeditated clearly. what did he do? talk us through his crimes? he has been convicted of the ill—treatment of muslim prisoners in the war between muslims and croats which started in april 1993 and endedin which started in april 1993 and ended in february 1994. he is charged with the command responsibility of the blowing up of the bridge and the ill—treatment of civilians when muslims were rounded up civilians when muslims were rounded up during that war and herded into the hangars at the airport. you have been at the hague many times, how surprised are you that
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somebody could smuggle in this poison. there are reports he has died. we have not been able to confirm that yet. that somebody could get that to him? it is a serious breach of security. i have been there a number of times. on one occasion the bosnian serb's political leader. i agreed to go because i thought it was my duty to because i thought it was my duty to be helpful. and i was in a guarded prison cell, but there was a barrier of plastic bullet—proof barrier between him and me, so it is impossible for a visitor to pass anything to a prisoner. he found a way around that and it is a very serious breach of security at the end of the tribunal‘s life. serious breach of security at the end of the tribunal's life. all those who have been affected by what he did, victims if you like, i suppose they will feel cheated if it does turn out and again we haven't confirmed this, but if it does turn out that he has died, that that was the way out that he would have chosen? he has taken the ultimate
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solution. he has taken his life in his own hands and he is not the first of the prisoners to have died in custody because it happened to milosevic as well. i suppose his victims might feel that justice milosevic as well. i suppose his victims might feel thatjustice was done, but it is an extraordinary, nothing like this has ever happened in the court before and i think if you look at his background as the theatrical character you will see how he did it. why he did it. martin bell, thank you. in a moment the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the uk is understood to have offered
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between 40 and 50 billion euros to settle its divorce bill with the european union. president trump retreats videos originally posted by a british far—right cloup. north korea conducts another ballistic missile test and claims it is now capable of reaching the entire us mainland. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. the government has announced an overhaul of the uk rail network — saying it could reopen lines closed in the 1960s. it's also considering splitting up two of the country's largest train operators. and it may ask local companies to run the track as well as train services in a bid to cut delays and overcrowding. the chief executive of the london stock exchange, xavier rolet, has left the company amid a bruising boardroom row. mr rolet was due to leave next year and one of the firm's biggest shareholders claims he has been forced out. he is in line for a pay—out of more than £12 million. construction workers from the eu should be granted "settled status" in the uk after brexit, according to the industry trade body. the construction sector, which employs around
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three million people, has warned it faces severe skills shortages with not enough home grown talent to meet demand. uber has revealed that 2.7 million british riders and drivers were affected by a 2016 data breach that it covered up for more than a year. the stolen information includes names, e—mail addresses and phone numbers and for drivers, licence numbers. we're starting in new york today with janet yellen — what's happening? janet yelland is the most powerful banker. she is speaking about how she sees the future of the global economy and it is particularly significant because it is almost four years since janet yelland took up four years since janet yelland took up that post and she will be stepping down soon. this is the last time she is speaking as head of the fed. what are we expecting her to say? let's find out more
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from samira hussain who is at the new york stock exchange for us. what are we expecting to hear from janet yelland ? what are we expecting to hear from janet yelland? we got a sneak peek in terms of what her prepared testimony will say. she will be talking about the strength of the us economy and a lot of the things that she talks about really is pointing towards two things. one, we're going towards two things. one, we're going to be seeing a rate rise in a couple of weeks at the next fed meeting and that would be the third rate rise for this year. and secondly, it seems that she is speaking so confidently about the economy that as long as things continue as they are, we could be seeing more rate rises in 2018. now, given this is janet yelland's last time that she will be before lawmakers, we can probably expect that the lawmakers in washington are going to try to ask her really pointed questions and give heran ask her really pointed questions and give her an opportunity to be a little bit more candid in her
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responses. especially when it comes to the political fights that are happening right now in washington especially with regards to tax reform. thank you. you've got a report out today that says loan sharks are hanging out at school gates and at food banks? yes, this is wa a report by the financial conduct authority. they we re financial conduct authority. they were concerned that those regulations, those caps could end up with an unintended consequence of pushing some people to payday lenders to loan sharks. they have been conduct ago review of loan sharks. they didn't find any evidence that more people were using them, but as you say, they found shocking tactics of what loan sharks we re shocking tactics of what loan sharks were doing to get clients. kevin peachy is the bbc‘s personal finance reporter and he's been looking into this.
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the fsa were told about cases where loa n the fsa were told about cases where loan sharks were hanging around school gates and giving out business cards and saying to youngsters, "if you want a new pair of trainers, get your mum to give us a call." they have been inside casinos and waiting for pensioners outside the post office. for many people using a loan shark seems to have been a way of life. the term loan shark is a stereotype. it conjures up a certain image. who are the people doing that that stereotype is true because people who are unable to pay are being threatened by the loan sharks and pushed into drug running and other illegal activities because they can't repay, but the uniting factor with the borrowers is they need cash quickly. so, they at the other end of the scale they are
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going to people at work who they may trust and saying they are setting themselves up as lenders of money and that happens in hospitals, it happens in the rural economy according to this fca report. what sort of interest rates are people charged charged extortionate. the fca has had a look at this and come up fca has had a look at this and come up with an average and saying someone up with an average and saying someone who borrows £250 is having to pay back £167 in interest. now that's a very high rate, but they are say there are cases where the illegal lenders are under cutting the loan sharks sorry the illegal lenders are under cutting the traditional lenders so there is a worry that that traditional lender isjust too worry that that traditional lender is just too expensive and pushing people towards loan sharks. thank you. a look at the markets. how are they
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getting on? sterling has been doing very well. so you have been talking about it, the brexit bill. a figure may have been reached. sterling doesn't care what the figure is. if an agreement is reached, we can make plans and doing well against the dollar and euro. when sterling is strong, the ftse will fall. if sterling is strong, it reduces the value of their profits. that's why the ftse is down. citigroup are the biggest faller. they have been down 20%. they have announced a plan to doa 20%. they have announced a plan to do a deal with regal cinemas. it sounds like a logical tie—up, but they will finance it through debts and rights issue. they will issue more shares that reduce the value of their current shares so the value is falling. beautifully explained. thank you very much.
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a sculpture of the founder of pakistan, muhammed alijinah has been unveiled at the british museum in london to mark the 70th anniversary of india's partition. the bronze bust has been made by philip jackson, who also sculpted the gandhi figure in parliament square and footballer bobby moore in front of wembley stadium. this report from shabnam mahmood contains some flash photography. adding the final touches to the bronze bust of the man known as the founding father of pakistan. the project marks the end of six months of work for the sculptor, who was inspired by old photographs of mohammed ali jinnah. he was quite a formal man and a lot of the photographs show him sort of standing straight onto the camera with his arms down by his side. i was desperate to find something that i could use to bring the... sort of bring a little bit of humanity to the sculpture. and then i noticed that he used a monocle, which i suppose even in those days was reasonably
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unusual, and so i've got him holding a monocle and i thought that made it quite an interesting sculpture. mrjinnah is on the viceroy's left... jinnah spent his younger years studying law in london before returning to india and joining the campaign for independence against the british. he later demanded an independent homeland for muslims, creating pakistan in 1947. here at the british museum, the sculpture is unveiled by the mayor of london, in front of a huge crowd of people. pakistan! it's been funded by the government of pakistan. this has been conceived by us. this has been funded by the government of pakistan, and i think this is a tribute by the people of pakistan to their great leader, the founder of the nation. the statue will now move to its permanent place at lincoln's inn in central london, where mohammed ali jinnah qualified as a barrister. for many here, it's a tribute that is long overdue. in general, for all young
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people and the like, he's a leader that we should be looking up to — his principles, his ideas. so i'm really proud today, seeing the bust. i think it's amazing, particularly that it's been made using newsreels, because the photographs in those days were not so good. finally, a memorial to a man who played a key role in the partition of the indian subcontinent 70 years ago. time for a look at the weather with tomasz. it's chilly out there, but at least many of us have fine, crisp weather and this evening and overnight it is going to turn very cold in the countryside we will have a look at that in a second. this is the satellite picture. not completely clear skies. there are little lumps of cloud. these are shower clouds. for most of us, it's rain, but there
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isa for most of us, it's rain, but there is a little bit of sleet and snow across the hills and maybe across the pennines and the north york moors, but for the majority of the country it is a clear evening. this is around 6pm today. you can see temperatures across scotland there barely above freezing and for most of us, it is around four celsius. four celsius for belfast and three celsius for manchester and gloucester and down to brighton and portsmouth, southampton and bournemouth towards plymouth, temperatures will be also four celsius. so really nippy one. and tonight, the frost develops quite widely across the uk. not the eastern coast. but here we could have snow showers across the hills. i wouldn't be surprised if there is a dusting first thing in the morning out in the countryside around east anglia. towns and cities around zero also, but in rural spots, it could be as low as minus six celsius. we have already had that so far this autumn. it could dip as low as minus
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seven celsius. tomorrow starts off cold. lots of sunshine around. but again the eastern coasts, shower clouds coming through and newcastle, probably getting rainfall, but the north york moors could be getting sleet and snow showers. temperatures will be feeling as if they are below freezing because we have got the win coming off the north sea. friday, again another chilly day, but we starting to see the temperatures creep upjust starting to see the temperatures creep up just a little bit. starting to see the temperatures creep upjust a little bit. we starting to see the temperatures creep up just a little bit. we are not going to get mild weather, but the weather is going to turn a little bit less cold. around this area of high pressure, winds spinning around and there is a bit of warmth stuck in the middle this high. the warmth is toppling over the high and moving towards the uk. so we will see a gradual rise by around three or four celsius. you will probably notice that as we go through the weekend. then it looks as if the cold weather could be back again later in the week. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm ben brown.
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today at three... britain is prepared to pay more to settle its brexit bill — up to 50 billion euros, according to reports. the foreign secretary says now let's move on to trade talks. the offer that the prime minister is able to make at that council will be one that guarantees sufficient progress — i think that's what everybody round the table — all the 27 plus us — wants to achieve. reports that a bosnian war criminal has died after he claimed to drink poison, while appearing in court in the hague. president trump has retweeted inflammatory anti—muslim posts from a british far right group. coming up on afternoon live — all the sport. and alan pardew is back in the premier league? yes, appointed the
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new manager of west brom on a 2.5 year deal and another familiar face will return later today, the former england boss sam allardyce is on his way to finalise terms with everton... way to finalise terms with everton. .. many thanks indeed, way to finalise terms with everton... many thanks indeed, we will bejoining queue for a everton... many thanks indeed, we will be joining queue for a full update at just after will be joining queue for a full update atjust after half past and tomasz schafernaker has all of the weather for us... it will stay cold for the next few days and a night in the countryside it could even dipped as low as —6 or 7 degrees... the countryside it could even dipped as low as -6 or 7 degrees... tomasz, thank you. also coming up — how to stop millions of tonnes of perfectly good food being needlessly thrown away... hello, and welcome to the programme.
