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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 2, 2017 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. the investigation into russian meddling in the us election closes in on president trump's inner circle. his former national security advisor michael flynn admits lying to the fbi as us media reports that he's prepared to implicate the president's son—in—law, jared kushner. good morning, it's saturday the 2nd of december. also this morning: a big day for england fans in brisbane as they get ready for the rugby league world cup final. yes, england will face the hosts australia whom they haven't beaten since 1995, which was also the same year they were last in the final. they lost to australia. here are the players coming out in brisbane.
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here are the players coming out in brisbane. cyber security experts warn government departments against using russian anti—virus software, saying it could be exploited. do you want to see my beard? i have a real beard. i have a real beard. the christmas grotto with a difference — how one mum has created a "silent santa" night to help children with autism enjoy the festive season. england's untold history — the public is asked to nominate places that deserve to be part of a new national memorial scheme. our weather could not be more different this weekend. we have got milder atlantique air with a lot of cloud and rain, not a great deal of sunshine, but the temperatures are rising. us media reports say donald trump's former national security adviser, michael flynn, who has admitted lying to the fbi about his contacts with russia, is prepared to give testimony that
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implicates the president's son—in—law, jared kushner. mr flynn has agreed to co—operate with an investigation into russian meddling in the us presidential election. it's thought he'll tell investigators he was taking directions from senior members of donald trump's campaign team. the white house says mr flynn has implicated no—one but himself in the investigation. our washington correspondent laura bicker has more. michael flynn, a retired three star general, left the court in washington to a familiar chant. "lock him up." he'd once encouraged donald trump supporters to use a similar version against rival hillary clinton. the 58—year—old played a key part in mrtrump‘s campaign and often travelled with him. if i did a tenth, a tenth of what she did, i would be injail today. he was rewarded with the post of national security adviser, kaspersky is used by consumers and businesses as well as some parts of government to protect systems from criminals and hackers. but now a new warning about russian anti—virus software, amid fears it could be used for spying.
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secrets of global significance... at britain's national cyber security centre, they say they've not seen actual proof of such espionage, but they've told government departments not to use kaspersky for systems containing sensitive data. this is specifically about entities that may be of interest to the russian government and so for us that's about national security systems in government, of which there are a very small number. kaspersky lab has already denied allegations that it's been used for espionage in america. we don't do anything wrong. they are just speculating about some rumours, opinions and there is zero of the hard data. 400 million people use kaspersky products around the world, but officials say they're not telling the general public to stop using it. kaspersky lab denies any wrongdoing, but today's warning is another sign about growing fears over the risk posed by russia.
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the conduct of two former police officers who leaked allegations that pornographic images had been found on the computer of the now first secretary of state, damian green, have been criticised by the former attorney general, dominic grieve. mr green has repeated his insistence that he didn't view the material. our political correspondent tom bartonjoins us now. there are reports on the front pages that the cabinet is split over this issue. there were threats of resignation from david davies who said damian green had not been treated fairly. there is an issue with the way the information is coming out. yes, that is right. after those further claims yesterday, by a second former met
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police officer surrounding these allegations, that pornography was found on his computer in his parliamentary office and was seized ina parliamentary office and was seized in a police raid in 2008, we have seen his colleagues in the conservative party rallying around him. the brexit secretary david davis said he should not go. last night on newsnight the former attorney general questioned the conduct of the officers making these allegations. conduct of the officers making these allegations. they choose to put material that an ordinary citizen would be prohibited from acquiring under data protection rules into the public domain on their own judgment. there is a way of dealing with that. if you think something is relevant, do it by proper, official means. you do not go freelancing as these officers have done and it has the smack of a police state about it. damian green is the prime minister's
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closest police will ally, the second most important person sat around the cabinet table, and he has consistently denied these allegations. but this row matters because it puts his word, his denial, it pits that against the word of two former serving met police officers. senior government officials are investigating this. the cabinet office ethics chief sue gray is carrying out a review. both into these allegations and separate allegations, also denied by damian green, of inappropriate conduct towards a conservative party activists. we are told the prime minister could receive her report in the next few days. thank you very much, we will be covering it very closely in the next few days. pope francis is spending his final day in bangladesh after using his highly—anticipated asia trip to express support for the rohingya muslims. yesterday, the pope met a group of refugees and referred to them using the word "rohingya" for the first time. he had been criticised
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for not using the term on his earlier visit to myanmar. it does not regard them as an ethnic group. white house officials have indicated that president trump is likely to announce next week that the united states will recognise jerusalem as the capital of israel. the status ofjerusalem is highly contentious, with both israelis and palestinians claiming all or part of the city as their capital. critics have warned that the decision by donald trump could jeopardise peace negotiations. it's feared there could be hundreds ofjob losses at toys r us after the retailer announced it would close around a quarter of its uk stores. the move, which would see the closure of 25 shops, is part of a deal by the owners to renegotiate debts with its landlords. it's thought christmas trading and gift vouchers will not be affected by the move. five people have been ended, two critically, after a car hit a number of pedestrians in london. the collision happened between brixton
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and stockwell and police say they are not treating it as terrorism. refugee families who are being resettled in the uk from syria, should not be forced to split up and be allowed to bring children, up to the age of 25, with them. the british red cross is calling for current rules to be relaxed so that older family members are not left behind in war zones. this week, the home office announced that over the past two years around 9,000 syrians had been allowed into the uk under its vulnerable person resettlement scheme. let's be clear. we are talking about children who are part of the family unit. people watching this now, think of your family, the children who still live at home, who may be away studying. that's what we're talking about. let's bring those families back together. families belong together. a new scheme which aims to recognise more places and people with historic importance is set to be launched by historic england. the heritage body wants people to suggest sites that deserve to be permanently acknowledged but aren't already marked with a plaque. the campaign will be piloted over three years. a huge waterspout has formed off italy.
