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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  December 23, 2017 7:00am-10:00am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with tina daheley and jon kay. the fbi says it's foiled a christmas day terror attack in san francisco. a former us marine has been arrested, accused of planning a suicide mission at pier 39, one of the city's most famous tourist attractions. good morning. it's saturday 23rd december. also this morning: a man's due in court in york, charged with the murder of a woman who was stabbed to death at the supermarket where she worked. china and russia join the united states in approving fresh un sanctions on north korea. good morning, like to christmas homeless shelter in central london as research points to the fact there are far more people sleeping rough than was previously thought.
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in sport, there's a festive feast at the emirates. three goals in five minutes for arsenal, but it's not enough as liverpool strike back to earn a draw in a cracker to kick off the christmas fixtures. one of the world's rarest pigs, caught on camera — scientists thought the javan warty had been driven to extinction. we'll hear how it's now been rediscovered. and matt has the weather. good morning, another incredibly mild state across the uk, fairly grey for many at the risk colder air getting closer. while it arrive in time for christmas day? yourfull forecast is coming up. we look forward to finding out, thank you, matt. good morning. first, our main story — a former us marine has been arrested on suspicion of planning a terror attack in san francisco on christmas day. everitt aaron jameson was held after allegedly discussing the plot with undercover fbi agents. our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. one of san francisco's most popular tourist attractions, pier 39, packed with shops and restaurants.
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the fbi says everittjameson planned to attack the area on christmas day. using explosives, he wanted to funnel the crowds into a location where he could inflict casualties. the alleged plot came to light after someone reported jameson for suspicious activity on facebook. he liked posts sympathetic with the so—called islamic state group, and he voiced support for the halloween attack in new york city when a lorry was driven on to a crowded bike path, killing eight people, and the mass shooting in san bernardino in 2015. jameson‘s home was raided on wednesday. investigators found several weapons and ammunition, and a will. agents believe the attack was to be a suicide mission. and there was a note that referred to donald trump's recent announcement that the us would recognise jerusalem as the capital of israel. it's really unbelievable, it's just hard to fathom right now. i really don't know what to say, what, you know, how to feel, really. it'sjust shocking, you know?
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that's my son. in a statement, the us attorney generaljeff sessions said: the fbi says the public in san francisco were never in imminent danger. this time, the fbi got his man but the concern is how many could there be out there that are not on the fbi's or local law enforcement's radar? and that's what keeps us up at night. the former marine has appeared in court. through his lawyer, he denied the allegations. if convicted, he faces a fine and a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison. a man is due in court this morning charged with murdering a woman as she worked in a supermarket. neville hord, who is 44, will appear before york magistrates over the death ofjodie willsher in skipton. our north of england correspondent judith moritz reports. malcolm and jodie willsher looking
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forward to a family christmas. now he is left grieving, paying tribute to her as a doting mother and loving wife. jodie willsher was getting ready for the holidays, wearing her festive jumper while serving supermarket shoppers. jodie had worked at the skipton aldi since it opened two years ago. the store was full when she was stabbed. trolleys were abandoned as fearful shoppers scattered, while several staff and customers rushed to help. there was chaos inside the shop as people realised what had happened. and asjodie lay dying, the first person to intervene was a man in his 60s who grappled with the attacker for a long time as he tried to restrain him. despite efforts to savejodie, she died on the shop floor. the supermarket became a crime scene, forensics staff and police officers taking evidence away. the shop was closed,
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with customers coming instead to leave tributes for the popular member of staff. whenever i've shopped in aldi, she's always been friendly, pleasant, you know, a lovely, lovely girl, and it's just — what a shock, you know, an absolute shock, really. the community here is small and tight—knit. jodie willsher worked at its heart, well—known and well liked. a 44—year—old man has been charged with her murder. some international news. the united nations security council has passed severe new sanctions against north korea, aimed at cutting oil supplies vital for its missile and nuclear programs. the sanctions, proposed by the us, also force north koreans working overseas to return home. nada tawfik reports. this is the 10th security council resolution imposing sanctions on north korea. none before it has convinced kim jong—un to abandon his nuclear programme, but diplomats hope this resolution will bite hard enough
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to change the regime's calculus — or at the very least, restrict its ability to carry out additional nuclear and missile tests. president trump specifically asked president xi of china to cut oil to pyongyang, believing it would be a pivotal step. mr trump celebrated the adoption of new sanctions, tweeting "the world wants peace, not death". today's resolution achieves an 89% total reduction of the kim regime's ability to import gasoline, diesel and other refined products, and should the north korean regime conduct another nuclear or ballistic missile test, this resolution commits the security council to take even further action. the resolution also requires countries to expel north koreans working abroad within 2a months in an effort to cut off an important source of revenue.
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15 north korean officials in the ministry which manages logistics for the army will now be added to the un blacklist. nada tawfik, bbc news, new york. the homeless charity crisis is warning of the hidden homeless, somebody whose sleeps on a train or car, bus or tent rather than in a doorway on the street. it is estimated up to 9000 people fall into the category, on top of more than 4000 people known to be sleeping rough. the charity is urging government to act or face thousands more falling into the situation. my my name is alex, i'm 36 and i was tent homeless. after the breakup of a relationship and with no friends oi’ a relationship and with no friends orfamily nearby, a relationship and with no friends or family nearby, alex felt rough sleeping was his only option. rather than coming and aahing, bought myself a tent and a sleeping back the same day and three weeks later, i have got out of the situation.
