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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  November 30, 2017 9:00am-11:00am GMT

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hello it's thursday, 30th november, it's 9 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme. after she told him she was wrong for re—tweeting, donald trump's hit back at theresa may telling the pm to focus on terrorism, not him. plenty of politicians have criticised the president. here is what his spokeswoman had to say. the threat is real, the threat needs to be addressed, the threat has to be talked about. that is what the president is doing, in bringing that up. tell us what you think about this diplomatic row. also this morning, we have a special report how thousands of people are being threatened with prison every year for not paying their council tax. one mother tells us how she how she ended up behind bars. it was absolutely horrific. i was worrying about the kids and nobody can prepare you for it. nobody could. it doesn't matter how many books you might read, it's not what you expect. we'll have the full report this hour. plus, in the next hour. i don't even
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know what to say, man. we'll speak to stars at the mobo music awards about a decision by police in london to scrap a controversial risk assessment form for grime artists known as form 696. now i feel like eve ryo ne known as form 696. now i feel like everyone has the hans to make their money and live their life. donald trump has told theresa may she should pay more attention to tackling terrorism in the uk rather than messaging him. it was delivered ina than messaging him. it was delivered in a tweet after downing street criticised the american president for sharing videos. there are calls
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for sharing videos. there are calls for donald trump's trip to the uk to be cancelled. laura bicker reports. any moment now. they may have held hands once but this so—called special relationship is now being tested by a series of presidential tweets. first, from the account of the far right anti—muslim group called britain first, donald trump retweeted three inflammatory videos to his 43 million followers. the first claimed incorrectly to show a muslim migrant attacking a man on crutches. when challenged, the white crutches. when chalieflgee". fnewhite crutches. when cheliengen". finewhi‘fie said crutches. when cheltengeu". finewhite said the videos might not be house said the videos might not be real but the threat was. i think europe has seen that a lot first—hand and something
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the president wants to continue to talk about and continue to make sure that we're dealing with. theresa may is on a tour of the middle east but her official spokesman said the president had been wrong to share the posts. it was that condemnation which prompted a twitter outburst from donald trump's account. he told theresa may not to focus on him but to focus on the destructive radical islamic terrorism taking place within the united kingdom. "we are doing just fine," he said. the president has caused diplomatic headaches for the uk several times already this year. from backing nigel farage as an ambassador to washington, to attacking the london mayor sadiq khan, all from his favourite social media platform. it may be a show of strength for his supporters but it may also weaken his position abroad. laura bicker, bbc news, washington. norman is at westminster. what have the british government said about the british government said about the tweet? there's been a stunned silence from number ten because they went to bed and all seemed well with the world or not any more chaotic than usual. they wake up to find mrs may being directly attacked and
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criticised by the president. now, i think that is unprecedented in the sense yes we are used to donald trump laying waste to all and sundry, including other foreign leaders but never to an allie, particularly give than we, you know hope, think, believe we have good relations with the united states. so there's been no response at all from downing street and probably won't be until mrs may has a question and a nswer until mrs may has a question and answer session in jordan where until mrs may has a question and answer session injordan where she's going to be speaking later this afternoon. but there is now massive pressure on her over the state visit which yesterday downing street were saying was still happening, america is an allie, still going ahead. but the level of anger and criticism that donald trump's tweets have provoked, i it that donald trump's tweets have provoked, i - it stretches across provoked, i mean it stretches across the political divide right up into the political divide right up into the cabinet, particularly struck, i was, by sajid javid's tweet you sent off last night. you get the sense he
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is personally incensed. he said so he's endorsed the views of a vile hate—filled racist organisation that hates me and people like me. he is wrong and i refuse to let it go and say nothing. you get a real sense of his personal anger. slightly less angry was the cabinet minister david gauke this morning but he's normally fairly mild mannered. even he was criticising the president. in normal circumstances, this doesn't normally happen, this sort of thing. the president did what he did yesterday, in terms of tweeting, re—tweeting britain first, i think the prime minister had no choice but to point out that that was wrong. she was correct to do so. of course, we want to have a good relationship with the united states. they are our closest security allie, one of our most
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important economic partners and we wa nt important economic partners and we want to have that close relationship and need to engage with the united states, including the president of the united states. but when he's got something as badly wrong as he has, we are right to call him out on it. mrgauke we are right to call him out on it. mr gauke went tonne say he thought it might be "educational" for the prime minister to come to britain as pa rt prime minister to come to britain as part of that state visit. quite apart from the controversy over the state visit, this matters because there is a question mark now about relations between mrs may and donald trump. remember, this was sort of a key pa rt trump. remember, this was sort of a key part of mrs may's sort of diplomatic offensive when she became prime minister, there was that famous handy—handy moment in the white house. now you wonder, given the president clearly is a man who does not take lightly to criticism and seems to bear grudges, whether that relationship's been seriously damaged and the potential implications then for the post—brexit world we are about to
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enter and in particular our prospects of getting a trade deal. one rast thing — lighter note — the president initially tweeted the wrong theresa may, he tweeted a lady called theresa scrimminer who has only six followers. i looked a moment ago, she still only has six followers. maybe it will go up during the day. it was a question that lots of people asked yesterday, should the state visit invitation that's been extended to mr trump be rescinded? we'll ask it again today. perhaps it's even more relevant when you hear what the communities secretary has said about the president of the united states. your own views very welcome. we are obviously going to talk a lot more about this in the programme to come in the next half hour. the rest of the morning's news now. the us has called on china to stop
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providing crude loyal to north korea in response to its latest test of a ballistic missile. at an emergency meeting of the un security council in new york, washington's ambassador to the un, nicky hayley, also urged other nations to cut their trade and diplomatic ties with pyongyang. bbc news understands that a 24—year—old british man who went to syria to fight against so—called islamic state, has been killed. oliver hall from the portsmouth area is the seventh british volunteer to have died in the country having joined a kurdish militia. plans to getan joined a kurdish militia. plans to get an extra one million disabled people into work will be published by the government today. disabled people remain significantly less likely to be in employment than those without disabilities, as our correspondent nicky fox reports. probably a yellow banana. trying out new technology. left edge, 5 feet away.
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a child consultant, hannah is testing face—recognition gadgets which could help her at work. she lost her sight five years ago and is now registered blind. during that time, she found it hard to get a job. i left uni with a first—class degree in law and i've been turned down from kind of basic admin roles when i had quite significant experience and that sort of thing. some of them, i might not have got the job anyway. some of them, it was quite clear from the questions they are asking, it was because of my disability. the employment gap between disabled and non—disabled people hasn't significantly changed for some years despite a pledge back in 2015 to halve it. today, the government has published a plan that aims to see i million more disabled people in work over the next 10 years. we are making progress. we've got 600,000 more disabled people in work than we did four years ago. what we want to do is continue to work with employers, to continue to exploit the opportunities of new technology and to keep testing and learning to find out what works, what are the things that actually can make a difference so that more disabled people can
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fulfil their potential and get a good job. today's announcement also includes measures to provide access to personalised support for those with mental health issues and an increase in the variety of health care professionals who are able to issue fitness—to—work notices but with employment rates for people with learning disabilities at around 6%, charities are warning the progress is too slow. nikki fox, bbc news. investigations are under way after the death of a war crimes defendant. he said he rejected the verdict and drank what he said was poison. the 72—year—old died in hospital and the un announced the courtroom was now a crime scene. two clinical trials have shown a new approach to
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preventing migraine can reduce the number of attacks and their severity, both trials used antibodies that shield the nervous system antibodies that shield the nervous syste m fro m antibodies that shield the nervous system from headaches. here is more from james gallagher. imogen smiths started having migraines two years ago when she was 16. imogen was having attacks every week and they forced her to take a year out of college. it was really scary so for me, when they were happening, i had no clue what they were ‘cause i thought a migraine was just a headache so we had to keep looking into more serious things. one in seven people in the uk live with the agony of migraine. scientists have now developed new treatments that target a chemical in the nervous to prevent a migraine developing. two trials have now published. one gave 955 patients a monthly injection of antibodies. before the trial, they were having migraines eight days every month on average.