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it isa it is a remarkable image. it was spotted off the coast of sanremo before moving inland as a tornado. the weather phenomenon caused significant damage to the city but luckily no—one was hurt. it is quite a spectacular sight. amazing pictures. it is 11 minutes past nine. it is 11 minutes past nine. the film "wonder" starring julia roberts and owen wilson tells the story of a young boy navigating his first year at school. he's a child who experiences a tougher time than many because he has a congenital condition, which affected how his face formed. now a charity is calling on schools to do more to support children going through similar experiences because of facial disfigurements. research by the organisation changing faces suggests almost half are bullied. we'll discuss this in a moment, but first let's hear from 13—year—old marcus.
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hi, i am marcus, i am 13, i have a facial disfigurement. they kept on calling me butt face, scarface, joker and one of them said if they looked like me, they would kill themselves. it made me feel really upset but i didn't tell anyone at first, but then my mum kind of knew that i was a bit down so then she asked me what was wrong and then i told her. i made a dvd and it, like, said all the information about what i was going through, what happened, all the operations. i hoped people would understand a bit more after they watched it because everyone gets stares, but it is more, when you have a facial disfigurement. it is not you that is the problem, it is them. and if you are going through this sort of time, then you need to tell someone.
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becky hewitt is the chief executive of the charity changing faces and lucy ritchie was born with treacher collins syndrome. good morning to you. you see, first of all, let's talk about how your experiences compare with markers who we heard a moment ago. how has it been for you in school and in those situations? i have had quite a positive experience compared to some of the other people who have disfigurement. but i think with this film that is coming out and the work that changing faces does it will open up the discussion. we were lucky enough to talk to the author of the book which the film was based
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on and treacher collins is not assigned to the main character as what he has. the author said to us that she wanted to talk about the issue of bullying and facial disfigurement and not talk about treacher collins. but you have it, tell us what it is. it is a facial disfigurement so i do not have any cheekbones, i have no years and i have a very small airway. this developed during birth. it is how i was born. and the work that is being done now to get a more positive conversation, or more upfront conversation, or more upfront conversation about disfigurement more generally, is that what you we re more generally, is that what you were trying to achieve? yes, we want to start conversations about visible difference and looking different. it is not something people feel comfortable discussing. we want to move to a place in schools where they value difference so they will say to kids, we are all different,
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you are different from your friends, difference is nothing to be frightened off, it is what makes us all unique and brilliant. if we can get people speaking about that, they are much more likely to be welcoming to kids who look a bit more different. people often say that youngsters in amongst themselves are often very accepting. there is also the side issue of bullying and that can happen, but at the same time young people can be very accepting of difference if they are not guided ina of difference if they are not guided in a different direction by adults who bring with them lots of other issues. what do you think?” who bring with them lots of other issues. what do you think? i think a lot of kids are really accepting. it is down to sort of educating people about disfigurement. the more they are educated, the more they will be aware. most kids i come across have been quite positive. if they are negative i think it is more just scared and curious from what i have
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found. one of the things the film highlights, and the book is written from a different perspective about the young boy, what have you learnt about people being tolerant as might your friends will have known about the operations and the painful procedures that you have gone through. definitely my friends and family get more upset about staring and other people's reactions compared to what i do. i definitely noticed different types of stairs. you get curious or sympathetic stairs, but as a whole... how do you react to those? say you are in the supermarket... i am completely immune to it. if people are staring at me with curiosity rather than horror or resentment, curiosity or a pity as you mention, would you say i
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walked up to them? i have never done that, usually i smile and say hello. it probably should be something i do more often, but i am pretty immune to it, i do not tend to notice it is much any more. as i say, i think my friends and family if they could with a something but i try and hold them back. has progress being made? are we in a better place than we we re are we in a better place than we were 30 years ago? some progress has been made and we have seen a slight improvement in the kind of implicit bias, people who automatically associate less positive things towards people who look different. but we also think there is an enormous amount to be done, so our research shows 50% of young people are experiencing bullying in schools and almost all of those those schools are not well equipped to deal with it. but we know there is a
