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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 30, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello. this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. donald trump lashes out at theresa may in a row over anti—muslim videos. the prime minister criticised the us president for sharing a series of posts by the far—right group britain first. but last night, mr trump tweeted that she should instead be focussd on tackling terrorism. good morning. it's thursday 30 november. also this morning: a warning that children with special educational needs aren't getting the support they need once they hit 18. we'll hear from parents desperately concerned about what the future holds for their families. i once said many years to go —— yea rs i once said many years to go —— years ago to the social worker when i was small, if something happens to me, put in the grave with me and i
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still feel that way. a breakthrough in migraine prevention. doctors say a new treatment could significantly cut the number and severity of attacks. kelloggs will be cutting the sugar in some of its sweeter cereals, but not all of them. so later on, i'll be talking to company's boss about why they've taken this decision now. how about this? wayne rooney with a hat—trick capped with a wonder goal for everton in front of sam allott ayce who will be appointed manager later. —— allardyce. and matt has the weather. a bit of snow in scotland the andrews day. more details coming up. --4 andrews day. more details coming up. "4 st andrews day. good morning. first, our main story. president trump has told theresa may that she should pay more attention to tackling terrorism in the uk, rather than criticising him. the message was delivered in a tweet last night
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after downing street criticised the us president for sharing anti—muslim videos posted by a british far—right group on social media. the row has placed more pressure on the prime minister to cancel mr trump's state visit to the uk next year. our north america correspondent laura bicker has more. they may have held hands once but this so—called special relationship is now being tested by a series of presidential tweets. first, from the account of a far right anti—muslim group called britain first, donald trump retweeted three inflammatory videos to his 43 million followers. the first claimed incorrectly to show a muslim migrant attacking a man on crutches. when challenged, the white house said the videos might not be real but the threat was. both theresa may and a lot of other world leaders across this country, i mean, across the world, know that these are real threats that we have to talk about. i think europe has seen that a lot firsthand and something the president wants to continue to talk about and continue to make sure that we're dealing with. theresa may is on a tour of the middle east but her official
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spokesman said the president had been wrong to share the posts. it was that condemnation which prompted a twitter outburst from donald trump's account. he told theresa may not to focus on him but to focus on the destructive radical islamic terrorism taking place within big united kingdom. "we are doing just fine," he said. the president has caused diplomatic headaches for the uk several times already this year. from backing nigel farage as an ambassador to washington, to attacking the london mayor sadiq khan, all from his favourite social media platform. it may be a show of strength for his supporters but it may also weaken his position abroad. laura bicker, bbc news, washington. we will be talking shortly to alex
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forsyth who is travelling with theresa may. plans to get an extra one million disabled people into work will be published by the government today. probably a new banana. hannah is testing face recognition gadgets which could help at work. she lost her sight five years ago and is now registered blind. during that time, she found it hard to get a job. registered blind. during that time, she found it hard to get a jobli left uni with a first—class degree in law and its pink turned down the basic admen rolls and i had significant experience. some of them, i might not have got thejob a nyway them, i might not have got thejob anyway but sum it is clear from the questions they are asking, it was because of a disability. the employment gap between disabled and nondisabled people has not significantly changed for years despite a pledge back in 2015 to halve it. today the government has published a plan to see 1 million more disabled people in work over
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the next ten years. we are making progress. we have 600,000 more people in work than we did four yea rs people in work than we did four years ago but what we want to do is continue to work with employers to continue to work with employers to continue to work with employers to continue to exploit the opportunities of new technology and to keep testing and learning to find out what works, what are the things that can actually make a difference? so that more disabled people can fulfil their potential and get a good job. today's announcement also includes measures to allow access to personalised support for those with mental health issues and an increase ina mental health issues and an increase in a variety of healthcare professionals who are able to issue fitness to work notices but with employment rates for those with learning to do —— disabilities at around 6%, the process could be said to be too slow. we'll be talking to the work and pensions secretary david gauke about this just after 0800. investigations are underway following the death of a bosnian croat war criminal, who drank poison in court after he was convicted of crimes against humanity. just moments after united nationsjudges
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upheld his 20—year sentence at the international criminal tribunal in the hague, slobodan praljak said he rejected the verdict and drank what he said was poison. the 72—year old died in hospital and the un announced the courtroom was now "a crime scene". two clinical trials have shown a new approach to preventing migraine can reduce the number of attacks, and their severity. both trials used antibodies that shield the nervous system from the headaches. here's more from our health and science correspondent james gallagher. imogen smiths about it —— images started haddin migrans two years ago. she was having a tax every week and forced to take a year out of college. it was really scary certainly, when they happened, i didn't know what they were because i thought a migraine was just a headache so we had to keep looking into more serious things. one in seven people in the uk live with the agony of migraine. scientists have
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now developed new treatments which target a chemical in the nervous system which develop —— which stop a migraine developing. two trials published. 0ne, migraine developing. two trials published. one, 955 patients a monthly injection of antibodies. before the trial, they were having migraines eight days a month on average. around 50% of patients were able to cut their migraines and harp. for drug companies are developing similar treatments and scientists say a new therapy could give patients their life back. these treatments are the first migraine specific preventive is ever. for the most substantial neurological cause of disability on the planet. it has a huge advance for all of us. -- it is. imogen‘s migraines are under control and she is now studying to bea control and she is now studying to be a nurse but currently available drugs don't work for everyone and can cause side—effects. new options for people living with migraine are desperately needed. litter levels recorded on the uk's beaches this year are 10 per cent higher than they were a year ago,
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and 20 per cent of everything found came from food and drink rubbish. the marine conservation society is now calling on the government to put a levy on single—use items that are handed over over for free in their millions when we're eating and drinking out. this would mean taxing items such as straws, cups, lids, stirrers and cutlery. those are the main stories this morning. john isner adjusting its leaves. we got a golfer you? i love a good goal. it gets the thumbs up from the potential new everton manager, sam allardyce. his third to the hat—trick. that is the peak. i will show you. the sam allardyce era will begin at everton later and it got off to the perfect start with what wayne rooney scored the best goal of his career, rounded off a hattrick in a four nil
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win over west ham, in front of the man who will be named everton manager today. —— 4—0. 96 minutes on the clock, being held to a 1—all draw with southampton, raheem sterling scored this winning goal. as top of the table manchester city made it a club—record 12th—successive premier league win. fair to say he and his manager enjoyed it. after arriving in new zealand, ben stokes has signed to play domestic cricket for canterbury, but is unlikely to play in the ashes. a decision on whether to charge him following an incident outside a bristol nightclub isn't expected for several weeks with his case now in the hands of the crown prosecution service. chris froome says he's targetting victory in next year's giro d'italia to complete a hattrick of cycling's biggest events. he'd become only the third rider to win the giro,
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the vuelta d'espana and the tour de france. he keeps a sort of setting is girls andi he keeps a sort of setting is girls and i think that's the thing, he wa nts to and i think that's the thing, he wants to break new boundaries and where he to win, it would be historic achievement if he did when the giro d'italia. that is what is setting its sights on. just remarkable. superhuman. back to our main story this morning, donald trump has hit back at theresa may after she criticised him for sharing far—right videos on twitter. the us president told the prime minister that she should be focusing on what he called destructive radical islamic terrorism in the uk rather than on him. alex forsyth is with us now. good to see you, you are win the prime minister in jordan. any
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see you, you are win the prime minister injordan. any sense of how the prime minister is reacting to donald trump's reaction? there is some irony that this tour of the middle east that theresa may is undertaking is to build new global relationships and we have an argument brewing with the president of the united states. yesterday, downing street issued a bit to the president saying he was wrong to twea k president saying he was wrong to tweak what he did but we haven't heard from the prime minister. she is giving a speech here injordan to members of the cabinet and business community and during that they will be an opportunity to journalists to ask questions and you can bet what is going to come up and at this stage, it's inevitable she will have to address the situation directly particularly given donald trump's latest tweet and senior members of her party have had a lot to this —— to say about this. he was backed by the leader of the
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scottish conservatives, the labour party laterjeremy corbyn stating the government must condemn this. all eyes on theresa may to seek how will react. we will be catching up with you later in the programme. alex forsyth travelling with the prime minister in jordan. michaeljohns, a former speechwriter for president george hw bush, joins us now. thank you the time this morning, michael. if you could give your analysis of where this sort of argument sits right now.|j analysis of where this sort of argument sits right now. i think you start with an understanding that has appreciated in washington and london that the relationship between our countries is so vital and shared interests are so abundant that you don't want to see even an inch of space between us. what is u nfortu nate space between us. what is
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unfortunate is that what has entered the public domain could have been handled more privately but i understand the terms —— the concerns on both parts. spend a bit of time in united kingdom, i have, and i have engaged with a lot of people and the perception on the president was a little fast and loose on some fa cts , was a little fast and loose on some facts, maybe. the group is not recognised in the united states are not well respected in the uk. 0n the us perspective, what he's trying to across is really understanding that we are engaged in this global war on terror. it requires a real degree of commitment and alliance and no room for being light on it. immigration has been the means through which islamic terrorists have entered these countries predominantly, not
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exclusively. if we are not looking at immigration, there is a lot of concern that it is not taken seriously enough. we are not seriously enough. we are not seriously engaged in trying to walk when the war on terrorism. one of the problems you are of course and you will realise, the problems with some of the material that donald trump posted. not representing what he thought it represented. a lot of people like saying here that he should have known this material was potentially not what he thought it was even if he was choosing to re— tweet that kind of material. you should have known that it didn't have harassed city, on top of which we now have the language in which he is telling the prime minister, theresa may, our prime minister, don't focus on me, focus on islamic terrorism. we are doing just fine. it almost feels like a put down to
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the british prime. right, and i think it was a pretty direct response to that condemnation by number ten. i am sure it will be quickly and easily resolved. i am not at all concerned. i think the broader message is the important one. what the president, maybe i na rtfu lly, one. what the president, maybe inartfully, was trying to express at that time and what is hopefully a growing recognition after manchester, after westminster, after, you know, ithink manchester, after westminster, after, you know, i think over manchester, after westminster, after, you know, ithink over 100 civilian deaths from islamic terrorism in the uk, what a significant threat this is. but michael, can i just significant threat this is. but michael, can ijust put to you, in the wider sense, a lot of people... of course there is no argument about whether this is an important battle, over terrorism more generally. that is an established fact. but one of theissues is an established fact. but one of the issues for a lot of people here
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is that right at the core of trying to win some kind of battle over islamic terrorism, for example, is that you get your facts right. that you don't disseminate things incorrectly, because thatjust adds to the confusion, and possibly gives the wrong people the right kind of impetus. i mean, you talk about trying to get the big message right. well, that starts with a small message. so if president trump retweet things that are not true, that are linked to issues around religious hatred, that is really bad in terms of the bigger debate you are talking about. right, you know, i started my career in a sort of academic think—tank, in journalism, and one of the things that i preach when i make it a and one of the things that i preach when i make ita minor and one of the things that i preach when i make it a minor error on matters of fact, you are engaged in this on a daily basis, especially at an international level and at the white house, where nothing escapes scrutiny, you are going to make mistakes. we elected as president dick as he was not a product of that
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world. he is a product of corporate america —— we elected this president because he was not a product of that world. a year he spent basically rebelling against the conventions of modern politics. we believe the problems are so severe that these periodic misstatements, or minor issues that might occur as it relates to someone not following these traditional protocols, is a very small sacrifice to make in terms of what he is going to contribute to the broader defence and advancement of the united states, and i believe the west in general. thank you very much for your time this morning. very interesting hearing the respect of. —— hearing your perspective. here is matt with a look at this morning's weather. you said it is big coat time. mine
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has been out for ages. you're a big coat comes out in the first of september. very big coat day to day. the coldest day of the week, the last day of autumn. a light frost across the uk. temperatures close to if not freezing. minus six degrees in worcestershire. the risk of ice in parts of northern ireland, england and northern scotland, where some of you are waking up to a bit of st andrew's day snow. a slight coating in aberdeen city centre in the past day, and the snow flurries will continue. some snow in east yorkshire and north yorkshire. in the west, showers. 0n the far west, wales, devon and cornwall. some of those easing through the day. in between, for a vast majority of the country it will be dry but the showers in the east will push a bit further inland through the day. and it is eastern areas where the wind chill will be most noticeable. either timely to the afternoon, school pick—up in the evening rush