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around 50% of patients were able to cut their number of migraines in half. four drug companies are developing similar treatments and scientists say a new therapy could give patients their life back. these treatments are the first migraine—specific preventives ever for the most substantial neurological cause of disability on the planet. that is a huge advance for all of us. imogen's migraines are under control and she's now studying to be a nurse but currently available drugs do not work for everyone and can cause side—effects. new options for people living with migraine are desperately needed. james gallagher, bbc news. serial producer —— cereal producer kelloggs is going to reduce its sugar content. it wants to make cereals more healthy. it employs 1700 people in the uk and owns
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europe's largest factory in the uk in trafford park in manchester. google is facing a mass legal action bya uk google is facing a mass legal action by a uk campaign group which alleges the tech giant unlawfully collected information from apple's iphone handsets. the group led by a former director of which? aims to claim at least a billion pounds in compensation for an estimated 5.4 million iphone users. google says the case has no case. according to research, baldy men might be more likely to have a heart disease before the age of 40. researchers said it was a bigger risk factor than obesity which raises the risk of heart disease four times. a watchdog has found that police helicopters take so long to reach crime scenes that more than 40% of its dents are over before they
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arrive. in its first independent study of police air support, her majesty's inspectorate of co nsta bula ry majesty's inspectorate of constabulary said helicopters and bases were providing substandard responses to ongoing incidents. inspectors have called for the service in england and wales to be urgently reformed or replaced. the grime artist stormzy has won three awards at the mobos, named best male act and best grime artist and also won best album. he said he would love to perform at the royal wedding, saying he wouldn't mind providing a little acoustic for young harry if he got an invite! we'll watch that space. back to you. we all wantan we all want an invite. another question i would like to ask you today, are you someone with a disability who has found it very ha rd to disability who has found it very hard to find paid work? the government says it is coming up with a plan today to try to get a further
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1 million more people with disabilities into work in the next ten years. your own experiences are releva nt to ten years. your own experiences are relevant to this conversation. we will talk about it before ten. watch of the government priorities be? what should they do to help somebody like you with a disability to get paid employment? do let me know. if your text in you will be charged. let's bring you some sport. hugh is here. a great night for everton supporters, the best in a long time? yes, they haven't struggling so far this season. they move up four places to 13th in the premier league. they were inspired by wayne rooney, captain on the night. he scored a first hat—trick in more than six years in their 4—0 win over west ham. they've heard a beauty from almost 60 yards out. great
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technique. —— the third was a beauty. former england boss sam alla rdyce was beauty. former england boss sam allardyce was there. he is expected to be announced as their new boss later. it also gave interim manager david unsworth a positive end to his time in charge. a great hat-trick and a great display from wayne. he was captain as well, captain for a reason, going into a tough environment after a tough spell. i asked them to be men denied. we spoke about how the bad run had to come to an end. being a real man means standing up in times of trouble. things looking rosier at everton. special mention to burnley. they have moved into the top six with their win last night as well. elsewhere, jubilant scenes from manchester city? yes, the leader is still needed a 96th minute winner from raheem sterling to beat southampton. they re—established an 8—point lead at the top of the
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table. that goal sparked wild celebrations. his 13th of the season. 12 straight wins in the league. pep guardiola pudding his good form down to his increased confidence. in the midst of all that benjamin mendy, the city defender, ran down the touchline to celebrate despite being out for six months with a ruptured knee ligament. afterwords guardiola called him a disaster, especially when he tried to get a selfie with sterling. happy scenes for them, arsenal, liverpool and chelsea, all winners. ben stokes is down under. there has been a return to action? yes, yesterday he landed in new zealand. a little break to see his family. he was greeted by his parents in christchurch. he had a cricket kit with him. he has signed to play for canterbury as their overseas player.
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it means we will see him in action down under. just not in the ashes series. it seems a decision as to whether to charge him will come in a number of weeks. he is unlikely to figure in that ashes series. we will miss his fiery style of play. there are plenty to take care of that. australian batsman peter hanscomb warning there may be some brutal words exchanged in the middle. he is happy to psychologically tired of the image. that doesn't worry jimmy anderson. it is something i have always enjoyed. excuse me. ithink it is... when someone is trying to get under my skin, notjust in cricket but all walks of life, it makes me more determined to succeed. that is something from a personal point of view that excites me and will drive me on to try and do the best i can with bat and ball. england will need to be strong. the second test begins in the early hours of saturday morning. thank you. good morning. welcome to
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our programme. thursday morning. president trump has hit back at theresa may pursing it was wrong for him to guidetti —— re—tweeted videos posted by right—wing group britain first. initially addressing a tweet at someone called theresa may rather than the prime minister's official account, he wrote... he then realised his mistake and sent it to the pm's correct twitter handle. the us president earlier had come underfire handle. the us president earlier had come under fire for re—tweeting three anti—muslim videos posted online by jayda fransen, three anti—muslim videos posted online byjayda fransen, the deputy leader of britain first. she is currently on bailfacing charges leader of britain first. she is currently on bail facing charges of causing religiously aggravated harassment. it relates to a separate incident. one of the videos that donald trump re—tweeted is called muslim i grinned beads up dutch boy
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on crutches. according to the authorities in the netherlands, there was no racially aggravated element to the incident and the perpetrator was a dutch national born and raised in the netherlands. who are britain first? we first investigative them a couple of years ago on this programme. there are extreme, right—wing and ultra nationalists. they were formed in 2011 by former members of the bnp. from the outset the organisation's aim has been to make a lot of noise on facebook and elsewhere on social media. on facebook they have nearly 2 million lights, head of the labour party, 1 million, the conservatives, around 650,000. the uk's most successful political party on facebook has been a wash—out when it comes to electoral success. the deputy stood in a by—election a few yea rs deputy stood in a by—election a few years ago and lost her deposit, winning just 56 votes. and the
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leader, paul golding, stood for a london mayor last year. and in the first round he won 1.2% of the vote. i have been talking tojoe walsh. he is an american conservative talk—show host. he is also a former republican congressman. he is a donald trump supporter. he told me what he makes of this diplomatic row between mr trump and mrs may.|j don't think it is a big row. look, this is president trump, i'm going to say this not to you but to the world for the 19th time, he is not a typical american president. these are not american times. he is going to do things and say things that typical presidents don't. we have to get used to it. the rest of the world does as well. but he is a man who says he battles against what he calls fa ke who says he battles against what he calls fake news. by re—tweeting these videos he is now spreading fa ke these videos he is now spreading fake news. look, to correct you, he
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technically re—tweeted three videos. two of the videos are actual news. he made a mistake. exactly. so he is guilty of spreading fake news, which, as you will know, various political leaders in this country say is dangerous to our country. two of the videos were not fake. the underlying truth is this. islamism isa underlying truth is this. islamism is a big problem. we are concerned about it. president trump is concerned about it. all of europe ought to be concerned as well. you don't think the british government is absolutely concerned about islamist terrorism ? is absolutely concerned about islamist terrorism? i don't. and the lot of us in the states don't. a lot of us don't understand the uk and the rest of europe has allowed radical islam, or islam is, to take over your entire continent. are you
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joking me?! that is the most grotesque exaggeration. not joking. you have entire neighbourhoods in the uk and europe for emergency police cannot even go because they are called no—go zones. police cannot even go because they are called no-go zones. that is com pletely are called no-go zones. that is completely inaccurate. completely wrong. made a up, inaccurate, fake and potentially dangerous. victoria, i love you and it is good to talk to you, but we don't give the truth on islamism in europe. we are afraid the same thing is going to happen in the same thing is going to happen in the united states. this is a big pa rt the united states. this is a big part of why president trump got elected. the counterterrorism budget has gone by 30%. that is british counterterrorist officers are involved in 500 investigations involving 3000 individuals, monitoring a wider pool of 20,000
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people. they are on it. well, i don't think they are on it. do you think donald trump should still be welcome in britain when he comes for the state visit? gosh, yeah. that is your call. but certainly he should. we are still very good friends, we are strong allies. look, this is a problem. we had a president before president trump who purposely refused to acknowledge the problem. this is a big reason why president trump got elected. peter mccarthy on twitter says, i'm concerned a president can disrespect a fellow world leader and so—called close ally. so much for the special relationship. let's talk to said joe curry, who is muslim. how bad is this in diplomatic terms? good morning. this is actually extremely serious. we have a situation on a
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whole multiple of different levels of not only interference in our domestic political agenda, but also along with that, a real diplomatic crisis brewing as well. i suspect, knowing donald trump's style which has developed since he came into office, this is the way in which he feels he can best attract attention to himself. that is his agenda. the problem for us is the ramifications of that, particularly in terms of community cohesion and the basic fabric of our society in the united kingdom and indeed throughout europe. it is extremely serious. you think as president he can upset community cohesion in britain? absolutely. what he is doing here, he is taking a very small french extremist movement, and promoting them into a space, a political
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space, that they simply do not occu py space, that they simply do not occupy otherwise. the real dangers are, and based upon the interview just aired, you don't have a reinforcement of what is in effect fa ke reinforcement of what is in effect fake news, and a repetition of that. that is taking place multiple times, creating a completely non—fact —based story, which then becomes factual lies in the minds of many, simply because it has been repeated multiple times. we have to take this extremely seriously. that is why this morning i have called on our pm macro theresa may not to ignore what donald trump as said, but to monitor what he is saying and to make sure that he and those who support him in the united kingdom, there are political actors in the uk who support the stance he has taken, that we monitor them very closely as well. otherwise they will talk away
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at the very fabric of our society. they will sow division weather isn't division. the consequences of that will be very great indeed. monitor closely, with respect, sounds rather lame. what about asking the british prime minister to withdraw his state visit invitation? i certainly have done that. the basis is this. a british citizen would not be given entry clearance into the united state of america if that british citizen has done anything which, in any way, undermines the fabric of usa society or security. that is exactly what the president of the united states has done. if those conditions are sufficient to prevent a british citizen from carrying out an ordinary visit to the usa, how can it be that a sitting president making such comments after assuming office, can be afforded an official