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massive opportunity to reach young people and if you talk to young people and if you talk to young people when they are young, they move forward. we did great work in a school during anti— bullying move forward. we did great work in a school during anti—bullying week and afterwards 60 children wrote as letters to talk about the positive impact on them and how it had taught them to see things differently. although there is a lot to overcome, we also know if we get in there and have conversations there is an opportunity to make things better. that is good for all kids because they could be a society where looks are not important. what would you say to children watching with or without facial disfigurement who are being bullied or challenge because they look different? if you have the attitude that you are no different, other people will adapt to that. just because you look different does not mean you are any different in the inside, sojust go not mean you are any different in the inside, so just go with that attitude and hopefully more people will accept that. and as you said,
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embrace the fact that we are unique. thank you so much. 90 minutes past nine, let's have a look at the weather. 0ur weather is changing and it will turn milder this weekend but we have got a lot more cloud and it is thick enough to give us a bit of rain and drizzle. it is a dull picture, cloudy skies for many of us, a bit of rain and drizzle in east anglia and the south fading away. still damp in the south—west. rain coming in towards the north of scotland. we will hang on cloudy skies. those temperatures struggling on the eastern side of england, especially in the south east and east anglia. still quite cold. some sunshine in north eastern parts of england, south east of scotland a glimmer of
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brightness, but we will see some rain and slightly stronger winds. the wet weather over the highlands. this evening and overnight that patchy rain sinks further south and moves away from scotland and moves into northern ireland, wales, through northern england and east anglia. it keeps the temperatures up, but behind that in scotland it could turn rather chilly. 0therwise a mild nightahead. the could turn rather chilly. 0therwise a mild night ahead. the cold air is in the near continent and although we have got high—pressure towards the west, around the top of it we are drawing down milder air. there will be a chilly start in eastern scotla nd will be a chilly start in eastern scotland and some sunshine and the cloud will break up more in northern england, perhaps improving through the day in east wales, the midlands and east anglia and maybe eventually in the south east. 0n the western side of the uk it is cloudy, dark and damp. this is how we start the
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new week. cloudy skies for many. best chance of sunshine in the east side of the uk. the middle part of the week it could get wet and cold air returned by the end of the week. and you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the writer and broadcaster, simon fanshawe, is here to tell us what's caught his eye. he is blending in very nicely with the server. it is my christmas jacket. first let's look at the front pages. it's meghan mania in the papers today with prince harry's fiance gracing most of the front pages. the sun's front page is dedicated entirely to ms markle, calling her a mega star. the guardian leads with the guilty plea of donald trump's ex—national security adviser michael flynn.
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the daily telegraph also leads on the case of michael flynn. he admitted yesterday lying. the question is what information he might provide. the question is what information he might provide. and the daily mail leads with the story about damian green. the tories are at war with scotland yard. simon, where are you starting? there is a story in the guardian in manchester about the scouts. the first ever buddhist scout group. do you remember scouts or whatever they were? 1908 it started. i took part
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ina were? 1908 it started. i took part in a documentary and i remember thinking we can send out scouting. when i got to the end i thought, there is nothing to send up, it is terrific. we discovered that there isa terrific. we discovered that there is a british muslim scouting association and there is an odd association with baden powell, white christian. but the scouts are trying to spread their wings. without being a big advocate for them, it is fun. this guy is a research scientist at manchester university and he started this scout group and it is centred around buddhists but it is open to all. it would send out the wrong message if it was only for buddhists. the whole point is you come to the group. and they meet at the buddhist temple so if there is any religious worship it would be buddhists, but they go out and they do their water not all over.