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hour, snow flurries across the north and east of scotland. in the wind, feeling more like —3 and minus four. a better afternoon in northern ireland, with some sunshine. should stay dry to the west of the pennines but east of the pennines the showers will become more abundant later on. rain on the coast, rain, sleet and snow inland, giving a coating on the hills. a few showers in east midlands, further west many will be dry. showers easing a little bit in eastern england and wales, shower starting to push offshore again. but the showers keep going in the eastern part of england during the night. the risk of some sleet and snow around, and there will be some ice. temperatures only just snow around, and there will be some ice. temperatures onlyjust above freezing for many as we go into tomorrow morning, but further west a cold night and for some, but italy across scotland, colder night than last night. where we have snow lying, we could see temperatures down around minus ten. so a cold start to friday morning again. the breeze becoming less abundant although showers continuing to feed into the far south—east corner of the country. some of those pretty
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heavy, with rain. crowding over a bit for scotland and northern ireland with some rain and that will eventually bring in some slightly less cold as we go into the weekend. the weekend ahead will bring less cold air, gradually, of the atlantic. the air coming from the west instead of the arctic. so through this weekend, a little less cold. it will be a slow progress process to get to that milder air, and some patchy rain around at times as well. more updates throughout the morning. it is cold. all this week, we have been looking at the issues facing families of children with special educational needs and disabilities. but what support is on offer when those children become adults? the education watchdog, 0fsted, has told breakfast there has been little progress in providing things like education, health, and care for young people once they get to 19, with parents often describing the system as a cliff edge. 0ur disability affairs correspondent nikki fox has been finding out more. did you have something to say? ruth
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loves being at this specialist college. what colour is this, ruth? but it has been tough getting to this point. her dad had to fight to get her and education, health and ca re get her and education, health and care plan. introduced three years ago as part of major reforms, they we re ago as part of major reforms, they were designed to help children and young people like roof, up to the age of 25. it took tribunal ‘s and around two years to get one. during that time, ruth missed a vital part in her course in speech and language therapy. she is 2a now, so she has only got one year left. hello. life with disabilities is a fight. the parents find it very hard. mum is extremely worried. i once said many years ago to the social worker, when she was small, if something happens to me, put her in the grave with me. and i still feel that way. because i
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do not actually feel that, in the past 15 years, we have actually made much of an improvement as far as services are concerned, for these vulnerable kids. after recent inspections, 0fsted has raised concerns about lack of help and resources for students once they reach the age of 19. report also says the transfer to ehc plans has had a negative impact on many young people's lives. wildlife expert chris packham wasn't diagnosed with asperger‘s until he was in his 40s. he has had a a successful career and he is convinced that access to education is key. the highly gifted and people at finding is we can't ignore them. they are worth the investment. everyone deserves a fair, proper education. that is what should be underlying the principle of our society, and at the moment they are not getting it. it is
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karaoke afternoon at this specialist training centre for people with learning disabilities. its aim is to get talented young people like ben hanson a diploma and a job. he is on a placement which he hopes will lead to paid work. so you are working at a hotel. yes. what are you doing at the hotel? do you have a dream? yes. what is your dream ? the hotel? do you have a dream? yes. what is your dream?” the hotel? do you have a dream? yes. what is your dream? i want to work ina posh what is your dream? i want to work in a posh hotel. you want to work in a posh hotel? yes. , with only around 6% of people with learning disabilities in employment, despite his energy and enthusiasm, the odds are against him. i think the whole thing is difficult. post—18, one father described it to me as jumping offa father described it to me as jumping off a cliff. there is no understanding that lifelong learning disability is there, that it is with you, and the education, health and
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ca re you, and the education, health and care plan, that finishes at 25. then what? is college fund? council say there isn't enough money or facilities to offer support up to the age of 25, but the government says it has recently put in an extra £45 says it has recently put in an extra £115 million to help families of young people with special educational needs. all ruth's pa rents educational needs. all ruth's pa re nts wa nt educational needs. all ruth's parents want is for her education to continue for as long as possible, to give her the best shot at living are fulfilled, happy life. 0ur disability correspondent nikki foxjoins us now. good morning. good morning. ruth, i mean, it is such an interesting story, looking at ruth and how her pa rents were story, looking at ruth and how her parents were concerned about the future. what does the future hold for her? the thing with ruth, it is unlikely she will get a job. her disability is profound and affects her speech and language. she needed that education setting for as long as possible. in the time she is spending there, she is improving her
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communication and that will then set herup fora safe communication and that will then set her up for a safe and happy life. she can express how she feels. ruth's parents have got a lot to worry about, because when she leaves that place, what is going to happen? you know, is she going to move back in with them? they are obviously getting a bit older. will she be able to live independently or in support of living? and they are typical of so many parents of children and young people who have got profound, complex disabilities, is that we all get stressed out, don't we? for the parents of kids with profound disabilities, it is constant, relentless, and doesn't let up. she is not going to move the university, move out. it is what is going to happen when i am no longer here, is the biggest concern for so many parents. it is stressful. we also met ben, we heard about his dreams of working in a posh hotel. what happens now? he is in a
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placement, not paid work party desperate lee wants to. the figures for people like ben in employment have been shockingly low for a long time. it is 6% at the moment and that has decreased overtime. so the chances of ben finding work, the odds are stacked against him. with an overall employment gap between nondisabled people and disabled people of around 30%, and that has not budged in around a decade. it has wavered, but it has not gone far from 30% and that means that 50% of disabled people are in work on compared to around 80% of nondisabled people. so for people like ben it is a constant struggle. and you sort rosa —— saw rosa monckton, she set up a charity to try and get them employment, but it is tough. and we have been talking about this all week, and we will
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talk more about it later in the programme. and you have been in touch with us all week. please keep doing so. if you would like to get in touch with us about your stories, e—mail bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk, or tweet us using the hashtag #bbcsend. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara 0rchard. there have been more than 180,000 complaints about rats and mice in the capital over the last five years, according to a new report. that is more than 100 per day. london assembly member susan hall began researching the problem after this video of scavenging rats in harrow went viral earlier this year. her report, rat land, found the number of complaints received by local authorities is on the rise. the mother of a nine—year—old boy with autism has put a sign up outside her home in reading asking neighbours not to phone the police if they hear her son having a meltdown. nine—year—old ryan can get very angry, before throwing things
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and swearing loudly. in one case, his meltdown was so bad a neighbour called the police. his mum, lisa, has spoken to neighbours and has put a sign up explaining ryan's condition and asking people not to contact the authorities. a mother and son from barnet have achieved the unusual feat of graduating from the same university, in the same subject, on the same day. samiya lerew and her son edwin studied politics at birkbeck, university of london. they credit each other with providing invaluable support, even if there were a few odd moments on campus. she would be at the front, and i would be at the back. that wouldn't be by accident. did i embarrass you, edwin? i strategically dodge the rest of the class as she might have been in. academically, he did better thanl been in. academically, he did better than i did, yes. it was hard, i couldn't have done it without her. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes this morning: 0n the 0verground, there is no service between surrey quays and clapham junction, with severe delays on other parts of the line, due
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to power supply problems. 0n the trains, on south—western railway, there is no service between reading and wokingham, following a broken rail. and part of the chelsea embankment remains closed westbound for major gas works. let's have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. feeling very chilly indeed today. in fact, this weather watcher picture sums it up very nicely. we've got temperatures widely below freezing as we start off the morning. now, there will be some sunshine around, and then it will tend to cloud over as we head into the afternoon. we've got a very chilly, bracing northerly winds, and that's going to make it feel much colder than the numbers would otherwise suggest. so some sunshine around to start with, then turning cloudier, particularly across eastern areas. we are looking at highs today of only three or four mac degrees celsius. but in reality, because of the wind chill, it's going to feel as if it is subzero for most of the day. and then as we
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head into the evening's rush—hour, the cloud amounts will increase. the wind is gradually turning more north—easterly, and that is going to blow in some showers, especially across part of essex, hertfordshire, and maybe part of kent as well. in some of the showers could increasingly be wintry and they will turn increasingly to rain as we head into tomorrow morning, the ice could bea into tomorrow morning, the ice could be a problem. another cold feeling day tomorrow, still without northerly breeze, but it will feel a little bit milder, and there will be some sunshine around. you'll notice the difference in temperature as we start to get the westerly wind over the course of the weekend. by the time you to sunday, we are up to 10 degrees. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it is back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello — this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. there's hope for migraine sufferers as tests show a new drug reduces attacks in some people by half
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and could be available on the nhs next year. we'll be speaking to former 0lympic swimming champion mark foster in his first broadcast interview since confirming he is gay. over 10 million people hear him sing every week but you'd be forgiven for not even knowing his name. we'll be talking to strictly singer tommy blaize before the end of the programme. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: president trump has told theresa may that she should pay more attention to tackling terrorism in the uk, rather than criticising him. (tx 00v) the message was delivered in a tweet last night —— the message was delivered in a tweet last night after downing street criticised the us president for sharing anti—muslim videos posted by a british far—right group on social media. the row has placed more pressure on the prime minister to cancel mr trump's state visit to the uk next year. the united states has called on the international community to sever ties with north korea — it follows the country's latest ballistic missile test. (tx 00v) north korean state media
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claimed that wednesday's missile —— north korean state media claimed that wednesday's missile launch was the most powerful in the country's history. at an emergency meeting of the un security council, washington's ambassador to the un, nikki haley warned of dire consequences if war were to break out on the korean peninsula. the dictator of north korea made a choice yesterday that brings the world closer to war, not farther from it. we have never sought war with north korea and still today, we do not seek it. if war does come, it will be because of continued acts of aggression like we witnessed yesterday and if war comes, make no mistake, the north korean regime will be utterly destroyed. the government is setting out plans to get a million more disabled people into work over the next 10 years. (00v) less than half of the uk's disabled population is currently —— less than half of the uk's disabled population is currently in work and last year only eight per cent of businesses employed a person with a disability. charities say progress from previous, similar schemes has
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been too slow. scientists say they have made an "incredibly important" advance in the prevention of migraine. the results of two clinical trials showed that injections of antibodies can be used to neutralise a chemical which is believed to trigger severe headaches. around half of patients reported a 50% reduction in the number of attacks they had each month. american airlines says it has suffered a computer glitch, which has allowed too many staff to take time off over christmas, leaving 15,000 flights without a pilot. earlier this year, ryanair was forced to cancel thousands of flights because of a similar mistake with the scheduling of leave. american airlines is offering staff extra money to tempt them back to work. those are the main stories this morning. it is 6:33am which means it is time the sport. an absolute cracker of a goalfrom is time the sport. an absolute cracker of a goal from wayne rooney. they have buried then deep thumbs. like, doublejointed they have buried then deep thumbs. like, double jointed thumbs.“ they have buried then deep thumbs. like, double jointed thumbs. is it the —— very bendy thumbs. you have
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very bendy thumbs. that is weird. i'm talking about a wayne rooney perla. oh, that thumb. tell us the story. he scored a great goal and sam alla rdyce is story. he scored a great goal and sam allardyce is very pleased about it. everton impressed their new manager but the night belonged to one man, wayne rooney scoring his first everton hat trick, his third, he says, one of the best goals he's ever scored. hard to disagree. especially when you're popping them in from the halfway line. that will give sam allardyce's team a great lift when he takes over. a great hat—trick, a great display from wayne. he is captain and captain for from wayne. he is captain and captainfora from wayne. he is captain and captain for a reason, from wayne. he is captain and captainfora reason, going from wayne. he is captain and captain for a reason, going from a top environment after a top spell, tonight, we spoke about the bad run
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having to come to an end, it doesn't last forever and being a real man does if you can stand up there and fight in times of trouble. from great goals to important ones, raheem sterling's 96th—minute winner against southampton extending manchester city's winning run. 1—1 going into stoppage time, he curled this effort into the top corner. and you might have thought he'd scored from the halfway line, wheelinga way ind elight. it's a club—record 12th—successive premier league win.. —— win. and pep guardiola was pleased. fourth—placed arsenal scored five against huddersfield — neat play for 0livier giroud to hammer home one of his two goals. and mo salah matched him, the premier league's leading goalscorer running on to this one as liverpool beat stoke 3—0. it's now 65 domes in in scotland, celtic managed to keep their 65 game unbeaten run in domestic fixtures going but onlyjust —
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a controversial scott sinclair penalty in the final minutes of the game rescued a point for the champions against motherwell. two months after ben stokes was arrested on suspicion of causing actual bodily harm, the police investigation has concluded and the file passed on to the crown prosecution service to decide if charges will be brought. well following their victory in the 1st test, australia batsman peter hanscombe says his side will continue to target the minds of england's batsmen on the pitch with their sledging. well, england bowlerjames anderson has his own message for the aussies something always enjoyed, excuse me. when someone is trying to get under my skin, butjust in cricket but in all walks of life, it makes me more determined to succeed 70 something from a personal point of view excites me and will drive me on to