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state visit in these circumstances? i understand that. my follow up question is, should donald trump be banned from britain? two very different things. i do not think it is appropriate to go ahead with a state visit. and secondly, moving on from that, he is a world leader. we have to have relations with the usa through him. and incidentally, i do not believe that the vast majority of american people will, in any way, wa nt to of american people will, in any way, want to be associated with what donald trump, their president, is trying to do. rescind the state visit invitation, but a visit without the formality of a state visit, is that all right? we have to maintain diplomatic relations and we have to try to repair the situation we are in. he is still welcome to britain in your view? if this sort of activity is to continue by him, and then we see the effects it
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sta rts and then we see the effects it starts to happen in a very negative way in terms of undermining the very fabric of our british society, then we must once again of course revisit, on what basis are we going to have those diplomatic relations through him? we have other channels as well. you will have heard the very powerful words of the communities secretary, sajid javid, saying effectively that the president of united states endorsed the use of —— file, hate filled the use of organisations that hate me and people like me. if you had the opportunity of talking to donald trump about the re—tweeting of these videos, what would you say?” trump about the re—tweeting of these videos, what would you say? i don't think it befits the office of president of the united states of america to be associated —— to be associating himself with somebody who has actually been convicted of religious hatred, harassment offences, and is currently facing charges of a very similar nature as
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well. it just does charges of a very similar nature as well. itjust does not become the office of president of the united states of america. do you think he hates someone like you? do you think donald trump hates someone like you? one has to go about the effects that come about when someone in his position put out tweets of this nature. i don't think he will have any personal hatred towards me, i very much doubt he even knows i exist, certainly there has been no meeting at this point anyway, but in term to haves wider effects based on the office that he calls, he ought to have that at the forefront of his mind. there are real consequences attached to this for other countries, including ours. thank you very much. get in touch with us if you have any views. mr
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karim saying the state visit invitation should be rescinded but he's going to have to come at some point. let me know your views. still to come. how thousands are being threatened with prison for not paying council tax. a mum tells us how she ended up behind bars. at the stars of the mobo awards — plans to change a controversial approach to policing certain music events. donald trump has said theresa may should pay more attention to terrorism in the uk rather than on him. theresa may criticised donald trump for sharing videos. there are calls for donald trump's visit to be cancelled to the uk. the us has called on china to stop providing crude loyal to north korea in response to its latest test
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of a ballistic missile. at an emergency meeting of the un security council in new york, washington's ambassador to the un, nicky hayley, also urged other nations to cut their trade and diplomatic ties with pyongyang. bbc news understands that a 24—year—old british man who went to syria to fight against so—called islamic state, has been killed. oliver hall from the portsmouth area is the seventh british volunteer to have died in the country having joined a kurdish militia. plans to get an extra one million disabled people into work will be published by the government today. disabled people remain significantly less likely to be in employment than those without disabilities, as our correspondent nicky fox reports. the rhyls of trials in migraines
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show antibodies can be used to neutralise a chemical which is used to trigger severe migraines. that is a summary of the latest news. thank you very much toer your comments about the row between theresa may and donald trump. abu says, i'm a muslim, i see nothing wrong in trump re—tweeting, he's reminding the world about the madmen. theresa may shouldn't have joined in this, as our relationship post—brexit is more important than a mere tweet. donald trump doesn't care, he'd prefer to play golf than come here. paul says it's difficult to remain diplomatic when it comes to remain diplomatic when it comes to this man. the best thing to do would be to avoid him completely. donald trump says it how it is, says another viewer, he should come here
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and give theresa may some advice. hugh is back with the latest sport. wayne rooney sent a reminder to the premier league last night of exactly what he can do with a hat trick in everton's 4—0 win over west ham united. the former england boss, sam alla rdyce, united. the former england boss, sam allardyce, is expected to be named as the club's new manager later today. leaders might have re—established an eight—point lead at the top of the premier league with a win over it took with a win over southampton, it took a 96th minute goalfrom sterling to do so. burnley continue their good form away from home with a 2—1win over bournemouth, seeing sean dyche's side move up to sixth in the table. away from football, england's ben stokes will make his return to cricket action but it won't be for england just yet. he's signed for new zealand side canterbury, a decision on whether he'll be charged by the cps for abh may take several more weeks. that's all the sport for now. more just after more weeks. that's all the sport for now. morejust after ten. more weeks. that's all the sport for now. morejust afterten. good
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morning. thousands of people are being taken to court and threatened with prison over council tax arrears every year this programme has learned. we've seen data that shows it happened to 4,800 people last year — with 62 of those going to jail for non—payment of council tax. council tax is one of the only debts where not paying can lead to prison. the figures are only for england and wales, people don't get sent to jail in scotland and northern ireland. our reporterjim reed has been investigating this for us and he's been to speak to a woman who was imprisoned for 50 days because she owed more than £5000 in council tax. it's hard to avoid, even harder to evade. 97% of us pay our council tax on time. linked to the value of a house or flat, it works out at around £1,200 a year on average. but what happens to people who either can't pay or won't pay? what's not well known is that, unlike other debts, it is still possible to go to prison for not paying your council tax — and that's something that does happen more often than you might think.
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ijust heard i was going to jail... yeah. i just heard that, and everything else was silent. nicola, a mother of two with no criminal record, fell behind with her payments when she split up with her husband. she ended up making six trips to court before, in the end, she was sentenced to 50 days in prison. it didn't actually sink in until they said "you're going to jail" and that's when it was shock, complete shock. i couldn't believe i was actually going to jail. and what happened next? they took me down to the cells, downstairs, you're then taken into a small cell and you have to wait for a van to come and collect you. you are handcuffed throughout all this time. so you feel like a criminal at that stage? yes. yeah. by that point, nicola's debt — with court fines — had risen to more than £5,000. council bailiffs had taken her car and she had offered to pay back £30 a week but that was turned down.
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they wanted £100 a week off me. i couldn't pay it. i went to tax advisors and they done my disposable income, £30 a week, which was offered to them and they refused. they refused the £30? they refused it, yes. i could barely afford that. that was really pushing it. so you had no choice but to say "can't pay?" just couldn't pay. figures seen by this programme show councils applied for a commitment to prison more than 4,800 times last year. that means the person who received it had to go to court and then was formally threatened with prison if they didn't settle their council tax bill. the number has been rising, even though the government issued new guidance calling on local authorities to use courts only as a last resort. even so, 62 people we know about ended up in prison last year because they couldn't or they wouldn't pay.
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the real number is likely to be a fair bit higher than that. critics say this only happens in england and wales. in scotland and northern ireland, councils are not allowed to use the threat of prison in this way. prison is for people who are dangerous or have committed a serious crime, not for people who are struggling to keep up with payments. threatening to lock people up doesn't solve the problem. if people are imprisoned, it's harderfor them to pay their debts — not easier. it's a terrifying experience, lumping people who are behind with their debts in with criminals. to its critics, using prison to deal with debt is a relic of victorian times. at the notorious marshalsea and otherjails like it, you could be locked up until you or your family paid what was owed. and this here is all that's left of what was marshalsea prison in south london. all of the debtors' jails,
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debtors' prisons were closed down more than a century ago as modern bankruptcy laws were brought in. today, council tax is one of the only types that can still end in a jail sentence — though if you don't pay court fines for missing some other payments, including the tv licence, you can get a conviction and prison time. because council tax is a civil matter and not criminal, it meant nicola had to serve herfull sentence — 50 days — with no early release for good behaviour. her children, aged six and 19, went to live with friends and relatives. it goes very, very slow. i just didn't know what to expect, where i was, it was absolutely horrific. i was worrying about the kids. nobody can prepare you for it. it doesn't matter how many books you might read, it's not what you expect. it's a pretty horrific experience. how do you feel you've changed as a person since then? i'm angry... i've got no trust in the system.
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i feel very vulnerable. if i can go to jailfor something like council tax, i can go to jailfor anything. nicola's council, conwy in north wales, said action in this case was taken in accordance with all necessary rules. nicola was given ample opportunity to pay what she owed and didn't provide information when asked. it said using the courts in this way was a last result and anyone in difficulty should contact the council to try to find a solution. new figures appear to show wide differences in approach between local authorities. of the 279 councils that responded to a request for information, just 99 started proceedings to imprison people and only 17 locked someone up.
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the london borough of havering, on the essex border, is one council that does threaten prison. last year, the report shows you started 96 committal proceedings against people who hadn't paid in this borough. two people ended up injail. why did you feel the need to take it so far? because it's the last resort. as those figures... of the 96, 94 did eventually come to an arrangement. it was probably the threat of that committal, prison sentence, that actually made them pay. what we're very keen on is recognising the can't pays from won't pays, why should people not pay their water bill or broadband bill? council tax is the same thing. we're providing a service. slightly different, though, if they don't pay their water bill or broadband bill... there's not the threat of going to prison. why should council
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tax be any different? the principle is we're paying to provide services to our schools, our children's services, adult services, and it's really important that we have that package in place so we can serve our communities to the best that we can. if you didn't have this power, to take people to prison or threaten prison, what would be the result? well, it's taking away a deterrent factor if that happens... it could be a problem for you? it could be a problem, because perhaps there may be some people who will simply not pay and ignore everything. as for nicola, she says after her release, she did come to an agreement to pay the council and thinks she has now cleared her debt. the council might say they have a responsibility to collect council tax, and unless there's some sort of punishment at the end of it, they might not be able to do that? it's not really fair to send someone to jail for something they can't pay!
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you know... if they've got plenty of money, holding it back, saying... "we're not paying because we don't agree you pay it towards the police or the bins that i'll empty myself". .. if they can't pay its a different matter. so no, i don't think you should go to jail. and in your mind you just felt you couldn't pay? i couldn't pay. this could all come to a head. a test case soon could make it much harder for councils to use the threat of prison to collect debts. local authorities worry, if that happens, it could also make it harder to fund the services we need. linda on facebook says what an absolute disgrace, the councils and courts should hang their heads in shame, shame on them all. norman says ridiculous, so many of us can't afford the increase in tax, they are not won't pay, they are can't pay.
