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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  December 2, 2017 8:00am-9:01am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. the investigation into russian meddling in the us election closes in on president trump's inner circle. his former national security advisor michael flynn admits lying to the fbi as us media reports that he's prepared to implicate the president's son—in—law, jared kushner. good morning, it's saturday the 2nd of december. also this morning: we need the england boys to win. come on! a big day for england fans in brisbane as they get ready for the rugby league world cup final. yes, england will face the hosts australia whom they haven't beaten since 1995, which was also the same year they were last in the final. cyber security experts warn
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government departments against using russian anti—virus software, saying it could be exploited. england's untold history — the public is asked to nominate places that deserve to be part of a new national memorial scheme. darren has the weather for us. our weather could not be more different this weekend instead of the cold, northern winds and wintry showers. this weekend we have got a lot of cloud and rain and not a great deal of sunshine, but at least temperatures are rising. good morning. first our main story. us media reports say donald trump's former national security adviser, michael flynn, who has admitted lying to the fbi about his contacts with russia, is prepared to give testimony that implicates the president's son—in—law, jared kushner. mr flynn has agreed to co—operate with an investigation into russian meddling in the us presidential election. it's thought he'll tell investigators he was taking directions from senior members of donald trump's campaign team. the white house says mr flynn has implicated no—one but himself in the investigation.
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our washington correspondent laura bicker has more. michael flynn, a retired three star general, left the court in washington to a familiar chant. "lock him up." he'd once encouraged donald trump supporters to use a similar version against rival hillary clinton. the 58—year—old played a key part in mrtrump‘s campaign and often travelled with him. if i did a tenth, a tenth of what she did, i would be injail today. he was rewarded with the post of national security adviser, but was forced to resign afterjust 23 days when his contacts with russia to discuss us sanctions were disclosed. on the 29th of december, michael flynn spoke to the russian ambassador on the phone in the first of a series of calls. on the 15th of january, vice president mike pence said that sanctions were not discussed in those calls. only after the 9th of february, when a newspaper revealed general flynn did discuss sanctions, did pressure increase
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and michael flynn lost his job. as part of his guilty plea, prosecutors said mr flynn is now cooperating with the investigation. us media claims he will testify that senior members of the trump team, including mr trump's son—in—law jared kushner, encouraged flynn to make contact with russian officials. the white house is now trying to distance himself from flynn's actions, and the lies he told to the fbi, but having reached a plea bargain to co—operate, what else has mr flynn told the enquiry and what further revelations are to come? all government departments have been advised by the national cyber security centre not to use russian anti—virus software on systems containing sensitive information. kaspersky lab, which has 400 million customers worldwide, was banned from us government networks earlier this year. the company denies any links to the kremlin. our reporter, jon donnison, has more. cyber security software like that provided by kaspersky lab requires extensive access to the files
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on a computer phone or network to look for viruses. our mission has always been to protect... kaspersky is used by consumers and businesses as well as some parts of government to protect systems from criminals and hackers. but now a new warning about russian anti—virus software, amid fears it could be used for spying. secrets of global significance... at britain's national cyber security centre, they say they've not seen actual proof of such espionage, but they've told government departments not to use kaspersky for systems containing sensitive data. this is specifically about entities that may be of interest to the russian government and so for us that's about national security systems in government, of which there are a very small number. kaspersky lab has already denied allegations that it's been used for espionage in america. we don't do anything wrong.
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they are just speculating about some rumours, opinions and there is zero of the hard data. 400 million people use kaspersky products around the world, but officials say they're not telling the general public to stop using it. kaspersky lab denies any wrongdoing, but today's warning is another sign about growing fears over the risk posed by russia. the conduct of two former police officers who leaked allegations that pornographic images had been found on the computer of the now first secretary of state, damian green, have been criticised by the former attorney general, dominic grieve. mr green has repeated his insistence that he didn't view the material. our political correspondent tom bartonjoins us now. bring us up with the latest developments. after yesterday's further
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allegations by a second for the metropolitan police officers surrounding claims that pornography was found on damian green's computer after his parliamentary office was raided in 2008, conservative mps have been rallying to his support, including the brexit secretary david davis, who yesterday told downing street they should not sack him over these allegations. then last night these allegations. then last night the former attorney general, dominic grieve, raised concerns about the conduct of the two officers who have been making these allegations. they choose to put material that an ordinary citizen would be prohibited from acquiring under data protection rules into the public domain on their ownjudgment. rules into the public domain on their own judgment. there is rules into the public domain on their ownjudgment. there is a way of dealing with that. if you think something is relevant, do it by proper, official means. you do not