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iam ben hello, and welcome to the programme. i am ben brown. what will be the final price of the brexit divorce bill? the haggling has gone on for months but now it's understood the government's offered a significant increase in what it's prepared to pay — between 40 and 50 billion euros, we understand. the hope is that a deal on this brexit bill will finally trigger crucial trade talks. eu leaders will meet soon to decide whether the uk has done enough — and offered enough — for those talks to start. 0ur political correspondent leila nathoo reports. she hopes she's on her way sealing to the divorce deal. after rounds of meetings, more money now on the table to leave the eu. it's understood that could be up to 50 billion euros, paid over a number of years, to allow trade talks to begin. the government won't get into specific numbers but insists the uk will meet its financial obligations. the prime minister is going to go forward to the december european council with, i think, a very fair offer and what we want to see is progress towards the second phase of the negotiations, and that's really what i think everybody now wants to do.
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for now, the eu is refusing to confirm anything's already been agreed. do you welcome britain's decision to pay more, mr barnier? is it enough? we are still working. so what does the uk have to pay for? things we signed up to as eu members that haven't yet been delivered. these include investment projects in poorer regions, pensions for eu staff and guarantees of loans to countries like ukraine. now it appears some are prepared to think longer term. we have public spending pressures at home but if we say we have wads of money, loads of money, to give to the european union in terms of the brexit negotiations, i think the public will rightly be outraged by
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it. they will go bananas because they want their money spent at home. but others appear prepared to take a longer view... as we leave, if you compare the two together over a 40 year period, even on the net terms, that would amount to about £360 billion saving to the uk exchequer as we leave because we won't make contributions after that two—year period. getting money back from the eu was one of the main pitches of the leave campaign. now remainers claim voters were mis—sold. they never said there was going to be this big bill to pay and, secondly, we are not seeing the central pledge that they made in that campaign to win it, to persuade your viewers who voted leave to vote leave, it is not being delivered on. the divorce bill is just one of three areas on which brussels wants to see sufficient progress before allowing talks to begin on a future trading relationship. eu leaders will meet in a fortnight to formally decide whether britain has offered enough. money may no longer be the sticking point, the focus now is on the irish border. they're inching towards
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a breakthrough but there's still a long way to go before the shape of britain's departure becomes clear. leila nathoo, bbc news, westminster. let's go over to westminster and conservative mp michael fabricant is with us. is 15 billion euros a fair price, you campaign for brexit? we don't know if it will be that amount but in perspective, it wasn't that long ago before people were saying it would be about 100 billion euros so if it is 50 billion euros, it isn't as much but what need to remember, i'm looking at some figures here, over the last ten yea rs we have figures here, over the last ten years we have given them 118 billion euros, and since we have become members of the european union, which was 44 years ago, we have paid half £1 trillion and in the next two yea rs £1 trillion and in the next two years it will cost in the order of
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our leaving from 2022 if we stayed m, our leaving from 2022 if we stayed in, it would be another 22 billion euros. they are huge figures, i know, but if it is 40 billion we are only talking about an extra two yea rs only talking about an extra two years payments and then nothing, because every year we paid 10— £12 billion net. during the referendum campaign, when you were talking to people and voters, did you say that actually, to leave, it would cost several tens of billions of euros? we had a great debate in lichfield cathedral. i remember saying very clearly that we have two by our way out of the contract but once we have done that, we would be free of any further obligations and, on top of that, we would be free to make trade deals with countries which we cannot do at present and then control our borders. frankly i think it is worth it. everybody would remember boris
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johnson saying that the eu could go and whistle if they thought they would get a big brexit settlement from the uk, was that orjust posturing and tough talk?|j from the uk, was that orjust posturing and tough talk? i wouldn't like to suggest what boris was up to! but i have been in business and if you have a contract and the united kingdom does have a contract with the european union, if you want to buy yourself out, if you want to leave the bbc, and you've got a contract for so many years you had to buy yourself out of that contract. it's only equipment, as i said, to about three years of our membership. once we have done that, there will be tens, 20s, 30s, loads of years to come where we would not be paying a beam and have the opportunity to make wonderful trade deals with other countries, as well as with the eu. and i must say that all the this offer is subject to us getting a good deal with the eu, a free trade agreement with them. you are sounding very sanguine about it
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but if the bill, we do not know what it is, people are talking about 40 or50, it is, people are talking about 40 or 50, but if it went up to 70,80, or 50, but if it went up to 70,80, or 90, would you still be happy? is there a limit in your mind?” or 90, would you still be happy? is there a limit in your mind? i don't think it will come to that but i think it will come to that but i think it will come to £12 billion per year net so divide by that, and then after that you are not paying a penny. so, let's see what happens. asi penny. so, let's see what happens. as i said they were saying only a few months ago that it would be 100 billion. you are talking about it like a billion. you are talking about it likea bargaining billion. you are talking about it like a bargaining chip but it is a legal obligation, isn't it? it is a legal obligation, isn't it? it is a legal obligation, isn't it? it is a legal obligation but one of the other problems with the european union who can audit the eu's bucks, they rejected the audit from the eu every year for the last 19 years. so while the united kingdom and the european union may agree what our
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obligation is in general principle, i think there is some bargaining that will go on as to what the actual quantity is. michael fabricant, thank you so much for being with us. let's bring you some breaking news, actually. we were talking in the sports news about ben stokes, the england cricketer. detectives investigating an incident outside of a bristol nightclub involving cricketer ben stokes have passed a file to the crown prosecution service for a decision on charging, avon and somerset police said. these are pictures of ben stokes arriving in new zealand, among speculation that he may be going down under to join up with the england cricketing tea m join up with the england cricketing team to play in the ashes but now we are hearing from avon and somerset police that the detectives investigating an incident outside a bristol nightclub cricketer ben stokes have passed a
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file to the crown prosecution service for a decision on charging, avon and somerset police said. we don't know when that decision will come but we will bring it to you when we does. croatian state tv is reporting that the convicted war criminal general slobodan praljak has died after taking poison at war crimes court in the hague. proceedings at the international criminal tribunalfor the former yugoslavia were suspended because the defendant drank something that he had said was poison. praljak consumed liquid from a small container, after his 20—year prison sentence was upheld. you may be seated. slobodan praljak is not a war criminal, i am rejecting the court's ruling. stop, please, please sit down. i have taken poison. we suspend, please, the curtains.
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very dramatic scenes there. that was at the hague, the war crimes tribunal. the former bbc balkans correspondent martin bell once gave evidence against praljak, and told me he remembers the general as something of a ‘theatrical character'. i am not surprised at all. he was not only a senior croatian officer but in civilian life he had been a theatre director. i met life he had been a theatre director. imet him life he had been a theatre director. i met him first in the croatian war. afterwards, i wondered whether one of these battles had been a bit stage—managed but then he was in charge of the bosnian croats on the day the wonderful bridge was blown up day the wonderful bridge was blown up on the 9th of november 19 93. five years ago i got a call from one of his lawyers, asking me to help him with an alibi. he said on that day i had been meeting with him in
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central bosnia, i check my notes and it was one day out so that would have been the alibi. i‘m not surprised, he was always a man with a sense of drama and i‘m sure this was premeditated, clearly. what exactly d id was premeditated, clearly. what exactly did he do? talk us through his crimes. he is convicted of the ill—treatment of prisoners, muslim prisoners, in the war between muslims and croats which began in april 1993 and ended in 1994. he is charged with the command of responsibility for blowing up the bridge and the ill—treatment of civilians when muslims were rounded up civilians when muslims were rounded up in the war in mestalla, and in the hangars at the airport. you have been at the hague many times, how surprised i use that somebody could smuggle in this poison, if that is
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what it turns out to be. there are reports that he has died, we haven‘t confirmed that yet. but how could somebody get back to him? is a serious breach of security, i have been there a number of times. on one occasion a political leader asked to see me, i went to go, i thought it was my duty to be helpful, i was in a guarded prison cell, there was a plastic bullet proof barrier between him and me. it is impossible for a visitor to pass something to a prisoner. he has found a way around it. it is a serious breach of security at the end of the life of the tribunal. all of those affected by what he did, the big teams, if you like, i suppose they would feel cheated, if it does turn out, we haven‘t confirmed this, but if it does turn out that he has died, that that was the way out that he would have chosen? he has taken the
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ultimate solution. he took his life in his own hands and he‘s not the first prisoner at these tribunal ‘s to have died. it happened to slobodan milosevic as well. i suppose his victims would think that justice was done but it is extraordinary. i think that if you look at his background, as a theatrical character, you would see how and why he did it. that was martin bell, a former bbc correspondent, in the balkans. don‘t forget, you can let us know what you think. tweet us using the hashtag afternoonlive. all the ways to contact us on the screen right now. president trump has used his twitter account to share inflammatory videos which were were posted online by the deputy leader of the far—right group, britain first. the footage purports to show muslims committing acts of violence. the president has been criticised on
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social media for spreading ‘hatred,‘ and labour is calling on the government to condemn his actions. 0ur correspondent richard lister has been looking at the tweets and reaction to them... even by his standards, it was an extraordinary thing to share with his 43 million followers. these three videos were posted from the account of the deputy leader of the far right group britain first. 0ne of the videos say it is an islamist mob pushing a teenage boy off a roof and pushing him —— and beating him to death. according to the press association this video was taken in 2013 in alexandria, egypt, where several men were pushed off a roof and one man was executed for murder asa and one man was executed for murder as a result of that. another retweeted video says it is a muslim destroying the statue of the virgin mary. it came from youtube more than four years ago, it was posted and
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said that is what happened but gave no context. it‘s impossible to say what that situation is. and the final video says it was a muslim migrant beating up a dutch boy. it was posted earlier this year, two young men were charged in relation to this that there was no mention of the religion of anyone involved in reporting. it‘s unclear the circumstances in which these videos came about. certainly, it is com pletely came about. certainly, it is completely unclear why the president would want to promote them. what has been the reaction to the fact he has retweeted this stuff? quite furious and measured from the mayor of london, sadiq khan. brendan cox, whose wife, jo cox, said that trump has legitimised the far right in his own country and now he is drawn to do it in hours. spreading hatred has consequences and the president should be ashamed of himself. david
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lammy, mpfor should be ashamed of himself. david lammy, mp for tottenham, says he is no ally orfriend lammy, mp for tottenham, says he is no ally or friend of ours, you are not welcome in my country or in my city. this will feed into the debate about his expected visit to the uk next year. that was richard lister speaking to me earlier on. north korea says it has successfully tested its "most powerful" ballistic missile to date. the hwasong—15 missile is believed to be capable of hitting most of the mainland united states. president trump has called china‘s president xi — calling on him to exert pressure on north korea. we have heard in a tweet from donald trump that additional major sanctions will be imposed on north korea as a result of this latest test—firing of that missile. paul adams reports from seoul. the face and the voice of north korean defiance. announcer ri chun—hee with news of pyongyang‘s latest and boldest missile test. kim jong un, photographed giving the order. i approve this test launch, he writes. for the party and the country, courageously fire. this was the 23rd missile test this year, the first since mid—september.