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violent criminals are treated better. and pat says how much did it cost to put this woman in prison, now she has a criminal record so hubbing she woman back from this? something isn't right. let's talk now to rona epstein, a law researcher at coventry university, who's campaigned against people being jailed over council tax debt for many years. she worked on the report published by the institute of money advisors today. why do you think councils shouldn't have this power, as a last resort, they say, to take people to court and ultimately to have them jailed if they don't pay their council tax? well, i believe they can take them to court. it's the imprisonment part that's wrong. the councils have powers to take people who haven't paid their council tax, which i fully agree with what we have heard, has to be paid. we need it for services that must be provided. that is why magistrates have the power to
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order dedictions from benefits or to order dedictions from benefits or to order deduction from any wages you order deduction from any wages you ori order deduction from any wages you or i may receive if we haven't paid our council tax bill. councils need and use the powers. two thirds of the councils in england and wales do not apply for commitment to prison. they ask for these other measures of enforcement and i believe they're behaving properly and morally, as we should in our society. it's one third, just under one third who u nfortu nately third, just under one third who unfortunately use the power to threaten imprisonment and then in some cases go through with it, as we saw with nicola who actually comes into the public domain because she contacted me knowing about my research and asked if there was any way she could be compensated for the dreadful experiences since i'm arguing it's mostly unlawful. we have as many councils to talk to
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us on we have as many councils to talk to us on the programme today. it wasn't possible. we have a statement from the local government association. they say before councils take legal action, people will have been encouraged to seek monetary support and efforts will have been made to attach the depth to a salary or arrange new payment plans. they have tried that. that has not worked. therefore, they say, they need this final, last resort power. they have a £5.8 billion shortfall by 2020 which is why they say it is essential councils collect these funds. they do need to collect them, we are agreed on that. it is not, i believe, correct to say that it doesn't work. if the magistrates order an attachment to earnings, the employer has to pay them. they have no choice about it. the employer as a legal duty to take the money out of your wages or salary if this has been ordered. if they don't have
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wages or salary, it can be deducted from benefit. therefore you say there is no need to send anybody to jail ever? absolutely. that is why two thirds of councils do not do it. ifi two thirds of councils do not do it. if i can just say something about what you have read out, one of your correspondents said nicola now has a criminal record. she doesn't. owing council tax is a civil offence. it is not a crime. that is why people like myself, many people believe, it is so wrong to put people in prison. prisons are therefore serious crime. and they are not there for people who, for whatever reason, illness, mismanagement in nicola's case, or people following a divorce, for whatever reason they have not paid the council tax, they should pay, thatis the council tax, they should pay, that is simply wrong to put them in prison. the other enforcement methods, attachment to earnings or benefits or savings, i believe
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should be applied, because councils need this money. thank you very much. nora epstein. breaking news. the latest net migration figures. it is from june 2016 tojune 2017. net migration has fallen by 100,000 in the last year. this is the largest annual decrease ever recorded. net migration to june 2017 annual decrease ever recorded. net migration tojune 2017 stands at 230,000. three quarters of the fall is down to changes in eu migration in the 12 months since the eu referendum. 75,000 fewer people came to britain from elsewhere in europe between 2016 and 2017, immediately after the brexit referendum. the office for national statistics says the number of non—eu citizens leaving has remained stable over the past year. the number of people leaving the uk who are eu citizens
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has increased. net migration has fallen by 100,000 people to 230,000 in the yearup fallen by 100,000 people to 230,000 in the year up tojune 2017. we will get reaction straight after the news at ten o'clock. are you in line for a pay—out from google? one campaigner says it's been taking data unlawfully from iphone users, and he wants a billion pounds in compensation. we will talk to him before ten. earlier this month, london's metropolitan police announced it was scrapping its controversial risk assessment form known as form 696. it was controversial because some in the music community said it targeted certain genres of music, like grime. in march, this programme highlighted the issue, including how a version of the form was being used by other forces outside london. chi chi izundu was on the red carpet of the mobo awards to find out how stars feel about it. music: man's not hot hot — big shaq # i tell her man's not hot
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# the girl told me take off your jacket # i said babes man's not hot, never # i tell her mans not hot, never hot # the girl told me take off your jacket.# yo, it's your boy, yxng bane, aka, the heart break kid and i'm here at the mobos having the time of my life. and we're here at the mobo awards, which is taking place in the wonderful city of leeds, the very same city that a rapper told us earlier this year he was stopped from performing in. i got taken off a festival in leeds that was meant to happen. yeah, they basically said, you know, you've got to take off these grime acts. we never actually get to talk to the police. they don't really respond to the artist at all. it's almost as if they don't have to tell us why. for me that's wrong because at least, if we know why, then we know how to change it, or how to go about it. london's metropolitan police introduced their promotion event risk assessment form 696 back in 2005 after a spate of violent attacks at events across the capital. but earlier this month the met said it was scrapping its
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controversial form 696, and it was controversial because music industry people thought that it was targeting music of black origin. i feel like it gives people a lot more opportunities because at the end of the day you can't really base a show on someone's mistakes. it's not fair, do you know what i mean? now i feel like everyone has an equal chance to make their money and live their life. everyone be getting blocked from london, you get me? obviously we've got it from up north but london we feel it the most, i feel like. now it's gone, it's only going to, you get me, domino affect. this programme also found in a freedom of information request, that a number of forces outside the capital were using their own version of the form. what if i told you other forces outside of london don't plan to get rid of it? i mean, i don't know why they wouldn't follow suit, like, if london's doing it. you might as well, innit. like, i don't think it helps. it doesn't help artists and there's a lot of
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artists that are being stopped by that, you know? and they've got great talents that don't need to be stopped because of, what i feel, is a bit racist, to be fair, so, yeah. our entertainment reporter, chi chi izundu, is here. the metropolitan police is scrapping this form. what about other forces? other forces like northamptonshire and the city of london police, bedfordshire, leicestershire police, say they will keep their form. they say they will keep their form. they say is voluntary and they don't force it upon anyone and it works really well with their venues and promoters. all the forces have said safety is their priority. even though the met are scrapping the form, they say they have had some constructive conversations with people in the music industry and they are hoping to meet in the new year to try and sort out a new
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process to keep everyone save within the industry. thank you. up to 5.4 million iphone users could be in line for a pay—out of several hundred pounds, if a legal claim against google is successful. richard lloyd is taking action against the internet giant who he says collected information on users' online browsing habits, without them knowing. it supposedly happened when people used the safari app betweenjune 2011 and february 2012. we can talk to richard lloyd now. he is the former director of the consumer group which? so hopefully he knows what he is talking about! what do you accuse google of doing? this was 2011, 2012, google were saying to people around the world they couldn't take your personal data from your iphone whether they wa nted data from your iphone whether they wanted to or not, at the very same time they were doing exactly that. they found a technical workaround
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that meant if you... they could take personal data. that is a breach of the data protection act. they were fined for this in the united states, a record fine. they were doing it. that is what the us regulator fined. what has not happened in this country is any consumer getting any redress for that massive misuse of their personal data which happened without people's consent. what sort of data are you talking about and how would anybody know if their data had been taken by google without their consent? you probably wouldn't. what google did was secretly put cookies on everyone's safari. if he didn't change the default security settings on your phone they would have taken that information about how you are using safari without your permission. what websites you are looking at, what you are websites you are looking at, what you a re interested websites you are looking at, what you are interested in, that kind of thing? your interests, getting that data from the kind of websites you
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are visiting. where you are, who you are. what they do with that, and this is what people often don't know about a company like google, is they sell that personal data to advertisers. they made $80 billion doing exactly this just last year. this is hugely profitable for them. we are saying it was illegal the way they did that to british consumers. there is a sense that google have somehow been operating outside the law, that they would be held to account in this country. well sorry, they broke the law here, we are saying. we want to see them in court and give consumers back the money we think they are old for this misuse of their data. google say this is xi ll§'= 421;- new, xi il§'= 421;- new, we have defended similar not new, we have defended similar cases before, we do not believe it has any merit and we were contested. it isa has any merit and we were contested. it is a shame. a lot of people look fondly at google. but underneath thatis fondly at google. but underneath that is a business model but i think people are starting to distrust. they are fighting this case, afraid to say, on technical grounds. they
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are saying, ok, this case should be held in california, not the uk. ridiculous, this is about british consumers and british law. i would like them to win back some trust from consumers by saying, ok, we did something wrong, we will put it right. their lawyers are very expensive. they will try to drag this out. i think we have a good chance of winning this. in doing so, setting a strong precedent for how these tech giants should treat our personal data in this country with some better respect. they are contested. we just said that. but if they are to do what you want them to do, which is, ok, we did it, it would be up to them to tell individual iphone users they did it to them, that they mind their personal information? the court will decide. is this criminal -- a criminal court? it is not. it is a high court. my job criminal court? it is not. it is a high court. myjob would be to make sure that everyone, nearly 5.5
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million, if we win myjob would be to get all of those people, as many as possible, to get them the money they are old as easily as possible. there will be some time for people to claim. in the end this is about holding google to account and sending a strong message to silicon valley that british consumers cannot have their data breach in this way. how are you funding this case? google's pockets are very deep. we have gone to a firm who have given us have gone to a firm who have given us the money. they are a litigation funding firm in london. this is the way this kind of case has to be run because i can't do it on my own. what is in it for the company? first, to support a really important case with big ramifications for public policy and will make these firms be held to account. they get a very small amount of whatever damages we might win. if we lose, they do not get anything. the point is this is of such big public
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importance, that we have been able to raise money for this to go through the courts for as long as it ta kes. through the courts for as long as it takes. richard lloyd, thank you. news and sport on the way at ten o'clock. before that, news and sport on the way at ten o'clock. before that, the news and sport on the way at ten o'clock. before that, the weather. here is mapped. thank you. last day of autumn today. it is already beginning to feel like the depths of winter. we have scenes like this in the past hour in the hills in north yorkshire. and a bit of st andrew's day snow in parts of scotland. snow flurries continue through today and and across eastern england they will come further inland. maybe into the east midlands. mainly rain and sleet here. rain and sleet across parts of wales, south—west england, devon and cornwall, northern ireland. those showers becoming confined to the far western fringes later. most of you,
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away from the showers, it is a dry, sunny and cold day. especially in the winter. below freezing. the wind blowing in showers across eastern pa rt blowing in showers across eastern part of the country. tonight, the showers keep coming across eastern parts of england. that could leave a dusting of snow in places. icy conditions into tomorrow morning. further west, the showers fade away. temperatures drop the furthest. in rural scotland we could get as low as minus ten. hello it's thursday 30th november, it's10 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. net migration into the uk sees it biggest fall on record , down by 100,000, in the year after the brexit referendum around 75,000 fewer eu citizens chose not to come to britain. reaction to that in the next half hour. after she told him he was wrong for retweeting a uk far right group, donald trump has now hit back at theresa may, telling the pm
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to focus on terrorism, not him. politicians here say his comments are dangerous and his planned state visit to the uk should be cancelled. a british citizen would not be given entry clearance into the united states of america if that british citizen has done anything which in any way undermines the fabric of usa society or security, and that is exactly what the president of the united states has done. the government says it wants to get an extra million disabled people in to work within ten years. but ministers also say there needs to be a "culture change" so employers and employees can work together. despite having done a masters, 28—year—old bethany who has cerebral palsy, has never been able to find work. it really is worth giving somebody a chance and it's worth giving me a
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chance and it's worth giving me a chance and it's worth giving me a chance and looking past what people might see as physical barriers and try and focus on how we can create social change together. if you have had a disability and found it difficult to get paid work, let us know. we'll have that conversation coming up. good morning it's10 o'clock, here's annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. net long—term migration to the uk was 230,000 in the year to the end ofjune 2017, a fall of more than 100,000 on the previous year, official estimates show. it's the biggest fall on record. three quarters of the fall is down to changes in eu migration in the 12 months since the brexit referendum. president trump has told theresa may that she should pay more attention to tackling terrorism in the uk, rather than criticising him. the message was delivered in a tweet last night after downing street criticised the us president for sharing anti—muslim videos posted by a british far—right
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group on social media. the row has placed more pressure on the prime minister to cancel mr trump's state visit to the uk next year. bbc news understands that a 24—year—old british man who went to syria to fight the islamic state group has been killed. oliver hall from the portsmouth area is the seventh british volunteer to have died in the country having joined a kurdish militia. the united states has called on china to stop supplying crude oil to north korea in response to its latest test of a ballistic missile. at an emergency meeting of the un security council in new york, washington's ambassador to the un, nikki haley, also urged other countries to cut their trade and diplomatic ties with pyongyang. the government is setting out plans to get a million more disabled and last year only 8% of businesses employed a person with a disability.