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in 201a do their water not all over. in 2014 atheist scouts, bearing in mind baden powell once described atheists as the worst sort, the founder of the scouts movement, but in 2014 atheist scouts were given the right to do their squaring in, the right to do their squaring in, the promise without saying duty to god they our scout values.|j the promise without saying duty to god they our scout values. i am a big fan of the scouts. your next story? it is the times and it is the co nsta nt story? it is the times and it is the constant fascination with what is it that forms sexual orientation? the thing that researchers in this area are absolutely love is a pair of identical twins because they are identical, so they are genetically absolutely similar, but these two women, rosie and sarah are sisters and they are identical twins and rosie on the left is lesbian and sarah on the right is not. so the question is what happened? these
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researchers are saying their genetic structure is the same and they are looking at is their early evidence of deviation from gender stereotypical behaviour? and when does that start to show itself? they have asked twins to bring pictures of them throughout their childhood. what they are discovering is it demonstrates non—gender stereotypical behaviour which started very early on. if you look at the other insect picture of the two of them you will see that on the left that is sarah dressed as wilma fli ntstone left that is sarah dressed as wilma flintstone and on the right is her sister dressed as fred flintstone. they are also saying it may be genetics, but the theory at the university of essex says it made well be to do with different nutrition and levels of hormones pre—birth in the womb. even though
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they are identical twins they have different experiences in the lumen. the suggestion is rosie who dressed as fred flintstone is gay and the other one is not. there is an interplay between sexual orientation and gender specific behaviour. you are starting to demonstrate difference even when you are unconscious about it. the idea that 93v unconscious about it. the idea that gay men are camp is about not being stereotypically masculine. without wanting to be flippant, in a way eve i’yo ne wanting to be flippant, in a way everyone is wearing a dress. they are all wearing tunics because they did not have trousers in fred flintstone's day. and so did the romans. they were not trousers, but on the other hand wilma was very definitely wearing a 50s dress. on the other hand wilma was very definitely wearing a 50s dressm was all the rage in prehistoric days! shall we finish off? this is a
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campaign the daily mail is running. it is shocking. when people throw away plastic it breaks down but only toa away plastic it breaks down but only to a certain degree. if you throw it away in the beach it gets into the water and fish and things like that feast on it like it is plankton. but they cannot digester. if you then eat the fish you are eating undigested plastic. if you look at that picture, you can see there is a beach with discarded litter on a beach with discarded litter on a beachin beach with discarded litter on a beach in cornwall and people are saying stop throwing away plastic in places where it will not biodegrade. put it in a bin and take it away. put it in a bin and take it away. put stuff in the bin, it is not hard! i got run over the other day ata hard! i got run over the other day at a traffic light because somebody who something out of their car and i picked it up and threw it back in again. i was on my bike. as i went
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off the guy tried to run me over. i thought, i am off the guy tried to run me over. i thought, iam pointing off the guy tried to run me over. i thought, i am pointing out you dropped something. in the same breath i would say be careful. it is one thing to be right, it is another thing to be... dead. nice to see. hgppy thing to be... dead. nice to see. happy christmas. this is breakfast. we're on bbc two until ten this morning, when angela hartnett takes over in the saturday kitchen. we were just talking about plastic and seafood and you have to be mindful as chefs and you have got to show that you are sourcing well. we have got a fantastic story later in the show so make sure you tune in and watch it. our special guest todayis and watch it. our special guest today is the wonderful gregory porter. you are here to face food heaven and hell will stop what is heaven? a great rib eye steak. and hell? pickled fish. what are you
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cooking today? we are going to cook some fish in a paper bag. with loads of seasonable vegetables like celeriac, walnuts and apple, seasonal ingredients. lovely to have you as always, ken. i am doing a spring roll filled with chicken and sun—dried tomatoes. spring roll filled with chicken and sun-dried tomatoes. that sounds delicious. how are you? we have got wine on the show today and other drinks as well. and no plastic straws! and you guys are at home in charge of whether gregory eats food heaven or food hell at the end of the show. check our website for details. see you at ten. sometimes i play the game about which think i
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would like to eat most. a spring roll? yes. coming up in the next half hour: is there somewhere or someone you think should be recognised for their historical importance? we'll be hearing about plans for a new memorial scheme in england. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. coming up before 10.00: mike will have the sport and darren will have the weather. us media are reporting that president trump's son—in—law, jared kushner, has been implicated in the investigation into claims that russia interfered in the election process. the former national security adviser, michael flynn, has accused a "very senior member" of the president's transition team of directing him to make contact with foreign governments. it's thought mr flynn, who pleaded guilty to making false statements to the fbi, will say he was directed to hold discussions with kremlin officials by senior members of trump's campaign team, including mr kushner. the white house says mr flynn has implicated no—one but himself. the uk national cyber security centre has warned government departments not to use russian anti—virus software if their computers contain sensitive information. the russian company, kaspersky lab, was banned from us government networks earlier this year, because of concerns it had ties to intelligence agencies in moscow.
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the company denies having links to the kremlin. despite its warning, the national cyber security centre says the general public shouldn't be concerned about using the software. 0ur guidance is to choose an anti—virus product that meets your needs and does well in industry standard tests. we're not saying, and we specifically say this in our guidance on the blog, that we are not telling people to rip out kaspersky willy—nilly because that makes no sense. this is about entities that may be of interest to the russian government, so for us that's about national security systems in government, of which there are very small number, and for example if you have a business negotiation that the russian government may be interested in. two former police officers who leaked allegations that pornographic images had been found on the tory minister, damian green's computer, were in "flagrant breach" of their own code of conduct, according to the former attorney general, dominic grieve.