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go freelancing as these officers have done and it has the smack of a police state about it. damian green is to reason‘s me's second closest ally, the second most important person sitting around the table. this matters because it pits his denial of these allegations against the word of two former police officers. a senior government official, sue gray, is looking into these allegations as well as separate allegations of the inappropriate behaviour by damian green towards a conservative activist, allegations which damian green also denies, and her report could well be on the desk of the prime minister within days. pope francis is spending his final day in bangladesh after using his highly—anticipated asia trip to express support for the rohingya muslims. yesterday, the pope met a group of refugees and referred to them using the word "rohingya" for the first time. he had been criticised for not using
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the term on his earlier visit to myanmar. white house officials have indicated that president trump is likely to announce next week that the united states will recognise jerusalem as the capital of israel. the status ofjerusalem is highly contentious, with both israelis and palestinians claiming all or part of the city as their capital. critics have warned that the decision by donald trump could jeopardise peace negotiations. it's feared there could be hundreds ofjob losses at toys r us after the retailer announced it would close around a quarter of its uk stores. the move, which would see the closure of 25 shops, is part of a deal by the owners to renegotiate debts with its landlords. it's thought christmas trading and gift vouchers will not be affected by the move. those are the main stories this morning. we've learnt so much about special educational needs here on breakfast this week and have discovered a record number of parents are fighting for the support
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their child requires at tribunals. we've found out there's been a staggering increase in the number of parents who have taken their kids out of school because they felt their needs aren't being met. we've also learnt so many more children will be affected by such issues over the course of their life than previously thought — today we are launching a week—long series to look at what life is like for our most vulnerable children. children with special needs are being let down by the education system. i do not think most people will understand unless you are a pa re nt will understand unless you are a parent of a child with special needs how much of a battle it is to get the appropriate support for your child. cruel, dramatic, heart wrenching. diane describes the process she has gone through, two yea rs process she has gone through, two years fighting two tribunal is to get the right support for her daughter. it does not make sense what we have been through. many pa rents tell what we have been through. many parents tell as they also have had to pay for financial independent
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advice, lawyers and experts, and emotional cost which cannot be quantified. life with disabilities isa quantified. life with disabilities is a fight. i once said many years ago to the social worker when she was small if something happens to me, put her in the grave with me because i do not feel in the past 15 yea rs because i do not feel in the past 15 years we because i do not feel in the past 15 yea rs we have because i do not feel in the past 15 years we have made much of an improvement as far as services are concerned for these vulnerable kids. services are overstretched, been reduced, rising referrals and unacceptable long waiting times. we have not had any response from the government but that is not through lack of trying. nobody will front up about this. i have a response from a teaching assistant who is working in outstanding school who says we do not have the funding or the facilities to allow them to flourish. my staffing is so low because of the cuts i have had to make over the last three years that i now have to phone parents up and
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say, sorry, i cannot have your son oi’ say, sorry, i cannot have your son or daughter in today. # what have you done today to make you feel proud... learning difficulties and autism. a speech impediment. you are just phenomenal kids and we absolutely love you even though our family puts the funk into dysfunctional, you guys rock. and he has been here it is a complete turnaround for him. he has friends, he can count, he is recognising the signs and trying to read, things they told us he would never be able to do. this is about helping children fulfil their potential. to do. this is about helping children fulfil their potentiallj am children fulfil their potential.” am proud of getting my firstjob. the doctor told me i would never talk. i am the doctor told me i would never talk. lam proud the doctor told me i would never talk. i am proud of that. sophie has
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beenin talk. i am proud of that. sophie has been in touch saying i think that school is amazing, the staff do an amazing job, it does not pay much, people do thejob amazing job, it does not pay much, people do the job for the love of it. thanks everyone for cheerleading as. keep saying it for manchester. we have had an enormous amount of interest in this this week. and we do read all the e—mails and tweets. # what have you done today to make you feel proud? you have been with us throughout this series. i am quite emotional. a lot of the stories are a very emotional. joe had his moment, but in amongst all of that and inspiring
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stories there are a lot of frustrations. for you as a journalist there is the lack of government representation. we wanted a minister here on the sofa with us and to say come on, let's talk about this. this is a work in progress, we will not let it go, we will work on that. the government offered something, a moment, one question. but not enough time. we wanted to have a big discussion about this, this is serious stuff. we wanted a significant amount of time to go through this and we wanted notjust the sound bite. work in progress, let's ta ke the sound bite. work in progress, let's take a moment. we always say so let's take a moment. we always say so many people have responded. this has been like nothing else. no story has been like nothing else. no story has touched people in the same way that this one has. many people have got in touch. can i share a couple with you. barry was intact and said
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this. we lived a nightmare, timescales ignored, expert evidence ignored, their decisions based on nothing other than their ill informed thoughts and budget all while our daughter had no education. catherine says i and many other pa rents catherine says i and many other parents resonate with this, there is so parents resonate with this, there is so little provision for the future, moreover the worry of real care and understanding and love of our children when they become adults and we are not there was it keeps me awake at night. our greatest fear is being able to secure a safe and happy future for our precious girl without us. we asked people out there to send their positive thoughts. we wanted them to send them to the people who made a difference in their lives because there are so many people and we have been cheering them on social media all week. can i take a moment to do that? one goes to conor sparrowhawk, a young man who died in an assessment treatment unit. chatting