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charities say progress from previous, similar schemes has been too slow. scientists say they have made an "incredibly important" advance in the prevention of migraine. the results of two clinical trials published in the new england journal of medicine showed that injections of antibodies can be used to neutralise a chemical which is believed to trigger severe headaches. around half of patients reported a 50 % reduction in the number of attacks they had each month. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30. the mayor of london's released a statement about the re—tweeting that donald trump did of those far right videos. sadiq khan says many brits who love america and americans will see this as a betrayal of the special relationship between our two countries, as mayor of this great
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diverse city i've previously called on theresa may to cancel her ill—judged offer of a state visit to donald trump, after this latest incident it's clear any official visit at all from president trump to britain would not be welcomed. more on that in the next half hour. let's get more on the migration figures. our correspondent is here. this is a heck of a drop? yes, it's a bit of a stat so i'll go through it slowly. in the yearup stat so i'll go through it slowly. in the year up to thejune referendum in 2016, net migration was very high, 340,000 more people we re was very high, 340,000 more people were coming to live in the uk in any given year than the numbers who were leaving. it wasn't quite the peak, that was a year or so before then it was incredibly high. in the but it was incredibly high. in the year since the referendum, net migration's fallen by 106,000, the greatest drop the office for national statistics has ever
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recorded. - migration stands at recorded. net migration stands at 230,000 a year, a dramatic fall. assuming the government wants to stick to its targets of getting net migration below 100,000, it's getting closer to that. now, high is this happening? it looks like it's some kind of brexit effect. we for sure, we forsure, we are for sure, we are only a year in, say for sure, we are only a year in, but the key drivers in this have been changes in eu migration. in the year since, we have seen eu migration go down dramatically, 80,000 fewer eu nationals are turning up, looking for a place in the uk. critically, within that, i think this is really interesting — far fewer think this is really interesting — farfewer eu nationals think this is really interesting — far fewer eu nationals are turning up far fewer eu nationals are turning up looking for work — that is a category in the immigration statistics, so the classic stereotype would be a polish plumber who wants to earn more money in the uk, he's got mates already here and thinks, i'll make a go of it. a lot
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of those arrivals are drying up. other eu workers are still arriving but only if they have a ditch nit job, we have seen a big change there. another big change, the number of eu nationals who're emigrating, giving up on the uk is up emigrating, giving up on the uk is up by emigrating, giving up on the uk is up by 30%. that is quite a change. they've decided to up sticks. i'm wondering whether it was a combination of facts that is going on here. anecdotally you pick up the fear, around the brexit effects and that may be reflected in the fact that may be reflected in the fact that more eu nationals apply for british nationality, that has risen 80%. the economic effects of this is another thing. it's a question now that some workers are sitting there thinking, is it worth coming to the uk because of brexit but also because of the economic factors because of the economic factors because so few are coming. one interesting figure in this which isn't picked up in the ons sticks, before the referendum, £1 bought a polish worker back home 6 zloty so
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that was a boon to their family, they were sending a lot of money home. that's fallen by a quarter since the referendum. so for many workers, it may not be worth sending money home and therefore not turning up money home and therefore not turning up in the first place and that may account for the falls of eastern and central european workers and the western european workers we are seeing going as well. thank you very much. 230,000 is what net migration is from 2016—2017. still a long way to two if the government wants to stick to its target of bringing it down to the tens of thousands. now here is the sport with huw. everton impressed their new manager sam allardyce but the night belonged to one man wayne rooney scoring his first everton hat trick, and what a way to get it, as the ball fell to him in his own half, he fired it first time over the head ofjoe hart in the west ham goal. he says, it's one of the best goals he's ever scored and it's hard to disagree, when you're popping them
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in from the halfway line. and it gave departing interim manager david unsworth a big win. great hat trick, great display from wayne. he was captain as well, captain for wayne. he was captain as well, captainfora wayne. he was captain as well, captain for a reason going into a tough environment after a tough spell. i asked them to be men tonight and we spoke about the bad run has to come to an end, it doesn't last for ever and being a real man does, if you can stand up there and fight in times of trouble. from a great goal to pretty important one, raheem sterling's 96th—minute winner against southampton extending manchester city's winning run to 12 consecutive matches.. it was 1—1 going into stoppage time, and he curled this effort into the top corner. it sparked wild celebration at the etihad stadium.. burnley made it 4 wins from 7 away from home in the premier league this season. even more remarkable given they only won once away in all of last season. a 2—1win at bournemouth means sean dyche's side move above spurs,
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up to sixth in the table. after touching down in new zealand, ben stokes has signed to play domestic cricket for canterbury, but is unlikely to play in the ashes. he's still to hear if he'll be charged following an incident outside a bristol nightclub. the police have handed theirfile to the crown prosecution service. he could be here through to the t20. any time you get to rub shoulders with a player of that calibre, it's an excitement for the players, and i think that's great for us. that's all the sport for now. more later on. there is movement on the question surrounding the state visit invitation that theresa may issued to donald trump quite a long time ago now so let's speak to norman smith. we are expecting something in the commons? we are going to get what is called an urgent question which means a government minister
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has to come to the commons and reply to mps about the donald trump tweet. so it's going to be a full—blown commons debate about the issue and, all the time you sense pressure is building on downing street to rethink this offer of a state visit to the president with the mayor of london, sadiq khan, weighing in in the past few minutes, as we were hearing, saying that mr trump had betrayed the special relationship by his tweets. we have had other government ministers this morning, perhaps the most striking one i think was sajid javid last night. let me read you what he said. he's extremely angry and personally affronted: so potus has endorsed the views of a vile hate—filled racist organisation that hates me and people like me. she wrong and i refuse to let it go and say nothing. you really get a sense of his personal anger at the president and
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for mrs may, she has to decide now how does she respond because she's going to be delivering a speech in jordan where she is at the moment, i've seen the speech, nothing in it about the trump tweet there, but there's going to be questions and a nswe rs there's going to be questions and answers afterwards. downing street knows she's going to be asked about it, she's going to have to answer. what does she say? my guess is she will absolutely not want to get into a warof will absolutely not want to get into a war of words with donald trump by escalating it. i suspect she'll still a line that it's trump was wrong, but that the stale visit is going to go ahead. before——— state visit is going to go ahead. yasmin, what do you think should happen?” think definitely the state visit should be cancelled. it should never have been issued, to be honest, in the first week of his presidency. it's not something we automatically offer all presidents of the usa, it's often done when he's been in position for a few years, precisely to see what kind of office that person will be holding their behaviour, their conduct, perhaps. why should it be cancelled? because
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he has said, notjust now, but the stuff he retweeted yesterday, which it turns out some of them are fake in any event. if you are a leader of a country, the last thing you do, you re—tweet or show videos or say comments which cause division and disunity. gosh, every community and country has so many challenges anyway, we don't need to unify everyone. for then accentuate and pick on a particular group or any group for that matter, and try to feed into the narrative of racism, of vile racism that's going on here, it's so wrong on every single level. and this organisation that he was re—tweeting this stuff is a fascist racist organisation the head of whom has been convicted of a criminal offence and they are purporting... i mean even if any aspect of what was in this was correct, its still not
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right for the president of the united states or any leader of a country to re—tweet those kinds of things. what do you think about the extraordinary way that donald trump has tweeted theresa may directly to tell her how to do herjob effectively to stop focussing on me, he said in the tweet overnight, focus on radical, as he put it, islamic terrorism? well, i mean, thatis islamic terrorism? well, i mean, that is also completely wrong. he's telling theresa may, well actually, cani telling theresa may, well actually, can ijust telling theresa may, well actually, can i just say to telling theresa may, well actually, can ijust say to him if he's listening, that we are actually ok in this country, there's been so many killings, thousands and thousands of killings taking place in the usa, their medical care's in a complete mess, they've got a gap between the rich and the poor which is so bad. there is so much killing going on. i meanjust recently, somebody went in and killed how many people? he doesn't talk about them. i think that, you know, what theresa
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may said, not surprisingly supporting a conservative prime minister but what she said was right, in fact i think her words could be much more stronger because he's talking about our country in a derogatory way and he's talking about it like that, so she has the right to respond to it. ok, can i be clear then. you are obviously absolutely adamant that the state visit should be cancelled. what about a more informal visit? is he welcome in this country as far as you're concerned? he's not welcome as far as you're concerned? he's not welcome as faras i'm you're concerned? he's not welcome as far as i'm concerned. but, he is the president of the united states of america and if he wants to come on work with it or unofficial visit, you know, if you apply the usual standards, so we have a standard where we say that people who have extreme views or insight hatred, normally under the home office rules they are not allowed to come to this country. that is right, they get put ona country. that is right, they get put on a banned list. exactly, in fact as was the prime minister of india, he was on a banned list by the usa