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try and do the best i can with bat and ball. chris froome will target victory at may's giro d'italia where he'll attempt to seal a hat—trick of successive grand tour wins. the a—time tour de france winner won the vuelta a espana for the first time this year as well as le tour again and will attempt to become only the third rider in history to hold all three grand tour titles at the same time. in netball, england came from behind to beat malawi and complete a 3—0 series win. the roses were eight goals adrift after the first quarter in birmingham but came back to complete a 62—60 victory. england, who are ranked third in the world, are building up to the commonwealth games in australia next year. by by the looks of it, they are in good form as well. a big win for them. like the look of those goals. we will be showing it again later and again at 8:30 a.m.. will we be able to see your thumb later?|j again at 8:30 a.m.. will we be able to see your thumb later? i don't know what is weird about my thumb. when you did that with your thumb, we have the voices in our heads, the
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other voices in our heads, they all went, ooh! look. that is a straight thumb and cs is even straighter and yours is bent. you are double jointed. it's all right. idon't know if there is any advantages to that. there will be. thanks, john. litter levels recorded on the uk's beaches this year are 10% higher than they were a year ago, and 20% of everything found came from food and drink rubbish. so is it time to tax the worst offenders — coffee cups, plastic cutlery, and takeaway trays? that's what the marine conservation society is calling for today. lauren eyles is from the charity's beachwatch programme, and joins us now. first floor, gives a sense of the scale the problem. litter on uk beachesis scale the problem. litter on uk beaches is a massive problem. the
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levels increased by 10% from last year which is huge and it highlights that we urgently need something, and more charges or refunds to reduce all the levels in the uk. what do they look like? we are calling for a charge or a levy on items such as copy cups, lives, stirrers and straws. the kind of items that we use on the go when we are out and about doing everyday things. a levy, tax? we up -- we are calling for a levy on these items, similar to the plastic bag charge. at the checkout, at shops, to encourage people to really think about why they are buying them. do they really need that plastic bag, do they need that straw? it encourages that behaviour change that we really need to seek to reduce litter levels in the uk. it is one thing putting a levy or
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attacks but ultimately, the reason those things and about in the ocean in this case is because someone has dumped them. the responsibility for what people do with things, is that more important than the purchase of them in the first place? we were looking at those pictures, the plastic bottle. why is it in the ocean? somebody has just dumped it. that comes from a variety of different places. the public accou nts different places. the public accounts were over 60%. we all have accounts were over 60%. we all have a responsibility to stop it getting there in the first place. awareness is really increased across the uk over the last few years in terms of different campaigns and projects that are being run. but there needs to bea that are being run. but there needs to be a motivation to really stop people from using these items in the first place and we believe a levy would create that behaviour change as with plastic bags. why is there still this problem? as charlie said,
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thatis still this problem? as charlie said, that is what it comes down to. whatever you buy, there are people who will go to the beach and dump their stuff or throw it out of cars. why is that not changing significantly enough? it all boils down to awareness. that is the key to some of these issues. if we try and raise awareness, which, as i say, the issue of plastics has been massively raised, the profile of it in the last year i think we really need to really raise that awareness but like i said, really create that motivation and start placing more charges and refunds on these items. i was talking to someone this morning who said they stopped using plastic bags completely and 80% of the uk public have stopped buying plastic bags but they were saying it took a year to make that behaviour change. i am not quite following you. the plastic bags has been a
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success story in terms of the numbers that are going over the counter but i am sure on the beach is that we are seeing behind us, you are seeing plastic bags on the beaches because you are ending up with a hard core of people who are buying the bags in the first place but i still not behaving responsibly in relation to the stuff they do have. we have seen over a 2096 reduction in plastic bag figures on uk beaches. the items discovered? yes. there is a tangible link. that is why our data has showed that massive reduction we believe a levy is the right way to go on these other single use plastic items that arejust other single use plastic items that are just unnecessary. you other single use plastic items that arejust unnecessary. you don't other single use plastic items that are just unnecessary. you don't need to use them and if we place a levy on these items, we will hopefully see the reductions in those items like we did with the plastic bags. interesting in the attitudes. when we had plastic cutlery, my mum would wash it and use it again. wejust don't do that, we dispose of it. we
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have become a throwaway society and we wa nt have become a throwaway society and we want to see that change. had he got a number on takeaway packaging? what is the price you are putting on that? it will vary. there is not one rule that would fit everything. we would want to see a similar price, like the plastic bags. just a couple of pence to make people think about whether they really need that and to create that behaviour change and to stop those items being bought in the first place. using a reusable alternative which makes a huge difference to us and the amazing wildlife that we get the uk. thank you very much. lauren miles from the marine conservation society. if you did want to walk along the beach today, big coats are in order. definitely the case, especially in eastern coastal counties. pretty windy as well. a noticeable windchill. how is this for a scene
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in scarborough this morning? a good covering of snow here and scarborough is not alone. some parts of northern scotland, the outskirts of northern scotland, the outskirts of aberdeen. another coating as well to get st andrew's day up and running. down all the way into norfolk, a mixture of rain and sleet in land. devon, cornwall, to the west of wales. an ice risk. the showers becoming confined further west during the day and in between those two areas of showers, most will have a dry and bright day. take a look at what is happening three o'clock as we head towards the school run. lots of sunshine in the west and south—west of scotland. still snow flurries to the north and east of scotland. two degrees, the thermometer will feel more like —3, minus four. the showers move a bit further inland. you can see the drain of sleet or snow. a bit more
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cloud towards the south—east. lots of sunshine across western parts of england and wales. becoming confined out towards the far, far west as we go through this evening and into the night. snow showers in northern scotland. an ice riskier. even with temperatures around the freezing market is not above. with clear skies, widespread —— widespread frost. it could get as low as —10 through some parts of scotland. another cold start tomorrow. still a breezy start an icy wind across the eastern parts of england. showers becoming less abundant through the day. further rain showers through the far south—east corner. failure to scotland and northern ireland. still quite cold. patchy rain developing. something changing towards the north—west later. high pressure to the west of others. we are dragging the of the atlantic. an
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indication this weekend we will see something a little less cheery. it will take a while. saturday will still be cold. notice that temperatures, temperatures lifting up. and by sunday, after a spell of patchy rain and drizzle, clearing away from the south—east corner. some brighter skies on sunday. lots of cloud but nowhere near as cold. that is a positive. back to double digits. only a brief one, though! back to double digits. happy happy. you heard from nikki earlier that only a staggeringly small number, just 6%, of people who have a learning disability are in full—time paid work. so should employers be doing more? sean is taking a look for us. good morning. i have craig and made to have a chat with me. —— meg.
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nikki was saying, wasn't she, the employment rate for people living with a disability is around 50%. that could be anything from needing a wheelchair to conditions such as autism, whereas the rate is about 80% for those without, a gap of 30%. and that gap has hardly moved for years, in spite of government and business plans and proposals to get more people into work. we have talked about the issue on brea kfast we have talked about the issue on breakfast before. i've got a couple of people with me who will know more about what can help, craig and meg. craig, you represent a lot of small businesses, meg, you are from sodexo. we provide services to a range of organisations like schools, hospitals, and also corporate environments. and our services are things like catering, cleaning, grounds, facilities management, as well as reception services. so we will get onto a few of those in a moment. craig, when you hear that employment rate gap, 30%, why do you
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think it is so big? well, if you start off with small businesses, who i represent, we find that the route back to work for many people comes through small business. so about 30% of that group you mentioned, more than 50% of those are through small businesses. so what we actually need to do is see what is working and make that bigger. there are lots of things we can do. if you are a small business owner, you tend to run your business owner, you tend to run your business like a family unit. what we would love to see is people feeling confident enough and knowing what they are doing in order to employ more people. and that rate must come from somewhere. is it big business is not having enough of a focus and a within them for all the managers and all the recruiters within that this is to feel confident in recruiting everybody?” this is to feel confident in recruiting everybody? i think it is an interesting point. many large organisations like ours, where we employ 30,000 people, our local sites can still have that very
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family feel. so our experience is that while there is a large organisation which will have programmes in place and commitments to bring in people with disabilities, where that works well is when we have the commitment of the on—site teams who are really wanting to add to someone's quality—of—life i providing them with the opportunity to gain those employability skills. we know it is difficult for those people to gain them, especially early in their careers. yes, and that first step on the ladder of employment can be the ha rd est, the ladder of employment can be the hardest, especially when you are trying to send cv ‘s to many businesses. do you think as an employer that people who are looking at those tvs, if they see that someone on those living with a disability, compared to somebody else who isn't, but that may affect their way of thinking a little bit? there is lots of research showing that people really do have bias is against people with disabilities, andi against people with disabilities, and i think the key thing for organisations to do is to break down those barriers. so from a sodexo
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perspective, we do organisation wide campaigns featuring people with successful jobs in campaigns featuring people with successfuljobs in our campaigns featuring people with successful jobs in our organisation who perhaps have invisible disabilities, so people who have started as chefs or general managers and become much more senior within our organisation and had that successful career progression. and craig, just very briefly, we will speak to the government a little later, is there anything they can do to help small businesses? yes, one thought was a national insurers holiday, so someone has autism or other guests, i have seen some of the promotions you have done over the promotions you have done over the last few days where there are people with real talent, and we have to find those people and get them realjobs. 0ne to find those people and get them realjobs. one way is for a small business owner, that is the person we need to convince to do this kind of good work as soon as we have done that, that small business will do that, that small business will do that forever more. you mentioned
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your company, but i found another company who produced educational materials for autistic kids, and thatis materials for autistic kids, and that is from a mother who had an idea, created a business, created apprenticeships with autistic children. you can see it work. and if there was a financial incentive, that first year of employment, to look after someone with a disability, that would be a real plus. that is one thing to may be put to the government a little later in the programme. the northern ireland secretary has told breakfast that the government recognises that the final brexit deal will have to recognise the unique challenges posed by the irish border. the irish government and the eu have been pushing for northern ireland to remain inside the customs union and single market, even if the rest of the uk leaves. that is now the main sticking point stopping brexit negotiations from moving on to trade. chris buckler has been looking at the challenges. for many months now, politicians have been huddled in brexit negotiations. the uk and the eu both
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pushing their priorities. and what is decided on one of the key issues will have quite an impact here. the derry donegal vipers are an irish—american football team, and their players come from both northern ireland and the republic. our whole team is split almost down the middle, from either side of the border, which is great. a key question is, what will happen to that border after brexit? in the future, is it possible that people will have to negotiate their way through customs posts as they once did in the past? a hard border would make it difficult, because you pretty much have to go through customs checks to go to training a couple of times a week. they'll think you're suspicious carrying these big bags and helmets across. that is a journey many take on a daily basis. some are wondering what their
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morning commute will be like in the future. they're saying they do not want a hard border, but the detail of not having a hard border, it has never been clearly defined for me. she lives in county donegal, and every day crosses the border to go to ajob as a principal in londonderry. this is an old customs post right here. that was the place where you were stopped. her concerns about a hard border go beyond potential traffic delays. the community is quite seamless. a lot of talk about the economy, and the impact on the economy, much less the social fabric of the society of a border people, which we are.
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many cross the border regularly to go to school, even hospital. they said that the british government has been too late in recognising the true impact of brexiteer. they're not thinking about the consequences of brexit. the consequences for people who have become used, and have mortgages and people in college, based upon a livelihood which appreciates the fact that you can move across without tariffs. the biggest obstacle to ensuring there are no obstacles on the many border bridges and roads are to do with customs. the eu says it northern ireland was to stick to the same economic rules, the issue would be sold. the prime minister has been very clear in saying that, as we leave the european union, we leave the single market is and we leave the customs union. but we know there need to be specific outcomes, to meet the unique circumstances of northern ireland and the island of ireland
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as a whole. that sounds like a desire to deal. they want guarantees about the border. that means there will be more clashes to come. chris is in londonderry this morning, and we can talk to him now. i know you have been speaking to either side of the border. yes, i mean, the thing is, it isjust that question of uncertainty. i am standing on the peace bridge in derry, londonderry. even what you call the city is something that divides people. but the thing is the peace process, and we are standing on the peace bridge, has had a really clear impact on people's lives. there are two that have been brought together, and the border in the past, people talk about the security border, and that is what is foremost in their minds. whenever they had to be a security presence at that point where northern ireland met the republic of ireland. there is nobody suggesting that that is
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going to return, but there is a real issue about what will happen there. when people talk about a hard border, they mean protest potentially customs posts, that people might have to go through some kind of physical presence again, and people don't want that. they live their lives on either side of the border. they go to see friends, they do shopping, they do all sorts of things. so we will be travelling the entire length of the 300 mile border, talking to people all day. we will begin thatjourney right now, and a little later on breakfast i willjoin you from right but that order, and we will find out what people there think. 300 miles in a day. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara 0rchard. grant hill survivors whose immigration status is uncertain have until today to apply for an amnesty.