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mr green, now the first secretary of state, has repeated his insistence that he didn't view pornographic material on the computer. the former attorney general said he found the behaviour of the ex—officers troubling. they choose to put material that an ordinary citizen would be prohibited from acquiring under data protection rules into the public domain on their own judgment... now, there is a way of dealing with that. if you think something is relevant, you do it by proper, official means. you do not go freelancing, as these two officers have done, and it has the smack of the police state about it. five people have been injured, two critically, after a car hit a number of pedestrians in london. the collision happened between brixton and stockwell. police say they are not treating it as terrorism. white house officials have indicated that president trump is likely to announce next week that the united states will recognise jerusalem as the capital of israel. the status ofjerusalem is highly contentious, with both israelis and palestinians claiming all or part of the city as their capital.
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critics have warned that the decision by donald trump could jeopardise peace negotiations. it's feared there could be hundreds ofjob losses at toys r us, after the retailer announced it would close around a quarter of its uk stores. the move, which would see the closure of 25 shops, is part of a deal by the owners to renegotiate debts with its landlords. it's thought christmas trading and gift vouchers will not be affected by the move. pope francis is spending his final day in bangladesh, after using his highly—anticipated asia trip to express support for the rohingya muslims. yesterday, the pope met a group of refugees and referred to them using the word "rohingya" for the first time. he was criticised for not using the term on his earlier visit to myanmar, which does not regard them as an ethnic group. a new scheme, which aims to recognise more places and people with historic importance, is set to be launched by historic england. the heritage body wants people to suggest sites that deserve to be permanently acknowledged, but aren't already
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marked with a plaque. the campaign will be piloted over three years. a huge waterspout has formed off italy. it was spotted off the coast of sanremo, before moving inland as a tornado. this is it. it is created by wind sucking up water through a tunnel of a. it rises and it looks like a water tornado above the sea. this did move inland. the weather phenomenon caused significant damage to the city. you can see close up images of boats on the coastline which were moored up, but luckily we can report nobody was hurt. those are the main stories this morning. now let's look at the sport. england are playing australia to become... rolled cup rugby league. are we telling the score?
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it may have been wishful thinking to think england were complacent, because they are so used to seeing australia win, but the australian tea m australia win, but the australian team have turned up and they are competitive. they are winning. england held out for 15 minutes before finally buckling under the pressure and it has taken some tough defending from england. australia did not like this tackle. the rivalry boiled over for some seconds of fisticuffs. eventually the winners powered through to score at the corner there, and converted to put the champions 6—0 up. chances at both ends since then but australia very much on top. it's the final session on day one of the second ashes test, but play well under way again in adelaide. under the lights come around this is a day night match with england looking to build on their own success. australia tried to take advantage of a miss—field from
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england, but it backfired. cameron bankcroft run out by chris woakes. david warner has gone, three runs short of his half century. australia have since settled into the groove, with steve smith the captain... a dropped catch was survived to negative 50. in the second over at the final session, he is gone. a wicket in the last while, james anderson, giving australia 141-3. if james anderson, giving australia 141—3. if england gets more they will feel they are right in this. pub landlords have been toasting england's world cup draw, because all of their games in russia will be played at 7pm in the evening or sunday afternoon, so people don't have to take time off work. they can all get together to watch, perhaps in a pub. diego maradona was the man who pulled england's name out of the pot in the kremlin. gareth southgate's side are in a group with belgium, tunisia and panama, but he says a good draw on paper doesn't mean anything, given england's recent world cup record. we've been good at writing teams off and then getting beaten, so we have to make sure that we're prepared for all of those games.
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it's fantastically exciting to be here for the draw with every other coach. it's been a great experience and really looking forward to getting on with it. the big game in the premier league today is the evening kick—off between arsenal and manchester united. celtic play motherwell in scotland, and the fa cup continues. last night, non—league afc fylde, earned a replay with wigan athletic of league one, danny rowe's penalty giving them a 1—1 draw. so both sides will be in monday's third—round draw. then all the premier league teams and championship sides come into the mix. newcastle snatched a very late victory at northampton, in rugby union's premiership. after a scrappy try from the final play of the game, tarney takula, kicked the crucial conversion, to give them victory by 24—22. and glasgow warriors' great run continues. they made it ten wins from ten in the pro 14, with a bonus point victory over cardiff blues — 40—16 the score. alfie hewett has joined
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gordon reid in the semi—finals of the wheelchair tennis masters. he came from a set down to beat stephane houdet of france. reid and hewett are the reigning wimbledon doubles champions. there's live coverage from loughborough on the bbc sport website and connected televisions from 11.00. tiger woods said he'd proved his latest back operation had been a success, after he shot another under—par round, at the hero world challenge in the bahamas. it's his first tournament for almost a year, but he's now seven under, at the half—way stage, tied for fifth place. charley hoffman is the leader. england's tommy fleetwood who was leading is three shots back. back at the rugby league world cup final live on bbc one, england have survived another of the australian attacks. the score is still at 6—0.