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and the uk, but after he got elected he came in. so i suppose in the real world, we probably have no alternative but for him to come and i certainly can't stop that. but i think the state visit is a different thing. it's a special honour, given for special people and he's definitely not a special person. the government is today setting out plans to get 1 the government is today setting out plans to get! million more disabled people in work over the next decade. ministers say the new strategy will not only help those with disabilities get work, but make sure they keep the job and progress with they keep the job and progress with thejob. the they keep the job and progress with the job. the announcement includes plans to provide access to personalised support for those with particular mental health issues as well, and an increase in the number of health care professionals able to issue work notices. i've been speaking to one man who suffers from tourette's. he was dropped from his
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lastjob tourette's. he was dropped from his last job because started tourette's. he was dropped from his lastjob because started having verbal tics. he features in the new bbc programme employable mate. —— employable mate. i have also been speaking to bethany young, who is 28 with cerebral palsy. she has never found paid work despite having a masters degree in english literature. i asked masters degree in english literature. iasked brian masters degree in english literature. i asked brian to explain when his physical tics began. when i was 15 i had a massive pressure headache that they classed as cluster migraines and... and they were there for about two to three weeks. it was a long period of them. and i was doing a drama performance at school, i managed to just get through that and i asked the teacher if i could go to the medical room. so i went to the medical room and within about 20 minutes the headache just lifted
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as if somebody had popped a balloon in my head, like that pressure. and it just went. wow. and then a few minutes after that my head started ticking and jerking. and they took me to hospital and then suddenly i was going through ct scans a lot. and then the head tics, i didn't have no vocal tics at this point, so my local tics were completely silent. and then it went down from my head to my shoulder and then they almost completely disappeared and i was having what looked like seizures on the floor and the hospital was classing them as pseudo—seizures. behavioural seizures. and then they said that my head tics were teenage tics and that i would grow out of them but obviously i didn't because a year ago, february gone, i went into work one morning and felt a bit funny and thought i was going to have what i
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thought at the time were pseudo—seizures, and went down to the manager's office and asked for a glass of water. and as soon as i asked for a glass of water i responded to myself going, no, you can die of thirst. out of nowhere, just my voice decided to respond to me. so there's me going, "am i possessed, or what, what's going on?" and then obviously after that it just progressed into things, so i had tics coming out of my mouth like salt on slugs. organic cucumber! that's one of my favourite ones. and i went to my neurologist after a few years of not seeing him and he's gone, yeah, i've been toying with the idea of tourette's but i didn't want to be putting that in your head. i've been waiting for it to manifest. and it led to in your lastjob, you being asked to leave? yeah, the manager in my last job, at first she was like, go on sick pay, concentrate on yourself, like,
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obviously if you're on sick pay you're going to be getting income so that will be less stress on you but you won't be at work. and then higher up they sort ofjust realised that maybe sort of, i don't know, i felt like collateral damage. what was the issue with your tourette's in the job you are doing? it was because it was public. i've forgotten what you call it now. public facing? public facing, that's it. customer service. it was in retail. so they were just worried that i'd end up having a reputation of being the boy with tourette's on the shop floor that people were going to come in and the mickey out of. were you worried about that? i was, especially after they told me that. i know the stigma around tourette's and everything else is ridiculously high and it's a barrier that needs breaking. yeah.
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you took part in the bbc programme employable me which helped you find work and we can now see your trial shift. let's have a look. excited? yeah. you've got nothing to be worried about. it's cool. for the first time since his diagnosis, ryan will be dealing with new co—workers and serving the public. when i'm cleaning windows. you're going to be feeding chips. i'm going to batter all these bleep. i'm not going to lie, i was a little bit taken aback at first. you do not hear that in a shop anywhere. the coping mechanism i'm going through at the moment is pretending that what i'm doing is what i do at my house. i'm trying to get my brain into saying, "you're familiar with this, you don't need to feel out of place." and if i can find a place to work like this full time i'll be well happy, over the
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rainbow and all that. munchkin land! and now we're going to see the clip where you get the job. whistles woo! yay! hello. hello, ryan. are you all right? not too bad. i've got a call back for some feedback they want to give me, which is a bit surprising because i thought that was sort of the end of it. but we'll see what they've got to say. so, when you were on the work trial i was a little bit nervous. there were a few awkward moments. normally we have a no swearing on the shop floor policy. when there's mode of people my brainjust goes, uh! having said that, there wasn't a single bad word said from any of the customers that we spoke to after they'd been served by you. brilliant. we do think you deserve a chance. you've got passion, you've got bundles of it. we've had a vacancy open upjust a couple of days a week, hands—on with the fish feeding, cleaning and we'd like you on board as part of the team. that's brilliant.
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it's amazing. i'm really quite chuffed with myself. you definitely deserve it. thank you. i'll be happy to do it. congratulations. thank you. you were very honest in that programme. you did talk about your reservations about hiring ryan. what were some of the things you were worried about? initially i think... thought he'd end up paying for it with his job. exactly. laughter i mean, swearing on the shop floor is something we've sort of always frowned upon. whistles and the tic attacks and the health and safety medications potentially off the back of that we were concerned about that. how the customers would would find ryan. it turned out really well. how other customers towards you? i've not had any bad experience. coffin dodgers!
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that was one of them. that was the main one that got out, to be fair. but i've not had any bad experience from them. it's been quite surreal, actually. because, normally you'd think there is, like i said, massive stigma against it all. and, yeah, it's weird. i honestly thought i'd have a lot more. i've had a few iffy comments like, obviously i don't want to drag anything too much, but if i pick something heavy up sometimes that can be a trigger, which means i want to chuck it and i don't want to be picking up a big barrels of water and then chucking it across the shop floor breaking glass or anything. and one person did turn around and go, "oh, you're just being lazy now." right. and i was sort of like, "no, i have got tourette's." and they just sort of laughed it off. that sort of like my mentality at the moment. fair enough.
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let me bring in bethany. whistles hi, bethany, how are you? hi. explain to our audience why it is you think that you have never been able to find a paid job, despite having very high level and brilliant academic qualifications. i think there's a number of factors that have come together to create that as an issue. i think for me i had very patchy careers service advice throughout school. there's not enough transitional support between different services, so in my case i left university having been very well supported by my university, and with regards to access to work, order to have a conversation with them you need to have a role, or have an interview, and almost know that you're going to have a role before you can have a conversation about how an assessment is going to work. right.
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but you've had interviews? yes, i've had interviews. and what response do you get from replies in interviews? i've had some very good responses in terms of good reactions to me personally. but it's never led to going any further than that. so, i know that my manner and the way that i am isn't the problem. but i do feel like maybe there might be some other fears there that employers have possibly around access to work in terms of... like what, for example. in terms of wondering what the gap is going to be between them possibly giving me a job and my assessment coming in to place. possibly that might be an issue. so not about your ability to do a job. no, i don't think people necessarily thinking that mentally i can't do it. possibly there might be making assumptions. physically i use a personal assistant on a day—to—day basis and, you know, having stability with my social care is a factor with work.
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but i personally feel that being connected into work would make me more secure, not less. how frustrating is that for you? it's very frustrating. very frustrating because it's been a long time and the longer it is the harder it is to overcome the level of isolation in between interviews. what would you say to employers who clearly have reservations, this part of the reason why government is saying it's going to try to help to get more people with disabilities into work? i think you've got to sort of look past the disabilities that people have and look past the problems and try and find what they're good at and find their abilities. from our point of view we've had great success with ryan. he's very popular with the customers. free advertisement.
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and free advertisement. no, he's been an absolute star. and it is very good for a company who's got a face with the public to show that you've got an inclusive workforce and represent the community that you're representing. what would you say, bethany, directly to a boss who might be watching now, in terms of your employability? i would say it really is worth giving somebody a chance and it's worth giving me a chance and looking past what people might see as physical barriers and try and focus on how we can create social change together by allowing people to use the skills that they have and seeing the skills, rather than seeing a medical condition, or sometimes problems that people might assume that i have that aren't actually the issues.
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i think we need to really empower disabled people across the spectrum to be able to handle their own disclosure process, whether they've got a visible disability or not. because, in my case, i feel that going into an interview with the wheelchair means that people feel that i've already disclosed what my issues might be. so, actually that's them deciding what those issues will be without having the in—depth conversation. and sometimes there might be things that they haven't thought of, or there might be assuming that it's more expensive than it actually is to do. if, for example, if i would be asking for flexible working. i think sometimes i feel that it's harder for entry—level employees to ask for flexible working because it's something that i think culturally is designed for people that have possibly sort of earned it by already being in the role.