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to his mother on this sofa made brea kfast to his mother on this sofa made breakfast do more than we have ever done on social disabilities. so many people said, the media never talks about this. he made a significant difference. another one goes tojoe who we talked about, who we saw in that report. he is amazing. he said i want to shout out to all my pals in tesco where he does work experience. also vary on the front i’ow experience. also vary on the front row in that choir singing his heart out. he was such a quiet little boy he hardly spoke, but he sang the loudest. he smiled the widest and looking at him yesterday in that choir it maybe think about all those pa rents choir it maybe think about all those parents fighting for something better and it made me think about the children sitting at home separated from their friends and it made me think we will carry on
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shining a light. the boss agrees and we will keep on at it and i will shut up. it has touched you greatly and that is what the stories do to us. and that is what the stories do to us. thank you. let's talk to darren. it is warming up let's talk to darren. it is warming upa let's talk to darren. it is warming up a little bit. one day? it is cold across the eastern side of england and it will turn milder this weekend. but we have got a lot more cloud this weekend and it is big enough to give as rain and drizzle from time to time. it is a dull picture, cloudy skies for many of us, rain and drizzle in east anglia and the south—east. dab in the south west. rain coming in towards the north of scotland. we will hang onto cloudy skies. grizzly
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showers in wales and the south—west and perhaps in the midlands. you see temperatures struggling up the eastern side of england. five or six this afternoon, still quite cold. sunshine in north—eastern parts of england and the pennines and a glimmer of brightness in south—west scotland. the wet weather is over the highlands. this evening and overnight that patchy, light rain thinks further south and moves away from scotland into northern ireland wales, northern england, the midlands and east anglia. it keeps the temperatures up, but behind that in scotland it could turn rather chilly, otherwise a mild night ahead. the cold weather has gone into the near continent and we have got high pressure out towards the west. but around the top of it there is mild air. it will be chilly start in eastern scotland, sunshine for a
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while in eastern scotland. a better chance of seeing sunshine in england, improving in wales and east anglia and maybe eventually in the south. temperatures will be nine or ten. on the western side of the uk it is cloudy and dial and a bit damp. we start the new week with cloudy skies and the best chance of seeing sunshine in the eastern part of the uk. mild at nine or ten. in mid week it could get wet and then cold air returns towards the end. from the birthplace of grime music to the site where stainless steel was invented, these are just some of the locations that could be celebrated as part of a new memorial scheme from historic england. do you know where stainless steel was invented? do you know where stainless steel was invented ? well, do you know where stainless steel was invented? well, the answer is no andi was invented? well, the answer is no and i was going to make a guess because i do not. that is why they
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wa nt to because i do not. that is why they want to draw attention to this. that is why they want to draw attention to this. the heritage group wants to find places, people and events which have played a part in shaping the country but aren't widely recognised at the moment. here to tell us more is celia richardson from historic england. do you know where stainless steel was invented? sheffield i think. of course. is it because we have not got enough plaques, what is the point to this? this is a scheme to enable communities to mark out the spots where history was made. we are quite small country, very rich in firsts, inventions and the founding of things from a couple of millennia right up to the present day we have got popular culture. it is important for a sense of identity and pride and important to local economies and tourism and there are a lot of passionate groups around the country who have told us this is what they wa nt who have told us this is what they want to do. can you give us a sense
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of what the threshold is? if somebody says the man who invented... spark plugs. the lollipop stick. what is the threshold for what is important?‘ lot of our statues and plaques are about one person and what we are interested in is the sort of history that has happened on a sport that has involved groups of people. one of the longest—running campaigns in the country has been by the peterloo campaigners. they want a permanent memorial to the peterloo massacre. it was a defining moment for the struggle for democracy and 15 people we re struggle for democracy and 15 people were killed and it has taken a long time to get this memorial to come to fruition. it is happening now and we are delighted. we want to make it easierfor communities. are delighted. we want to make it easier for communities. the threshold will be decided by a panel and we want to help them. but it is about things that local communities
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find important. it might be the birthplace of ska music, something like the peterloo massacre. we have not decided exactly what the threshold will be. we are still in the research stage and we are uncovering a lot of local passion and people wanting to mark this out. it isa and people wanting to mark this out. it is a storytelling job as well. you want to stand on the spot where history happened, but you cannot do it unless somebody tells you. you mentioned it would help tourism. basically communities decide how to define themselves and once you have that narrative that is how you sell yourself to be on the trail. we have not even been to far—flung ends of oui’ not even been to far—flung ends of our own country, but yet when people come here they say, you should go there, but it is hard to cover. you need to prove you are attractive and worth visiting. you need to think why your place is special and your