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the home office has suggested it would allow those people are temporary residents in the uk —— grenfell. there have been more than 180,000 complaints about rats and mice in the capital over the last five years, according to a new report. that is more than 100 per day. london assembly member susan hall began researching the problem after this video of scavenging rats in harrow went viral earlier this year. her report, rat land, found the number of complaints received by local authorities is on the rise. a mother and son from barnet have achieved the unusual feat of graduating from the same university, in the same subject, on the same day. samiya lerew and her son edwin studied politics at birkbeck, university of london. they credit each other with providing invaluable support, even if there were a few odd moments on campus. she'd be at the front, and i'd be at the back. that wouldn't be by accident.
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did i embarrass you, edwin? no. i strategically dodged the rest of the classes that she might have been in. academically, he did better than i did, yes. it was hard — i couldn't have done it without her. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes this morning: 0n the 0verground, there are severe delays across the line, and a part closure. the piccadilly line also has minor delays. 0n the trains. 0n south—western railway, there is no service between reading and wokingham, following a broken rail. and part of the chelsea embankment remains closed westbound for major gas works. let's have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. feeling very chilly indeed today. in fact, this weather watcher picture sums it up very nicely. we've got temperatures widely below freezing as we start off the morning. now, there will be some sunshine around, and then it will tend to cloud over as we head into the afternoon. we've got a very chilly, bracing northerly wind, and that's going to make it feel much colder than the numbers
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would otherwise suggest. so some sunshine around to start with, then turning cloudier, particularly across eastern areas. we're looking at highs today of only three or four degrees celsius. but in reality, because of the wind chill, it's going to feel as if it's sub—zero for most of the day. and then, as we head into the evening's rush—hour, the cloud amounts will increase. the wind is gradually turning more north—easterly, and that's going to help to blow down some more showers, especially across parts of essex, hertfordshire, and maybe part of kent, as well. and some of the showers could increasingly be wintry, however, they will turn increasingly to rain as we head into tomorrow morning, so ice could be a problem. another cold feeling day tomorrow, still with our northerly breeze, but it will feel a little bit milder, and there will be some sunshine around. you'll notice the difference in temperature as we start to get the westerly wind over the course of the weekend. by the time we get to sunday, we're up to 10 degrees. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it is back to charlie and naga. bye for now. this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. donald trump lashes out at theresa may in a row over anti—muslim videos. the prime minister criticised the us president for sharing a series of posts by the far—right group britain first. but last night, mr trump tweeted that she should instead be focussd good morning. it's thursday 30 november. also this morning: a warning that children with special educational needs aren't getting the support they need once they hit 18. we'll hear from parents desperately concerned about what the future holds for their families. i once said many years ago to the social worker when i was small, if something happens to me, put in the grave with me and i still feel that way.
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a breakthrough in migraine prevention. doctors say a new treatment could significantly cut the number and severity of attacks. good morning. kelloggs will be cutting the sugar in some of its sweeter cereals, but not all of them. so later on, i'll be talking to company's boss about why they've taken this decision now. good morning. in sport, how about this for impressing your new manager? wayne rooney with a hattrick and one of the best gfoals he's ever scored in front of sam allardyce who will be appointed everton manager later. —— goals. a breakfast exclusive, as the olympic swimmer mark foster gives his first tv interview since revealing that he is gay. we'll speak to him just after 7:30. and matt has the weather. all disturb a week out there today. the most of us, and bright. that bit of snow across parts of eastern england and scotland. i will tell you if it's going to affect more of you. see them. good morning.
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first, our main story. president trump has told theresa may that she should pay more attention to tackling terrorism in the uk, rather than criticising him. the message was delivered in a tweet last night after downing street criticised the us president for sharing anti—muslim videos posted by a british far—right group on social media. the row has placed more pressure on the prime minister to cancel mr trump's state visit to the uk next year. 0ur north america correspondent laura bicker has more. they may have held hands once but this so—called special relationship is now being tested by a series of presidential tweets. first, from the account of a far right anti—muslim group called britain first, donald trump retweeted three inflammatory videos to his 43 million followers. the first claimed incorrectly to show a muslim migrant attacking a man on crutches. when challenged, the white house said the videos might not be real but the threat was. both theresa may and a lot of other world leaders across this country, i mean, across the world, know that these are real threats that we have to talk about.
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i think europe has seen that a lot firsthand and something the president wants to continue to talk about and continue to make sure that we're dealing with. theresa may is on a tour of the middle east but her official spokesman said the president had been wrong to share the posts. it was that condemnation which prompted a twitter outburst from donald trump's account. he told theresa may not to focus on him but to focus on the destructive radical islamic terrorism taking place within the united kingdom. "we are doing just fine," he said. the president has caused diplomatic headaches for the uk several times already this year. from backing nigel farage as an ambassador to washington, to attacking the london mayor sadiq khan, all from his favourite social media platform. it may be a show of strength for his supporters but it may also weaken his position abroad. laura bicker, bbc news, washington. alex forsyth is travelling with the
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prime minister in jordan alex forsyth is travelling with the prime minister injordan this morning. there was a bluntness to it ina morning. there was a bluntness to it in a way. don't focus on me, theresa may. focus on islamic radical terrorism. we are doing just fine. what he is shearing so far? terrorism. we are doing just fine. what he is shearing so far7m terrorism. we are doing just fine. what he is shearing so far? it was a pretty blunt tweet. some would see thatis pretty blunt tweet. some would see that is pure criticism of theresa may and is a bit of iranian fact that while the prime minister is here doing a very short tour of the middle east to try and forge new partnerships and make friendships around the world, there is this argument with the president of the united states. we did that —— we did have that rebuke from downing street but we haven't heard directly from the prime minister. this morning, she is due to address the
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conference. there will be a 0&a she is due to address the conference. there will be a q&a from journalists. it seems inevitable she has to respond to the latest from donald trump and among senior figures in her party, there is condemnation of the president of the united states. he was backed by the leader of the scottish conservatives, the labour leader, jeremy kervin —— jeremy corbyn urging the government to condemn this. all eyes on theresa may to see how she is going to respond. the united states has called on the international community to sever ties with north korea — it follows the country's latest ballistic missile test. north korean state media claimed that wednesday's missile launch was the most powerful in the country's history. at an emergency meeting of the un security council, washington's ambassador to the un, nikki haley warned of dire consequences if war were to break out on the korean peninsula. the dictator of north korea made a choice yesterday that brings
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the world closer to war, not farther from it. we have never sought war with north korea and still today, we do not seek it. if war does come, it will be because of continued acts of aggression like we witnessed yesterday and if war comes, make no mistake, the north korean regime will be utterly destroyed. a 24—year—old british man, 0liver hall, has been killed clearing mines in raqqa. he is the seventh british man to be killed in syria for the kurdish— led group, the ypg. probably a yellow banana.
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trying out new technology... left edge, 5 feet away. a child consultant, hannah is testing face—recognition gadgets which could help her at work. she lost her sight five years ago and is now registered blind. during that time, she found it hard to get a job. i left uni with a first—class degree in law and i've been turned down from kind of basic admin roles when i had quite significant experience and that sort of thing. some of them, i might not have got the job anyway. some of them, it was quite clear from the questions they are asking, it was because of my disability. the employment gap between disabled and non—disabled people hasn't significantly changed for some years despite a pledge back in 2015 to halve it. today, the government has published a plan that aims to see 1 million more disabled people in work over the next 10 years. we are making progress. we've got 600,000 more disabled people in work than we did
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four years ago. what we want to do is continue to work with employers, to continue to exploit the opportunities of new technology and to keep testing and learning to find out what works, what are the things that actually can make a difference so that more disabled people can fulfil their potential and get a good job. today's announcement also includes measures to provide access to personalised support for those with mental health issues and an increase in the variety of healthcare professionals who are able to issue fitness—to—work notices but with employment rates for people with learning disabilities at around 6%, charities are warning the progreess is too slow. nikki fox, bbc news. we'll be talking to the work and pensions secretary david gauke about this just after 8:00. investigations are under way following the death of a bosnian croat war criminal, who drank poison in court after he was convicted of crimes against humanity. just moments after united nationsjudges upheld his 20—year sentence at the international criminal tribunal in the hague, slobodan praljak said he rejected
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the verdict and drank what he said was poison. the 72—year old died in hospital and the un announced the courtroom was now "a crime scene". a watchdog has found that police helicopters take so long to reach crime scenes that more than 110 per cent of incidents are over before they arrive. in its first independent study of police air support, her majesty's inpectorate of constabulary said helicopters and bases were providing sub—standard responses to ongoing incidents. inspectors have called for the service in england and wales to be urgently reformed or replaced. litter on beaches rose by 10% this year, with a fifth of the rubbish made up of on—the—go food and drinks items such as cups, foil wrappers and bottles. the marine conservation society is now calling on the government to put a levy on single—use items handed over for free like plastic cutlery, straws and sandwich packaging. to really stop people from using
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these items in the first place and we believe a levy would create that behaviour change as it has done with a plastic bag charge. american airlines says it has suffered a computer glitch, which has allowed too many staff to take time off over christmas, leaving 15,000 flights without a pilot. earlier this year, ryanair was forced to cancel thousands of flights because of a similar mistake with the scheduling of leave. american airlines is offering staff extra money to tempt them back to work. matt is going to have the weather for some few minutes and john will have the sport later. it's being described as a huge deal by scientists — a breakthrough in migraine treatment which appears to have reduced the number and severity of attacks in some people by half. so just how significant are these findings, and when might we see treatment available on the nhs? we're joined now by sally cleary, who suffers from severe migraines,
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and by dr fayyaz ahmed, a consultant neurologist. let's start with you. celek, tells what you suffer with.” let's start with you. celek, tells what you suffer with. i was diagnosed nine years ago with the birth of my third child in a woke up one morning, my daughter was five weeks old and i thought i had a stroke. i was slurring my words, i was confused and after a few days of investigation, by a process of elimination, i had a form of migraine, very unusual and it has quite interesting symptoms and i don't get headaches with it. because it hasn't been diagnosed until then what happens when you have one of these? i have quite profound
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physical symptoms. these? i have quite profound physicalsymptoms. confusion, dizziness, problems with logical reasoning, thinking of the next step. i slur my words. i can't find words, sometimes can't even speak. i have problems following what people are saying is. and i have one sided numbness and weakness. it looks a little bit like i have had a soap ——a stroke. i do have quite a fine —— profound aura. it gives these sort of different symptoms. that is a very graphic description of what it is like living with the condition. it is suggested the new trials could reduce the number and severity of migraine attacks. dr fayyaz ahmed, tells a bit more. the new drugs that are currently going to be marketed only —— in the next year or so, the first ever drug that
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has been developed for migraine. currently, what drugs we use our fourth depression, epilepsy. and they also work for migraine. it's a bold claim. does it work. ——? they also work for migraine. it's a bold claim. does it work. --? the data suggests it works similar to other drugs but the beauty of these is they have little to know side—effects. secondly, the patient will administer the drug themselves, given as an infection like an insulin injection. they do it without going to the hospital and it produced the hospital costs. it depends on how it is marketed. the best thing about the drug is that it will work for migraine and it is a ninth —— an anti— migraine drug, not antihypertensive or anti— epileptic.