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alex was a hidden rough sleeper according to the homeless charity, hiding his homelessness in a tent in a wooded area rather than bedding down on the street. it isjust putting my mind that this is the long—term, it is a long—term, it is just an overdue camping trip which i kind of just explained just an overdue camping trip which i kind ofjust explained to myself, made me get through it. any new report it suggests more than 9000 hidden rough sleepers across the uk will spend christmas sleeping in cars, trains and buses, as well as te na nts cars, trains and buses, as well as tenants like alex. everyone walks past homeless people, use it all the time, it is almost like part of day—to—day life that they experience, people begin with cups and stuff with dogs or bits of cardboard with writing on it and you kind of technology at and think it is never going to happen to me, never. the charities is hiding the homelessness often makes them invisible to outreach workers who could lead to further problems like depression and isolation. the feelings about being homeless, it is
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a massive stigma, and i kind of really didn't want to explain to friends and family that i am in that sort of area of need. and almost too proud to ask for help. crisis is calling on the government to do more to help people who find themselves in this situation so that they can get the help they need. which alex eventually did. five or six months ago i was living in my tent, 20 18 is coming to be a new year and it is going to be my dear. the government says we are committed to halve the rough sleeping by 2022, by providing over a billion through to 2020 to provide —— prevent homelessness and rough sleeping. he has performed with lulu, pendleton and anaesthesia but now he can at the duchess of cornwall to his dance partner list. the duchess welcomed thejudges his dance partner list. the duchess welcomed the judges and a couple of co ntesta nts welcomed the judges and a couple of contestants to buckingham palace,
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they had been filming a special section of the strictly come dancing christmas gig, at buckingham palace, and brendan later said camila definitely knew her way around the dance floor. i am looking forward to watching that, and you can two, 6:30pm on bbc one. what about a royal family strictly come dancing? they did that years ago with knockout, it would be amazing. it is 7:10 am. burning the turkey or forgetting the name of a distant relative can happen to any of us over the festive period. and it's easy to put those little christmas clangers down to the stress of the big day. burning the turkey or forgetting the name of a distant relative can a dementia experts as they could be early signs of the disease. professor alistair burns is clinical director for dementia at nhs england, and he's compiled a list of warning signs. he joins us now along with sue howorth, whose husband michael is living with alzheimers. thank you both are joining us this
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morning. if we can come to you, sue, when did you realise the men was wrong with your husband? when did you realise the men was wrong with your husband7m when did you realise the men was wrong with your husband? it was diagnosed 11 years ago and there was an symptoms so much better change in his personality. —— there was not. ifi his personality. —— there was not. if i say it was causing rows, you know, as husbands and wives do have rows, but it was his cognitive impairments that prevented him from taking in information and thinking that he had not been told. can you give as examples of those types of things? i will mention we will meet up things? i will mention we will meet up at things? i will mention we will meet upata things? i will mention we will meet up at a particular garrard and he would get the wrong one and he said i never said that it sound but the normal husband and wife ralph, doesn't it? but he progressed and carried on like that until he got worried and he got to the dock and was sent to alistair, thankfully, who gave him a huge amount of test and then it came out he had
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alzheimer's. alistair, you are saying this is a good time of year when families are together and spending lots of time together to spot potential signs of dementia in one another. what should or could we be looking out for? i think christmas is a good time, as soon as described it well, because dementia can obviously be a gradual miss that someone can obviously be a gradual miss that someone living with a person day to day it may not notice the science, but as you mentioned you take them for granted but at christmas time if you haven't seen someone for months, to see a change would be important that it to see a change would be important thatitis to see a change would be important that it is the change which is key. i guess the other thing at christmas is we tend to think one of things, getting the presence, doing the christmas dinner, things like that, that we can have a comparison. it is a great time for people to talk about things. what can you do to support people who have already been diagnosed, we should probably come to you, sue, because your partner
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was diagnosed 11 years ago. yes, mike has done incredibly well actually over the years, even been the first person in the country to be employed by salford west to help people who were newly diagnosed with alzheimer's. so he is working while not? he has finished now but he was incredibly inspirational, wasn't he, alistair? he spoke to students, psychology students, so keeping active, doing sudukos, keeping engaged with whatever is going on but 11 years now, all that has sort of died down now. but you know he has done very well. you just have to support them if they want to keep driving and they are safe, that is fine. it is a good point, at christmas, instead of sitting around their tally it may be worthwhile playing a board game for example. yes. that is right, there are many
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things we can do to prevent the development of dementia and keeping active mentally and physically active mentally and physically active is extremely important and as sue has said very well, we need to learn from people about the early signs, the description of sue has given is very important. if you spot, in a parent or grandparent or auntie or uncle over the next few days, or any auntie or uncle over the next few days, orany time, auntie or uncle over the next few days, or any time, symptoms that you think doesn't seem right, something has changed, maybe it is dementia, how do you then deal with it? do you speak to them about it? do you get them to go to a dock? it is potentially a minefield. reassure people that it isn't an isolated forgetting one thing, forgetting someone's name as you said, that is completely normal. i think it would bea completely normal. i think it would be a change, a significant change over time that worried people and worried their families and carers. that is the crucial thing and isolated thing, but is an everyday
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experience, i think starting the conversation, we know from people over the age of 50 of the dementia is the most fatal illness, to start in the conversation is important. is the most fatal illness, to start in the conversation is importantm is difficult. it is awkward, especially over the christmas table or in the evening. it's a hard time of year to address this. that's right. you wouldn't necessarily address it at business, but in the new year when everything has settled, if it is still a worry, that would give you time to have a discussion and to go to the doctor get a memory test and reassure people. how much progress have we made when it comes to dementia? there's huge amounts of progress in terms of understanding what happens in the brain, looking for new treatments, there are treatments available, but that support for people with dementia, adding that support is key. i suppose at this
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time of year when it is so busy, what sort of support you have? honestly, i think when you've explained to people that your husband has alzheimer's, your partner, or whether, husband has alzheimer's, your partner, orwhether, it's incredible how supportive people can be. so being open about it's a good thing. people are afraid of it and some people may be worrying about it and they have the test and they are fine. so have the test and see that there is help and support there. thank you for being so open about it and thanks for sharing your story with us and giving some advice. all the very best for christmas. if you look at this beautiful scene in london this morning, it is still dark. if you look closely you can just make out the houses of parliament and the bongs of big ben are back for christmas. good
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morning. we are on the roof of parliament this morning. it is a chilly saturday morning. the bongs of big ben will be back for christmas and new year's eve. extensive renovation are being carried out on the clock tower and that's why it big bet has been silent since remembrance day. we will hear them live at 9am this morning, live on bbc breakfast —— big ben. thank you. we will be back for more bongs later. live bongs! here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. it is looking icy? it is. it's christmas, so we've got to have a christmas, so we've got to have a christmas quiz. a quick question. we all dream of christmas quiz. a quick question. we alldream ofa christmas quiz. a quick question. we all dream of a white christmas. watch the you think was the coldest christmas day ever recorded in the uk? iam going uk? i am going to go... it was about... didn't we have a
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white christmas about 2010? minus 18. that was back in the 18705. why didi 18705. why did iforget 18705. why did i forget that one? what about the mildest one? 16 degrees. almost spot—on. back in 1920, almost 16 degrees. melting any snowmen around. and this christmas it won't be1 million miles from that around. and this christmas it won't be 1 million miles from that one across some parts of the uk. 0ut there at the moment it is incredibly mild for december. 13 degrees this morning in parts of aberdeenshire. cooler through the vale of york, but clear skies to start the day. fairly cloudy conditions across the uk. rain might be limited towards shetland, but it will edge into
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other parts of northern scotland. gusty winds in the northern half and we could have a bit of drizzle in the west. a lot of low cloud sitting on the heels of western england and wales. if you are travelling home for christmas today to be warned there will be some foggy conditions in some of the higher routes. not too strong in the south. most places dry. a few cloud breaks are possible, anywhere from gloucestershire through the chester. we could get back in north—east england as well. with the brakes towards the east of ireland, not bad. rain towards the north—west later and turning wet across north—western scotland. gusty winds to the east of high ground. temperatures around aberdeenshire could pick about 15 celsius. not far off the record. tonight it stays mild. rain edging southwards. further north, easy. scotland has the wettest conditions. it could lead to minorflooding in a of spots. much of england and wales will be dry with a little bit of
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drizzle in the west. another very mild start to tomorrow. christmas eve of course, high—pressure keeping things dry. this weather fronts around scotland and northern ireland. fairly wet, especially in south—west scotland. in the afternoon the rain band pushes southwards once more. the rain comes and goes to eastern parts of scotland. a few splashes on parts. with a bit of a breeze, a few more cloud breaks in england and wales on christmas eve. a little bit of sunshine here and there, but temperatures again in double figures for the vast majority. for the big day, the rain band starts in southern scotland on christmas morning and it will gradually pushing the northern and western parts of england and wales. heavy burst, gusty winds, still fairly mild, turning colder in scotland and northern ireland. 0n mild, turning colder in scotland and northern ireland. on christmas day you might get some brightness and on higher ground of northern scotland there may even be a little bit of snow.