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local heritage. a lot of places do this. a packet of their stories and history well. but there are so many places where we do not know what has gone on. local communities are the people we are trying to help get these stories out to help places and their sense of identity. when will we see it? we are starting next year. any ideas, send them on a blue plaque to be busy breakfast. or on an e—mail or twitter. celia will be coming back to us. celia will be coming back to us. you're watching breakfast. time now for a look at the newspapers. the writer and broadcaster, simon fanshawe, is here to tell us what's caught his eye. he is clearing his throat.” he is clearing his throat. i want to know who invented the cardboard box. every child up to the age of five,
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thatis every child up to the age of five, that is what matters. the information is probably out there somewhere. i hope so. you said you have got a cold. on the front page of the telegraph is as lemon and honey. it is either that or pilates and roast tofu. you pick out what you want. there is one story, this quy you want. there is one story, this guy is called doctor oliver bevington. he is chairman of the royal college of paediatrics and child health chinese committee and he says there is no evidence that cough medicines work. he says the danger is you could unintentionally overdose your children with paracetamol. there it is, hot honey and lemon. the part of taking cough medicine is the thought you think you are doing something. maybe
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doctor watson will tell me it was the natural progress of the cough going away, but i feel like it has got better. where are you going next? i am not the only one who wondered about this. i have been wondering why has all this stuff about damian green suddenly resurfaced? about damian green suddenly resurfaced ? i about damian green suddenly resurfaced? i am about damian green suddenly resurfaced? iam not about damian green suddenly resurfaced? i am not going to talk about the allegations and the so—called pornography, but why has it suddenly come back after such a long time. the guardian and a number of papers have done this and it is a fascinating story. it is a grudge and it is about 11 years old. in 2006 a civil servant, christopher galley, approached david davies originally, damian green's boss, and saidi originally, damian green's boss, and said i am a conservative, i want to help the conservatives. he got a job
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injacqui smith's help the conservatives. he got a job in jacqui smith's office, help the conservatives. he got a job injacqui smith's office, the then home secretary. he leaked document which were then used by damian green to get stories in conservatives supported newspapers. move on and there was a stink about this and the lea ks were there was a stink about this and the leaks were investigated. the person investigating the lea ks leaks were investigated. the person investigating the leaks was this policeman, bob quick, who is now coming back about allegations about damian green's computer and so on. you remember that damian green's office was invaded and there was a big controversy about whether or not a parliamentary office should be invaded by the police. what then happened was there was a story that was designed to blacken the name of bob quick planted in the newspapers about some business that his wife was running, a wedding chauffeur business, and he alleged, which he subsequently withdrew, that it had been planted by damian green in the newspapers. he was appointed to
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investigate the leaks, he exposed damian green, he then thought he had been blackened by a story in the press and he has nurtured this thing. so when these allegations came up about damian green from somebody called kate moss beek who alleges damian green was inappropriate with her, hejumped back on the bandwagon. we cannot speculate on someone's motivations for saying what they have said, but we cannot know someone's reasons behind it. no, we cannot, but i guess my point is bob quick and damian green have had a relationship over various things for a long time. according to the guardian. you suddenly wonder where do these stories come from? and then somebody joins the dots for you and i find it fascinating. so often these things arejust arguments. so fascinating. so often these things are just arguments. so we talk about pronouncing tomato and potato?
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speech science lecturer at the university of york has done some analysis on things like alexa and all these boys response mechanisms. he has discovered they do not respond to things like yorkshire accent and cockney accent. what is happening is that the speech recognition things are conniving the american pronunciation of tomato rather than the english one. they are programmed by americans and so they are dictated by american pronunciation. the chairman of the itv wrote a story the other day saying he had been in a friend's house and there had been some rock music on which he had not liked and he turned to alexa and said please show pan. alexa came back and said, there is no shopping nearby. you
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will be back in an hour's time. this is where we leave viewers on bbc one, as it's time for the build up to the rugby league world cup final, which kicks off in half an hour. we are on bbc two and also on the news channel until ten this morning. still to come on breakfast; it's the subject of a new film starring julia roberts and owen wilson and as a new survey suggests half of children with facial disfigurements are bullied at school, we'll be asking what more can be done to support them. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. coming up before 9.00, darren bett will have a summary of the weather. but first, at 8.30, this is this morning's main news: donald trump's former national security advisor, michael flynn, is prepared to testify
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against the president's son—in—law, jared kushner, according to us media reports. it's thought mr flynn, who pleaded guilty to making false statements to the fbi, will say he was directed to hold discussions with kremlin officials by senior members of trump's campaign team, including mr kushner. the white house says mr flynn has implicated no—one but himself. the uk national cyber security centre has warned government departments not to use russian anti—virus software if their computers contain sensitive information. the russian company, kaspersky lab, was banned from us government networks earlier this year, because of concerns it had ties to intelligence agencies in moscow. the company denies having links to the kremlin. despite its warning, the national cyber security centre says the general public shouldn't be concerned about using the software. our guidance is to choose an anti—virus product that meets your needs and does well in industry standard tests. we're not saying, and we specifically say this