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sally was explaining about a —— aura. can you explain? what we know, there is an area in the brain involved in migraine. what happens with the aura, you get similar symptoms, flashing light in front of your eyes. you develop numbness. and as if you are developing a stroke. it's very worrying for patients. sally, have you been offered any of this? i haven't but i have a brilliant neurologist. my condition is very well managed. i am on drugs and on botox for it. i don't have any caffeine, no painkillers, three litres of water. i avoid triggers. i've still got this condition comically even though the symptoms a much milder, but i still do have
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several attacks. and for a lot of other people, you say you are able to manage your condition using what you have presently but for people who have not yet reached the point you are at, this could be a real breakthrough. it could be. ithink at, this could be a real breakthrough. it could be. i think a migraine is misunderstood. i don't think people realise how many different symptoms you can have with a migraine. they are a bit dismissive and say you have a headache, then. a lot of people don't have a headache with migraines, and they have a myriad of other symptoms. it can be disabling and devastating, and it is really positive that this is on the horizon. thank you for sharing your story with us, and thank you for your time. here is matt with a look at this morning's weather. it is not all good news. it is snowy. it certainly is. if you are
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waking up in eastern parts of north yorkshire, east yorkshire, norfolk and northern scotland, we have seen for some of you similar to this one bridlington, that may cause problems on the roads for you this morning. most waking up clear and frosty this morning. temperatures at the moment across parts of the west midlands down to —5, —3 in north—west england as well and we have seen some showers overnight. not just as well and we have seen some showers overnight. notjust the snow but a bit of an ice risk around, so ta ke but a bit of an ice risk around, so take it a bit gingerly on roads and pavements. taking a look at what is happening, those showers coming in on quite a cold and raw wind to north—west scotland. it is rain showers mainly to the far west of wales, the far west of devon, choral and northern ireland. a bit of brightness in between but there is an ice risk here. improving across these areas, deteriorating in eastern counties through the afternoon, the same for other parts of south—east scotland. most of scotla nd of south—east scotland. most of scotland will have a dry and bright day, lots of sunshine around. the
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temperatures two or three degrees, colder than that in the breeze. the same in northern ireland but the afternoon brighter than the morning. lots of dry weather around, some sunshine as well but east the pennines you will see the showers getting further and further westwards. there will be a mixture of rain, sleet, hailand westwards. there will be a mixture of rain, sleet, hail and snow. westwards. there will be a mixture of rain, sleet, hailand snow. 0ne or two wintry flurry is getting close to the south—east corner but clouding over here, feeling like —3 —4 clouding over here, feeling like —3 “i! in the wind. we still have showers in the far western fringes of cornwall at this stage. the showers keep going in eastern parts of england, south—east scotland again, witha of england, south—east scotland again, with a slight covering of snow. ice cover the main risk for some of you as we go into friday morning in the east. tomorrow morning in the east. tomorrow morning in the west, clearer conditions but very, very cold indeed. where you have snow lying in parts of rural scotland, —10 is not out of the question. so chilly start to friday morning. still some showers, some wintry showers at that in eastern england, but clearing up. icy wind easing for all but east
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anglia and the far south—east of england. much of england and wales having a dry and bright afternoon. cardiff scotland and northern ireland tomorrow. still feeling very cold out there but eventually outbreaks of rain pushing in from the north and the west and the sudden change in wind direction. this high—pressure means that instead of bringing winds from the arctic we are bringing them from the atlantic, and the weather warms up just a touch this weekend. it will bea just a touch this weekend. it will be a slow process, still feeling raw with not as much sunshine around. lots of cloud, patchy rain and drizzle in the west. already eight to 10 degrees in scotland and northern ireland and the milder air will be down towards the south by saturday after overnight drizzle has cleared. for many, much cloudier thanit cleared. for many, much cloudier than it was today, but temperatures on the up. that is how it is looking. all this week, we have been looking at the issues facing families of children with special educational needs and disabilities. but what support is on offer when those children become adults? the education watchdog, 0fsted, has told breakfast there has been little progress in providing things like education,
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health, and care for young people once they get to 19, with parents often describing the system as a cliff edge. 0ur disability affairs correspondent nikki fox has been finding out more. did you have something to say? ruth loves being at this specialist college. what colour is this, ruth? but it has been tough getting to this point. lovely, using your words... her dad had to fight to get her an education, health and care plan. introduced three years ago as part of major reforms, they were designed to help children and young people, like ruth, up to the age of 25. it took tribunals and around two years to get one. during that time, ruth missed a vital part in her course in speech and language therapy. she is 26 now, so she has only got one year left. hello. life with disabilities is a fight.
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the parents find it very hard. mum is extremely worried. i once said, many years ago to the social worker, when she was small, if something happens to me, put her in the grave with me. and i still feel that way, because i do not actually feel that, in the past 15 years, we've actually made much of an improvement, as far as services are concerned, for these vulnerable kids. after recent inspections, 0fsted has raised concerns about a lack of help and resources for students once they reach the age of 19. this report also says the transfer to ehc plans has had a negative impact on many young people's lives. wildlife expert chris packham wasn't diagnosed with asperger‘s until he was in his 40s. he has had a a successful career, and he is convinced that access to education is key. the highly gifted, and the people
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that find things difficult, we can't ignore them. they're worth the investment. everyone deserves a fair, proper education. that's what should be the underlying principle of our society, and at the moment, they're not getting it. it is karaoke afternoon at this specialist training centre for people with learning disabilities. its aim — to get talented young people like ben hanson a diploma and a job. he is on a placement which he hopes will lead to paid work. so you're working at a hotel. yes. what are you doing at the hotel? do you have a dream? yes. what is your dream ? yeah, my dream is a posh hotel. you want to work in a posh hotel? yes. but, with only around 6% of people with learning disabilities in employment, despite his energy and enthusiasm, the odds are against him.
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i think the whole thing is difficult. post—18, one father described it to me asjumping off a cliff. there's no understanding that lifelong learning disability is there, that it's with you for life. and the education, health and care plan — well, fine, but that finishes at 25. then what? is college fun? yes! councils say there isn't enough money or facilities to offer support up to the age of 25, but the government says it has recently put in an extra £115 million to help families of young people with special educational needs. all ruth's parents want is for her education to continue for as long as possible, to give her the best shot at living a fulfilled, happy life. 0ur disability correspondent nikki foxjoins us now. we saw ruth there, and the concern her parents have over what happens when she turns 25, what care will be
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provided. what does the future hold for ruth? well, i think if ruth's lovely parents for ruth? well, i think if ruth's lovely pa rents could for ruth? well, i think if ruth's lovely parents could do anything it would be to keep her in that specialist college for as long as possible. it was there, she is thriving, she is happy, she is learning to improve her communication skills, and that kind of stuff is really important for people with quite complex, profound disabilities, to improve communication so that they lead a happy and safe life in the future. at gilbert and geraldine represent a lot of parents of young children like ruth because it is an ongoing stress. gilbert said to us there, when i die, put her in the grave with me, what is going to happen? because really, when she leaves that place in a year's time, they will have to fight again. they fought for the education, health and care plan to get her there, she missed education but she is there now. she has one year left and they will have
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to fight to get her to somehow live independently in some kind of supported living, hopefully, if that is an option. but will she end up in a residential care setting? all these thoughts will be going through, and they are getting older now, you'll vote and geraldine, and they want her to be as happy as she can possibly be —— gilbert and geraldine. she needs to live as independently and happy as possible. you also introduced us to ben, whose dream, he says, well, one is to work, and the dream job, work in a posh hotel, was his phrase. what is his situation? how is it going to work out? here's on a placement at the moment. he is not getting paid, but that is what he wants to do. but the figures for people with learning disability like ben are shockingly low, at 6%, and that is a figure that has actually decreased overtime. so for someone like ben,
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the odds are really stacked against him, but he desperately wants to work. that is why rosa monckton, who you saw in our peace, has set up a centre to try and get people with disabilities in employment. there is an argument that people with disabilities are forgotten when it comes to the targets. because it is too difficult to deal with an easier too difficult to deal with an easier to ignore? some would argue it is quite easy. supported employment is a great option. for someone like ben, he would have somebody to get him started in work, somebody he could chat to if he has any problems, to take the pressure off the employer. some would argue it is an easy solution, but it costs money, and maybe that is why. people do definitely feel forgotten in that figure when we talk about getting people with disabilities into work. learning disabilities have their own problems. thank you very much, and
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we will be speaking to the work and pensions secretary later on this morning. and you have been getting in touch with us all week about this, it has really touched a nerve with our viewers. if you would like to get in touch with us about your stories, e—mail bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk, or tweet us using the hashtag #bbcsend. you are watching breakfast. still to come: for decades, christmas cards were as important to the festive season as turkey and presents. but when it is faster, and free, to send your greetings by social media, we will be asking if the tradition could finally be dying out. do you have your christmas card list ready? oh yes. i hope i am on it. i am not on your list? let's not go there... good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara 0rchard. grenfell survivors whose immigration status was uncertain have
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until today to register for a 12—month amnesty. the home office announced that it would allow undocumented residents who have been directly affected by the fire to be granted a temporary period of lawful residence. but there is concern that some are still reluctant to make themselves known to authorities, fearing they will be deported. there have been more than 180,000 complaints about rats and mice in the capital over the last five years, according to a new report. that is more than 100 per day. london assembly member susan hall began researching the problem after this video of scavenging rats in harrow went viral earlier this year. her report, rat land, found the number of complaints received by local authorities is on the rise. a mother and son from barnet have achieved the unusual feat of graduating from the same university, in the same subject, on the same day. samiya lerew and her son edwin studied politics at birkbeck, university of london. they credit each other with providing invaluable support, even if there were a few odd moments on campus. she'd be at the front, and i'd be at the back.
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that wouldn't be by accident. did i embarrass you, edwin? no, and i strategically dodged the rest of the classes that she might have been in. academically, he did better than i did, yes. it was hard — i couldn't have done it without her. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes this morning: 0n the 0verground, there are severe delays across the line and a part closure. the piccadilly line also has severe delays westbound. 0n the trains: southern trains via selhurst are running with some cancellations, and delays of 20 minutes, due to a local points failure. and on the roads: part of the chelsea embankment remains closed westbound for major gas works. let's have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini hello, good morning. feeling very chilly indeed today. in fact, this weather watcher picture sums it up very nicely. we've got temperatures widely below freezing as we start off the morning. now, there will be some sunshine around, and then it will tend to cloud over as we head
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into the afternoon. we've got a very chilly, bracing northerly wind, and that's going to make it feel much colder than the numbers would otherwise suggest. so some sunshine around to start with, then turning cloudier, particularly across eastern areas. we're looking at highs today of only three or four degrees celsius. but in reality, because of the wind chill, it's going to feel as if it's sub—zero for most of the day. and then, as we head into this evening's rush—hour, the cloud amounts will increase. the wind is gradually turning more north—easterly, and that's going to help to blow down some more showers, especially across parts of essex, hertfordshire, and maybe part of kent, as well. and some of the showers could increasingly be wintry, however. they will turn increasingly to rain as we head into tomorrow morning, so ice could be a problem. another cold feeling day tomorrow, still with our northerly breeze, but it will feel a little bit milder, and there will be some sunshine around. you'll notice the difference in temperature as we start to get the westerly wind over the course of the weekend. by the time we get to sunday, we're up to 10 degrees. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom
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in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it is back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello — this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, president trump has told theresa may that she should pay more attention to tackling terrorism in the uk, rather than criticising him. the message was delivered in a tweet last night after downing street criticised the us president for sharing anti—muslim videos posted by a british far—right group on social media. the row has placed more pressure on the prime minister to cancel mr trump's state visit to the uk next year. the united states has called on the international community to sever ties with north korea — it follows the country's latest ballistic missile test. north korean state media claimed that wednesday's missile launch was the most powerful
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in the country's history. at an emergency meeting of the un security council, washington's ambassador to the un, nikki haley warned of dire consequences if war were to break out on the korean peninsula. the dictator of north korea made a choice yesterday that brings the world closer to war, not farther from it. we have never sought war with north korea and still today, we do not seek it. if war does come, it will be because of continued acts of aggression like we witnessed yesterday and if war comes, make no mistake, the north korean regime will be utterly destroyed. the government is setting out plans to get a million more disabled people into work over the next 10 years. less than half of the uk's disabled population is currently in work and last year only eight per cent of businesses employed a person with a disability. charities say progress from previous, similar schemes has been too slow.
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scientists say they have made an "incredibly important" advance in the prevention of migraine. the results of two clinical trials published in the new england journal of medicine showed that injections of antibodies can be used to neutralise a chemical which is believed to trigger severe headaches. around half of patients reported a 50% reduction in the number of attacks they had each month. litter on beaches rose by 10% this year, with a fifth of the rubbish made up of on—the—go food and drinks items such as cups, foil wrappers and bottles. the marine conservation society is now calling on the government to put a levy on single—use items handed over for free like plastic cutlery, straws and sandwich packaging. coming up on the programme, matt will have the weather. first, goals. what are the best goals of the season. it got a thumbs up from sam
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alla rdyce, season. it got a thumbs up from sam allardyce, who will take over at everton. i'm surprised it didn't get more. everton impressed their new manager sam allardyce but the night belonged to one man, wayne rooney scoring his first everton hat trick, his third, he says, one of the best goals he's ever scored. and it's hard to disagree, when you're popping them in from the halfway line. and it gave departing interim manager david unsworth a big win. a great hat—trick, a great display from wayne. he is captain and captain for a reason, going from a top environment after a top spell, tonight, we spoke about the bad run having to come to an end, it doesn't last forever and being a real man does if you can stand up there and fight in times of trouble. from great goals to important ones, raheem sterling's 96th—minute winner against southampton extending manchester city's winning run.