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i understand. and by having children, parenthood people associate it in that way, even though you can ask for it legally, it's one of those things where you really feel like it's hard to really talk about the actual needs that you have versus what people might assume you might need. that was bethany and ryan and et al. thank you for your messages. my epilepsy started when i was 24 and i am employed as a technician in the university physics teaching lab. it did not impede my lab that might work. when i moved about ten years later, nobody would give me a paid job but i could officially do volu nta ry job but i could officially do voluntary work at the citizens advice bureau. i came to realise that ignorance leads to fear leads
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to prejudice. good programme. there was a swear word in that which i have left out. dear victoria, thank you for the good work you do. disable schools at times do not focus on the individual students. they have a one size fits all attitude. after school, students are given work placement in supermarkets. where is the challenge them achieving their career goals? one more from a mum who doesn't want to use her name. i'm really interested in what the government is going to do about disability discrimination today. my son has a muscle condition which means he is an electric wheelchair user. despite his disability, he has obtained number2 his disability, he has obtained number 2 degrees. unfortunately, despite these qualifications he has been unable to find paid work within sports industries. the mum goes on, he has a brilliant mind. ifeel if
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the mum goes on, he has a brilliant mind. i feel if my son could brush floors, which he can't, then he would be more likely to get a menial job, but not one that would reflect his abilities. i wait with baited breath for the good news that will be announced today (not) she says. we'll be live in the house of commons shortly where the government is going to make its comments on the diplomatic row between donald trump and theresa may. whatever we are discussing at that moment, we'll cross straight to it. you will not miss that urgent question in the commons following the diplomatic row between donald trump and theresa may, the prime minister, over the re—tweeting that mr trump did of various anti—muslim videos. here is the latest news with annita. net long—term migration to the uk was 230,000 in the year to the end ofjune 2017, a fall of more than 100,000 on the previous year, official estimates show. it's the biggest fall on record. three quarters of the fall is down to changes in eu migration in the 12
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months since the brexit referendum. president trump has told theresa may that she should pay more attention to tackling terrorism in the uk, rather than criticising him. the message was delivered in a tweet last night after downing street criticised the us president for sharing anti—muslim videos posted by a british far—right group on social media. the row has placed more pressure on the prime minister to cancel mr trump's state visit to the uk next year. bbc news understands that a 24—year—old british man who went to syria to fight the islamic state group has been killed. oliver hall from the portsmouth area is the seventh british volunteer to have died in the country having joined a kurdish militia. the government is setting out plans to get a million more disabled people into work over the next 10 years. less than half of the uk's disabled population is currently in work and last year only 8% of businesses employed a person with a disability.
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charities say progress from previous, similar schemes has been too slow. scientists say they have made an "incredibly important" advance in the prevention of migraine. the results of two clinical trials published in the new england journal of medicine showed that injections of antibodies can be used to neutralise a chemical which is believed to trigger severe headaches. around half of patients reported a 50 % reduction in the number of attacks they had each month. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. here's some sport now with huw. everton impressed their new manager sam allardyce but the night belonged to one man wayne rooney scoring his first everton hat trick, and what a way to get it, as the ball fell to him in his own half, he fired it first time over the head ofjoe hart in the west ham goal. manchester city re—established an eight point lead at the top of the
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premier league with a 2—1win over southampton but it took a 96th minute goalfrom southampton but it took a 96th minute goal from raheem southampton but it took a 96th minute goalfrom raheem sterling southampton but it took a 96th minute goal from raheem sterling to do so. burnley continued their good form away from home ah 2—1win over bournemouth move them up to sixth in the table and away from football, bone stokes will make his return to cricket action, however it won't be for england just yet, he signed for new zealand side canterbury, a decision on whether he'll be charged by the cps after his arrest in september may take several weeks. that's all the sport for now. we made it through. back with more after 11. thank you very much. we'll cross to the commons when we get that question about the status of donald trump's planned state visit to the uk after the issue on the re—tweeting of the islamic videos. we're all familiar with vulnerable children being placed
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with foster carers, or found adoptive parents. but in some cases, the best option for them is what's known as kinship care, where the child is looked after by a relative, often a grandparent. until now, very little research has been done into the outcomes for these children to identify the benefits of staying with a family member, but also consider if there are any downsides. today, the charity grandparents plus publishes the findings of a two—year research project based on in—depth interviews with young adults and their kinship carers. one of the main findings is that these families do not get anything like the support from social services that you might expect. let's talk now to jackie carwright. she's raised her two grandchildren since they were babies, as her son has struggled with drug and alcohol problems. poppy and annabel roberts are also here. poppy has been looked after by her grandma, annabel, since she was seven, as her mum couldn't care for her. kate o'brien is director of programmes at grandparents plus, who have conducted the research on kinship carers. welcome all of you, thank you very much for coming on the programme. i may interrupt our programme to go to the commons but don't wore vicious
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i'll come right back to you. poppy, annabel, what are the benefits to you being brought up by your grandma? oh, well! you being brought up by your grandma? oh, well i think for me, kinship care has allowed me to have a more stable environment than if say i had been put into foster care which has helped me take advantage of all of the opportunities i've had, to do well at school, to have normal friendships, had, to do well at school, to have normalfriendships, which had, to do well at school, to have normal friendships, which would just be so difficult if i was say in adoption or foster care. annabel, from your point of view?” adoption or foster care. annabel, from your point of view? i wouldn't have... although it's a disadvantage because i had to give up myjob and forego contributions to my pension forego contributions to my pension for so many years so my financial outcomes for my future are quite compromised, but it's still a no—brainer because you wouldn't give up no—brainer because you wouldn't give upa grand no—brainer because you wouldn't give up a grand child when that's the only other option. it's family, you know. you don't really think about your plans for the future, you just think, well, what can i do and the
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outcomes are really long—term that we couldn't have foreseen and have been better for all of us really in keeping that whole extended family kind of united over that issue. actually, for the relationship with poppy actually, for the relationship with poppy and her mum, it's still as good as it can be and things have been better, her mum's been better because of maintaining that, so all of that has been better for us, yes, not easy. no. jackie, annabel issing, it's not easy. no. jackie, annabel issing, its family, it's a no—brainer, was that the same for you with your tiny grandchildren? yes. mollie and liam, when you started to look after them not long after they were born? yes, there was no question that we'd take them on. but, in saying that, you don't really realise what you're taking on at the time. because i think the
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reality is, a lot of... well certainly we did, i don't know about you, in the back of your mind there's always, for goodness sake, i hope the parent also get their act together in a couple of years' time, the reality is they very rarely do, so we are sort of 18 years on, they're still with us. but no, i mean there wasn't any question that that's what would happen. you said it's been hard ? that's what would happen. you said it's been hard? yes. in what way? financially. i'm going to pause now because we are going to commons but we'll come back. the speaker: the home secretary, amber rudd. thank you mr speaker. britain first is an extreme iist organisisation which seeks to seek hateful narratives which stoke tensions. it's subject to a pending criminal trial accused of
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religiously aggravated harassment over the alleged distribution of leaflets a nd over the alleged distribution of leaflets and the posting of online material. british people overwhelmingly reject the prejudiced rhetoric of the far right which is the antithesis of the values this country represents, decency, toll rancy, respect. we will stand with them in doing so. this is why we launched our counterextremism strategy in 2015 and why we launched the hate crime action plan just last year. so this house should be clear — this government will not tolerate any groups who spread hate by demonising those of other faiths or ethnicities and who deliberately raise community fears and tensions. we have been clear — president donald trump was wrong to retweet videos posted by far right group britain first. when we look at the wider picture, the relationship between the uk and the us, that i
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know how valuable the friendship is between our two nations. as home secretary, i can tell the house that the importance of the relationship between our countries, the unparalleled sharing of intelligence between our countries is vital. it's undoubtedly saved british lives, thatis undoubtedly saved british lives, that is the bigger picture here and i would urge people to remember that. i thank the home secretary for answering. i raised related matters with you when members from across the house raised our clear view with you that after the sexist behaviour he shouldn't be afforded the honour of addressing westminster hall. i wa nt of addressing westminster hall. i want to thank the home secretary. i wa nt want to thank the home secretary. i want to thank the home secretary. i want to thank the prime minister for her comments and others who've spoken out. the extraordinary events we have seen undownedly underline why members from across the house
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we re why members from across the house were right to make that call about him not coming here and why the prime minister's premature offer of a state visit should not now go ahead. let me be clear, i condemn the original content of the messages shared as abhorrent and anybody who pervades hatred or violence online or in person, whether that be the fascist far right by those who falsely claim to be acting in the name of islam or anti—semitics that should be dealt with. let's be clear, this is the president of the united states, sharing with millions inflammatory and divisive content, deliberately posted to sew hatred and division by a convicted criminal who is facing further charges who represents a vile fascist organisation seeking to spread hatred and violence in person and online. by sharing it, he is either a racist, incompetent or unthinking, or all three. can the a racist, incompetent or unthinking, orallthree. can the home a racist, incompetent or unthinking, or all three. can the home secretary please explain what the government
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is doing to crack down on the activities of britain first and other far right organisations including online and explain why britain first hasn't been prescribed in the way national action has been? given the extraordinary events of the last 24 hours and the direct attack by the president on the prime minister for rightly condemning his actions, can she confirm whether the prime minister and the president have spoken? has the foreign secretary who just days ago heaped praise on the president's statements on twitter saying that people related to them summoned the us ambassador to express his concerns. can she also advise mr president trump's actions and implied endorsement can have prejudicial outcomes. is the home secretary aware she posted a video urging the president to help keep her out of prison. finally, can the home secretary confirm when she and the government will take tough action which i support her in her efforts on, on the social media companies.