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in our guidance on the blog, that we are not telling people to rip out kaspersky willy—nilly because that makes no sense. this is about entities that may be of interest to the russian government, so for us that's about national security systems in government, of which there are very small number, and for example if you have a business negotiation that the russian government may be interested in. two former police officers who leaked allegations that pornographic images had been found on the tory minister, damian green's computer, were in "flagrant breach" of their own code of conduct, according to the former attorney general, dominic grieve. mr green, now the first secretary of state, has repeated his insistence that he didn't view pornographic material on the computer. the former attorney general said he found the behaviour of the ex—officers troubling. they choose to put material that an ordinary citizen would be prohibited from acquiring under data
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protection rules into the public domain on their own judgment... now, there is a way of dealing with that. if you think something is relevant, you do it by proper, official means. you do not go freelancing, as these two officers have done, and it has the smack of the police state about it. pope francis is spending his final day in bangladesh, after using his highly—anticipated asia trip to express support for the rohingya muslims. yesterday, the pope met a group of refugees and referred to them using the word "rohingya" for the first time. he was criticised for not using the term on his earlier visit to myanmar, which does not regard them as an ethnic group. white house officials have indicated that president trump is likely to announce next week that the united states will recognise jerusalem as the capital of israel. the status ofjerusalem is highly contentious, with both israelis and palestinians claiming all or part of the city as their capital. critics have warned that the decision by donald trump could jeopardise peace negotiations. it's feared there could be hundreds ofjob losses at toys r us,
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after the retailer announced it would close around a quarter of its uk stores. the move, which would see the closure of 25 shops, is part of a deal by the owners to renegotiate debts with its landlords. it's thought christmas trading and gift vouchers will not be affected by the move. refugee families who are being resettled in the uk from syria, should not be forced to split up, and be allowed to bring children, up to the age of 25, with them. the british red cross is calling for current rules to be relaxed, so that older family members are not left behind in war zones. this week, the home office announced that over the past two years around 9,000 syrians had been allowed into the uk under its vulnerable person resettlement scheme. let's be clear. we are talking about children who are part of the family unit. people watching this now, think of your family, the children who still live at home, who may be away studying. that's what we're talking about. let's bring those families back together. families belong together. a new scheme, which aims to recognise more places and people with historic importance,
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is set to be launched by historic england. the heritage body wants people to suggest sites that deserve to be permanently acknowledged, but aren't already marked with a plaque. the campaign will be piloted over three years. a huge waterspout has formed off italy. it was spotted off the coast of sanremo, before moving inland as a tornado. the weather phenomenon caused significant damage to the city, but luckily no—one was hurt. with the wind gathers and the force of that draws water up into the air. this phenomenon and dead cause damage to the city. we will see pictures —— the phenomenon and caused significant damage to the city. you can see items from boats being whipped up by winds and water. but luckily nobody was hurt. dramatic images. 8:35am is the time. now the sport.
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later on... we will know who is the by later on... we will know who is the rugby league world cup winner. will it be australia again? there are so will it be australia again? there are so confident and they have won three out of the last four are not even the lead story in the brisbane times but forth on their website. england are in the imagine anything could happen. england must play on the overconfidence by australia and can draw on the heard of some years ago when they did not even make it into the final because of new zealand in london at wembley. they can draw on those years of hurt and then back to 1995 when england were in last place in the world cup final and guess who they lost to? australia and australia have already beaten them in the group stages of this year's permit. but the gap at because these travelling fans are confident there can provide a big upset. i'm very helpful. cos i've put a big bet on. really good atmosphere, but i think the home of
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rugby league is back in the uk. we started it. we need the england boys to win, for sure. 22 years, man, come on! england this year have just been so much better than recently, so, you know, we are actually in the chance, i think. we've been around all day and we've been around all week, actually, and it's been all week. the final is live on bbc one, where the build—up is already under way. you can also follow the match on radio 5 live and via the bbc sport website. we will keep you up—to—date on bbc two as well and the news channel. down in brisbane, england are warming up in the dark blue shirts and not a sell—out but australia are overconfident. they are hoping for 40,000 fans inside the stadium. there is the captain for today, sam burgess. mclauchlan is injured. popping over 40,000 inside and 52,000 capacity stadium. 6000 england fans from england supporting, and there will be a fantastic atmosphere full of
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friendly rivalry and banter. a great shot of the warm up from above as they swing there are likes. sam burgess is the captain today. he was captain in the four nations and has experienced. australia taking a lie down and a stretch. insight into how they warm up with the exercises... just like the breakfast team here. yes, that is what we were doing. england looked relaxed and they have learned a lot from their opening game defeat against australia. 18—4. brian noble earlier was saying that he thinks england will produce a surprise today. he was the last person to inspire a victory for great britain and it was not england over australia back in 2006, was it? some pictures of buses... and now the cricket. we've had two rain interruptions on day one of the second ashes test, but play well under way again in adelaide.