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1—1 going into stoppage time, he curled this effort into the top corner. and you might have thought he'd scored from the halfway line, wheeling away in delight. it's a club—record 12th—successive premier league win.. —— win. and pep guardiola was pleased. fourth—placed arsenal scored five against huddersfield — neat play for 0livier giroud to hammer home one of his two goals. and mo salah matched him, the premier league's leading goalscorer running on to this one as liverpool beat stoke 3—0. it's now 65 domes in scotland — celtic managed to keep their 65 game unbeaten run in domestic fixtures going but onlyjust, a controversial scott sinclair penalty in the final minutes of the game rescued a point for the champions against motherwell. meanwhile rangers beat second placed aberdeen 3—nil at ibrox. james tavernier got on the scoresheet twice either side of a goalfrom carlos pena.
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after touching down in new zealand, ben stokes has signed on to play the canterbury but will probably not play to the ashes. relating to an incident outside a bristol nightclub, police have handed their file to the crown prosecution service. well following their victory in the 1st test, australia batsman peter hanscombe says his side will continue to target the minds of england's batsmen on the pitch with their sledging. well, england bowlerjames anderson has his own message for the aussies. something i've always enjoyed, excuse me. when someone is trying to get under my skin, notjust in cricket but in all walks of life, it makes me more determined to succeed so it is something from a personal point of view that excites me and will drive me on to try and do the best i can with bat and ball. chris froome will target victory at may's giro d'italia where he'll attempt to seal a hat—trick of successive grand tour wins. the a—time tour de france winner won the vuelta a espana for the first time this year
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as well as le tour again and will attempt to become only the third rider in history to hold all three grand tour titles at the same time. in netball, england came from behind to beat malawi and complete a 3—0 series win. the roses were eight goals adrift after the first quarter in birmingham but came back to complete a 62—60 victory. england, who are ranked third in the world, are building up to the commonwealth games in australia next year. by the looks of it, they are in good form as well. a big win for them. we will talk to mark foster in a moment. this week, he made a statement in relation to his sexuality and saying he is gay for the first time. such a big thing for sport, feeling comfortable in their own skin and performing better. the environment you work in, how comfortable are you? we known
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football, how many open gay footballers a re football, how many open gay footballers are playing in the premier league? do they feel comfortable coming out? is the environment as well. you as one of the most successful british swimmers of all time and we get to talk to him now from his home in hertfordshire. good morning. it is naga here, can you hear me? we were just talking about being comfortable in your own just talking about being comfortable in yourown skin just talking about being comfortable in your own skin and sports people being comfortable in their own skin timing with your decision this week to make public your sexuality. why did you do it? one of the reasons why i have got this moustache, it's not something on the regular, it is to do with movember, i am raising awareness and i realised over the last year, i had a big year, my dad died, i realised i hadn't spoken to
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him foran —— died, i realised i hadn't spoken to him for an —— an awful lot and other things in my personal life. i went to some counselling and reflected a bit and it's all about speaking, because a lot of people hold things in and with movember, there are 6000 men every year, men and women, 80% are men who take their own life and it's not all linked to being gay but at the same time people do struggle with things and 70, when i was on the block and competing, at home in my personal life, i was out to friends and family and close network and when i went to work, i never took it with me. potentially, and i know now looking back some of it is foggy. know now looking back some of it is foggy, there was a tiny bit of that which was potentially holding me back. you mean performance wise or personally? i think both. performance wise. it's like going to
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work with half of view. some level, i got good with dancing around the truth. what are you doing on the weekend? i'm just going to see friends and family. i never shared anything with my swimming colleagues. the only one i did confide in was by coach. if i was having a bad time, i had somebody to talk to. it was important to me to share with someone then. it took a long time until the age of 30. one of my first swimming team—mates. and when it came to being, some of my life is in the public, i got used to dancing around the edges and saying half—truths. dancing around the edges and saying half-truths. how important do you think it is for a sportsperson to reveal that side of their personal life? for the fans, reveal that side of their personal life? forthe fans, but reveal that side of their personal life? for the fans, but also the sport? i didn't think it'sjust
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sports people. it is people in general. this is not a question of, if you are gay, come out. everyone at the right time. i am 47 and i've been retired now fourth nine years after representing britain. it took mea after representing britain. it took me a long time to become comfortable with it in the outside world so to speak. i suppose the analogy is, it is strength in numbers, having role models. i went to an event last night and we shared an awful lot of stories, and similar stories about ourtime in stories, and similar stories about our time in sport. not being fully present. anyone would know if you are not fully present in whatever you are doing, part of your brain, the brain is a complex thing, it is a lwa ys the brain is a complex thing, it is always try to filter stop in the background, don't mention this or act ina background, don't mention this or act in a certain way but if you can be yourself, then you get more out
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of yourself. you spent a lot of time with colin jackson. of yourself. you spent a lot of time with colinjackson. 0ne of yourself. you spent a lot of time with colinjackson. one of the things that has come out in your recent interview is that you weren't open with each other about your sexuality. when you look back on that now... no. had he think that came about? we both got used to hiding away our personal lives. in fairness, what happened was, i used to train in bath and these to watch him work with the athletes. i suppose that to me was probably, i wa nted suppose that to me was probably, i wanted to be away from the swimmers soi wanted to be away from the swimmers so i did not have to share or see that much of me. friend of mine at that much of me. friend of mine at that time, ross baillie, died of anaphylactic shock. it was a horrendous experience. he can't have
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moved in with me for two years. we probably spent two weeks together at the same time. but we were very close friends. for me, he knew my partner, came to the house and knew my personal relationship. but i never spoke about it. i never wanted to dig into his personal life. i got used to not asking questions about other people. i did not want people asking questions at me. in sport, its masculinity, you think growing up its masculinity, you think growing up that to me, being gay for —— being gay was wrong. when i first fell in love with somebody, i learnt that love was wrong. that's not right. that came from generations of that's what i learnt as a child. i
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think the both of us, we never really shared our true selves because you are in fear of being vulnerable. i think in life, there is love and fear. you are either in love and happy or in fear of certain things. it's difficult to be vulnerable with other people. i'm thinking back on moments. he said perhaps the media skirted around the issue of your sexuality. i'm thinking back to when you are commentating with rebecca adlington. much of —— much was made of her squeezing your knee and speculation about your relationship. how did that make you feel? was that more pressure in terms of how much you could keep your life private? yeah, i suppose the me, in a good way, it was another way of trying to nudge me out, so to speak. i suppose if i didn't spend a lot of my life in the
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public eye, that would not have been a problem. isuppose public eye, that would not have been a problem. i suppose that was another example of people just assuming that i am straight or it was the paper trying to, i don't know, becky and mark having a thing, gossip and titillation. becky knows me and she knows my other half. we laughed it off and at the same time, it was quite shocking that that became a news story when the olympic games was going on behind us in the distance. we are very good friends. i winced at the time. i would have gone, that was very flattering. and iam gay gone, that was very flattering. and i am gay and that is an opportunity, certain opportunities have come up for me around the 2012 olympics, strictly come dancing, people were intruding into my private life and i wish to me, looking back, there were
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certain times, this is who i am and i was more open and honest then them this wouldn't have been an issue and the only issue is, it's not about being gay, there are a lot of gay people out there, but it's more to do with, fernee, if could just be yourself and not have too carry around half—truths and half lives. there is this big problem with mental health. speaking more with friends orfamily, mental health. speaking more with friends or family, do mental health. speaking more with friends orfamily, do be a bit more vulnerable and it makes things an awful lot easier because you've not got this voice in your head all the time saying this is not normal. it isa it is a very positive message you are putting out in terms of mental health, and it is good to see you are ina health, and it is good to see you are in a good place as well. thank you for being with us on bbc brea kfast. here is matt with a look at this morning's weather.
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it isa it is a little bit nippy, matt. a little bit nippy and some more. for most of you, we start the day a little bit frosty. it is dry and sunny, many will stay dry and sunny all day long but the picture behind me shows it is not the same everywhere. a bit of saint andrews day snow and it is not confined to northern scotland. this is the view in scarborough. eastern parts of north yorks, east yorkshire and eastern parts of yorkshire as well, so there will be problems on the roads for one or two back. i see on the roads were northern and eastern areas, and where we see rain showers in the night, clear skies in between. parts of devon and cornwall will have rained through the morning. in between, most of us dry and sunny after a frosty start. it will still feel cold into the afternoon. that northerly wind really does have a buy to it today and while temperatures on the thermometer is reached two or three degrees across parts of scotland, it will fill sub zero in northern and
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eastern areas. sleet and snow flurries continuing. lots of sunshine around and a few showers for northern ireland into the afternoon. staying dry the northern england, but down these eastern counties, the showers on the coastal strip. i 3pm they will be further inland. a mixture of rain with some hailand inland. a mixture of rain with some hail and thunder on the coast. a little bit of sleet and snow inland. clouding over in south—east england. much of western england and wales should be fine but pembrokeshire down towards cornwall will have some showers by the end of the afternoon. they drift offshore by the end of the night and with the wind change by the evening, the risk of ice to ta ke by the evening, the risk of ice to take us into friday morning's russia. these are the temperatures to start your friday morning. most towns and cities around the freezing mark in the countryside. in rural scotla nd mark in the countryside. in rural scotland it could be as low as —10. today could be the coldest day of the week, but staying cold tomorrow. icy winds and eastern england becoming confined to east anglia and
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the south—east, as do the showers, mainly rain showers by the end of the afternoon. much of england and wales having a dry and bright day tomorrow. cardiff scotland and northern ireland. signs of a change as temperatures lived across north—west scotland. that is because as this high—pressure drifts its way southwards we are bringing in winds of the atlantic instead of the arctic. so the message for this weekend, slowly, and i emphasise the word slowly, coming less chilly. still a raw day across england and wales, a little bit of sunshine east of higher ground. patchy rain and drizzle in the west but around eight to 10 degrees in scotland and northern ireland, and the milder air reaching the coast by the time we hit sunday after some damp and drizzly weather overnight. and it gets colder again next week. have you had your breakfast this morning? i haven't yet, no. i haven't. we are talking breakfast now, talking brea kfast talking breakfast now, talking breakfast cereals. well, for me it
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is more like it afternoon, i should be having lunch. nice pie and chips, to keep you warm. the story is about kellogg's, and cereal. sugar content particularly, and kellogg's have made some moves in the past, and they are making more moves today now, adjusting some of the sugar content in some cereals, but not all of them. morning, everybody. chances are, at some point, you will have had some in your cupboards at home. but kellogg's, like all the major cereal brands, saw a big drop in sales of cereal. they are making some changes, cutting the sugar in coco pops, getting rid of the ricicles brands. but long—term favourites like frosties are untouched. many still think there is too much sugar in our cereal portions, one of those being nutritionist dr anna robins. when you take that 30 g serving, there is approximately a third of
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that total added sugar in that one setting, so in that on—ball. so by the time the child has finished its it has already consumed a third of the total upper limit of added sugars per day. i think any move to be helping the general public to make healthier choices is a good one, and the changes that are taking place, while it is a positive step, i don't think they go far enough to be making these cereals are healthy option in the morning. with me now is 0li morton, managing director of kellogg's uk. just to kick off, you are changing your coco pops level, and do you think children have been consuming too much sugar at breakfasttime? what we are announcing today is a big overhaul of our cereal range, and we have worked really hard to get on seven out of ten of the nation's reckless tables in the morning. that consumers are saying they want to make healthier choices
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in the morning, but importantly they wa nt in the morning, but importantly they want products to taste great. 0ur response is exactly what we are doing, and there are two parts to that. the first part we're doing is a big sugar overhaul in our children's product. coco pops will bea children's product. coco pops will be a 40% reduction in sugar levels while keeping the same great taste. is that because consumers, parents, are thinking there is too much sugar in these cereals, so you are adapting to that, or is it because you have said children are eating too much sugar at breakfasttime? you have said children are eating too much sugar at breakfasttime7m is what consumers are telling us, which is that they want to make his healthier choices. if you take the coco pops example of a 40% reduction in sugar, that will be 17% sugar in those cereals. it still seems like quite a lot. if you look at that from the government's perspective, it doesn't qualify as a higher sugar level. by keeping the sugar levels down, we are able to focus on the
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key things in these products, from b—vitamins to iron. key things in these products, from b-vitamins to iron. clearly there has been a movement from consumers towards products they think are healthier, yet you have coco pops and rice krispies which you are making changes to, but frosties, they are still there. more than a third of every cereal bowl is sugar, and you are not making any changes to that. what we are talking about todayis to that. what we are talking about today is the biggest change in a decade. to reduce coco pops's levels by 40% has taken five years of work and £5 million of investment, because the crucial part is you have to keep the same great taste. why couldn't you have, five years ago, with frosties, crunchy nut cornfla kes, with frosties, crunchy nut cornflakes, because with frosties, crunchy nut cornfla kes, because consumers with frosties, crunchy nut cornflakes, because consumers want less sugar at breakfasttime. well, let mejust talk
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less sugar at breakfasttime. well, let me just talk about frosties, two of the interesting things we are doing. firstly, ricicles, so captain rick will be no more. we don't actually see that that fits with consumers‘ lifestyles are moving forward. with frosties, a fact you may not know, for our generations who grew up with these products, we haven‘t position that towards kids dance 2010. the majority of people who eat frosties are actually adults. —— since 2010. who eat frosties are actually adults. -- since 2010. is this about kids, or adults? this is about us responding to consumer needs. for us, the biggest move we can make and one we‘re really proud of is to make sure get those sugar levels right in the first place. the other part, as adults talk about, is sugar. they are asking is about health and that same great taste, and we will bring out a whole range of products to do that. one thing which has had a lot of growth over recent years is granola. a lot of people will see it
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as being potentially a bit healthier, especially the way it is marketed. a lot your granola products will have much more sugar in them than your coco pops. how does that work? for us, there is a great thing about breakfast where it isa great thing about breakfast where it is a lot about perception versus reality, and across our cereals we are very open about a sugar levels, and these changes are a big part of transparency from us, to talk about these sugar levels. what is also crucial, taking the granola example, we started this new range 90 years ago, founding the business on plant —based simple food, healthy nutrition. we will meet needs that consumers are talking about... so they will have to be new brands. because flexatarian, obedient and organic. is there a point at the end of the day when, if you are an adult
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over 35 and you want your cereal to have more than a third of it as sugar, you should be allowed to have it. why should you reduce your sugar levels because other people think you shouldn‘t have it? levels because other people think you shouldn't have it? what consumers play back to us is that some find it really important, on taste, others find health really important. so for those that want taste and sugar, that is about how we get that right for them, and do that. the really important thing is you have to keep taste right. the piece we are really proud of, because it is a big emotional decision for consumers to make, is when we come through with a 40% reduction in sugar in coco pops, they still taste great. thank you very much for coming in this morning. very interesting one, to see how consumers will change, because we have seen huge changes in brea kfast taste. because we have seen huge changes in breakfast taste. i wonder, would kelloggs uk be willing to sacrifice sales in order to ensure that we as
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a nation are healthier? a lot of it comes down to you starting our days. i think the two can go hand. firstly, the big decision not to do ricicles, that is a hit in sales but when consumers ricicles, that is a hit in sales but consumers tell us they want sugar levels to be lower, that goes hand in hand. we are actually in excess of 10% growth at the minute, so it is about keeping on train with the consumer and keeping ahead of it, to make sure we do that right. we will be back with the headlines in just a few minutes. but first, it‘s time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m sara 0rchard. grenfell survivors whose immigration status was uncertain have until today to register for a 12—month amnesty. the home office announced that it would allow undocumented residents who have been directly affected by the fire to be granted a temporary period of lawful residence. but there is concern that some are still reluctant to make themselves known to authorities, fearing they will be deported.