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a little tiny bit creeping over the top. we will take it where we can find it! thank you. a "national crisis" — that's how a committee of mps described the growing problem of homelessness earlier this week. official figures estimate there are more than 4,000 rough sleepers across the uk. but the homeless charity crisis believes the actual number is double that. with rising numbers in cities like birmingham, manchester and brighton, the problem remains worst in london, and breakfast‘s john maguire is there for us this morning. tell us what happens where you are. good morning. there are nine of the centres in london, 13 across the uk, including in edinburgh, learning and coventry. as people come in they are registered and they can then access all sorts of different services like the internets, get their hair cut, legal and housing advice and medical services as well because of course
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these are people who are rough sleeping, out on the streets. i'm going to take you into the cafe. lots of volunteers are here. they will be manned until the 30th, so anybody can be referred to one of these centres. i'm going to introduce you to jason. good morning. you've got your bag of tricks here. you've developed this over the years so that it is specific for the needs of people who are homeless or rough sleepers? yes. we have a number of things like wound dressings, things to measure how much oxygen is circulating in people's lard. what sort of problems to people typically have? a range of things, from general coughs and colds, skin problems like authors, chest infections, sometimes an ammonia —— ulcers. sometimes we transfer people to hospital. sometimes it's the only time of year when people have access to a healthcare service
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when people have access to a healthca re service and when people have access to a healthcare service and they come and see a doctor or nurse. thank you very much. today let's have a chat tojohn very much. today let's have a chat to john and paula. very much. today let's have a chat tojohn and paula. this research you've been telling us about, about hidden homeless people, were you surprised by the scale of the findings? i think we were. the true numbers. neither is in people rough sleeping and another nine people hidden rough sleeping, in tents and cars and buses and we think it will grow by another 50% in the next ten years if we don't change our approach now. what's your experience? you found yourself homeless a couple of years ago?|j did. homeless a couple of years ago?” did. ispent homeless a couple of years ago?” did. i spent about three months in my carandl did. i spent about three months in my car and i was in a hostel for about a year and then i went into a halfway before being housed by the council. people who have been fortu nate
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council. people who have been fortunate enough not to be in those circumstances might struggle to understand what that's like. what is it like? terrifying. it is terrifying. you've got no privacy and you don't know who is around the car at and you don't know who is around the carat any given and you don't know who is around the car at any given time. i was lucky really because i had neighbours around who were quite supportive, who knew the circumstances and supported me and helped me with hot water, a shower now and again and luckily i was able to go to college as well and i could have a shower at couege as well and i could have a shower at college if i needed to as well, so i was quite lucky. did you feel as if you were trapped at that stage? that there were options available to you to get out of that situation?” mean, i had a good connection... the good connection with the worker who came to visit me when i was in the carand came to visit me when i was in the car and helped me get into the hostel. so i was quite lucky,
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really. but there are a lot of people who aren't and theyjust get left. sometimes it's because they are too scared and theyjust avoid everything, so they can't be found. thank you very much. we are at the centre in central london throughout the morning. a quick line from what the morning. a quick line from what the government is doing. you would have heard them talking about it in great detail over the last couple of months. they say it's a complex issue with no single solution. they are committed to halving rough sleeping by 2022, eliminating it by 2027 and they are bringing in the homeless as with the act to try to tackle this problem. these centres across the uk are open for christmas, up until about the 30th of december. they aren'tjust christmas, up until about the 30th of december. they aren't just about christmas, they are really about catching people, helping them and trying to find solutions to the situations they find themselves in. thank you for now, john, and see you later. we've got all too used to bringing you sad stories of animals driven to the brink of extinction,
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so it makes a nice change to tell you about this handsome chap — the javan warty pig. the first ever wild footage of the creature has been captured by british scientists from chester zoo. the species is under such threat from hunting and habitat loss that conservationists thought it might have already been driven to extinction. you are one of the people in charge of this work. you looked at the footage and there it was. talk me through it! it was fantastic. we didn't really know if that species still existed. a study in 2004 said 50% of the population had already gone extinct, so we went and thought we had to do something about it, we need to save the species. we used camera traps to find them... coming straight up to the camera. at that
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moment we weren't sure whether they we re moment we weren't sure whether they were still there are still extinct, or could we find them in the wild? no one had footage of these animals. so when we found this footage we we re so when we found this footage we were so over the moon, we thought it was amazing. they are still there are there's still hope for the species. why were people worried that they were extinct? there was an interview study based on interviews with local people, asking them, do you think they are still there? that's what our assumption was based on, but these animals may have gone. but the threat is hunting. we are not completely sure yet why they are hunted it ——, perhaps for crop protection and people shoot them because they don't want them to eat their crops, or maybe because people like to hunt them, almost as a hobby. they enjoy that. and these are two different scenarios that we need to work with and find solutions
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on how we can protect them. this is daytime as well. yeah. do we know how many of them there are? we know they exist. how many altogether? we don't know. that's the next step of our project, finding out how many animals are there. has that one got animals are there. has that one got a tag? this is actually footage from one of our partners in west java and there are two breeding centres and they breed these animals, but there are not many. 50— 60 in captivity, but that's it. and in the wild widowed or anything, so this is the problem. they are called warty pigs because they have warts. what else makes them distinctive? in terms of how they look they have different colouration, they are smaller, more slender, so they are definitely a
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distinct species. 0therwise slender, so they are definitely a distinct species. otherwise in the ecosystem they play the same role. they turn over soil, so quite important for the forest ecosystem, but they are quite different. why do they matter to us in britain? i guess they tell us things we didn't know? of course. we try to do research now on them and studying their behaviour and ecology and why they are important. also it's a natural heritage of the indonesians. they occur only on java natural heritage of the indonesians. they occur only onjava and if they are gone they are gone and that's it, so it is also ethical to save them, but they do play a role in the ecosystem for sure. thank you very much for sharing your holiday pictures with us! coming up in the next half hour: singing we had a lot of fun bringing the nation together for a festive sing song this week. we'll take a look back at the highlights. later we will play the choirs and a
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bit more of you. shall we hear a little bit more? headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast with tina daheley and jon kay. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. good morning, ourfirst main story, a former us marine has been arrested by the fbi on suspicion of planning a terror attack in san francisco on christmas day. everitt aaron jameson was allegedly planning to target the city's pier 39 area, which is popular with tourists. the fbi says he had written a letter claiming the attack and making reference to president trump's recent decision to designate jerusalem as the capital of israel. one of san francisco's most popular tourist attractions, pier 39, packed with shops and restaurants. the fbi says everittjameson planned to attack the area on christmas day. using explosives, he wanted to funnel the crowds into a location where he could inflict casualties. the alleged plot came to light after someone reported jameson for suspicious activity on facebook.