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england made an early breakthrough, after some confusion between the australian openers. they tried to take advantage of a miss—field from england, but it backfired. australia are getting on top despite that early breakthrough. yes, australia 137—2 in their first innings. the sun has been peeking out from behind the crowds in adelaide, which was nice. we have had some like the rain delays this afternoon and the weather has not been inviting for the thousands of fa ns been inviting for the thousands of fans that were queueing up here outside the stadium earlier on today. 53,000 in total, which is a record for the adelaide oval. it was cold and chile. it was damp and it was not pleasant for the fans, and barely had they played away than we had to link the rain delays, so they could regroup. england won the toss and they chose to bowl a brave move
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from joe route. they did eventually make the breakthrough for an unlikely source, a run out. cameron bancroft, a run out by chris wouk ‘s 410. it was a right old mix—up from the australian openers. a mis—field from moeen ali. to run out cameron bancroft... a superb field from him and then they lost a second wicket later. the other opener, david warner, cot behind off the bowling of chris, 47. australia were two down at that point. they should tha nkfully down at that point. they should thankfully be three down because another has been dropped in the team. he reached his half—century and captain steve smith is in. interesting verbal exchange between steve smith and stewart broad. some bad blood you sense between teams. australia going nicely, 137—2. how much pressure is there on england? how much pressure is there on england ? they lost the how much pressure is there on england? they lost the opening test
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in brisbane. michael vaughan has been saying this test in adelaide is a must win because they like playing these days night matches with the pink rather than red bulls. gas, -- read balls. the first ashes day night test and the first time they have been using one of these, a pink ball, and this was the one they were using. moeen ali was bowling with this, so thank you to england for letting us borrow it. it is pink because it is easier to see under floodlights than the traditional red one. but there is a sense that it does behave differently as well. simply during the twilight session, which is coming up over the next hour or so, a sense that it does swing a bit more. that in favour of the england bowlers, like jimmy anderson, more. that in favour of the england bowlers, likejimmy anderson, and stewart broad, a re bowlers, likejimmy anderson, and stewart broad, are good and i can all swing. more tricky for the batsman to pick up under floodlights. the next hour or so could be pivotal for floodlights. the next hour or so could be pivotalfor england. they will need to make this pink ball
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swing and get it into this test match. thank you very much. and the swiss, you must get that ball signed and then bring it back to the kids as a souvenir. now let's speak to somebody in london. what have you made a reaction so far? do you agree with michael vaughan, because it is a day and night match with the pink ball, england have to win it? yes, england have been positive. there was negativity around this and everybody talking about, if we could get out of brisbane with a draw it would be superb. we lost and got hammered. it in by ten wickets. in adelaide, straightaway arisaig —— there is a positivity. england bowled the new pink hole and snowballing into twilight. two shots to bowl out australia. —— the pink ball. positivity is there anything in there and have bowled with
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aggression and a plan but australia has just started to get on top of this. it looks great behind you in the pub in london. just take us back to your days, when people were sledging in australia, because jimmy anderson said it was the worst he had known. how that might affect the ashes tour? once you got through the airport in australia, it starts. the media are on your back, and you realise there will be a battle from start to finish. and the young lads in the first tents, they will do absolutely superb. the only ones who will be angry will be our tail and when they got stuck in... they got stuck into route, and big players for us, so an ethical ready yards in again, from england, you have seen and aggression to smith, the captain, they attacked smith. trying to get on top and show that. you should
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see... iam on top and show that. you should see... i am drinking on top and show that. you should see... iam drinking ipa on top and show that. you should see... i am drinking ipa with people here. australians are watching here and watching the game together. it has been fantastic. there is probably more here than out there on the pitch. will have do hope for england that they can try to get some more wickets in the session after dinner. and other lager brands are available and many will be drunk, i imagine, today. is there an excuse for an early table, since the rugby is on at 9am? decadent at... even at an airport, you see people having lager at an airport at this time of day. quite closely seen the odd tipple. pub landlords have been toasting england's world cup draw, because all of their games in russia will be played at 7pm in the evening or sunday afternoon, so people don't have to take time off work. they can all get together to watch,
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perhaps in a pub. diego maradona was the man who pulled england's name out of the pot in the kremlin. gareth southgate's side are in a group with belgium, tunisia and panama, but he says a good draw on paper doesn't mean anything, given england's recent world cup record. we've been good at writing teams off and then getting beaten, so we have to make sure that we're prepared for all of those games. it's fantastically exciting to be here for the draw with every other coach. it's been a great experience and really looking forward to getting on with it. the big game in the premier league today is the evening kick—off between arsenal and manchester united. celtic play motherwell in scotland, and the fa cup continues. last night, non—league afc fylde, earned a replay with wigan athletic of league one, danny rowe's penalty giving them a 1—1 draw. so both sides will be in monday's third—round draw. newcastle snatched a very late victory at northampton, there is no dan walker in the studio
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because he is travelling for the fa cup. he goes on tour and i think he is going to fleetwood today. find out where he is at 12 o'clock. i think it is power hour so don't miss it. alfie hewett has joined gordon reid in the semi—finals of the wheelchair tennis masters. he came from a set down to beat stephane houdet of france. reid and hewett are the reigning wimbledon doubles champions. there's live coverage from loughborough on the bbc sport website and connected televisions from 11.00. tiger woods said he'd proved his latest back operation had been a success, after he shot another under—par round, at the hero world challenge in the bahamas. it's his first tournament for almost a year, but he's now seven under, at the half—way stage, tied for fifth place. charley hoffman is the leader. england's tommy fleetwood who was leading is three shots back. it is so busy with the world cup final and rugby league to begin. people have been asking about the new year but wales and south africa is in rugby union. last of the
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autumn internationals. you were edging to tell me something about pink bowls or coloured balls? do you know how andy smith was talking about the pink cricket ball. and the red cricket ball. there is a thing in golf, they are introducing... there have always been coloured balls but there is a new brand and one of them is read andi new brand and one of them is read and i was trying to play with this, and i was trying to play with this, and one of the things i noticed, you know opposite colours, you learn your opposite colours... red and green are opposite... actually, it looks very difficult. i found it difficult to hit it because of the stark contrast between green and red. it is against the grass but i wondered how that would affect the game? when you have got such... white... it is similar. no, green and red because it is against grass. the pink ball is not that different to the red ball but if you go in golf from a white ball to a rebel it isa golf from a white ball to a rebel it is a jumper. charlie drinks his cup
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of tea. a tumbleweed flies over... i don't think there is a tumbleweed that it i don't think there is a tumbleweed thatitis i don't think there is a tumbleweed that it is interesting the way colours about sports. changing technology... a lot of players play domestically, so a lot of players play domestically, so it probably takes some getting used to. and technology goes across different sports. they pick up ideas against each other. rugby league final pick—up at nine. australia start 71 on. it's 8.46 and you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: donald trump's former security advisor, who admitted lying to the fbi, could be prepared to testify against the president's son—in—law over contacts with russia. government departments are being advised not to use anti—virus software from the russian company, kaspersky lab, because of concerns it has links to the kremlin. here's darren bett with a look at this morning's weather.