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there have been more than 180,000 complaints about rats and mice in the capital over the last five years, according to a new report. that is more than 100 per day. london assembly member susan hall began researching the problem after this video of scavenging rats in harrow went viral earlier this year. her report, rat land, found the number of complaints received by local authorities is on the rise. a mother and son from barnet have achieved the unusual feat of graduating from the same university, in the same subject, on the same day. samiya lerew and her son edwin studied politics at birkbeck, university of london. they credit each other with providing invaluable support, even if there were a few odd moments on campus. well, she‘d be at the front, and i‘d be at the back. that wouldn‘t be by accident. did i embarrass you, edwin? no, and i strategically dodged the rest of the classes that she might have been in. academically, he did betterthan i did. he did better, yes.
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it was hard — i couldn‘t have done it without her. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes this morning: 0n the 0verground, there are severe delays across the line, and a part closure. the piccadilly line also has severe delays westbound. 0n the trains: south—eastern services between 0rpington and victoria are running with cancellations and delays, after an earlier broken—down train at penge east. and on the roads: part of the chelsea embankment remains closed westbound for major gas works. let‘s have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. feeling very chilly indeed today. in fact, this weather watcher picture sums it up very nicely. we‘ve got temperatures widely below freezing as we start off the morning. now, there will be some sunshine around, and then it will tend to cloud over as we head into the afternoon. we‘ve got a very chilly, bracing northerly wind, and that‘s going to make it feel much colder than the numbers would otherwise suggest. so some sunshine around to start with, then turning cloudier, particularly across eastern areas.
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we‘re looking at highs today of only three or four degrees celsius. but in reality, because of the wind chill, it‘s going to feel as if it‘s sub—zero for most of the day. and then, as we head into this evening‘s rush—hour, the cloud amounts will increase. the wind is gradually turning more north—easterly, and that‘s going to help to blow down some more showers, particularly across parts of essex, hertfordshire, and maybe parts of kent, as well. and some of the showers could increasingly be wintry. however, they will turn increasingly to rain as we head into tomorrow morning, so ice could be a problem. another cold feeling day tomorrow. we‘ve still got that chilly northerly breeze, but it will feel a little bit milder, and there will be some sunshine around. you‘ll notice the difference in temperature as we start to get the westerly wind over the course of the weekend. by the time we get to sunday, we‘re up to 10 degrees. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it is back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello this is breakfast,
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with naga munchetty and charlie stayt donald trump lashes out at theresa may in a row over anti—muslim videos. the prime minister criticised the us president for sharing a series of posts by the far—right group britain first. but last night mr trump tweeted that she should instead be focussed on tackling terrorism. good morning it‘s thursday 30th november. also this morning. a warning that children with special educational needs aren‘t getting the support they need once they hit 18. we‘ll hear from parents desperately concerned about what the future holds for their families. kelloggs will be decreasing their
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sugarin kelloggs will be decreasing their sugar in their cereals. i‘ll be speaking about that a bit later. and in sport, sam allardyce is due to be appointed the everton manager after their win last night. # i'm their win last night. # i‘m so in love with you. their win last night. # i'm so in love with you. more than ten million people hear him sing every week, but you would be forgiven for not knowing his name. we‘ll speak to the strictly singer tommy blaze. and the weather: an icy arctic wind. this is the view a short while ago in scarborough. for some, snow in the forecast. details in15 some, snow in the forecast. details in 15 minutes. first, our main story.
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in a blunt tweet president trump has told theresa may that she should pay more attention to tackling terrorism in the uk, rather than criticising him. the message was delivered last night after downing street criticised the us president for sharing anti—muslim videos posted by a british far—right group on social media. the row has placed more pressure on the prime minister to cancel mr trump‘s state visit to the uk next year. 0ur north america correspondent laura bicker has more. they may have held hands once but this special relationship is being tested by a series of presidential tweets, first from the group called britain first, donald trump retweeted three inflammatory videos to his 43 million followers, the first claimed incorrectly to show a muslim migrant attacking a man on crutches. when challenged, the white house said the videos might not be real but the threat was. theresa may and a lot of other world leaders
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across the world know that these are real threats, that we have to talk about. i think europe‘s seen that a lot first hand and something the president wants to continue to talk about and continue to make sure that we are dealing with. theresa may is ona tourof we are dealing with. theresa may is on a tour of the middle east. but her official spokesman said the president had been wrong to share the posts. it was that condemnation which prompted a twitter outburst from donald trump‘s account. he told theresa may not to focus on him, but to focus on the destructive islamic terrorism taking place within the uk. we are doing just fine, he said. the president has caused diplomatic headaches for the uk several times already this year. from backing nigel farage as an ambassador to washington to attacking the london mayor sadiq khan all from his favourite social media platform. it may be a show of strength for his supporters, but it may also weaken his position abroad. let‘s get the latest on this now from our political
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correspondent alex forsyth, who is travelling with the prime minister and is injordan for us this morning. what are you hearing about this? we have not had a lot from the prime minister directly to speak frankly, we have the rebuke from downing street yesterday saying donald trump shouldn‘t have tweeted what he did about britain first but that wasn‘t issued by the prime minister. however, theresa may‘s due to make this trip to jordan however, theresa may‘s due to make this trip tojordan today, there‘ll be business leaders and the focus is expected to be on trade and the economy. you can expect the q & a session to be dominated by this response from donald trump because seniorfigures in the response from donald trump because senior figures in the conservative party are becoming more and more outspoken about this. the communities secretary sajid javid
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tweeted yesterday saying president trump endorsed - view of the hate trump endorsed the view of the hate organisation that hates people. 0ther organisation that hates people. other senior conservatives say he was right to say something. liz truss, the leader of the scottish conservatives ruth davidson, and jeremy corbyn is calling on the government to condemn donald trump in the strongest possible terms. the lib dems are calling on the government to rescind donald trump‘s invitation for a state visit so increasing pressure and focus on theresa may this morning to see exactly how she‘s going to react. we‘ll keep a close eye on it. thank you very much. the united states has called on the international community to sever ties with north korea — it follows the country‘s latest ballistic missile test. north korean media claimed that wednesday‘s missile launch was the most powerful in the country‘s history. at an emergency meeting of the un security council, washington‘s ambassador to the un warned of dire consequences
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if war breaks out. a 24—year—old british man has been killed in syria while clearing and dismantling mines in raqqa. 0liver hall, from the portsmouth area, joined kurdish armed groups to fight against so—called islamic state. he is the seventh british man to have been killed in syria with the kurdish—led group the ypg. plans to get an extra one million disabled people into work will be published by the government today. around 50% of disabled people are in work, that‘s around 3.5 million people, compared to 80% of non—disabled people. we‘ll speak to the work and pensions secretary in the next few minutes. two clinical trials have shown a new approach to preventing migraine can reduce the number of attacks, and their severity. both trials used antibodies that shield the nervous
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system from the headaches. here‘s more from our health and science correspondent james gallagher. imogen started having migraines two yea rs imogen started having migraines two years ago when she was 16. she was having attacks every week and they forced her to take a year out of college. it was really scary. for me, when they were happening, i had no clue what they were because i thought, a might ran wasjust a headache, so we had to keep looking into more serious things. more there isa into more serious things. more there is a chemical in the nervous system to stop a might ran developing. 0ne trial gave patients injections. before the trial they were having migraines eight days a month. 50% of patients were able to cut their number of migraines in half. four drug companies are developing similar treatments and scientists say a new therapy could give patients their life back. these treatments are the first migraine
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specific preventives ever. for the most substantial neurological cause of disability on the planet. it has a huge advance for all of us. imogen‘s migraines are under control and she‘s now studying to be a nurse. but currently available drugs do not work for everyone and can cause side effects. new options for people living with migraine are desperately needed. litter on beaches rose by 10% this year with a fifth of the rubbish made up of on—the—go food and drinks items such as cups, foil wrappers and bottles. the marine conservation society is now calling on the government to put a charge on single—use items handed over for free like plastic cutlery, straws and sandwich packaging. there needs to be a motivation to stop people from using these items in the first place and we believe that a levy would create that behaviour change as it has done with the plastic bag charge. mark foster
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has been telling breakfast that it‘s important for young people to be confident in their own skin in his first broadcast interview since revealing that he is gay. foster is one of the most successful british swimmers of all—time with six world championship titles, two commonwealth titles, 11 european titles the to his name but he thinks keeping his sexuality secret kept him from achieving even more. he‘d a lwa ys him from achieving even more. he‘d always kept that part of his life private but feels now it‘s time for him to be himself. it's not about that i‘m gay because so what there area that i‘m gay because so what there are a lot of gay people out there, but it‘s more to do with, for me, if you can just be yourself and not have to carry around half—truth and half lies, then, you know, there‘s this big problem with mental health and if people only speak a bit more, and if people only speak a bit more, a friend or family and confide and if people only speak a bit more, a friend orfamily and confide in someone and be a little less vulnerable, it makes things easier because you don‘t have the voice in your head all the time saying this
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is not normal, trying to process and filter things. we are focussing on issues around disability and employment now, and mr david gauke joins us. the comments by donald trump first of all, can i ask you about these. a blunt put touchdown theresa may for those who haven‘t already seen it. don‘t focus on me, focus on the destructive islamic terrorism taking place within the united kingdom. what do you make of his comments? well, president trump was wrong to retweet something coming from britain first. there are ghastly obnoxious organisations. the prime minister was absolutely right to point out that he was wrong to do so and i‘m pleased that she did that and, if donald trump doesn‘t like it, so be it but the prime minister was right. it feels fairly uncomfortable does it not though, having the president of the united states and our prime minister at
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oddsin states and our prime minister at odds in this way over twitter? well, in normal circumstances, this sort of thing doesn‘t happen. but we are not in normal circumstances. the fa ct not in normal circumstances. the fact is, when the president did what he did yesterday in terms of tweeting, re—tweeting britain first, i think the prime minister had no choice but to point out that that was wrong. she was correct to do so. of course, we want to have a good relationship with the united states, they are our closest security allie, one of our most important economic partners and we want to have that close relationship and we need to engage with the united states, including the president of the united states. but when he‘s got something as badly wrong as he has, we are right to call him out on it. you use the phrase, we are not in normal circumstances, a lot of people wondering about the trump visit. do you think it‘s time to withdraw the invitation? as i said,
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it‘s important that we engage with the united states and president trumpjust the united states and president trump just because there is a visit doesn‘t mean that that is an endorsement of everything that a particular leader says or does and, the united states is a very important allie to us. so we have got to continue to engage. that invitation‘s gone out, it‘s been accepted, the details to be finalised and who knows, it might be educational. so let us talk about theissues educational. so let us talk about the issues around getting more disabled people into work. you are pledging to get one million more people into the work place in a decade over the space of ten years. tell us about those proposals? it's an ambitious target, but it‘s important we do everything we can to make sure people can fulfil their potential. the vast majority of disabled people who‘re out of work do want work. we have made progress in recent years, there are 600,000 more disabled people in work than was the case four years ago but there‘s further to go. that means ensuring that we have got a welfare
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system that gives people the personalised support so they can get into work, a health system that is working to ensure that we prevent problems, preventing people from working, and also we need to have a culture shift, we need employers who are looking to do what they can to provide opportunities to disabled people. we have very many excellent employers in this country doing great work but we need toe ensure that happens across—the—boa rd great work but we need toe ensure that happens across—the—board and that happens across—the—board and that the government prosides the employers and support they need to get people who have disabilitied into work. did you really call this an ambitious target, a million over ten years, in the same sentence you said infouryears, ten years, in the same sentence you said in four years, 600,000 ten years, in the same sentence you said infouryears, 600,000 people have got work, so in what way is this ambitious because a lot of critics are saying it‘s the opposite, you have set a low target, it could be a lot higher and you could do a lot more? we have made great progress, but as you progress, sometimes these things can get
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harder. hold on, so you are saying the process is going to slow down and you know it? no, let us be clear of the numbers, there are 3.5 million people in work today who‘re disabled, we are looking to move that to 11.5 million people that. is a substantial increase and that will require a lot of work on a number of fronts, in terms of working with employers, the welfare system, the health system. that is about increasing opportunities for large numbers of people. so it is an ambitious programme, one that we believe that we can deliver and what we are setting out today is some of the measures that we are going to ta ke the measures that we are going to take and also the plan to how we are going to test and learn and how we are going to innovate in this area to ensure we increase opportunities for disabled people and people with health conditions that at the moment don‘t get the chances that they need and it‘s really important for them and it‘s really important for them and also for our economy that we make progress on this.”