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he liked posts sympathetic with the so—called islamic state group, and he voiced support for the halloween attack in new york city when a lorry was driven on to a crowded bike path, killing eight people, and the mass shooting in san bernardino in 2015. jameson's home was raided on wednesday. investigators found several weapons and ammunition, and a will. agents believe the attack was to be a suicide mission. and there was a note that referred to donald trump's recent announcement that the us would recognise jerusalem as the capital of israel. it's really unbelievable, it's just hard to fathom right now. i really don't know what to say, what, you know, how to feel, really. it'sjust shocking, you know? that's my son. in a statement, the us attorney generaljeff sessions said: the fbi says the public in san francisco were never
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in imminent danger. this time, the fbi got his man but the concern is how many could there be out there that are not on the fbi's or local law enforcement's radar? and that's what keeps us up at night. the former marine has appeared in court. through his lawyer, he denied the allegations. if convicted, he faces a fine and a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison. a man is due in court this morning charged with murdering a mother of one as she worked in a supermarket. neville hord, who is 44, is accused of stabbing 30—year—old jodie willsher to death at an aldi store in skipton, north yorkshire, on thursday. he'll appear before york magistrates today. the united nations security council has passed tough new sanctions against north korea aimed at cutting oil supplies vital for its missile and nuclear programs. china and russia voted in favour of the resolution proposed by the united states delegation. 2017 has seen north korea conduct a series of ballistic missile launches and enter into a war
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of words with president trump. today is the 10th time this council stands united against the north korean regime that rejects the pursuit of peace. the kim regime continues to defy the resolutions of this council, the norms of civilised behaviour, and the patience of the international community. their arrogance and hostility to anything productive has set a country on a destructive path. thousands of miles of a roads in england could be improved, following a government consultation which begins today. key routes will be eligible for up to 100 million pounds each from the new roads fund. it would be used for improvements such as newjunctions, more dual carriageways, and better safety, but critics say the cash would be better spent improving the public transport network. the chimes of big ben will ring out over london again from 9 o'clock
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this morning until new year's day. the bongs were silenced this summer while restoration work takes place on parliament's elizabeth tower. the repairs on the 157—year—old clock aren't due to be completed until 2021. we promised you can lebols, we give you can lebols. ben bong. the cornish holiday home where daphne du maurier wrote her first novel has been given protected status. du maurier wasjust 22 when she started writing the loving spirit at ferryside in bodinnick, on the river fowey. it has been given grade two listed status. for a city so used to producing films about alien invasions, it's maybe not surprising that when people in los angeles saw a mysterious light in the sky last night, talk swiftly turned to visitors from another world.
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they thought the movies were coming true. look at but! -- that! thousands of people living in california posted photos and videos online of this strange white light that appeared overhead. look at it! could it be a slee flying through the sky? —— sleigh. however, dissapointingly for sci—fi fans the ufo was swiftly claimed by spacex as one of thier falcon 9 rockets that had taken off from vandenberg air force base, 150 miles north of la. the famous la smog which is causing that, do you think? doesjetstream ripple things? i see where they were scared. of course! imagine looking up scared. of course! imagine looking up and seeing that! it is 7:37 am.
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mike is here with sport. good morning! we have something spectacular in the football last night, a great start to the festive fixtures. arsenal were 0—2 down but they came back, three goals in five minutes, extraordinary, against the pool minutes, extraordinary, against the pool, fifth against fourth. —— liverpool. it was the first time arsenal had played liverpool on a friday night, since the since the title decider, back in 1989. and although the stakes weren't as high, it was just as dramatic, as drew savage reports. much had been made of the history of this friday night fixture. the only thing up for grabs tonight, fourth place in the premier league. but these days, that fourth champions league spot is all—importa nt. liverpool and philippe coutinho determined to grab it. arsenal were booed off at half—time and jurgen klopp's side should have had more. mo salah put them two up in the second half but by then, they could have had three or four. and the atmosphere at the emirates changed. first, alexis sanchez
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rose to the occasion. no celebrations at this stage. arsenal were all business. less than three minutes later, this. liverpool keeper simon mignolet embarrassed. now, arsenal celebrated. for the home fans, it was to get even better. from 2—0 down to 3—2 up in less than five minutes, thanks to mesut 0zil. great entertainment for the neutrals, but both teams will be frustrated by the mistakes they made. the exposed petr chech couldn't keep out roberto firmino. regrets on both sides. a 3—3 draw not too much help to either manager's european hopes, but for many different reasons, a friday night to remember for all concerned. overall, we didn't give up and the spirit in the team is absolutely fantastic and you have to acknowledge that and on that front, i'm quite proud of the players, who responded and showed the strong mentality. usually with arsenal,
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if you get a point, that's an ok result. for most teams in the world, it's pretty unlikely to get it. we deserved more, we got only one, but that's how it is and, yeah, it feels not too good at the moment. among today's matches, manchester city take their 11—point lead at the top of the table into a home game against bournemouth, who are dangerously close to the relegation zone. graeme murty says he wants to make himself irreplaceable at rangers, after being given the job of manager until the end of the season. they've won six games in nine since he took temporary charge two months ago, when pedro caixinha was sacked. murty said: "if i'm good at it and stand out hopefully i can get to do it for longer". rangers are away to kilmarnock today and the big one is between the top two. celtic, five points clear at the top, take on aberdeen, and the visitors are confident they can, like hearts, did last week, also cause an upset.
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we know we've got to be our best. we know that. but we've got a couple of players who can do that. we've got a squad that we'll call upon and we will make sure we are putting in our best chance to win the game. we've done a lot of work and we will make sure we use that confidence that the boys have got from the last two performances and go into the game looking to get that win. england all—rounder ben stokes is returning home to the uk for what he called "family reasons", after a month—long spell with the new zealand side canterbury. he signed as an overseas player and flew out just after england had lost the first ashes test, sparking speculation he could be about to return to the side, but he's still suspended following his arrest in september. it was a record—breaking day for rohit sharma yesterday as he equalled the fastest century in t20 international history. he made it injust 35 balls against sri lanka — the same feat as south africa's david miller. rohit was eventually out for 118, a record high t20 score for india. premiership rugby union is back this
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weekend after the european break and last night, worcester warriors eased their relegation fears, beating london irish to move 10 points clear of them at the bottom of the table. it finished 23—8, welsh wing josh adams scoring both tries for worcester. the defending champion, michael van gerwen is in frightening form, at the pdc darts world championship at london's alexandra palace. he was up againstjames wilson, known as ‘the lethal biscuit‘, but if wilson was hoping ‘mighty mike' would crumble, he was disappointed, as van gerwen won 4—0 to reach the third round. if you are wondering about that name, he was known as jammy dodger but it had to change the now he is the lethal biscuit. i don't do why he is lethal. 16—times champion phil ‘the power‘ taylor plays tonight — this is his last championship before he retires —
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and so to look back on his record—breaking career, hejoined me here in salford with a few of his celebrity friends as he prepared for his last shot at the world title, phil taylor came to our studios in salford for some practice on the 0chey with some of his most famous friends and fans. like robbie williams‘ dad, pete, who's used to the lights, often appearing on stage with his rockstar son. # i‘m walking along, singing a song, walking in a taylor wonderland...# pete was the first to accept phil‘s three dart challenge. butjust as he was about to sing, because he‘s winning, phil showed us why he has won 16 world titles. oh, yeah! i‘m a big darts fans and i‘m very lucky that the best man in the world is one of my mates. you can‘t get better than that. how did you meet initially? what was the story? we're both from stoke. there's only four of us. for me, personally, it was dedication.