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0nly attacks. the score is still at 6—0. only six points in it in the opening match of this tournament when england lost to australia 18—4, but it was closed until the final stages. england need to hang on to survive these next ten minutes to get to half—time, and only six points in it and only a converted try away from at least matching australia. is this pitch gigantic? it looks particularly big. iam not particularly big. i am not aware of that. certainly i know in football sometimes they do narrow their home pitch to suit their own advantage if they prefer a narrow pitch or wider pitch, they can alter it to... am not aware this isa can alter it to... am not aware this is a huge pitch necessarily. it is a big stadium, though, 52,000 capacity. first half, we will see what happens. australia are being competitive and not complacent. we are holding our own a little bit? and we? just about. good defending. 9:41am the time. from the birthplace of grime music to the site where stainless steel was invented —
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these are just some of the locations that could be celebrated as part of a new memorial scheme from historic england. the heritage group wants to find places, people and events, which have played a part in shaping the country but aren't widely recognised at present. here to tell us more is celia richardson from historic england. good morning. morning. what are the untold stories? that is the problem that you don't know when you want people to tell you. we have heard from many people already and have been doing research. we have passionate people around the country who want to see many things recognised and this is a country rich in invention, especially in the north—west of england. the atom was split here and thatis england. the atom was split here and that is marked out. notjust about invention and engineering and those things we know we are good at, but there is music and literature and art. we have people wanting to mark at the birthplace of the nhs. we have people wanting to work out a place where ewan maccoll wrote a
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book called dirty old town. everybody loves some kind of heritage. yes, but when does it all become a bit too much? how do you decide what deserves a plaque? we are going for communities where the heritage is not marked out in history is not marked. you'll often find them in town centres and great buildings, markers of important people, but we are looking for the communities where that has not happened yet and were important have happened yet and were important have happened and things that are central to place making and a sense of identity. import into tourism and the economy and not yet marked out. there are places in city centres, like a particular massacre. a long campaignfora like a particular massacre. a long campaign for a permanent memorial. these are things people feel passionately need to be marked out but looking for the untold stories at the moment. this is an exercise in storytelling and celebration as much as anything. interesting... emily pankhurst. ..
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some stories, you think, of course, there would be a blue plaque. 0ne some stories, you think, of course, there would be a blue plaque. one of there would be a blue plaque. one of the really significant moment of history. is it awkward sometimes? you have a panel of people and you are presented with someone, somebody somewhere thinks the story is important and they feel passionate, but you're presumably in an awkward position because if you don't agree, you have descended back saying, not quite important enough. we don't think what you think is think is important is important. that is a bit awkward, isn't it? that is one of the things heritage england has to do where the body that lists buildings... people apply to have a building listed and in orderfor us to list to have a building listed and in order for us to list it must be nationally significant and linked to history, and it must be a special example of its kind and the threshold is high. if someone is sitting there and thinking, i know someone down the road that should be recognised, what is the list that will get it through your process? what are the markers that they must reach?
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it is important we don't decide to impose a national grid on this sort of scheme, because this has really got to come from communities themselves. we will work with local people and they are the ones who will make the decision, is this history really significant to us? is it worth marking up? is it important and the community to happen? talking about identity and belonging, it must come from them. and then, what they get is what, financial? is it financial gain or is ita financial? is it financial gain or is it a sense of pride? what do these communities seem to be after? it isa these communities seem to be after? it is a permanent marker and often they just want acknowledgement and recognition, but also it is working with local groups, we run heritage schools... it is making sure this knowledge people are passionate about is that held between one or two people but a lot of our history is locked up in the minds of specialists and needs to be shared accessibly. people want to pass it on forfuture accessibly. people want to pass it on for future generations. thank you very much. earlier one of
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the things asked, because we were talking about stainless steel, and you told us it is from share field... we were educated that way. —— sheffield. who invented the cardboard box? did you find out? a person got in touch on twitter and says the scottish born robert geyer invented the precut cardboard or paperboard box, guess one? 1890. and those pieces were folded into boxes. has robert gair been recognised with a blue plaque? lets put on the list. inventor of the cardboard box marvellous. now the cardboard box marvellous. now the weather. slowly but surely our weather is changing. certainly we will find it turning milder through the weekend. but rather than blue skies and wintry showers we have got more cloud this weekend, and the cloud is thick enough to give us rain and drizzle from time to time. a dull picture with cloudy skies
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for many through the morning. rain and drizzle across east anglia and south—east, fading away and damp towards the south—west. rain coming in towards the north of scotland. we will probably hang on to cloudy skies and some drizzly showers across wales and the south—west and into the midlands perhaps. temperatures struggling up the eastern side of england, especially south—east and east anglia, five or six celsius, still quite cold. sunshine perhaps in north—eastern part of england and the east pennines, and in scotland a glimmer of brightness, and northern ireland, too, and some rain and stronger winds for the northernmost part of scotland. wetter weather over the highlands. what happens this evening and overnight is patchy, mostly light rain sinking further south, moves away from scotland down into northern ireland, into wales, through northern england and towards the midlands and east anglia. it's a weather front bringing all that lot. keep the temperature up as the cloud breaks, and behind that in scotland it could turn chilly. otherwise a mild night ahead.