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still quite cold across the eastern side of england this morning. slowly but surely weather is changing. we will find it turning milder through the weekend. rather than blue skies and wintry showers we have got more cloud this weekend and the cloud is thick and will give us rain and drizzle from time to time. a dull picture with cloudy skies for many through the morning. rain and drizzle across east anglia and south east, fading away and damp towards the south—west. rain coming in towards the north of scotland. we will hang on to cloudy skies and some drizzly showers across wales. also the south—west and into the midlands perhaps. temperatures struggling up the eastern side of england, especially southeast and east anglia, five or six celsius, quite cold. sunshine perhaps north—eastern part of england and east pennines and the scotland a glimmer of brightness, and northern ireland, too, and some rain and stronger winds for the northernmost
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pa rt stronger winds for the northernmost part of scotland. wetter weather over the highlands. what happens this evening and overnight is patchy, mostly light rain sinking further south, moves away from scotla nd further south, moves away from scotland at the northern ireland coming to wales... through northern england was the midlands and east anglia. weather front. england was the midlands and east anglia. weatherfront. keep the temperature up as the cloud breaks, behind that in scotland it could turn chilly. otherwise a mild night ahead. really cold are we had recently, actually all the way into the near continent. instead, although we have high pressure towards the west, rounded up of it, we are drawing down some milder air. having said that, a chilly start across eastern scotland, sunshine for a while across scotland, and we will seek cloud breaking up in northern england, so a chance of sunshine and perhaps improving through the day across east wales, midlands and east anglia and maybe the south—east were temperatures will be higher than today, nine or 10 celsius. across the western uk, cloudy and dull. damp as well. this is how we start the new week, cloudy skies were many again, best chance
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of sunshine across the eastern side of sunshine across the eastern side of the uk. mild start at nine or 10 celsius. middleweight could get rather wet and then called are returned by the end of the week. back to you. —— middle of the week could get wet. the uk's largest atm network, link, is proposing an overhaul that could see a significant reduction in the number of free—to—access cash machines. in response to the plans announced last month, the chair of the commons treasury select committee, nicky morgan, has written to the company for more details on the numbers likely to be affected. paul lewis from radio 4's money box programme has been looking at the plans and joins us now. we have got accustomed to the idea ofa we have got accustomed to the idea of a cash machine we don't have to pay for, but they are present. that is right, and a great many are operated by private companies, 24,000 privately operated machines. they are free to use or free to us. they are free to use or free to us. they make their money because every time we use one, the banks that run the link network you mentioned earlier, the banks that run that
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network pay them a fee. and the banks want to cut at the because at the moment it is 25p every time we use a machine. in future they want it to be 20p. it may not sound much but that is good to by a fifth. we are using the cash machines less often because we are doing more co nta ctless often because we are doing more contactless payments. the private operators have got fewer people using machines and now they are facing a reduced fee and it is them who say that could mean a lot of machines will simply be taken away. so carry on that thought process, what will be? —— what will be affect the edit happens? nicky morgan, chair of the treasury select committee, says there will be fewer machines. she is trying to buy now from link what its assessment is because it has not produced an estimate. she is concerned they will be taken away from places where people do not have access to banks, and we have heard this week another
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300 branches are closing between lloyds and rbs. that is in the next few months. so we will have fewer banks and they operate some machines on their own premises, and possibly fewer cash machines as well. she is concerned there will be people who don't have access to cash machines in their locality, or if they do, there will be some of these that charge you to get your own money out, which is often £1.50 or thereabouts. what about the banks? what do they say? the banks say they want things to be more efficient. what that seems they mean is they want to be paying the private operators less and i think they really... the implication is they really... the implication is they want to slow the expansion of free to use cash machines by saying, well, you will not get paid as much money. so it would be that worthwhile. the banks say it is efficiency but there is a formula which works out this 25p fee and they are planning to scrap that. they will actually reduce the fee at
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a time when under the formula it probably should be increasing. they arejust probably should be increasing. they are just setting efficiency and cash machine operators say, well, no, it is not efficiency cabana but they are trying to squeeze us out and we will be taking thousands of machines away. it is a battle between the two. where will and, that depends on the discussions that are going on. the intervention of nicky morgan this week is an interesting part of that, i think. thank you very much, presenter of money box. when billy white was living on the streets in wigan, little did he know his life would be turned around thanks to a chance meeting with a man who offered him a cigarette on remembrance sunday. that man was roy aspinall. we'll speak to them in a moment, but first here's katie wray with more details on why their meeting was so special. roy aspinall, former infa ntryman with the queen's lancashire regiment, and billy white, until recently, sleeping rough on the streets of wigan. they were strangers