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dedication, dedication. i didn't spend the night going clubbing, i stayed in, didn't go anywhere, i led a very boring life, but it paid off. after giving up hisjob in a pottery industry and winning a first world title in 1990, he went on to become so well known he was even given a role on coronation street as disco dave, where he formed a friendship with stars like michael lavell, who plays kevin webster. not that his influence rubbed off too much. 17. 34. do you want us to move the board down a bit? no, no, i‘m going... 17! it was never, ever going to be surpassed, do you know what i men? —— mean? what was it, 16? 16 times world champion? you know, i remember you telling me a story, some of his trophies are this big! like the one from america which phil decided to leave behind. so i‘ve looked at the bushes outside and thought, that‘ll do. so i‘ve gone into the bushes, put the trophy inside a bush. "can you see it?"
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"no, i can‘t see it." you never saw it again? no, i don‘t want to. it was this big! he was inspiring all ages, from the pride of britain award winners to radio 4‘s sam fenech, but not even when i summoned up the power of four paws could we beat the greatest of all time. all right, phil 'the power' taylor, are you retiring from the darts? yes. what are you going to do with your days? i‘m going to be a professional dog walker! it‘s gone in! phil ‘the power‘ taylor on the 0chey. go on, have a go, but you‘re not gonna beat me. you‘ve got no chance! no chance! oh, no, he‘s won! he‘s got 180! it‘s great because what they do is they run up to a thing and they chuck an arrow at a round thing and it goes in, then they drink some beer, then they chuck another arrow at a round thing and they drink more beer... if phil doesn‘t look impressed it‘s because the sport has changed completely now, too much for his liking, which is one reason he‘s retired.
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it‘s all changed now. we would all be friends and have a drink together or whatever and socialise with each other. now it‘s like walking into a doctor‘s surgery and they‘re all serious. so i‘m really looking forward. there won‘t be any tears, no, not at all. no, i can‘t wait, i‘ll be honest. 30 years, though, it‘s a long time! the end of an era. i love the photo at the end, when he won his first title. he went back to his home and eve ryo ne title. he went back to his home and everyone came out with their flags to celebrate. that was the first of many. in all he has about 220 professional titles. incredible. i was just looking professional titles. incredible. i wasjust looking up ourdiet incredible. i wasjust looking up our diet names. you would bejohn the champ.
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i think the champ. ithinki the champ. i think i was mighty ‘mike‘ bushell. that‘s not just darts! thanks. here‘s matt with a look at this morning‘s weather. i will give you a little breast from the christmas quiz on this one, but if you are thinking of your plans for christmas there‘s no snow into forecast —— a little rest. mild and cloudy, rain in the north. some of us cloudy, rain in the north. some of us will get colder by christmas day. 0ut there at the moment the mild is dominating. temperatures today about 13 degrees in the north—east of scotland. skies cleared through the vale of york. even here temperatures shoot up once the sun is up and in eastern scotland and north—east england we have the best of the sunny breaks. a wet start in —— in
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shetland. a lot of cloud, which could be the biggest travel—. in the west there is missed and hill fog. dense at times. there could be fog for the channel islands as well. most for the channel islands as well. m ost pla ces for the channel islands as well. most places will be dry. a bit of drizzle in the west. no temperatures, above where they should be. cloud breaks in gloucestershire and through towards cheshire. parts of paris could have 12- 13. cheshire. parts of paris could have 12-13. 13 cheshire. parts of paris could have 12— 13. 13 possible through the vale of york and north—east england. sunny spells into the afternoon. greater the west of the pennines. cloud breaks in northern islands will come and go. 15 possible in aberdeenshire and the murray firth, but lots of rain to finish the day in the highlands, which will move down into southern scotland tonight. it will affect northern ireland every now and again. it pushes back northwards later, the rain will come and go in scotland through the night. some of it will be heavy and for us all into christmas eve it will be a very mild start.
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temperatures around 8—12 degrees. we‘ve got south—westerly winds around. that will cause loads of fog problems in other parts of western europe, but this wriggling weather front of the northern half of the uk on christmas eve. in scotland there will be lots of heavy rain and puddles, especially in the west. there could be minorflooding in a couple of spots by the end of the day. by the evening it could be into the far north—west of england. but that means parts of scotland brighten up. england and wales, as you were. lots of cloud, a few brea ks you were. lots of cloud, a few breaks tomorrow, with more of a breeze, and temperatures above where they should be. of course christmas eve a certain gentleman will be setting off on his epicjourney around the world. the too much snow in the north pole at the moment. —25 as he starts hisjourney in the north pole at the moment. —25 as he starts his journey tomorrow and heads towards the south pacific on his first port of call. that cold
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air never quite reaches us on christmas day, but things will be changing. starting with rain in southern scotland and turning wetter in northern and western scotland and wales on christmas day. quite breezy. not much rain in the east of england. much of scotland and northern ireland will turn brighter later. a few showers in the forecast and temperatures dropping. 0n the hills we could see a future worries of snow. a little tiny bit. the odd flake. just a little bit. i would take 11 degrees over —25 any day. christmas morning can be an early start, but what about waking up at 5am fora start, but what about waking up at 5am for a wage which might not reach £8 an hour? that‘s what many people will be doing on monday as they do every day and written‘s course racing industry depends on them. respect for the
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sta ble depends on them. respect for the stable group has become an issue in racing. 6am, creeping daylight reveals the unsung human heroes of christmas sport. for thousands of grooves like jacob and lily, business day will a lwa ys jacob and lily, business day will always be another working day. start off anywhere between 5am and 6:30am. i look after five horses. they don't know it‘s christmas time. they still expect their food. we ride them out and put christmas hats and stuff on. i don't know whether they know, but they might enjoy it. obviously we loved animals and myself and lily obviously have a goal of one—day writing. my dream is to be a professional jockey. writing. my dream is to be a professionaljockey. boxing day is important for british horse is because there are eight meetings around the country on december 26. in total in britain there are about
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14,000 racehorses in training and all of them need that day—to—day ca re all of them need that day—to—day care and attention from a professional. it‘s what can and do we did. he died in october looking after a horse. —— we did. he died in october looking aftera horse. —— ken we did. he died in october looking after a horse. —— ken dooley. racing simply relies on the grooms. the boss of this yard knows it. it's ha rd boss of this yard knows it. it's hard work, cold weather, coming in in the dark to go home in the dark. idid it in the dark to go home in the dark. i did it myself for years i know what it‘s like. i started as a lad. it is hard work for not a lot of money. it‘s a way of life and that‘s all you can describe it as. they do it for the love of the job. this is the reward. an icy hillsides grooves riding out, exercising the horses and imagining winners that may come their way on this and future boxing days. snow in the cotswolds at least a couple of days ago. probably all
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gone now for christmas. that was joe wilson reporting. big ben‘s iconic bongs will return today to ring in the festive period. a beautiful sight across london this morning. the sun is starting to rise. you can see the scaffolding around it. they‘ve been doing works. big ben fell silent for a few months. but! it will resume its hourly chimes from 9am this morning until they. —— until new year‘s day. ricky boletto is getting a closer look from the palace of westminster rooftop. good morning! we are on the roofs of the houses of parliament and behind me is one of the most iconic landmarks in london, officially called elizabeth taylor, but more affectionately known as big ben ——
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elizabeth tower. tourists haven‘t been able to experience the full effects of big ben since august because it hasn‘t been bonging away since august because extensive renovations are being carried out on the clock tower to bring it back into the 21st century. for them to do that it needs to be silent for pretty much for years. that was a decision that wasn‘t taken lightly. apart from the political ramblings of brexit, talk of big ben going bongless, difficult to say at this time of the morning, has been a hot topic at the palace of westminster. even mps and the reason they criticised the move, saying for yea rs criticised the move, saying for years was too long, but engineers say it is crucial because it is the only way they can make sure that the integral workings of the tower are all working properly. and at this morning we are in luck because they will be chiming again at 9am this morning and throughout the festive