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and also for our economy that we make progress on this. i don't want to get bogged down in this but you keep using the word ambitious which is just not true. you seem to be officially saying that the rate at which people will get work in the next few years is slowing down, according to your official figures, thatis according to your official figures, that is what you are saying, and specifically a lot of critics say specifically a lot of critics say specific to those with learning disabilities, there is almost nothing in your outlining of your proposals that will address any of their needs and they often think they‘re the most forgotten of all they‘re the most forgotten of all the people in these situations? i don‘t accept that. to go from 3.4 million disabled people in work to 4.5 million in the course of a decade would be extraordinary progress. yes, we have made progress in the last four years. i am pleased about that. but if we don‘t take further steps, then frankly we could go backwards. it is the case that
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people with disabilities are three times more likely to leave work, sorry, twice as likely to leave work as those without disabilities. and they find it harder to get into work. we do need to take steps, notwithstanding the progress we have already made. that is why we set out in the paper today a number of measures across the piece. there is particular focus on mental health and those with musculoskeletal conditions, because those are the largest groups were we think we can make progress. but across the board for every type of group we are making steps. it does require a culture change and it requires government to take steps ensuring people get that personalised support with the welfare system. we are doing that. this is a really important approach that can transform significant numbers of lives. you have used the word is
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ambitious and important. how much money are you pledging, how much new money are you pledging, how much new money are you pledging, how much new money are you pledging to these important ambitions? today is not a day when we are setting out new money. how much money will you be putting into this important new ambitious programme? the question was how much money will you be putting into this programme that is ambitious? we have already set out a number of areas of expenditure. for example, when it comes to innovation in this particular area there is a £70 million programme we have announced. this is in a context where we spend £50 billion a year on disabled people, people with health conditions. we spend a very significant sum of money every year on this. what today is about is about how we find ways in which we can innovate. find ways in which we can innovate. find ways in which we can change the culture. find ways in which we can find additional money.
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0ne which we can find additional money. one example, spending £39 million on people accessing psychological support, psychological therapies. we have already set out how we are spending £330 million over the next four years in terms of personal support packages for people with disabilities, to help them, and health conditions, to help them into work. this is an important set of policies. this week we have been doing a series of reports on the problems faced by many people, including those with learning disabilities. i think your words will ring pretty hollow with them. what they are seeing is the reality of the situation. they look back at the place from 2015 from the treasury, i‘m not sure, maybe you we re treasury, i‘m not sure, maybe you were in the treasury at the time, the place was... increasing employment levels among people with
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learning disabilities is a key aim of the government. the aim is to have the employment gap between disabled and non—disabled people. it was an aim, a pledge, it was ambitious. they probably used the same words you are using now. a lot of people will think you are saying the words with little to back it up. that place did not happen. it is nowhere near? hold on. since 2014, the employment rate for disabled people has gone up by 4.7%. for the population as a whole it has gone up by 2.2%. as i say, we have been making progress in terms of increasing the employment rate. —— the employment rate amongst disabled people. there is more we need to do. we have a record of making improvement in this area in terms of the employment rate but there is further work that needs to be done. what we are setting out today in the paper is how we are going to do
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that. we can increase the number from 3.5 million to 4.5 million over the course of a decade. if we can do that, that would be good news for the british economy because we are tapping into the talents of people. but perhaps more importantly, there will be good news for the million people who will be able to get into work and have all the benefits that work and have all the benefits that work provides. that is why we are making this announcement. david gauke, thank you for your time. the work and pensions secretary. here‘s matt with a look at this morning‘s weather. it is cold. it is going to get colder. it is cold. the start of meteorological winter not till tomorrow but it has started already. most startling dry and sunny. —6 in parts of worcestershire. some are
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now waking up to a good covering of snow in yorkshire, norfolk and parts of scotland. that will cause a few issues on the roads. i see in places. the showers in eastern england will push further west. rain showers to the west of wales, devon and cornwall, northern ireland. turning drier later. for the vast majority it will be a dry and fairly sunny day but a cold day. arctic with us. with a wind blowing across the country and added wind—chill, _3’ the country and added wind—chill, —3, 4; the country and added wind—chill, —3, —4 in eastern scotland. central scotla nd —3, —4 in eastern scotland. central scotland with lots of sunshine. a dry afternoon in northern ireland. eastern counties of england the greater chance of showers later. most rain, hail or sleet. greater chance of showers later. most rain, hail orsleet. clouding over to the south—east. much of the
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west will stay dry and bright. showers in wales will become more confined to the far west. tonight, clear for many. lots of cloud in eastern england. a strong breeze. wintry showers. increased risk of ice. temperatures just above freezing. elsewhere, temperatures below freezing. colder night in parts of scotland. —10 tomorrow morning. a cold start to friday. i see winds across eastern england easing down. confined to east anglia and the south—east. showers on the coastal strip. much of england and wales dry with sunshine tomorrow. cloudy day with sunny breaks in scotla nd cloudy day with sunny breaks in scotland and northern ireland. later, a change in wind direction. that is due to this area of high—pressure drifting south into weekend. the yellow colours an indication of something less chilly
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pushing its way in. slowly, and i emphasise slowly, getting milder this weekend. saturday still quite roar in england and wales. wet conditions to the north—west of scotland. the mild air will be down towards the south coast by the time we get to sunday. doubled —— double—figure temperatures after early drizzle. right conditions east of high ground. a lot of cloud around this weekend. the upside, if you like your weather not to chilly, it will be a touch milder, but colder weather is never too far away. back next week. not to chilly is a lwa ys back next week. not to chilly is always preferred, isn‘t it? it depends. cold and crisp from me. thank you. will the government make good on its promise of bringing high speed internet access to all of us by 2020? the key company that it will have to rely on to make that happen — 0penreach — is warning it could risk missing the target unless it decides how it‘s going to do the work very soon.
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ross hawkins is in north wales. they have come up with a clever way to get people connected. i see ca bles to get people connected. i see cables behind you. explain how they will achieve what many people are seeing is a big problem for auroral areas? yeah, we have cables, we have snow. something even more exciting than that. people lived on the high side of the valley. but the high speed network was down there. what did they do? they came up with a solution. this drone. attached to the bottom of that, as it takes off, is actually some fishing line. they use the fishing line to fly out there over the valley. they then managed to drop the fishing line down and use that to drag across the fibre—optic cable, which then meant they can have high—speed internet up
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here. there goes the cable. they can use that to drug —— drag across. 12 drone pilots they have trained, according to the company 0penreach, behind this. the head of engineering is not allowed to do it any more because he is scared —— he has scared some sheep. what difference has admitted to you, chris? tremendous difference. it has brought light to the dark side. tremendous difference. it has brought light to the dark sidem practical terms that means what? how long did it take to download a film before and how long does it take now? i made wait for the afternoon for the film to come and now it is about 12 minutes. a blu—ray film. you will be thinking that is all very well for rural wales. i don‘t live on the side of a valley. i is my broadband not as fast as chris‘? headhunted from 0penreach can answer that. this is clever and innovative but the government wanted to force
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you legally to put in place broadband right across the country and you are resisting their proposal, putting a counter offer. why not accept what the government wa nts ? why not accept what the government wants? we are not resisting it. their plan is from 2020 people request broadband at 10 megabits per second minimum. 0ur request broadband at 10 megabits per second minimum. our offer we request broadband at 10 megabits per second minimum. 0ur offerwe have made to government is better, however. we are saying we will deploy to everybody from next year if they accept our offer. but you have made this counter innocence to what the government promised consumers in their manifesto. you know there are —— your industry rivals think there is a problem with your offer, if you fail to give people who don‘t have the advantage of drums the server broadband they want, they will hold you to account. how can we trust 0penreach to deliver what you say you will? so far we have delivered to 95% of the uk. that is a huge amount of effort, commitment and investment, partly
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funded by government. we want to go further. we think the right thing to do is to make a generous offer to government in order to bring greater than 10 megabits broadband to absolutely everybody and started from next year. thank you very much. who knows, a drunk would be coming to help with the internet by you sometime soon. if it doesn‘t, you will have 0penreach to answer questions. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. goo moderning, temperatures widely
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below freezing this morning. —— good morning. we have further wintry showers affecting the north and eastern parts of the uk. snow down to low levels across eastern england, the north—east of scotland. showers becoming further inland as we go into the afternoon. further showers towards west wales, south—west england, the odd shower in northern ireland, but it will feel cold. these are the wind chill temperatures. so if you are out and about, it will feel like minus one, two or three. into this evening‘s rush hour, tricky conditions with ice developing with the snow showers in northern and eastern scotland, particularly so down the eastern side of england. temperatures dropping away, still the risk of lying snow, settling snow for a short time. that could cause a few problems. still a few showers in pembrokeshire and cornwall. clear skies and sunshine that you have had through the day, it will turn cold here quite quickly in the evening. 0vernight, we‘ll continue with the
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wintry showers in eastern areas of england. turning more to rain towards the south—east of england. but the risk of ice certainly into the early hours of friday morning. another cold and frosty one for many of us. during friday, plenty of sunshine across england and wales and fora time sunshine across england and wales and for a time across scotland before the cloud moves into the north—west then patchy rain follows on. not as cold tomorrow. into the weekend, it will be less cold. the air is coming more in from a north—west direction so here coming in milderair, or north—west direction so here coming in milder air, or less cold air really. with the orange, the less cold air moving through, it‘s going to turn much cloudier for many of us. more details on the website. that is all from me. bye. this is business live from bbc news with jamie robertson and sally bundock. nervous energy in vienna.
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the oil producers cartel 0pec looks set to extend the supply cuts that have pushed up prices. live from london, that‘s our top story on thursday the 30th of november. but with oil prices now above $60 a barrel can saudi arabia and russia do much to stop us shale producers taking their market share? also in the programme.... google searches for answers. the tech giant is accused of illegally collecting the data of millions of uk iphone users

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