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it took off in the early hours of the morning, north of the capital pyongyang. it flew for 53 minutes, landing in the sea 600 miles away. crucially, it flew higher than any previous missile — 2,800 miles up into space. experts say this means north korea now has missiles capable of hitting almost anywhere in america. after a pause in testing that lasted 75 days, this is a stark reminder of the determination of the north korean leader to pursue his nuclear and missile programme. today‘s statement from pyongyang that the programme poses no threat to anyone, provided the country‘s interests are not infringed, will come as little comfort. a missile was launched a little while ago from north korea. i will only tell you that we will take care of it.
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a fresh challenge for president trump and his administration. little doubt here that this represents something new. it went higher, frankly, than any previous shot they've taken. it's a research and development effort on their part, continuing to build ballistic missiles that could threaten everywhere in the world. korea‘s president moonjae—in on the phone to donald trump this morning. the test took his government by surprise. he called it a reckless provocation. south korea responded with a missile test of its own but warnings, threats and pressure appear to be having little effect. kimjong un says north korea now has its own nuclear force. a bold claim, but only partially true. he has the bombs and the missiles — putting one on top of the other and making it work, that‘s still some way off. pauladams, bbc news, seoul. the latest headlines... the united
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kingdom is understood to have offered between 40 and 50 billion euros to set a list bill with the european union. there are reports that a bosnian war criminal has died after claiming to drink poison while appearing in court at the hague. president trump has retweeted videos originally posted by a british far right group, claiming to show muslims committing acts of violence. and in the sport, avon and somerset police say that detectives investigating an incident outside of a bristol nightclub involving the england all—rounder ben stokes have passed a file to the crown prosecution service for a decision on whether he will face charges. alan pardew says that he is determined to take west bromwich albion forward in the premier league after replacing tony pulis as the head coach of the club. and, another familiarface is head coach of the club. and, another familiar face is back head coach of the club. and, another familiarface is back soon. evidence a former england manager sam alla rdyce a former england manager sam allardyce will finalise a deal to
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become their new boss at the club‘s training ground this afternoon. i will be back with moreno stories just after half past three. —— more on those stories. the prime minister is in the middle east on a trip aimed at strengthening the uk‘s global links after brexit. i‘m joined now by our security correspondent frank gardner. so, what is the aim of her trip. so, what is the aim of her tripm is pretty much that, in a post—brexit world where britain is leading the eu but not europe, it needs all the friends it can get. prime minister theresa may is keen on forging trade links and security links with the gulf arab states. the three—day trip includes jordan links with the gulf arab states. the three—day trip includesjordan and saudi arabia. the saudi portion is a little controversial, i think, because as well as their human rights record saudi arabia is leading a coalition and an air war in yemen that is causing quite a lot of casualties. a lot. it is also
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imposing the brocade on the yemeni port of her data. he who views, the other side, are not blameless. —— the houthis. it would be a difficult conversation. if she brings up yemen. her only saudi leadership do share, however, a distrust of iran. they do not trust them in the region and they will talk about that common ground. it is a time of seismic change, it‘s an extraordinary time for her to be there? she is barely touching the ground before she is off again. the saudis will not like that. they have a close relationship with the white house. there is enormous bonding and chemistry going on, notjust enormous bonding and chemistry going on, not just between enormous bonding and chemistry going on, notjust between mohammed bin zouma, the crown prince who effectively runs saudi arabia now but particularly jared kushner, effectively runs saudi arabia now but particularlyjared kushner, a fairly regular visitor to riyadh
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now. they are trying to sort out their relationship with the us. back chemistry does not exist between them and the uk. there is the thought that they should have this military. theresa may‘s view and not of her party is that they need saudi and gulf arab money and trade. and post—brighton, are their big contracts post—brighton, are their big co ntra cts to post—brighton, are their big contracts to be won in somewhere like saudi arabia? we talked about the trade that there is, with defence contracts or not. not with the tornado deal, and the project, the tornado deal, and the project, the typhoon deal. but all of it is tiny as compared to what the
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americans announced during donald trump‘s visit. i was there in may, there was talk of $300 billion worth of trade, massive. eye watering amounts of deals. they have been inked but not all come to fruition. whatever britain concludes will be tiny by comparison. and you say that the way they will see it is maybe she will not spend enough time there? bielik to get to know people. they will of course have looked at her political position here, and run their own conclusions. it is not an issue that theresa may is female. they are at the upper echelons of society. they are more than used to dealing with people like hillary clinton and margaret thatcher for that matter. so, that is not an issue. ivanka trump and so on, the issue, i think, issue. ivanka trump and so on, the issue, ithink, is issue. ivanka trump and so on, the issue, i think, is whether britain will be a long—term partner for them. the saudis have thrown in their lot with the white house. i
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think they would be in trouble if anything were to happen to donald trump‘s administration and it will eventually finish whether after four yea rs or eventually finish whether after four years or eight, but they will have to forge a completely new relationship. president 0bama did not get on very well with them and they did not like his administration. he put a lot of curbs on them. this one is such a brief visit i do not know if a great deal would be announced afterwards. frank gardner, thank you. lawyers for a man found guilty of murdering a mother and daughter in kent in 1996 say they‘ll release significant new evidence today that raises serious questions about his conviction. lyn russell and her six—year—old daughter, megan, were attacked as they walked along a quiet country lane near the village of chillenden in kent. michael stone, who‘s serving three life sentences has always denied being involved in the attacks. here‘s wyre davies. it was a notorious murder, a brutal, unprovoked attack in rural kent on a family walking home from a school swimming gala. 45—year—old lin russell
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and her six—year—old daughter megan were killed in the frenzied hammer attack. that one‘s quite heavy. butjosie russell survived, despite suffering terrible injuries. nine—year—old josie was left for dead at this isolated spot in the kent countryside on the 9th ofjuly1996. she‘d been walking along this country lane with her mum lin and six—year—old sister megan, they were going home just on the other side of this copse. michael stone, a known criminal and drug addict, was arrested a year later and found guilty of the russell murders. he‘s serving a life sentence but has always protested his innocence. there‘s no forensic evidence against stone and he was convicted on the strength of a disputed confession to a fellow prisoner. and stone‘s legal team say they now have compelling new evidence linking this man, levi bellfield, to the russell murders. the killer of schoolgirl milly dowler, amelie delagrange,
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and marsha mcdonnell, is serving two full—life terms. many say bellfield has committed dozens of similar serious crimes. the similarities you‘ve got are a woman, a blitz attack with something heavy like a hammer, you know, just those features make it an extremely rare crime. i think, in the absence of other facts, he would be a good suspect. from the high security frankland prison michael stone acknowledged his violent criminal past but told me that, unlike bellfield, he had no history of attacking women. you‘ve got a track record of violence, you hit a man with a hammer, you‘ve got... well, michael stone‘s legal team now are beginning a news conference. let‘s have a listen now. it is his barrister, and sister. the sister of michael stone. we intend first to read a statement, paul will read the statement, and at the end of that
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there will be questions, i am sure, but we will take some questions and before you leave i will hand out copies of the statement. let me hand to paul to read this statement. copies of the statement. let me hand to paulto read this statement. can i add my thanks to all of you for coming today. this is an important moment for michael stone. this is the statement that we want to give to you. michael stone was convicted in 2001, following a retrial of the murder of megan russell, lin russell, and the attempted murder of josie russell. the jury were not unanimous, and he was convicted after many hours of deliberation by after many hours of deliberation by a majority verdict of 10—2. michael stone has always protested his innocence. the only evidence against michael stone is a confession said to have been heard by a notorious
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criminal, damien daley. there was no forensic or identification evidence linking michael stone to these murders. damien daley has told numerous people that he lied to the jury. he has since gone on to commit murderand is jury. he has since gone on to commit murder and is serving a life sentence in prison. we have now received evidence of a full confession by levi bellfield. he has admitted the russell murders. in the confession, levi bellfield describes how he came across lin russell, and her two children, how he attacked them with a hammer, and he explains
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his motivation for the killing. the confession is detailed and has a numberof confession is detailed and has a number of facts which are not in the public domain. we have conducted a full review of the case papers and have an independent witness who saw levi bellfield close to the scene of the murders at about the time they were committed. and importantly, we have identified forensic material from the scene of the murders which corroborates the confession made by levi bellfield. the russell murders by levi bellfield fits perfectly with his modus operandi. he is a man known to attack and murder women. his weapon of choice is a hammer. this material including the detailed
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confession is now before the criminal cases review commission. we are of the view that this evidence must, as a matter of urgency, be brought before the court of appeal. we know that levi bellfield will deny the confession and make up counter allegation, but we also know that levi bellfield is very manipulative. the confession, as i have said, is very detailed and he has said a number of matters which as i've said before are not in the public domain. further, as i have said too, it is corroborated by the forensic evidence. finally, we do have concerns about the kent police investigating this and would ask that an independent police force look at the investigation and in particular, the fresh evidence that we have presented to the criminal cases review commission. thank you. we will take questions.