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we have had no response from twitter, a typically irresponsible attitude. mr speaker, let me conclude by emphasising that i love america and americans. my true grand father was an american gi who came to this country in 1944 to help us fight the dark forces of fascism and i've travelled the length and breadth of 25 of the united stateses and it's a country of people of extraordinary generosity, courage, kindness and generosity, but this president represents none of these things. in one of his last speeches, the great republican general and protector of america at a great time of peril and protector of america at a great time of periland a protector of america at a great time of peril and a friend of britain, dwight eisenhower said down the long lane of history yet to be written america knows this world of ours ever growing smaller must avoid becoming a community of dreadful fear and hate and be instead a proud confederation of mutual trust and respect. as we stand in the shadow of the words of our fallen colleague jo cox, i hope herwords of the words of our fallen colleague jo cox, i hope her words that we have more in common and that his
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words will be heeded in these dangerous times because we must all ta ke dangerous times because we must all take a stand against hatred from wherever it comes otherwise we'll slip into the darkness. the speaker: just before i ask the home secretary to respond, and on the basis of sound professional procedural advice, i think i ought to say this to the house — jada franson as referenced by the honourable gentleman is awaiting trial i believe on 14th december, andl trial i believe on 14th december, and i hope that members will be conscious while giving vent to their views, as they should and will, of the importance of avoiding comments which could be prejudicial to the proper conduct of criminal proceedings. i thank the honourable gentleman. the home secretary? thank you for your guidance regarding the criminal case that has been referred to. i hope that the honourable member for cardiff south
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understands i will not reply to that pa rt understands i will not reply to that part of... i share his views about america. i also love that country, having worked there for a year. as i said in my opening remarks, i am having worked there for a year. as i said in my opening remarks, iam in awe of the mutual trust we have with the americans. the effort they make to work with us. our shared values with the american people and the way that their work has been so important to helping us on intelligence matters, which has undoubtedly saved british lives. he asks particularly what we have done about online social media extremism of various sorts. we have taken it extremely seriously, which is why i prescribed national action the first far right group to be prescribed in this way, as a terrorist organisation. he asked about other organisations. we are very careful
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with identifying what merits prescription or not. he may have a different view. but in the letter of the law that we abide by, we have to be very clear where members or activists embark on actions which are not illegal. we have prescribed national action and we will keep under review what other organisations may be prescribed. he asked what else we were doing with online companies to ensure that the internet is free of dangerous material, and he will no doubt know that the uk has been leading in this area. the prime minister has called for more action. we called in the wa ke for more action. we called in the wake of the terrorist attacks this yearfor wake of the terrorist attacks this year for a wake of the terrorist attacks this yearfor a global wake of the terrorist attacks this year for a global internet forum for counterterrorism, which i went to the launch of in san francisco in the launch of in san francisco in the summer. twitter now takes down 95% of the illegal material for
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using artificial intelligence. the fa ct using artificial intelligence. the fact they are now engaging in machine learning to get his head taken down is an incredibly important investment and breakthrough, to ensure that more is taken down. but we are not complacent. there is more that needs to be done. we will always make sure that we provide the vital leadership to ensure that it does take place. finally, he asks about the prime minister. he asked about whether she had spoken to the president. i would just say to that the prime minister will always have regular calls with the president. she has been explicit in criticising this tweet. i know that she will always make sure that she calls it out were she sees it. that is what she has done here. sir peter bottomley. the re-tweet has been condemned. we can concentrate on the wrong storm by the original tweet. can we ask the home secretary to identify...
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i thank my honourable friend for the question. it is essential that we have a fair approach to all types of extremism. and with a view to that, we always make sure that the far right extremism is tweeted —— treated just as harshly as it should be, as any sword of islamic terrorism. it is interesting to observe the 25% of the referrals to the channel programme, the bespoke programme following prevent referrals, are on the far right side. dianne abbott. the home secretary will appreciate that on this side of the house we believe the united states is our most important ally. we would anticipate that any british government would want to work closely with the united states on
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issues of mutual concern. and we on this side of the house bow to no one in our affection and respect for the mike and people. but on the question of the online activities of the 45th president, does the home secretary except that the fact that the 45th president chose to re—tweet material from britain first is notjust offensive to british people of muslim heritage, it is notjust offensive to british people of black and minority ethnic heritage, it is offensive to all decent british people. and it is also an attack on the values of this country. so while on this side of the house we
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appreciate the importance of real politic, we would also call on the government to make clear that in no way, and at no time, does it give any support whatsoever to the distasteful views of the 45th president of —— on race and migration and muslim communities internationally. because to do anything else would be an affront to voters in this country, whichever side of the house they support. i thank the right honourable lady for her powerful response. and i think that it is fair to say that we have been very clear. president donald trump was wrong to re—tweet the videos posted by britain first.
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we have said so clearly in this house. the prime minister has said so house. the prime minister has said so clearly online. we will continue to speak freely and frankly when it takes place. the home secretary responding to various questions from a conservative mp and two labour mps. you heard the home secretary talking about britain first as an extremist organisation which seeks to divide communities and british people overwhelmingly reject their far right beliefs. overwhelmingly british people believe indecency, tolerance and respect. amber rudd went on to say the government will not tolerate group to spread hate by demonising others. donald trump was wrong to re—tweet those videos. as home secretary she said she can tell the house the importance of the relationship between the uk and the usa is absolutely vital. the sharing of intelligence information, she
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said, has undoubtedly saved british lives, and that is the bigger picture. more reaction at 11 o'clock. for the last few minutes of our programme we will continue our conversation about kinship care with p°ppy conversation about kinship care with poppy and annabel roberts. poppy has been looked after by her grandmother, annabel, since she was seven. jackie cartwright is here. she has raised her two grandchildren, molly and liam, from being tiny babies to being a now. and kate o'brien is here from grandparents plus. jackie, you are about to tell us about the challenges really of taking on two little ones because you're on son was not able to do it because of drug and alcohol problems. well initially, the biggest challenges are obviously financial. emotional. a lot of isolation. like annabel, i had to give myjob up. although
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social services thought i should keep on working and leave the children with my mum. how old is your mum at that point? she would have been 60s then. we were in a strange way in that we were lucky we we re strange way in that we were lucky we were slightly younger grandparents. but even so, it was quite difficult with two babies. so financially, we struggled. we still had a daughter at home. she was 11 when they were born. so the impact on her, although has turned out fine, so that is she has turned out fine, so that is 0k... the she has turned out fine, so that is ok... the lack of support. because of the time you think there is nobody else in the same position. let me bring in kate at this point. people like annabel and jackie are unseen carers. people like annabel and jackie are unseen carers. in people like annabel and jackie are unseen carers. in that sense people don't know they really exist. and
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therefore, don't know they really do need support sometimes and they don't get any? absolutely. annabel 515.5;33555555 ' '*' 555 {5:55 en? ' '*' earlier 5555.55 ss5 east ' ,, earlier that often 555 ss5 east ' ,, earlier that often you don't said earlier that often you don't know what a kinship carers until you one. there are around 200,000 become one. there are around 200,000 children being brought up in kinship care, which is three times the numberof care, which is three times the number of children growing up in foster care. not a lot of people know that. they are often completely invisible. off the radar. they received no support. but often they have had a similar situations, similar experiences, to children growing up in foster care. they need that support. grandparents plus works to support kinship carers. we have an - line. what kind of have an advice line. what kind of questions would you get? the issues that jackie and annabel have been talking about, isolation, financial support. we advise a lot on benefits. and signposting to other organisations. we support them in
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their local area. we also have project workers who work globally to support kinship carers and weren't support kinship carers and weren't support groups. —— run support groups. can i ask annabel and jackie what help you fired from your local authority, social workers or anybody? none, basically. social services definitely not. the day after we got the call, social services said, nice knowing you, goodbye. annabel? they kind of ebb away once you have got a guardianship order, or whatever order you are going to get. you are on your wrong. we have had a kinship ca re on your wrong. we have had a kinship care allowance, which has helped. who does that come from? the local authority. they fulfil that obligation. it is a massive postcode
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lottery. it completely depends on each local authority. what we need, the research shows, is a national strategy for a kinship care and more investment by the government to make sure these young people are not disadvantaged just because of the difficult family circumstances. we give that support to children in foster care and adopted children, which they absolutely should get. what we are saying is that these children, a large group with similar experiences, need the same support. p°ppy, experiences, need the same support. poppy, would you agree with that? definitely. since i officially started living with my grandma i have not noticed social services checking on me or anything. since there are some neat people in a similar attended —— position who would need support, it needs to be talked about and thought about. it has not been a presence in my life at all. how would you describe the way your grandma has looked after you? what would you say? well, it's been the best possible option in
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every way. without it i wouldn't have been able to do well at all. what are your hopes for the future? to go to university and do what i wa nt to go to university and do what i want to do. your two grandchildren are 18, you said. they are all right? they are absolutely fine. molly is working now. she did two yea rs molly is working now. she did two years at agricultural college. she is now working in a dress size yorkshire. and liam isjust busy doing university applications to do politics. and he's done two years on the youth council and two years as youth member of parliament for newcastle. they are very lucky that these kinship carers have sacrificed
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a lot of their own personal life for that. thank you all. thank you for being patient as well. really appreciated. thank you. thanks the company. bbc newsroom like this next. had a really good day. back tomorrow night. —— bbc newsroom life. good morning. it was a cold start to the day and the cold wind will blow through much of the day today. that will bring some showers which turn just now because the north and east of scotla nd just now because the north and east of scotland and the eastern side of england quite a bit of snow falling down even at low levels. that will continue through the afternoon. maybe some flurries in norfolk and suffolk. some showers in west wales, the south of england. it will feel pretty cold. with the wind chill, temperatures 02 minus three. this
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evening watch out for some ice. that continues into the early hours of friday. more showers drifting further west. these are the temperatures in towns and cities. another bitterly cold night. temperatures down to —10 in rural parts of scotland. during friday, a cold and frosty start. cloud increasing in northern western areas. more sunshine in western england and wales. this is bbc news — and these are the top stories developing at 11am: after president trump hits back at theresa may for criticising him for re—tweeting videos posted by a british far—right group, the home secretary defends the special relationship. the importance of the relationship between our countries, the unparalleled sharing of intelligence between our countries, is vital. it is undoubtedly saved british lives. net migration into the uk sees its biggest fall on record —
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down by nearly a third — as eu citizens chose not to come here. ireland signals it will still block progress in the brexit negotiations unless it gets guarantees on the border — we've a special day of reports looking at the border question.

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