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period, right up until new year‘s day at one p.m.. so they are bringing it that interaction and the man who knows exactly what‘s going on with this tower is here. good morning. the renovations have been in force for some time. how are they coming along? very nicely, as for as we know. lots of work taking place at the moment. hopefully we will be able to get the bells up and running at 9:15am. hopefully? is there any doubt? very slight doubt that they won‘t come back, but we have two very qualified mechanics up there right now. how do you reinstate big ben? how do you get the bill to ring ain? ben? how do you get the bill to ring again? it's called barring off when you stop it, so they will be unbarring it, making sure the weights are in a proper position and making sure the strike and —— chimes
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mechanisms are in the right position. how many clocks to you look after? we have about 2000 on the parliamentary estate that we look after, we keep those running for the rest of the year as well.” imagine big ben is the biggestjob of them all. the reaction to it going bongless, stopping chiming, has been quite negative. what are your thoughts? we were very surprised by how many people had negative thoughts about it. just imagine trying to run your car for 365 days a year, you need maintenance! so we had to do maintenance! so we had to do maintenance on it and the opportunities came about because of the tower being worked on. we‘ve taken the time to work on the clock as well. thank you very much. we will be here throughout the morning, talking to the team working on the renovations. it got to imagine, if you are working in that hour with big ben chiming at the top of the
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power it would be a deafening experience, which is why they‘ve had to silence it for four years. since 1923 the bbc have been recording those famous bongs on new year‘s eve. that‘s no different. we will hear them this year. it‘s a big job and it will take a lot of time. they will be back at 9am we will be here to hear them! i can‘t wait. from bongs to songs. it‘s been a big week of song here on breakfast, as our big sing brought together six choirs for a sing—a—long that crossed the country and we asked you tojoin in! well, you did it in your vests, your dressing gowns... you even filmed your dogs doing it. some didn‘t know all of the words. many didn‘t even know the tune. but you tried and that‘s the main things. here are your best bits. joyful and triumphant... to
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bethlehem... , and behold him... i don't know the words to this... oh come let us adore him... oh come let us adore him... looooooord... sin... 0h, us adore him... looooooord... sin... oh, no. angels... sing in... exaltation... oh, no. angels... sing in...
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exaltation. .. citizens of heaven above. high-pitched singing dog barking oh come let us adore him... christ, the lord. we greet thee, on this happy morning... mumbling oh come let us adore him...
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adore him... christ, the lord. can we give them a massive round of applause, everybody, who was listening into doubt! well done, everybody. i liked the "i don‘t know the words". imagine if your dogs were listening to that. we‘ve heard all this week singing is good for you and we hope you have proved it. headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast,
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with tina daheley and jon kay. the fbi says it‘s foiled a christmas day terror attack in san francisco. a former us marine has been arrested, accused of planning a suicide mission at pier 39, one of the city‘s most famous tourist attractions. good morning. it‘s saturday 23rd december. also this morning: a man‘s due in court in york charged with the murder of a woman who was stabbed to death at the supermarket where she worked. china and russia join
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the united states in approving fresh un sanctions on north korea. in sport, there‘s a festive feast at the emirates. three goals in five minutes for arsenal, but it‘s not enough, as liverpool strike back to earn a draw, in a cracker to kick off the christmas fixtures. and big ben is back. during these extensive renovations, we will hear big ben chiming again once again this morning at 9am. it will happen over the festive period. you can hear them live on breakfast later this morning. they start at 9am. we will be there in an hour. and matt has the weather. good morning. well, it‘s another incredibly mild day across the uk today. fairly grey for many of you, too. but there is some colder air getting closer. will it arrive in time for christmas day? i have got your full forecast coming up. all will be revealed. matt, thank you. good morning.
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first our main story: a former us marine has been arrested on suspicion of planning a terror attack in san francisco on christmas day. everitt aaron jameson was held after allegedly discussing the plot with undercover fbi agents. from california, peter bowes reports. one of san francisco‘s most popular tourist attractions, pier 39, packed with shops and restaurants. the fbi says everittjameson planned to attack the area on christmas day. using explosives, he wanted to funnel the crowds into a location where he could inflict casualties. the alleged plot came to light after someone reported jameson for suspicious activity on facebook. he liked posts sympathetic with the so—called islamic state group, and he voiced support for the halloween attack in new york city when a lorry was driven on to a crowded bike path, killing eight people, and the mass shooting in san bernardino in 2015. jameson‘s home was raided on wednesday. investigators found several weapons and ammunition, and a will. agents believe the attack was to be a suicide mission. and there was a note that
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referred to donald trump‘s recent announcement that the us would recognisejerusalem as the capital of israel. it‘s really unbelievable, it‘s just hard to fathom right now. i really don‘t know what to say, what, you know, how to feel, really. it‘sjust shocking, you know? that‘s my son. in a statement, the us attorney generaljeff sessions said: the fbi says the public in san francisco were never in imminent danger. this time, the fbi got his man, but the concern is how many could there be out there that are not on the fbi's or local law enforcement's radar? and that's what keeps us up at night. the former marine has appeared in court. through his lawyer, he denied the allegations. if convicted, he faces a fine and a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles.
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a man is due in court this morning charged with murdering a woman as she worked in a supermarket. neville hord, who is 44, will appear before york magistrates over the death ofjodie willsher in skipton. our north of england correspondent judith moritz reports. malcolm and jodie willsher looking forward to a family christmas. now he is left grieving, paying tribute to her as a doting mother and loving wife. jodie willsher was getting ready for the holidays, wearing her festive jumper while serving supermarket shoppers. jodie had worked at the skipton aldi since it opened two years ago. the store was full when she was stabbed. trolleys were abandoned as fearful shoppers scattered, while several staff and customers rushed to help. there was chaos inside the shop as people realised what had happened. and asjodie lay dying, the first person to intervene was a man in his 605, who grappled with the attacker for a long time
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as he tried to restrain him. despite efforts to savejodie, she died on the shop floor. the supermarket became a crime scene, forensics staff and police officers taking evidence away. the shop was closed, with customers coming instead to leave tributes for the popular member of staff. whenever i‘ve shopped in aldi, she‘s always been friendly, pleasant, you know, a lovely, lovely girl, and it‘sjust... what a shock, you know, an absolute shock, really. the community here is small and tight—knit. jodie willsher worked at its heart, well—known and well liked. a 44—year—old man has been charged with her murder. judith moritz, bbc news, skipton. we have some news coming into us at bbc breakfast this morning, breaking news that ten fire engines and 70 firefighters are currently tackling a fire firefighters are currently tackling
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afire in firefighters are currently tackling a fire in a cafe in a shop at london zoo. the london fire brigade say the fire is in the cafe which we can see there. the shop associated with the petting zoo. no injuries reported but they say it is ongoing. the picture is still dark, but a large operation, ten fire engines, 70 firefighters tackling the blaze at the cafe shop in london zoo in regents park. we will get more the story goes on. the united nations security council has passed severe new sanctions against north korea, aimed at cutting oil supplies vital for its missile and nuclear programs. the shamshuddin ‘s the shamshuddin ‘5 proposed by the united states will also force north korean ‘s united states will also force north korean ‘5 working overseas to return home. this is the tenth security council resolution imposing sanctions on north korea. none before it has convinced kim jong—un to abandon his nuclear programme.