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reporter: where has the confession from and what‘s the forensic evidence? it has come from a fellow prisoner and we don‘t want to go into any detail right now with regards to the forensic evidence. that‘s before the criminal cases review commission and they are investigating it now. do you not find it strange that the case that has rested on a criminal analogy that michael stone, now you would argue somebody else giving a confession. the first one alleged to have been given to damien daley who you may remember occurred through a pipeline between two adjoining cells and had nothing in it that was not in the public domain. damien daley had a newspaper and a lot of the evidence that was said to be in the confession was in the newspaper. what we have here is a confession which has material in it which is
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not in the public domain and more importantly is corroborated by other evidence. the independent witness as we have said and in relation to the forensic material which corroborates what is said by levi bellfield. so there is a significant difference in both. more than that, this confession goes over many pages. it was just one half a statement by damien daley. reporter: where has this new witness come from and why has it taken them so long to arrive with the conclusion that they saw levi bellfield there? this wasn‘t a quiet case and levi bellfield isn‘t exactly a figure that‘s not known, why have they come forward and how are they so certain it was levi bellfield they seen and they are not imagining it was levi bellfield? the witness contacted me out of the blue when it started to become apparent there was a lot of interest in the case. this was a year ago. she had seena case. this was a year ago. she had seen a picture of a car and she
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recognised this car and she told me this and i went to interview her. as a result of that, we got hold of her statement. she had told the police about this and told me she had rung the police several times and the statement that was taken was dated a month after the event. so, the kent police had got this information, took sometime to do anything with it and then she never heard from the police again. so it's something which emerged because of the interest. we've check it and we've confirmed what she said and what she saw and she is certain it was levi bellfield. can you tell us how it teals at this moment it is being reviewed as a possibility? i think is this is the biggest hope my brother has had for a long time. i understand there will be some interest in the fact that it‘s a confession of sorts given that my brother was convicted by a
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confession, but as it has been said, the confession that convicted my brother, all that information was in the public domain. this information is different and i would quote my brother by saying that he has read it and the information in that cell confession can only have come from somebody who was at the scene and committed the crime and so together we‘re both really hopeful now that we‘re both really hopeful now that we could get a positive outcome. of course, all this depends on the ccrc continuing their investigation and i would urge them to really act quite quickly to refer this back to the court of appeal because mick has beenin court of appeal because mick has been in prison now for 20 years and that‘s 20 years too long for somebody who hasn‘t committed a crime. understanding bli he has been told about the news. what‘s his reaction? he wants you to know that he is very hopeful. he fully believes that bellfield has committed the crimes, but he had doubts in the past when he has seen the contents of the new evidence. he
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is quite confident that it is him that has done it and he is quite hopeful, but like myself, we won‘t allow ourselves to believe that the justice system will be kind to us this time, so we remain hopeful, but you know, it all depends and relies on the ccrc making that referral become to the court of appeal.m has been a long fight for you. are you committed to carrying on with this? absolutely. never will we stop, really. i‘d like to think this will go to the court of appeal. they will go to the court of appeal. they will hear the evidence and see it would have made a difference at the original trial and that mick will be released and then maybe we will hit our retirement years and we will be able to live in peace really. in the 20 years that he has been in prison have you ever doubted his innocence? never. not from the very beginning. has he ever contacted levi bellfield in prison? minimal. years ago. nothing recently. they are in the
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same prison as i understand, but they are in different areas of the prison. my brother is in the general population. and i believe levi bellfield is on the block that they refer to as the numbers or section 42 is it? is that the right phrase? so they are in the same prison, but in different buildings within that, their paths don‘t cross. mark, what are the steps next? this application is before the criminal cases review commission. they are looking at it. and we urge them to refer this now to the court of appeal as soon as possible. what needs to happen is this needs to get before the court of appeal. for it to be properly tested. for the crown prosecution service to look into it and look behind it and take a view on it and in my view, the evidence
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is so compelling that it was presented to the jury at the time, the conviction would be unsafe. you don‘t trust kent police to investigate this. can you just explain a little bit more as to why you don‘t trust this in kent police? the chief exhibit was a shoelace which was used in the murder and was a murder weapon and dropped at the scene and it was brought to the scene and it was brought to the scene by the perpetrator, it had material on it which confirmed it was used in the murder. that lace, we wanted to have re—examined, but it was lost when it was asked for first, to have a new forensic examination, a dna examination, with all the modern techniques, not those from 20 years ago, the exhibit envelope was empty. ,000 they lost t who knows? well, it is notjust an exhibit, it is one of the murder weapons. we don't have confidence in them and we would like another force to take this on board. let's face
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it, they became fixated on michael stone. he was presented to them a year after the incident and eventually he is convicted onjust this piece of cell confession evidence, this confession. we don't think that they can look at this objectively and say to themselves, we are really going to investigate this thoroughly. we realise we will be embarrassed to have to admit we got the wrong man 20 years ago. so we want someone else who can be objective and can be determined and can be hopefully, set out to establish that the truth is known, justice needs to be done and it needs to be seen to be done. i don't think it's right that kent police are the force tasked with that objective. have you said that to alan or matthew and what was their reply? i haven't said this. this is the criminal commissioners for kent, police commissioner. i haven't said
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it yet, but i'm saying it to him,000. he wants to speak to them because we have made known our concerns. we have already been in touch with them a number of times. each time, they have been, i suppose, my best term would be unhelpful. this is the important thing. as! unhelpful. this is the important thing. as i say, the application is now with the criminal cases review commission. it's compelling evidence. it needs to be read a the court of appeal. whoever investigates it, and we encourage an independent force does so, it needs to be done quickly and a referral needs to be made. has josie russell been informed of this announcement today? we have made sure that the families were informed. what was her reaction? we don't want to comment. we have made the dourl family aware. they will be emotionally affected by
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the fact that bellfield's name appears yet again. i know you can't give us the details of the forensic evidence, but can you give us an idea of what type of evidence it is, what is it? i can't because anything i say will, i am afraid, give it away. so, all! i say will, i am afraid, give it away. so, all i can say is that it is forensic material and this is important, it corroborates the confession. so, and i can't say any more than that i am afraid. sorry. can you say anything more about the circumstances of this confession? when was it given? how did it come to you? as! when was it given? how did it come to you? as i say, it's notjust once, it is more than once this confession. it was over a period of time. it was over a number of days and indeed, weeks. and it is as i say, detailed and includes diagrams. it includes a diagram of where the murder took place and where the
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bodies were in situ. the documentary and the confessions — because of bellfield and what might be in the documentary and that triggered the conversation. bellfield said he was involved in other murders and the police discounted him what makes you think you can believe him this time around? right from the beginning, there is matters which only the person involved in the murders would know. like what? at some stage it maybe that levi bellfield faces yet another trial and whatever we say, we can't prejudice a fair trial. can
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you explain why would lel field feel the need this far on to confess to something just because there was a documentary? if you are going to confess, why not confess to the authorities? well, this is a discussion that's been had in a prison unit between two fellow prisoners. one prison who is worried that a documentary is going to feature something which is going to be prejudicial to him and so has the conversation about his concerns and then goes on to discuss why he has those concerns. with a man who can do nothing about it? it is a conversation between two individuals. so, it was a conversation that's had. but it's a conversation that's had. but it's a conversation that's had. but it's a conversation that's quite detailed and notes were taken of that conversation. levi bellfield denies making that?
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he denies the killing of milly dowler and confessed in full to police officers about that and denies that confession as well. it has not taken us by surprise. any further questions? again, thank you very much for coming today. i have copies of the statement to hand out. studio: well that concludes that news co nfe re nce studio: well that concludes that news conference by mike ale stone‘s legal team, his barrister, solicitor, and sister as well. suggesting that there is new evidence that could link the serial killer levi bellfield, the man who killed milly dowler to the deaths of lin russell and her daughter megan in that attack at chillenden in kent more than 20 years ago, in 1996. stone, who has been in prison for 20 yea rs, always stone, who has been in prison for 20 years, always maintained his innocence. but his legal team
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suggesting now that there has been a detailed and full confession by levi bellfield to those killings describing how he attacked them with a hammerand describing how he attacked them with a hammer and also saying that they now have an independent witness to claims to have seen levi bellfield near the scene of the attack. michael stone is serving three life sentences for bludgeoning lin russell and her daughter megan to death in that attack in 1996 in which her other daughterjosie who is nine suffered serious head injuries and the family‘s dog was also killed. the news conference just concluding and we will bring you more reaction to it later on. in a moment the business news with rachel. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the uk is understood to have offered between 40 and 50 billion euros to settle its divorce bill with the european union. there are reports that a bosnian war criminal has died after claiming to drink
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poison while appearing in court in the hague. president trump retweets videos originally posted by a british far—right group, claiming to show muslims committing acts of violence. the government has announced an overhaul of the uk rail network saying it could reopen lines closed in the 1960s. it‘s also considering splitting up two of the country‘s largest train operators. and it may ask local companies to run the track as well as train services in a bid to cut delays and overcrowding. the chief executive of the london stock exchange, xavier rolet, has left the company amid a bruising boardroom row. mr rolet was due to leave next year and one of the firm‘s biggest shareholders claims he has been forced out. he is in line for a pay—out of more than £12 million. uber has revealed that 2.7 million british riders and drivers were affected by a 2016 data breach that it covered up for more than a year.
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the stolen information includes names, e—mail addresses and phone numbers and for drivers, licence numbers. we‘ve been hearing about a possible agreement on a brexit divorce bill, but there is still so much to resolve — today the construction industry have stood up to say they are worried about how brexit will impact it‘s access to workers? the construction sector, which employs around three million people in the uk say they face "cliff edge" skills shortages over access to eu workers. they promise they willing do more to train traditional uk workers, but that‘s going to take time. sarah mcmonagle — director
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of external affairs — federation of master builders. what does the construction industry want? the that the government neglects a sensible transition period of at least two years so we don't have the cliff edge issue come march 2019 and the second is that the kind of post brexit immigration syste m the kind of post brexit immigration system that we find ourselves with in the medium to longer term makes allowa nces in the medium to longer term makes allowances for the occupations that our country needs rather than arbitrary levels on income or skills, those qualifications. the industry has committed to training up industry has committed to training up more uk workers. but how long will that take to set—up af how long to implement? it could take sometime. we have been training too few people in the construction industry in terms of the domestic levels. however, we need to be
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realistic here because the uk is almost at full employment so although we can do more to train domestic workers, there is a kind of a cap to that and that's why we will also need to be able to access eu workers in the longer term too sarah, in the budget last week, the chancellor pledged to build 300,000 new houses every year, do we have the workers in this country to do that? i don't think we do, no. there we re that? i don't think we do, no. there were some sensible measures in last week's budget, the fmb called it the budget for builders, however the stuff we saw there on access to finance and so on, those sorts of measures would be deemed redundant if we don't have enough skilled workers. we are experiencing a severe skills shortage and that's before we have left the eu. sarah, thank you. you‘ve got a report out today that says loan sharks are hanging out at school gates and at food banks? yes, this was a report done by the
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financial conduct authority. they wa nted financial conduct authority. they wanted to look into loan sharks and what tactics they were using. this was prompted by the fact that extra regulation was brought in a few yea rs regulation was brought in a few years ago on payday lenders and there was a fear there would be an unintended consequence that people who could no longer use the payday lenders could turn to loan sharks. what is interesting in this report, they haven‘t found evidence that more people are using loan sharks, but they have found evidence of some shocking tactics that loan sharks are using. so earlier we spoke to our reporter kevin peachey. the fca we re our reporter kevin peachey. the fca were told about cases when loan sharks were hanging around school gates, giving out business cards effectively to youngsters saying, "if you want a new pair of trainers, then get your mum to give us a call we'll extend a loan. " then get your mum to give us a call we'll extend a loan." they have been outside foodbanks and inside casinos. they have been waiting for pensioners outside the post office. so for many people, actually using a loa n so for many people, actually using a loan shark seems to have been a bit
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ofa loan shark seems to have been a bit of a way of life. the fca had a look at this and come up with an average which they are saying that someone who borrows £250 is having to pay back 167 inside interest. that's a very high rate, but they say there are cases where the illegal lenders are cases where the illegal lenders are under cutting the loan sharks — sorry, the illegal lenders are under cutting the traditional lenders so there is a worry that traditional lender is too expensive and pushing people towards loan sharks. now, then, suggestions today really that britain is going to settle its brexit bill, maybe 40 billion, 50 billion euros. how has that affected the market? it pushed up the value of sterling. sterling was up higher
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than this against the dollar. 134 and michel barnier came out and said, wouldn‘t confirm whether or not this deal had been agreed, this figure. and sterling fell again. it is sensitive and volatile. we have put up just is sensitive and volatile. we have put upjust eat. it is not quite so much a strictly come dancing move, it is more like football. ma r what about a cabinet move? three companies will be relegated to the 250 based on their value. it is based on their value at close of play yesterday. it couldn‘t be con fu rld play yesterday. it couldn‘t be con furld until close of play today, but just eat is tipped to go up. if it does, it will be the first customer digital facing platform to enter the ftse100. digital facing platform to enter the ftse 100. just eat which is just a platform and connects people and delivery restaurants and puts them in contact, they are valid higher
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than sainsbury‘s, marks & spencer‘s, these huge companies. if that‘s confirmed, that‘s big news. these huge companies. if that‘s confirmed, that's big news. that would be extraordinary. many thanks, indeed. another line about brexit and suggestions that britain is paid to prepare 40 billion, 50 billion euros. we have had through the afp news agency some reaction from the european parliament co—ordinator on brexit saying that more progress is needed. this is his letter to michel barnier, the chief eu brexit negotiator. more progress gug verhofstadt is needed. he is suggesting the situation has been reversed in one area. there had been optimism about britain being prepared to settle that brexit deal
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and then moving on to trade talks, but mr verhofstadt, the eu parliament brexit co—ordinator sounding more negative and pessimistic perhaps than the general mood. a sculpture of the founder of pakistan, muhammed alijinah has been unveiled at the british museum in london to mark the 70th anniversary of india‘s partition. the bronze bust has been made by philip jackson, who also sculpted the gandhi figure in parliament square and footballer bobby moore in front of wembley stadium. this report from shabnam mahmood contains some flash photography. adding the final touches to the bronze bust of the man known as the founding father of pakistan. the project marks the end of six months of work for the sculptor, who was inspired by old photographs of mohammed ali jinnah. he was quite a formal man and a lot of the photographs show him sort of standing straight onto the camera with his arms down by his side. i was desperate to find something that i could use to bring the...