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really cold air we had recently, actually all the way into the near continent. keep the temperature up as the cloud breaks, and behind that in scotland it could turn chilly. otherwise a mild night ahead. instead, although we have high pressure towards the west, around the top of it, we are drawing down some milder air. having said that, a chilly start across eastern scotland, sunshine for a while across scotland, and we will see cloud breaking up in northern england, so a chance of sunshine and perhaps improving through the day across east wales, midlands and east anglia and maybe the south—east where temperatures will be higher than today, nine or 10 celsius. across the western uk, cloudy and dull. damp as well. this is how we start the new week, cloudy skies for many again. best chance of sunshine across the eastern side of the uk. a mild start with nine or 10 celsius. the middle part of the week could get rather wet and then cold air returns by the end of the week. back to you. thank you very much. the christmas period can be stressful and overbearing at the best of times,
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but it can be even more challenging if you are a parent of a child with autism. the change of routine, noise and unfamiliarity can all combine to make the festive season particularly difficult. so breakfast'sjohn maguire has been to visit a santa's grotto with a difference — one that's been adapted to become autism—friendly. as the song goes, it's the most wonderful time of the year, but not for everyone. i used to hate christmas because you never got it. he didn't want presents and it's his birthday on new year's day. so you just sort of missed out on everything. julie's13—year—old sonjoe has autism and in the past christmas has been difficult for the whole family. we couldn't wrap the presents for a few years because he couldn't bear the noise of them opening. the autism affects the senses and it blocks him from understanding things so you have to reduce everything, so you don't have a big celebration, everything is kept on the down low, but as he's got older we've been
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able to expand each year and add an extra element each christmas, so this year he'll have his presents wrapped, so i'm looking forward to that. julie approached her local garden centre in liverpool and suggested this, silent santa night, designed for children with autism. the music is quieter, there are no queues and julie's trained father christmas and his elves on what to say and crucially what not to say to the children. "have you been a good boy," that could really stress somebody out and just little tips where they can say, "just try to be the best you can be," or, "have you been the best you can be?" rather than challenging the child. i had it turned off. really quiet i like it. a few weeks ago we met 0scar and this family who told us about the difficulties they face when going shopping. well, tonight, a very excited and a very happy 0scar is doing something this parents say would usually be just too much for him. i'll give it to my elves
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when i get back to the north pole and we'll sort all your presents out. are you real? of course, i'm the real santa. see my beard, look. a really nice experience. we've normally avoided santas grottos at christmas time because of 0scar's condition. it could be the lights, the sensory overload, but coming here he's so excited and he's able to engage and understand the whole process, which is not what we would experience in general. what else did he tell you, what's he going to do with your list? take it to the elves. yes, at the north pole. it's a long way! it is a long way. it's hoped these nights will become commonplace, ensuring christmas is special for as many children as possible. bye, john. bye, 0scar. good to have a space to enjoy the
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festive season at peace. the time is 9:51am. meghan markle has had a taste of her future royal life, joining herfiance prince harry on their first official public engagement in nottingham yesterday. the pictures were on all the front pages. crowds lined the streets to see the couple who were visiting a charity fair hosted by the terrence higgins trust to mark world aids day. the royal commentator, james brooks, was at the event along with lizziejordan, who's an hiv campaigner. we can talk to them now. good morning. james, we will show you some pictures as we talk, and give a sense of the occasion. everyone was looking forward to this and saying this is the first outing as a couple. we did not know how it would be but we had a sense they are relaxed and each other‘s company. what did you make of what you saw? it was a cold day, freezing down
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there, but it took well to build up. we did not know how many crowds would turn out and whether would be popular. but as the morning got on, about half an hour before they were expected to arrive, the crowd build built up. this is where you were... you are very much involved in the campaign they are. tell us what happened. they came in the room? there are groups of organisations, and my organisation was represented there, and terrence higgins trust and other charities and organisations. lots of us living with hiv, and we got to connect with the prince and meghan and share personal stories of our lives living with a stigmatised health condition. can you explain your own personal link? i was diagnosed 11 years ago after the death of my partner and since thenl the death of my partner and since then i have gone on to do a lot of work around bringing a face to the condition that does not fit with stereotypes people assume someone