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diplomats hope this resolution will bite hard enough to change the regime‘s calculus, or at the very least, restrict its ability to carry out additional nuclear and missile tests. president trump specifically asked president xi of china to cut oil to pyongyang, believing it would be a pivotal step. mr trump celebrated the adoption of new sanctions, tweeting, "the world wants peace, not death." today‘s resolution achieves an 89% total reduction of the kim regime‘s ability to import gasoline, diesel and other refined products. and should the north korean regime conduct another nuclear or ballistic missile test, this resolution commits the security council to take even further action. the resolution also requires countries to expel north koreans working abroad within 24 months in an effort to cut off an important source of revenue. 15 north korean officials in the ministry that manages
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logistics for the army will now be added to the un blacklist. nada tawfik reporting from new york. a leading dementia expert says we should be looking out for signs of the illness in friends and loved ones over the festive period. professor alistair burns says things like struggling to cope with cooking a big meal, orforgetting names, could be symptoms of dementia, and that christmas is an ideal time to spot them. at christmas time if you haven‘t seen someone for months, to see a change would be important. and it‘s that change which is key. i guess, the other thing at christmas is that we tend to do the same kind of things — getting the presents, doing the christmas dinner, and things like that. so we can have a comparison, and it‘s a great time for people to talk about things. the government is starting a 12 week consultation on which key a roads in england will benefit from new funding. roads will be eligible for
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money as our business correspondent jonty bloom reports. many a roads around the country are run and maintained by local councils, even when they‘re important parts of the nation‘s infrastructure. but the government is aiming to change that by providing money for improvements from a new central fund. that will be paid for with money raised from vehicle excise duty, improve thousands of miles of a roads, and provide up to £100 million for each major new scheme such as road junctions, more dual carriageways and improved safety. this is typically all about bypasses for small towns where they have got an a road going through the middle, lots of heavy lorries and gets congested, lots of pollution, everyone says there needs to be a bypass — this is about making sure those bypasses can be delivered. it is important for regional connections, it‘s important for new housing, but it‘s also important to make life better for the people who live on those roads. the plan is that by providing central government money, regions of england will be able to cut congestion, remove bottlenecks and
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boost economic growth. but critics say that the money would be better spent maintaining the current road network and improving public transport. jonty bloom, bbc news. he has performed with lulu, victoria pendleton, anastasia, and brendan cole can add the duchess of cornwall to his list. the duchess welcomed judge craig revel horwood and former strictly come dancing and testing judy murray, robbie savage and colin jackson to buckingham palace as they filmed a section of the strictly come dancing christmas special. brendan later said that camilla "definitely knew her way around the dance floor." will we see her dancing? that is the point. she is not a contestant. she was dancing. the special is on bbc one on christmas day at 6:30, all will be revealed. we will find out! more now on one of our top
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stories this morning — more than 9,000 people in britain are considered ‘hidden homeless‘. that‘s people who are constantly sleeping on public transport or pitching a tent to avoid rough sleeping. the homeless charity, crisis, is warning the government that this number could increase by 50% in the next ten years if it doesn‘t take urgent action to address homelessness. breakfast‘s john maguire is at a crisis christmas shelter this morning. it is busy. lots of people around us are volunteers, but they have had 55 people come in overnight. they will expect to sleep 250 here tonight and over the next few nights over the christmas period. across the country, 13 of these centres, 1200 rough sleepers coming into spent the night here. 4500 clients can get something to eat, get a hot drink, talk to people and access medical
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services, get checks, dentists, legal services, too. it is a real life—saver, if you like. let‘s talk tojohn sparks, life—saver, if you like. let‘s talk to john sparks, chief life—saver, if you like. let‘s talk tojohn sparks, chief executive of crisis. you are talking about we search this morning that indicates the problem of hidden homeless being larger than we previously thought. where user prized by the figures? we were. we wanted an accurate picture, and we find that not only 9000 people sleeping rough, but another 9000 are hidden, in cars, tents and trains. they are vulnerable, because they are hidden from support they might get. it is a problem that is set to grow unless we change our approach. good morning to corky and paul. what was your experience?” was sleeping on trains for about 4—5 years. because i was sleeping on the train, i wasn't located by any outreach workers or any teams that
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could have assisted me at that time, because generally, outreach workers assist people sleeping rough during the night. during the night was the time whenl the night. during the night was the time when i needed to stay away, because i slept on the trains in the daytime. therefore, it was paradoxical, therefore the outreach workers couldn't reach me. i would be out in implement weather, sitting down on park benches, there is a bank around leicester square. see outreach workers, try too sweet to them sometimes, and i don't know if they thought i was just out... them sometimes, and i don't know if they thought i wasjust out... it is night—time in leicester square, lots of people out and inebriated, may be assumed i was and inebriated passer— by, but they assumed i was and inebriated passer—by, but they didn't reach me. that is quite concerning. these figures don't surprise me, but also, these figures actually say how vital and crucial it is the work that crisis do. their doors are open. they will not challenge and say, you
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homeless or not? if you present as homeless, they take you on your word, take you in and give you a multifaceted service. that is what is needed. paula, what was your story? you had been living in your car. yeah, three months in my car. i'd got into a hostel after that. what was it like? terrifying. absolutely terrifying. you didn't know who was around from one day to the next. you didn't know who would walk around your car. there was no prissy either. the only way i could get privacy was by putting towels and blankets up at the windows. so that when i woke up in the morning, i wasn't being overlooked by someone outside. i was quite lucky because the people in the neighbourhood knew who i was. they made the connection, and helped me with stuff like hot
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water, and inviting me in for hot meals on occasions. and letting me use showers and wash facilities. but i had the college as well. thank you very much indeed, good to talk to you. we will talk to you again in the last hour of the programme here. these centres across the uk open until the 30th. a quick line on what the government says," tackling homelessness is a difficult problem with no easy solution. we want to half rough sleeping by 22 and eliminated by 2027. " two leaps until christmas, will it bea two leaps until christmas, will it be a white christmas? probably not? we have been doing the christmas
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quiz, a quick one for you, john and tina, i will give you one this time. the snowiest christmas, how much snow fell on christmas day on our snowiest christmas day? in what measurement would you like it?” snowiest christmas day? in what measurement would you like it? i was going for inches. old school! a couple of feet. this is going really well. about a foot and a half, 47 centimetres fell not too long ago, 1981, ican centimetres fell not too long ago, 1981, i can remember that one in perthshire. we believe it! you can tell us anything! i get away with it every day with the weather forecast! that was the snowiest christmas ever recorded. we are more likely to be closer to a white christmas. the latest was in 2015, 100 and 625 millimetres of rainfall. but a few