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sort of bring a little bit of humanity to the sculpture. and then i noticed that he used a monocle, which i suppose even in those days was reasonably unusual, and so i‘ve got him holding a monocle and i thought that made it quite an interesting sculpture. newsreel: mrjinnah is on the viceroy's left... jinnah spent his younger years studying law in london before returning to india and joining the campaign for independence against the british. he later demanded an independent homeland for muslims, creating pakistan in 1947. here at the british museum, the sculpture is unveiled by the mayor of london, in front of a huge crowd of people. pakistan! it‘s been funded by the government of pakistan. this has been conceived by us. this has been funded by the government of pakistan, and i think this is a tribute by the people of pakistan to their great leader,
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the founder of the nation. the statue will now move to its permanent place at lincoln‘s inn in central london, where mohammed ali jinnah qualified as a barrister. for many here, it‘s a tribute that is long overdue. in general, for all young people and the like, he‘s a leader that we should be looking up to — his principles, his ideas. so i‘m really proud today, seeing the bust. i think it's amazing, particularly that it's been made using newsreels, because the photographs in those days were not so good. finally, a memorial to a man who played a key role in the partition of the indian subcontinent 70 years ago. time for a look at the weather with tomasz. it's it‘s chilly out there, but at least many of us have fine, crisp weather and this evening and overnight it is going to turn
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very cold in the countryside. we will have a look at that ina we will have a look at that in a second. this is the satellite picture. not completely clear skies. there are little lumps of cloud. these are shower clouds. for most of us, it‘s rain, but there is a little bit of sleet and snow across the hills and maybe across the pennines and the north york moors, but for the majority of the country it‘s a clear evening. this is around 6pm today. you can see temperatures across scotland there barely above freezing and for most of us, it‘s around four celsius. four celsius for belfast and three celsius for manchester and gloucester and down to brighton, portsmouth, southampton and bournemouth towards plymouth, temperatures will be also four celsius. soa celsius. so a really nippy one. tonight, the frost develops quite widely across the uk. not the eastern coast. but here we could have some snow showers across the hills. i wouldn‘t be surprised if there is a dusting first
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thing in the morning out in the countryside around east anglia. towns and cities around zero also, but in rural spots, it could be as low as minus six celsius. we have already had that so far this autumn. it could dip as low as minus seven celsius. so tomorrow starts off cold. lots of sunshine around. but again these eastern coasts, shower clouds coming through and newcastle, hull, probably getting rainfall, but the north york moors could be getting sleet and snow showers. temperatures will be feeling as if they are below freezing because we‘ve got the wind coming off the north sea. friday, again another chilly day, but we starting to see the temperatures creep up just a little bit. we‘re not going to get mild weather, but the weather is going to turn a little bit less cold. around this area of high pressure, winds spinning around and there is a bit of warmth stuck in the middle of this high. the warmth is toppling over the high
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and moving towards the uk. so we will see a gradual rise by around three or four celsius. you will probably notice that as we go through the weekend. then it looks as if the cold weather could be back again later in the week. hello, you are watching afternoon live, i‘m ben brown. today at four... britain is prepared to pay more to settle its brexit bill — up to 50 billion euros, according to reports. the foreign secretary says now let‘s move on to trade talks. the offer that the prime minister is able to make at that council will be one that guarantees sufficient progress — i think that‘s what everybody round the table — all the 27 plus us — wants to achieve. lawyers for the man convicted of killing lin and megan russell say he didn‘t do it — claiming that serial killer, levi bellfield, confessed to the murders to a fellow inmate. reports that a bosnian war criminal has died after he claimed to drink poison, while appearing in court in the hague. president trump has retweeted inflammatory anti—muslim posts
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from a british far right group. coming up on afternoon live — all the sport. 0lly foster has battled a new development on the ben stokes saga? there has been commit yes. detectives at avon and somerset police have concluded their investigation and pass their file onto the crown prosecution service who will now decide whether or not the england all—rounder will be charged. thank you. and the weather with tomasz schafernaker, it is so called out there! yes, it is freezing in the studio. not really! it is going to be colder tonight, i will speak more about how cold it is going to get in about 30 minutes. thank you. also coming up — how to stop millions of tonnes of perfectly good food being needlessly thrown away... hello, and welcome to the programme.
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i am ben brown. what will be the final price of the brexit divorce bill? the haggling has gone on for months but now it‘s understood the government‘s offered a significant increase in what it‘s prepared to pay — between 40 and 50 billion euros, we understand. the hope is that a deal on this brexit bill will finally trigger crucial trade talks. eu leaders will meet soon to decide whether the uk has done enough — and offered enough — for those talks to start. 0ur political correspondent leila nathoo reports. she hopes she‘s on her way sealing to the divorce deal. she hopes she‘s on her way sealing the divorce deal. after rounds of meetings, more money now on the table to leave the eu. it‘s understood that could be up to 50 billion euros, paid over a number of years,
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to allow trade talks to begin. the government won‘t get into specific numbers but insists the uk will meet its financial obligations. the prime minister is going to go forward to the december european council with, i think, a very fair offer and what we want to see is progress towards the second phase of the negotiations, and that‘s really what i think everybody now wants to do. for now, the eu is refusing to confirm anything‘s already been agreed. do you welcome britain‘s decision to pay more, mr barnier? is it enough? we are still working. so what does the uk have to pay for? things we signed up to as eu members that haven‘t yet been delivered. these include investment projects in poorer regions, pensions for eu staff and guarantees of loans to countries like ukraine. now it appears some are prepared to think longer term. we have public spending pressures at home but if we say we have wads of
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money, loads of money, to give to the european union in terms of the brexit negotiations, i think the public will rightly be outraged by it. they will go bananas because they want their money spent at home. but others appear prepared to take a longer view... as we leave, if you compare the two together over a 40 year period, even on the net terms, that would amount to about £360 billion saving to the uk exchequer as we leave because we won‘t make contributions after that two—year period. getting money back from the eu was one of the main pitches of the leave campaign. now remainers claim voters were mis—sold. they never said there was going to be this big bill to pay and, secondly, we are not seeing the central pledge that they made in that campaign to win it, to persuade your viewers who voted leave to vote leave, it is not being delivered on.
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the divorce bill is just one of three areas on which brussels wants to see sufficient progress before allowing talks to begin on a future trading relationship. eu leaders will meet in a fortnight to formally decide whether britain has offered enough. money may no longer be the sticking point, the focus now is on the irish border. they‘re inching towards a breakthrough but there‘s still a long way to go before the shape of britain‘s departure becomes clear. leila nathoo, bbc news, westminster. we are going to talk to vicki young ina we are going to talk to vicki young in a moment but some breaking news. first of all, on president trump, who has been using his twitter account, as we mentioned in the headlines there, to share inflammatory videos which were first posted online by the deputy leader of the far right group britain first. footage purporting to show
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muslims committing acts of violence. we have had a response from downing street. the prime minister‘s official spokesman saying that it is wrong for the president to have done this but as far as they plan for a state visit goes for a visit from donald trump, there are no changes, the us is one of our closest allies, and invitation was extended and accepted. there will be more details in due course but downing street saying simply and boldly that it is wrong for the president to have done this. that may ruffle a few feathers in the white house. let‘s go to our chief political correspondent vicki young. we will talk about brexit in a moment but would that be seen as a slapped down by downing street to president trump? i think they were left with no option but to say this. the story broke during prime minister‘s questions and after that the official spokesman was asked to
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comment several times on those tweets by the president and he said to be fair that he had not see them, he will go away and come back to them, he has clearly looked at them and firmly said that the president was wrong to have done this. theresa may is on a trip abroad and i‘m sure that she will be irritated as she will be asked this question. in the past she has been criticised for not being more critical of the president when he says things that the reaction here in parliament has been outrage, particularly from labour mps, as soon as prime minister‘s questions finished, they stood up to say that they needed a statement on this, they needed condemnation. for them, this is personal. the murder ofjo cox, the labour mp, before she was murdered the person who committed it shouted "britain first". this is particularly poignant, downing street clearly think that they need to condemn this. diplomatically it could cause problems but on the other hand there
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are many people outraged by what he has done and they have been left with no choice. the idea of a state visit by president trump, it has been shrouded in controversy but downing street with no news. they have repeated this was for a few months now. it‘s coming up to a year ago now, that any firm plans have not been forthcoming. there are some, of course, who have threatened protests. and many think that the president would not want to come here in those circumstances, if there are people lining the streets, not to cheer him but to do the opposite. it is clearly fraught with difficulties and there are some who think that theresa may was far too quick to extend that invitation when she did so earlier in the year. 0k, vicki, let‘s talk about brexit. it
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looks like britain is prepared to pay a bill that could be up to 40 or 50 billion euros, according to reports. what is the response, the tick you look from brexiteers? i think that boris johnson tick you look from brexiteers? i think that borisjohnson said that they could go and whistle?” think that borisjohnson said that they could go and whistle? i think he has changed his tune, saying this is money that they owe to the eu. theresa may initially said that britain would be prepared to pay 20 billion euros, that is what they we re billion euros, that is what they were due to owe at the end of this budget cycle but the uk is prepared to extend that and they are talking about paying their dues. downing street say that this is all speculation and they will not talk about a figure but many mps are talking about a figure. some on the brexit side of the argument so that they do not legally owe a single penny, they shouldn‘t handover anything but someone said to me that this is a pinprick compared to what
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they have paid into the eu coffers over the years. to discuss this more iamjoined by over the years. to discuss this more i am joined by antoinette sandbach, on the remain side of the argument. what do you make of what is still speculation that the british commencing they had to pay their dues? it is not something that the leivas said during the campaign that britain should accept their responsibilities and as the prime minister has made clear, nothing is agreed until everything is agreed, and if this helps move us forward into the trade aspects of the negotiations, it is a good step. into the trade aspects of the negotiations, it is a good stepm this money we owe to the eu or is it literally goodwill to get onto the next step? are not party to those discussions, and we should leave it to negotiators, but what is clear is that we should try and build a close
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and positive relationship with europe. it also shows what a good deal our current relationship with europe is. and do your constituents and other people around the country, would they wonder why we pay any money at all, given that we are leaving? i think it was made clear by the remain campaign that there will be a cost and that was put at £4000 per family. this reflects that it is slightly less than that but there was always going to be a cost to leaving the eu. the country has voted by a narrow margin to leave, and my constituents are very divided, as are many in this country, my constituency was roughly 50-50 country, my constituency was roughly 50—50 remain and leave, and i think there will be concerned, unless they can see what the outcome is. that is really what we need to know. what is the future relationship and what is the future relationship and what is the future relationship and what is the future deal? and met some back,
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thank you very much indeed. this will sound like a huge amount of money but some will say given that we do give £10 million a year to the european union, over a we do give £10 million a year to the european union, overa number of yea rs, european union, overa number of years, it doesn‘t add up to that much money but it is how the economy performs when we leave which will impact people‘s everyday pockets —— antoinette sandbach, thank you. vicki young, thank you. lawyers acting for michael stone — who was found guilty of murdering a mother and daughter in kent in 1996 — have released details of an alleged confession to the crimes made by another suspect. lyn and megan russell were attacked with a hammer as they walked along a quiet country lane. stone‘s lawyers say the alleged confession, by the serial killer,
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levi bellfield, raises serious questions about their client‘s conviction. michael stone‘s legal team have given a press conference this afternoon with crucial details of what they say isa is a crucial development. we have now received evidence of a full confession by levi bellfield. he has admitted the russell murders. in the confession, bellfield describes how he came across lin russell and her two children, how he attacked them with a hammer and two children, how he attacked them with a hammerand he two children, how he attacked them with a hammer and he explains his motivation for the killing. the confession is detailed, and has a number of facts which are not in the public domain. we have now conducted a full review of the case papers, and have an independent witness who saw levi bellfield close to the scene of the murders at about the time that they were committed. and,