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until on remembrance day they found themselves in the same churchyard. billy was sitting outside on a wall when roy approached him. i grew up without knowing all his siblings. billy knew he had a big brother but no idea where to find him. after the men met, they compared birth certificates, and that's when they realised they were siblings. billy is no longer homeless. just in time for christmas, he's moved in with his big brother. katie wray, bbc news. brothers, roy aspinall and billy white, welcome. good morning. morning. this is a great story. a fantastic story. we saw how you both met through a chance meeting, but the detail of it really is, how did you know? how did
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you recognise parts of each other? i will be honest, i do not see it. what was it? it was the old photographs i had, old photographs of my mother and he does have a lot of features of my mother. 0k. that was what caught my eye on the churchyard. we took it from there. were you drawn to billy? yes, and no. do are notaiming? it is not an everyday thing. no, but... when he came over to me, i thought, who is this? you don't usually get random people coming over, especially when they ask you questions like, who is your mum and who is your sister? i thought... did it happen that quickly? take us through the encounter. you walk up to billy... yes, and it wasjust initial
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to billy... yes, and it was just initial chat from there. you are saying, how are you doing? i started it with a cigarette, to be honest. i offered a homeless man a cigarette, and the facial features caught my eye, and i could not resist. you said, what did you say? i asked his name and he said, billy white. but i have a memory of william white isa but i have a memory of william white is a little child. the odds are putting it together was slim. the next you said was? i rang the next you said was? irang our the next you said was? i rang our sister who i met at the beginning of this year, liz. and i rang her and she confirmed it and she had not seen him for 15 years or more. i let them talk on my mobile phone, and once it was confirmed, that was it. the background to this is a fractured family from when you were young. can you put this into context for as? we we re for as? we were split up when we were young. i never saw roy until rundgren sunday, the first time in 28 years
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of my life. a big shock for me. —— remembrance sunday. at is when we we re younger. remembrance sunday. at is when we were younger. i'll lived with my mother until the age of ten and then from ten to 17 i was put into the ca re from ten to 17 i was put into the care system and we were moving radically different children's homes. one got out of care, i was back staying with my mother, and my mum moved to ireland and i went there to stay with her for a while but then came back over here. from there, everything... i met my partner, which... that's where everything went downhill from, really. i lost my partner and ended up really. i lost my partner and ended up being on the streets. things were getting worse and worse for me while i was on the streets. i was getting toa i was on the streets. i was getting to a point in my life where ijust wanted... that was it. you had given up. yes, literally. he also lost a child in 2013, which was sad. you have a difficult time, and you we re you have a difficult time, and you were at a low point...
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of my life. then this happens. in other circumstances, if you are doing fine this the surgery, but feels more important because of your circumstances. my life went from nothing to... it is still coming around and things are still happening. every day, you know what i mean? i are still happening. every day, you know what i mean? lam are still happening. every day, you know what i mean? i am getting myself into employment due to my brother taking me in off the streets. double things like having an address, isn't it? lam managing address, isn't it? i am managing to get stability and finances for my son as well, because i have to fight for my son at the minute, which is a difficult thing to do, as well as keeping stress from being when i was homeless and everything like that, and problems and everything... a place of support from ben has helped me to pass it on. we one of those people who has... you went up to what you thought was a stranger and it turned out to be different. yes. is that in your nature? not at all. it is just a role that i
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have picked up within the ed's place organisation that i volunteer my time for. it was a poke in the dark. i went that way and i was not supposed to walk that way in the church. i just supposed to walk that way in the church. ijust decided to go that way to catch the bus. and i find this guy. some things are meant to be and it is lovely to see the two of you together. ears like my guardian angel. someone is definitely looking over us. family christmas? definitely. we hope there are more of us out there that we don't know of yet that do want to come and... yes. coming to ourfamily yes. coming to our family unit as well, you know? life is about family and you know? life is about family and you should not be separated or live away from your family. no, that is very true. i like the fact that i have this all the brother that i knew i had but i had never seen him. i did not know he was alive and had kids or
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anything? enjoy your christmas and i am pleased for you. coming up in the next half hour... we'll be reviewing this morning's papers with the writer and broadcaster, simon fanshaw. stay with us — headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. the investigation into russian meddling in the us election closes in on president trump's inner circle. his former national security advisor michael flynn admits lying to the fbi as us media reports that he's prepared to implicate the president's son—in—law, jared kushner.
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