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with hiv has. a lot of what has been made of the couple, and about the manufacturing of this appearance, this first appearance, it is no coincidence that princess diana was a great patron of this charity, and did a lot of work for recognising hiv and it was the way in which he brought important is to its appearance. he wants to make a difference to people's lives. like the charity lizzie and other charities and causes are involved with that as well. a lot of the imagery is react relaxed... a touchjohnny and... but without being cynical, a lot of this is managed. it is, and will be addressing the next month and coming years to see whether that tactility does disappear whether it stays whether
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meghan puts her own her own royal life. i think there will be aspects of harry helping her along on the way we saw that yesterday. she is used to, as an actress, taking selfies with people and she told crowds when they asked, sorry, we are not allowed to do that. there are not allowed to do that. there are bits that she will start to learn and it is a big learning curve, but i think the fact that she has got that experience as an actress, somebody who is quite 0k with the cameras already, it will do her a world of good and prepare her for what will be and interesting life. 0n the issue of being prepared for situation comedies that first hand, didn't you? when you met her, she was instantly... she knew the connection and this is the moment. you can see the energy, photograph taken as you mad, and instantly knew more than she might have done. you we re more than she might have done. you were surprised? yes, she tapped me on the arm and
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said, we know your story. you are on the programme with harry. and it was genuine and warm. she clearly knew her stuff and had seen the programme, and, yes, so warm and relaxed. and so informal. not to cast aspersions on the rest of the royal family but there is great excitement for this couple in terms of how they change the image of the royal family. terms of how they change the image of the royalfamily. but terms of how they change the image of the royal family. but that he will be able to comment. you have a young son, 12 years old, and you are obviously with the website and seeing it grow and peoples interest, how will they connect to a different generation? my son is mixed race and megan is as well, and that intersection allergy and bringing together and bring a platform to a strong, independent woman, that is mixed raced and actually bringing that focus and celebrating diversity. —— all of that intersectionality. is he interested in the royal
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family? he was over the moon to be there yesterday? incredibly nervous but a very cool, calm and collected person. harry said to him, you must be proud of your month. and he said, yeah, of course. and i said, i be proud of your month. and he said, yeah, of course. and i said, lam so proud of him. and harry when, how great is that? you're proud of each other. what do you see in terms of younger people engaging with monarchy? the fact that harry is one of the most legible royals out there, and the fact he is... yesterday we were at nottingham academy and he did the walkabout and chatted to some kids down there. chatting to them after words, and seeing how they interacted with the kids, it was just the usual questions you would get asked. stuff like, what are you doing this weekend? rather than, how doing this weekend? rather than, how do you feel, the queen's famous catchphrase of, have you come far?
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those are receding and what you see from harry and the younger royals is trying to get to know people. they wa nt to trying to get to know people. they want to be seen as almost one of the people. the reality is that as everybody knows, and logically, there will be a change in the dynamic of the royal family, and the roles that people do, however that plays out. that will happen in the next few years. we're talking about a period of one year, five years, but there will be big changes, want their? 0bviously big changes, want their? obviously we don't want to assume what will happen but we will start to see... there is an assumption that the queen will bullock was some official duties in the —— there is an assumption that the queen will roll english official duties in the next two years. the duke of edinburgh stepped down as commander of the brigadier guards and prince andrew has taken over. 0ver and prince andrew has taken over. over the next year ‘s patron ages will be passed to the royal royals —— passed to the younger royals, and thatis —— passed to the younger royals, and that is key for harry, meghan, william and catherine, it is to engage with those passion points they want to put out there.
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lizzie, a last thought, a great day for you and your son personally, but tangible difference for the campaigning groups when the royal company has a part to play? very much. the spotlight they put onto a stigmatised condition is fantastic. the coverage about it, the being had, you know, hats off to them. thank you to them for making it happen. i give it happen. igive are it happen. i give are sharing your experiences. thank you forjoining us this morning. lots of sport going on let's hope england does well for the by. let's hope england does well for the rugby. breakfast back tomorrow from 6am. bye—bye. this is bbc news, the headlines at ten: donald trump's former national security adviser admits lying about his contacts with russia and is prepared to give testimony that implicates the president's son—in—law according to reports. the tax cuts and jobs act as amended
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is past. the tax cuts and jobs act as amended is past. the us approves a package of tax changes described as the most sweeping reforms in almost 40 years and seen as the first big legislative achievement for donald trump. the head of britain's cyber security centre advises all government departments not to use russian anti—virus software in systems containing sensitive information. also in the next hour: england take on australia in major sporting clashes.
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