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importantly, we have identified forensic material from the scene of the murders which corroborates the confession made by levi bellfield. the russell murders, by levi bellfield, fits perfectly with his modus operandi. he is a man known to attack and murder women. his weapon of choice is a hammer. this material, including the detailed confession, is now before the criminal cases review commission. we are of the view that this evidence must, as a matter of urgency, be brought before the court of appeal. that was michael stone‘s solicitor. we can speak to our correspondent danjohnson, who attended a press conference by michael stone‘s legal team. these were terrible murders, a terrible crime but the suggestion from michael stone‘s legal team is that this has been a terrible
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miscarriage of justice, that this has been a terrible miscarriage ofjustice, that their client has been in a prison cell for 20 years for a crime that he did not commit? indeed, yes. michael stone, his family and legal team have said all along that he was not responsible for the murder of lin and megan russell, and the attack that leftjosie russell and megan russell, and the attack that left josie russell injured and megan russell, and the attack that leftjosie russell injured but she survived. they come out with a staggering revelation where they say they‘ve got a confession from another convicted murderer, levi bellfield. he is the man who is already serving a prison sentence, a life sentence, for the murder of milly dowler, marcia macdonald and amber lee diarra grunge. they say they have conviction for levi bellfield that he was responsible for the murder of lin russell and megan russell in 1996 in kent. they say that is corroborated by forensic evidence and details by levi bellfield could give in prison which only would have been known by
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someone involved or close to the police investigation. they say they wa nt police investigation. they say they want the case to go to the court of appeal and to be looked at. michael stone has been to the court of appeal before, he was convicted a second time through a second free trial and in the meantime in the yea rs trial and in the meantime in the years that have passed he has tried to appeal twice and that has been refused. this case has been reviewed over and over again, michael stone is still in prison but his team think they have a major breakthrough with this claim of a confession. levi bellfield, responding to this, has denied making a confession and says he didn‘t commit the murder. kent police, investigating the crime originally, says michael stone‘s denials have been rejected in court a number of times. dan johnson, thank you very much indeed. north korea says it has successfully tested its "most powerful" ballistic missile to date. the hwasong—15 missile is believed to be capable of hitting most of the mainland united states.
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president trump has called china‘s president xi — calling on him to exert pressure on north korea. we have heard in a tweet from donald trump that additional major sanctions will be imposed on north korea as a result of this latest test—firing of that missile. paul adams reports from seoul. the face and the voice of north korean defiance. announcer ri chun—hee with news of pyongyang‘s latest and boldest missile test. kim jong un, photographed giving the order. i approve this test launch, he writes. for the party and the country, courageously fire. this was the 23rd missile test this year, the first since mid—september. it took off in the early hours of the morning, north of the capital pyongyang. it flew for 53 minutes, landing in the sea 600 miles away. crucially, it flew higher than any previous missile — 2,800 miles up into space. experts say this means north korea now has missiles capable of hitting almost anywhere in america. after a pause in testing that lasted 75 days, this is a stark reminder of the determination of the north korean leader
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to pursue his nuclear and missile programme. today‘s statement from pyongyang that the programme poses no threat to anyone, provided the country‘s interests are not infringed, will come as little comfort. a missile was launched a little while ago from north korea. i will only tell you that we will take care of it. a fresh challenge for president trump and his administration. little doubt here that this represents something new. it went higher, frankly, than any previous shot they've taken. it's a research and development effort on their part, continuing to build ballistic missiles that could threaten everywhere in the world. korea‘s president moonjae—in on the phone to donald trump this morning. the test took his government by surprise. he called it a reckless provocation.
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south korea responded with a missile test of its own but warnings, threats and pressure appear to be having little effect. kimjong un says north korea now has its own nuclear force. a bold claim, but only partially true. he has the bombs and the missiles — putting one on top of the other and making it work, that‘s still some way off. pauladams, bbc news, seoul. joining me now from westminster isjohn everard, uk ambassador to north korea from 2006 to 2008 and former co—ordinator of the un security council‘s panel of experts on sanctions on north korea. are they saying that this is a breakthrough, the north koreans, do you see this test launch like that? not a breakthrough but a major step forward. as your correspondent was saying, they flew higher and further than any other missile they have tested. it is a big if but if they
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can mounta tested. it is a big if but if they can mount a nuclear warhead on this missile then yes, they could deliver a warhead to pretty much anywhere in the us. and that is the key question for the us, that when they see that capability on the horizon, that they will feel that they‘ve got to act? welcome me yes and the capability is on the horizon. i do not think that anybody really knows what president trump meant when he said that they would handle this. there is a rather more articulate statement from secretary rex tillerson who says that in the face of it, the us will ratchet up sanctions, including a possible introduction of boarding north korean ships. he said that he will call a meeting of the states of their united nations command, which includes the uk. i would imagine the telephones in london will be ringing soon. . . telephones in london will be ringing soon... do sanctions make a difference to the regime in pyongyang? they do if they are a
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threat to the popular existence of content, threat to the popular existence of co nte nt, to threat to the popular existence of content, to the economy, if it is greater than the actual threat. they have had some high—level meetings organised at short notice, there is panic in the air, working out what to do on the sanctions. yes, they are worried, but are they more worried about the sanctions or the united states? thank you so much for being with us, the ambassador to north korea between 2006—2008. croatian state tv is reporting that the convicted war criminal general slobodan praljak has died after taking poison at war crimes court in the hague. proceedings at the international criminal tribunalfor the former yugoslavia were suspended because the defendant drank something that he had said was poison. praljak consumed liquid from a small container, after his original twenty—year prison sentence was upheld. you may be seated. slobodan praljak is not a war criminal, i am rejecting the court‘s ruling. stop, please, please sit down.
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i have taken poison. we suspend, please, the curtains. high drama in the court in the hague. the former bbc balkans correspondent martin bell once gave evidence against praljak, and told me he remembers the general as something of a ‘theatrical character‘. i am not surprised at all. he was not only a senior croatian officer but in civilian life he had been a theatre director. i met him first in the croatian war. afterwards, i wondered whether one of these battles had been a bit stage—managed but then he was in charge
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of the bosnian croats on the day the wonderful mostar bridge was blown up on the 9th of november 19 93. five years ago i got a call from one of his lawyers, asking me to help him with an alibi. he said on that day i had been meeting with him in central bosnia, i check my notes and it was one day out so that would have been the end of the alibi. i‘m not surprised, he was always a man with a sense of drama and i‘m sure this was premeditated, clearly. what exactly did he do? talk us through his crimes. he is convicted of the ill—treatment of prisoners, muslim prisoners, in the war between muslims and croats which began in april 1993 and ended in 1994. he is charged with the command responsibility for blowing up the
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bridge and the ill—treatment of civilians when muslims were rounded up in the war in mostar, and herded in the hangars at the airport. president trump has used his twitter account to share inflammatory videos which were were posted online by the deputy leader of the far—right group, britain first. the footage purports to show muslims committing acts of violence. the president has been criticised on social media for spreading ‘hatred ,‘ ‘hatred,‘ a downing street spokesperson said it was ‘wrong‘ for the president to have retweeted the videos‘ but —— despite calls for his state visit to the uk to be cancelled —— there has been no
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change in the plans... 0ne labour mp chris bryant has even taken it one step further and said donald trump "should be arrested" if he comes to the uk for "inciting religious hatred" the first thing that should happen is they summoned the american ambassador and give him a dressing down. the american president is meddling in british politics in a dangerous way and the prime minister should make it clear that if donald trump comes to this country he will be arrested for inciting religious hatred and therefore he is better off not coming at all. 0ur correspondent richard lister has been looking at the tweets and reaction to them... even by his standards, it was an extraordinary thing to share with his 43 million followers. these three videos were posted from the account of the deputy leader of the far right group britain first. one of the videos says it is an islamist mob pushing a teenage boy off a roof and beating him to death. it turns out to two investigation by the press association, this video was taken
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2013 in alexandria, egypt, where several men were pushed off a roof and one man was executed for murder as a result of that. another retweeted video says it is a muslim destroying the statue of the virgin mary. it came from youtube more than four years ago, it was posted and said that is what happened but gave no context. it‘s impossible to say what that situation is. and the final video says it was a muslim migrant beating up a dutch boy. it was posted earlier this year, two young men were charged in relation to this that there was no mention of the religion of anyone involved reporting. it‘s unclear the circumstances in which these videos came about. certainly, it is completely unclear why the president would want to promote them. what has been the reaction to the fact he has retweeted this stuff? quite a furious and measured from the mayor of london, sadiq khan. he said britain first is a vile and
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hate filled organisation whose views should be condemned and not amplified. brendan cox, whose wife, jo cox, was murdered by a supporter of britain first, said that trump has legitimised the far right in his own country and now he is drawn to do it in hours. spreading hatred has consequences and the president should be ashamed of himself. david lammy, mpfor tottenham, says he is no ally or friend of ours, you are not welcome in my country or in my city. this will feed into the debate about his expected visit to the uk next year. now let‘s have a look at the weather prospects, it is so cold out there, tom xavi, is it going to get warmer? it is cold but by my standards, personally, it is not that cold! —— tomasz schafernaker. there is a bit of milderair tomasz schafernaker. there is a bit of milder air out tomasz schafernaker. there is a bit of milderairout in tomasz schafernaker. there is a bit of milder air out in the atlantic, if we look at this, this milder air will be stuck there for a few more days. but come the weekend it will
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be coming our way, it is a nice picture. we have a lot of weather watcher pictures. this is from stornoway, it‘s as cold as it is down south in stornoway, this is from hertfordshire. and this one is from hertfordshire. and this one is from greater london. this is how cold it is going to get across the countryside tonight, down to about -6 countryside tonight, down to about —6 or7 countryside tonight, down to about —6 or 7 degrees. we had —6 point something in the last week or two. we‘ve had temperatures this low already. let‘s have a look at the forecast for the here and now. some showers in eastern posts, some wintry. wintry showers in northern scotland, that is the sunset setting there. for the rest of the afternoon and into the evening, clear skies across the country. frost developing, temperatures dropping like a stone. this was the scene at 6pm, about1 like a stone. this was the scene at 6pm, about 1 degrees like a stone. this was the scene at 6pm, about1 degrees in inverness, is1 6pm, about1 degrees in inverness, is 1 degrees in glasgow. four in
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belfast. these are the little wintry in the north york moors. with temperatures falling quickly through the evening, some of those showers are moving further inland and by the early hours of tomorrow morning, if you live anywhere from the eastern parts of yorkshire through lincolnshire and down into east anglia committee could be waking up toa anglia committee could be waking up to a covering of snow. you wouldn‘t wa nt to to a covering of snow. you wouldn‘t want to be building a snowman but it will be wintry first thing! city centre temperatures of freezing tonight. it is cold, but we get colder than that! tomorrow is similar, a lots of sunshine around the heart of the country. some showers towards the south—west. wintry across the hills, in the east and temperatures of four degrees. there is some wind blowing in the east. temperatures are more like minus three. that is how it feels. 0n minus three. that is how it feels. on friday, still about single
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figures. four or 5 degrees and from saturday, that is when things will not really be warming up but becoming less cold. areas of high pressure, wind is blowing around like so. whatever is here, is turned around with high—pressure moving in our direction. these yellow colours, things will be warming up for some of us. through the weekend and rather than three, four or five, of us. through the weekend and rather than three, four orfive, we will be closer to ten by the time we get to sunday. getting a little warmer and a little milder, let‘s say. that‘s it. this is bbc news — our latest headlines:
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breaking news this afternoon. it has been confirmed that the bosnian war criminal, slobodan praljak, has died after drinking poison after he heard that his scr0untion for crimes against humanity had been upheld in the hague. we havejust had that confirmed by the court spotion man, slobodan praljak, who announced to the court that he had drunk poison after he heard that his 20 year sentence had been upheld and we‘re hearing from the court spokesman confirming that he was rushed to a nearby hospital where he died.
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that‘s just in. the uk has agreed to pay more to settle the brexit bill — up to 50 billion euros. the foreign secretary said it would pave the way to move forward to the next phase of negotiations. new evidence could link the serial killer levi bellfield to the murders of lin russell and her daughter megan. michael stone who was found guilty in 2001 has always disputed his conviction. president trump has shared tweets from the far—right group britain first, which show inflammatory anti—muslim videos. labour is calling on the government to condemn him. sport now on afternoon live with 0lly. there has been an update in the ben stoke investigation. there has been an update in the ben stokes investigation. good afternoon. detectives investigating the fight outside a
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bristol nightclub have passed their file on to the crown prosecution service and they will now decide whether or not to press charges. stokes is currently in new zealand, his england team—mates are in adelaide preparing for the second ashes test. let‘s get more on this from our sports correspondentjoe wilson. any indication at all as to how long this will take? it is in their hands, avon and somerset police made that clear. a decision could come by the end of the week or it could take weeks. it is almost two months, isn't it, from ben stokes being arrested in the early hours of 25th september. a couple of days after- the 1 from zfrom . ecb would from . ecb would notn. eci {mag
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we is ’- ,, , {mag we is é’éffiiifiif'ffis—é'fi'”"'""' {mag we is azjcé one at —7 gig}??? ; ., —— — ——— , charges about s baffles 131 a , ,, ,, g if the squad. .; i;i;;;;;:>s s, 7, e for siqqad. 2 over e to possibly play for canterbury over there and everybody is drawing their conclusion that he is getting ready tojump conclusion that he is getting ready to jump straight into the england tea m to jump straight into the england team should the call come and should he not be charged, of course, you mentioned that the ecb are likely to have their internal inquiry into his conduct on that night? there has been this other issue of the ecb's own code of conduct. i think even if the cps decided not to bring charges the cps decided not to bring charges the ecb will have to go through the motions or be seen or to take seriously their code of conduct and
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their own disciplinary inquiry. it could be that say stokes missed the first two ashes test matches then that could be seen as his punishment, but look, even if we get to that stage olly, there is the question of ben stokes' fitness. if he plays this weekend, we might get a clearer idea of whether he is fit to play cricket, but after this, there is the consideration of the disruption and the attention that ben stokes' potential recall into the england squad would create. the ecb have to balance that up along with everything else. as you said at the start there, is a step towards some kind of conclusion this this, but only a step. joe wilson, thank you very much indeed. staying with cricket and the 21, year old worcestershire all—rounder alex hepburn, has been charged with two counts of with rape. and director of cricket, steve rhodes has been put on leave by the club after failing to report the player‘s arrest
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in a timely fashion. he was charged earlier this month for the incident that happened in april worcestershire won the division 2 county championship last season. the former england manager sam allardyce is finalising his move to everton. he had one game in charge of his country before but helped crystal palace beat the drop last season. he will have a similarjob on his hands at everton. he had initially distanced himself with the role, with watford marco silva believed to be the clubs number one choice. caretaker boss david unsworth will remain in charge of the side for tonight‘s match against west ham. west bromwich albion have a new man in position, another former crystal palace man. alan pardew has signed a contract through to 2020 he has been out of a job since he was sacked at palace manager in december with allardyce taking over. he will be taking over from tony pulis who lost his job last week after a run of ten premier league games without a win.
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john hardie has been given a three—month suspension following a scottish rugby investigation into gross misconduct. it‘s believed the investigation centred around alleged cocaine use by the scotland and edinburgh forward. the ban means that hardie won‘t be available to play until mid—january. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. now on afternoon live, let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. peter levy is in hull and will tell me about the news of government plans to possibly to restore some rail routes in the region which were lost in the 19605 and 19705 and in a minute i‘ll be speaking to alex lovell in bristol about a meeting between relatives of two meningitis b victims
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and the health secretary in a bid to make vaccines more widely available on the nhs. but first to peter levy at bbc look north in hull. what is the government proposing? the transport secretary chris grayling is saying some lines, ben, which were axed in the 19605 by dr beeching and there were many of them, could, could be reopened if a 5trong them, could, could be reopened if a strong enough bu5ine55 them, could, could be reopened if a strong enough business case is put forward to show it would help an area, help its business, help also ea5e area, help its business, help also ease congestion, take less car5 off the road. now, at the time, back in the road. now, at the time, back in the mid—605, many routes, especially in rural areas were lost and many people, it has to be said, even to this day, are very unforgiving of the beeching cuts. today‘5 this day, are very unforgiving of the beeching cuts. today‘s news has given them fresh hope especially many in the rural areas. it would be
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popular. would there be demand for the routes? i mean, how busy would they be? campaigners have been fighting for literally 50 years to get one particular line open. it is the beverley to york line. the line was the beverley to york line. the line wa5 axed by zrap beeching. today‘5 news has given hope to campaigners. to go from beverley to york on the train would involve one, possibly two changes and can take up to two hours. tho5e campaigners, they have been doing this virtually since day one of the cuts say that at the time, even at the time, it was a marginal decision as to whether this particular line should have closed. beverley i5 particular line should have closed. beverley is a thriving town and campaigners say the line would not only be used, but it would help if you visualise it going from beverley up you visualise it going from beverley up to york it with would help the town5 up to york it with would help the towns and villages on the loon and
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there are many other examples of line5 all over the uk like this one, ina ruralarea, line5 all over the uk like this one, in a rural area, that people will have renewed hope about tonight, but we will have to see what happens in the future. we will, indeed. we will keep up—to—date with that, peter. thank you very much indeed. and we can now cross to alex lovell at bbc points west in bristol. and the two bristol familie5 meeting with the health secretary today regarding meningitis b. tell us more about that. this is something that's become close to our hearts actually. we have been following the families and the cases since they lost their teenage children to meningitis. the familie5 teenage children to meningitis. the families have been campaigning ever 5ince. so they have put their energy into raising awareness of the symptoms for all of us to be more aware of what to look out for and for the medical professionals as well as, of course. it‘s something a bacteria that needs identifying very quickly as i think most of us know. but there are also increasingly frustrated that the vaccine is not
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available to teenagers a5 frustrated that the vaccine is not available to teenagers as you say, ben, unless you pay for it and it‘s expensive. so, there are arguments that are going on about this and there is a working group looking at there is a working group looking at the viability of teenage vaccines, but the families feel that it is all ju5t but the families feel that it is all just really taking too long. they don‘t want other families to go through what they went through and to put it into prospective, at moment and since 2015, the nhs has only given the meningitis vaccine b to babie5, not teenagers. only given the meningitis vaccine b to babies, not teenagers. they met the health secretary. do we know what happened at the meeting? our health correspondent wa5 what happened at the meeting? our health correspondent was with them and the health secretary apologised to the two families for failings in the care of their children. they also received a promise from jeremy huntand also received a promise from jeremy hunt and that they are going to be pa rt hunt and that they are going to be part of a new working group that will look at helping professionals to pick up on the symptoms of this deadly disease and actually if anybody out there wants to know more
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about them, but they are trying to circulate them more, there is a website, meningitis now.org and you could get more information there. alex, there is a trial starting next year, is that right? yeah. it is a nationwide trial. it starts in march and it‘s going to look at whether the men b vaccine should be rolled out to teenagers. the family is happy about this. they want it to happen quickly. but it will look at how effective it can be at reducing the carriage of the bacteria and if targeting this age group will make the whole population immune. local cycle5 will be asked to take part and in bristol we will be at the centre at the of this. speaking to one of those from the university of bristol who is at the helm of it, if you want to see it and you are not in our region of bbc points west, you can watch it again on the iplayer. alex levell and peter levy, thank you.
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if you want to see more on those stories, you can access them via the bbc iplayer. we go nationwide pefr weekday afternoon at 4. 307pm on afternoon live. —— 4.30pm on afternoon live. two of the country‘s largest train operator5 could be broken up as part of a new rail strategy to improve services. the plans could also see railway line5 closed in the 19605 — reopened if they can help to boost the economy. but labour have criticised the ideas a5 a "flimsy re—announcement". here‘s our transport correspondent richard we5tcott. newsreel: the beeching report has been published. 5,000 miles of railway and over 2,000 stations are to be closed. more than 50 years on, people 5till talk about the beeching cuts. thousands of miles of rail line were closed down. now the government says it might open some other game.
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now the government says it might open up some again. i come from the north where a lot of the smaller stations were closed down in the 19605 and it has made it very difficult for people to get around. i think for people in villages there are a lot of places that not serviced well. i think it is a brilliant idea. i was delighted to hear that news. it worked here in the scottish borders, where a reopened beeching line has been far more popular than expected, but newlines cost hundreds of millions of pounds and even if they are approved, could be many years off. mini5ter5 also want to change who does what on our railways. right now, it‘s bitty and complex. private firm5 run the trains, the publicly owned network rail run5 the track and they‘re often bad at working together to fix problems. this is the east coast mainline. virgin train5 flying up and down between london and edinburgh. but this line has got one of the worst punctuality records in the country so now the government wants to change who is in charge of fixing up and renewing
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all the track amber signals. all the track annd the signals. mini5ter5 plan to set up a public—private partnership on the line. the idea is that we‘ve one person in charge. we‘ve got one brand, we‘ve got a pooling of resources so that the leadership team of the new east coast partnership is responsible for the routine maintenance of the tracks, for planning repair5, for running the trains. so, a bigger role for private companies, plans to reopen mothballed lines, but labour aren‘t convinced. how likely is that this will happen when you have a government that has a record of downgrading, delays and cancellations? they should follow through on the commitments made in 2010, 2012, 2015 and 2017. the government is also talking about breaking up two of the biggest rail franchises, govia thame5link, which includes strike riddled southern train5, and great western, where intercity services between south wales, the south—west and london might
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eventually be run by a different company to local services in devon and cornwall. the government says it will all mean better services. opponents doubt it will work. pa55enger5 just want their trains to run on time. every year millions of tonnes of perfectly good food are being needlessly thrown away. well, now manufacturers and retailers are being urged to make labelling on products clearer to stop the waste. the food charity wrap says a third of the uk‘5 two million tonnes of food waste is thrown away every year simply because of confusion over date labels. here‘s our environment analyst, roger harrabin. because it is not used in time, according to the waste body wrap.
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about a third of waste food happens because people are confused by food labels, it says. we asked 5hopper5 if labels are clear enough. if you are a day passed something, do you throw it away? not normally. you‘ve usually got a few days, haven‘t you? roughly, if it looks all right, you will eat it? yeah, of course, yeah. and if it smells all right, of course. i've had toast with a bit of green on and, like, threw up but you live and learn, don't you? i'm a student and as long as it is food i will pretty much eat it, to be fair. so, what to do? well, fruit is what we most often throw away. mostly, we should keep it in the fridge, wrap says. it wants to see this little fridge label on things that would keep longer chilled. the idea as well is that when you pick it up with the new guidance that is being recommended, if it should go in the fridge it will have a nice clear picture of a fridge on it. and food firms should put clear labels on all produce so people know wrap‘s answers to questions like these. how cold should i keep my fridge? you should keep your fridge at five
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celsius or below or food spoils. should i keep potatoes in the fridge? no, it turns the starch into sugar and makes them gritty. what about pineapples in the fridge? yes, if it is cut and no if it is whole. that is a trick question. and here is a trick question that divides the nation. bread — in the fridge or out of the fridge? wrap says the fridge actually helps keep bread fresh. it stops it going mouldy. but also, it makes bread taste stale more quickly. so it is your choice. and what about milk? it‘s something people throw away too quickly, according to wrap. remember that you can freeze right up to the use by date, so even if you‘ve got an open pack, and we do in our own home, label up, put it straight in the freezer and then you can use at another time. getting to know our food better will leave cash in our wallets. it will also help prevent farmers expanding into rainforest areas to grow more food and also reduce greenhouse gases.
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that‘s a big result for a little label. in a moment the business news with rachel. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. bosnian war criminal, general slobodan praljak, has died — after drinking a liquid, claimed to be poison, in court at the hague. the uk is understood to have offered between 40 and 50 billion euros to settle its divorce bill with the european union. lawyers for the man convicted of killing lin and megan russell say he didn‘t do it, claiming that serial killer, levi bellfield has confessed to the murders to a fellow inmate. the government has announced an overhaul of the uk rail network — saying it could reopen lines closed in the 19605. it‘s also considering splitting up
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two of the country‘s largest train operators. it may ask local companies to run the track as well as train services in a bid to cut delays and overcrowding. construction workers from the eu should be granted "settled status" in the uk after brexit, according to the industry trade body. the construction sector, which employs around three million people, has warned it faces severe skills shortages with not enough "home grown talent" to meet demand. uber has revealed that 2.7 million british riders and drivers were affected by a 2016 data breach that it covered up for more than a year. the stolen information includes names, e—mail addresses and phone numbers and — for drivers — licence numbers. what is going on at the london stock exchange — their chief executive has stepped down — some are saying he‘s been forced out? we are talking about xavier rolet.
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he is the boss of the long stock exchange. in october he announced he would step down. 0ne exchange. in october he announced he would step down. one of the biggest shareholders started to claim that they felt he was being pushed out. yesterday, the governor of the bank of england, mark carney stepped in and told them to sort it out and this morning it was announced that he is going to step down with immediate effect. however, he has been put on gardening leave for 12 months and he is due to pick up bonuses, long—term incentives and salary worth more than £12 million. 0ne salary worth more than £12 million. one of the main stories is the brexit divorce bill. maybe the uk prepared to pay 40, 50 billion euros. what impact has that had on the markets? it had an impact on sterling. sterling has strengthened and when sterling is strong that tends to pull down the value of the ftse100. a number of companies earn their money abroad in dollars, euros and when they bring it back to the
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uk and convert into sterling, a stronger sterling reduces the value of those companies. 0ne stronger sterling reduces the value of those companies. one of the biggest fallers in the ftse was cineworld. they have confirmed today that they are in proper official talks to take over regal which is the second biggest cinema chain in the second biggest cinema chain in the us. that sounds like a logical tie—up, however their the us. that sounds like a logical tie—up, howevertheirshare the us. that sounds like a logical tie—up, however their share price has fallen by 18%. to find out why a logical tie—up is leading to a fall in investor confidence, we will speak to a senior analyst. let‘s talk to laith khalaf, senior analyst at hargreaves lansdown. it sounds like a good match. why have we seen such a fall on the markets? what you have got is a £1.5 billion company trying to swallow up something that's almost twice its size. that raises eyebrows anyway.
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on top of that, you have got existing shareholders who are being asked to put their hands in their pockets to fund the deal. this is an industry that's facing head winds from new media entrants like netflix and amazon. it might make sense for individual companies to kind of club together because there is strength in numbers, but individual investors in those companies may not want to expand into that sector. so, i mean, if you look at what happened in terms of share price movement today, shares in regal were up, but $2.5 shy of the $23 offer price that is on the table which suggests that the market isn't convinced the deal will go through and as you say, shares in cineworld tanking today, which suggests if the deal goes through, the market won't like it. events at the market won't like it. events at the london stock exchange sound like a soap opera. the chief executive stood down today with immediate
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effect. what‘s going on and what impression is it giving to the rest of the business world? it is not great. you're right. it is a mellow drama. this has been going on for months. since october when xavier rolet announced he would be stepping down. we expected at the end of next year at the end of 2018. things have been forced along by a big activist investor, a hedge fund, who owns 5% of the company which has basically agitated to have mr rolet remain and oust the chairman who it believed was trying to move mr rolet on against his wishes. we had mark carney wading it on the issue yesterday and the london stock exchange taking action today. mr rolet has gone. the chairman is not going to stand for re—election in 2019. it looks like the saga has claimed two scalps at the top of the organisation and the london stock exchange will be hoping that this draws an end to theage tation from
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the hedge fund and it can look forward to finding new leaders for its business. sterling had a good day, but when we look at the big picture, we had a missile launch in north korea and an 0pec meeting, that‘s coming up tomorrow. what is driving the strength of sterling? is it the idea that part of the brexit divorce bill may have been agreed?” think that's pretty much it, yes. we have seen that sterling is quite sensitive to what's going on in terms of the brexit negotiations. we haven't had any hard news as such. we've had rumours flying around that something is in the offing and this probably isn't a verdict on you are know whether it is a good or a bad deal. it is probablyjust a reaction to the fact that some progress is being made and i think you know if we are looking forward, you know, we can expect the currency to react like this, positively and negatively to what is going on in the
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negotiations over in brussels. thank you very much for your time. have you got a good head for heights? yes. this one is for you then! two french wingsuit flyers have completed an amazing stunt after a base jump from the top ofjungfrau mountain in switzerland. fred fugen and vince reffet managed to land in a moving plane in mid—air to celebrate the 20th anniversary of patrick de gayardon jumping from an aircraft into a moving plane. mr fugen and mr reffet had been training for months, it is real and they completed more than 100 test flights in spain. wingsuit flying — or wingsuiting — involves gliding through the air using a wingsuit which expands the material between the legs and arms. the pair described their stunt as "incredible" and "emotional" when they landed back on the ground.
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do not try that at home. it looks like something out of a james bond movie. that‘s it from your afternoon live team for today, next the bbc news at five with huw edwards. time for a look at the weather. here‘s tomasz schafernaker. it's it‘s chilly out there, but at least many of us have fine, crisp weather and this evening and overnight it‘s going to turn very cold in the countryside. we will have a look at that in a second. this is the satellite picture. not completely clear skies. there are little lumps of cloud. these are shower clouds. for most of us, it‘s rain, but there is a little bit of sleet and snow across the hills and maybe across the pennines and the north york moors, but for the majority of the country it‘s a clear evening. this is around 6pm today. you can see temperatures across scotland there barely above freezing and for most of us, it‘s around four celsius. four celsius for belfast and three celsius for manchester and gloucester and down to brighton,
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portsmouth, southampton and bournemouth all the way towards plymouth, temperatures will be also four celsius. soa celsius. so a really nippy one. tonight, the frost develops quite widely across the uk. not the eastern coast. but here we could have some snow showers across the hills. i wouldn‘t be surprised if there is a dusting first thing in the morning out in the countryside around east anglia. towns and cities around zero also, but in rural spots, it could be as low as minus six celsius. we have already had that so far this autumn. it could dip as low as minus seven celsius. so tomorrow starts off cold. lots of sunshine around. but again these eastern coasts, shower clouds coming through and newcastle, hull, probably getting rainfall, but again the north york moors could be getting sleet and snow showers. temperatures will be feeling as if they are below freezing because we‘ve got the wind coming off the north sea. then on friday, again another chilly
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day, but we starting to see the temperatures creep up just a little bit. we‘re not going to get mild weather, but the weather is going to turn a little bit less cold. i. a little bit less cold, i. this area of high pressure, around this area of high pressure, winds spinning around and there is a bit of warmth stuck in the middle of this high. you can see the warmth is toppling over the high and moving towards the uk. so we will see a gradual rise by around three or four celsius. you will probably notice that as we go through the weekend. then it looks as if the cold weather could be back again later in the week. today at 5, britain offers more money to unblock the brexit negotiations, reportedly as much as 50 billion euros. the final figure has yet to be formally confirmed, but ministers now suggest they want to give a "fair offer". the offer that the prime minister‘s able to make at that council will be one that guarantees sufficient progress. i think that is what everybody around the table, all the 27 plus us, really want to achieve.
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we‘ll have the latest on the brexit process, and the other obstacles still remaining, before talks can move on to talk about trade. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. donald trump shares inflammatory material on social media from a british far—right group. downing street says he was "wrong" to do so. a convicted bosnian war criminal has killed himself by drinking poison, after an international tribunal upheld his prison sentence.
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