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fla kes millimetres of rainfall. but a few flakes in the forecast as i will show you. here and now, if you are christmas shopping, the good news is, not cold out there, temperatures this morning around 13 in the north—east of scotland, it shouldn‘t be that in the run—up to christmas. but wet weather at times in part of scotland. at you like rain and drizzle across western areas with thick cloud, grey start to the day for most with mist and hill fog hampering the journey if you are driving. north east england will see sunshine come and go through the day. not much sunshine towards the channel islands, western parts of england and wales, fog here and there, more especially over hills. brea ks there, more especially over hills. breaks in cloud up towards powers, wrexham and across into cheshire. you could see sunshine. sunshine breaking in the north—east of england throughout the day. temperatures reaching 13, maybe a touch more. brightness to the east of northern ireland. splashes of
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rain and the north—west will be wet. to the north east of high ground, aberdeenshire may hit 15 today in the sunshine. clear skies for a time tonight as rain pushes southwards. overnight, will working back, but another mild one. if it is a last—minute panic shop, it will be largely dry across england and wales thanks to high pressure, splashes of rain and drizzle. this weather front in the north will continue to cause issues with rain, scotland in particular, lots of servers water ran, spray on the roads, minor flooding by the end of the day. by the end of the day, edging into northern ireland and northern england. much of england and wales will be dry, temperatures above where the chip beat for the time of scotland. scotland will see movement, flurries of snow on the tops of the mountains in the north,
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bright conditions in northern ireland, turning wet and windy in the west across england and wales. not the west across england and wales. n ot exa ctly the west across england and wales. not exactly a festive forecast you would wish for. burning the turkey or forgetting the name of a distant relative can happen to any of us over the festive period . and it‘s easy to put those little christmas clangers down to the stress of the big day. but a dementia expert says they could be early signs of alzheimer‘s disease — and christmas is a good time to spot the symptoms. professor alistair burns is clinical director for dementia at nhs england, and he‘s compiled a list of warning signs. hejoins us now. good to see you again. good morning. why is this time of year good for spotting signs of dementia? christmas is a good time because we know that many of the symptoms of dementia are gradual. if you are living with someone it every day, those small changes you might not notice, but if you haven‘t seen someone notice, but if you haven‘t seen someone for several months, that change can be apparent. christmas is a time that we talk and see families
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with a good chance to talk about concerns and worries. the other thing is, we tend to do the same things at christmas, getting presents, doing dinner, watching the queen‘s speech, so to compare what things were like a year or two years ago, can bring things to before. tina was saying burning turkey, forgetting people‘s names, we have all done that, there is a danger people might overthink it and think it is signed of dementia when they are not. that is absolutely right. the simple things happen to everyone, and they are not a sign of dementia, necessarily. how do you know what is a sign? if you have several of them. if things begin to affect someone‘s life. if there is a significant change as well. as we heard earlier, some of the changes in emotion are common as well. it is the significance of the change, and isolated thing is normal. going into the room and forgetting what you
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have gone in for is a normal thing. forgetting someone‘s name, but when it comes back, that is fine. it is when there is an accumulation and a significant change. we tend to think, when it comes to symptoms, memory loss is one we tend to, it is also language, confusion, if you spot a sign, it is a difficult one to have at christmas, how should you approach it? it is a challenge. people over the age of 50, that is the age of most feared illness. maybe in the new year, when everyone is going home and things have settled down after the festive season, have a conversation and if people are still worried, perhaps go to the doctor or get advice from the alzheimer‘s society. to the doctor or get advice from the alzheimer's society. thank you very much indeed. people coming together and spending time together is a good time to think about it. it is a good time to think about it. it is a good time to think about it. it is a good time to think about loneliness as well, and we know that loneliness is
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apparent at christmas, so a great time to involve people. well said. thank you for coming in. some breaking news this morning, 10 fire engines and around 70 firefighters and officers are tackling a fire in a cafe and shop at london zoo. we had this picture from the london fire brigade, they say the fire is in the cafe and shop associated with the petting zoo, in regent park, not farfrom the petting zoo, in regent park, not far from central the petting zoo, in regent park, not farfrom central london, a busy part of the city, it will be easy today in the capital, people doing last—minute shopping and going off to do various christmas events. so far, we are told no injuries have been reported, but the battle to bring the fire under control is ongoing. we will bring you more on that as we get it will stop the picture is dark, it is light now, so it was taken a while ago, but we will keep you updated. 70 firemen, ten fire
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engines, clearly significant. it is 8:23, time fora engines, clearly significant. it is 8:23, time for a look at the newspapers. good morning, you have looked through the papers this morning. we will check in with what you saw inside, let‘s look at the front pages first of all, let‘s look at some of them. the guardian leading with passports. we heard yesterday that blue passports will replace burgundy ones, and according to the guardian, that means red tape, according to the eu. we have burgundy, blue and now read altogether. the daily mail also talking about the same thing, passport again, now make them in britain. the line they are going with is eu tendering laws mean the new ones could potentially being designed and manufacturer in germany or france. they say only one of the three companies competing for the contract to make the new
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passports is british. the daily telegraph‘s front page today, they lead on a story that some of the tycoons, as they are called, the very rich individuals who bankrolled brexit, who funded the brexit leave campaign, believe that the taxman is digging his revenge on them, hmrc is trying to penalised them and claim back tax as revenge. the front page of the sun, bar humbug is the headline, furious fages axed from christmas gift box, about the decision by cadbury is to drop the traditional fudge bar from their medium—sized selection box. it has been replaced by dairy milk oreo. fury! i don't like them anyway. the papers, what is inside?
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iam anyway. the papers, what is inside? i am looking for like, but there is a substantial amount of shade. first up a substantial amount of shade. first up in the times, this is where drug dealers in the metropolitan areas pay or groom very young drug dealers, often 12 or 13, to become drug dealers in rural parts of the country. we have a successful conviction of a significant gang, a london based gang. what we have now, and we heard this over the last few months, thousands of young boys, generali, as young as 12, are groomed, promised substantial amounts of money to go off to places like gloucester, cheltenham, or places you would never imagine them to go, to deal drugs. they get trapped. the problem in the past has been, they have treated them as
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young boys and criminals, rather than victims. it is difficult then to get the big boys. in the past, lots of people that end up going our from vulnerable households. they themselves are often the victims of abuse and the end up being stuck in abuse and the end up being stuck in a situation where they can‘t come back. they can't come out of it. it is important for the authorities to treat them as victims, rather than petty drug dealers, which is what they become. they are trapped, trafficked, and they are trapped. staying with crime and punishment stories, the daily mail have this story, we have reported in the past, police patients have been closed down and police officers have started using libraries or shops, supermarkets, as police agents. lot of police stations have closed in the last seven years because funding hasn‘t been available. the idea of having a local police patients or local people hasn‘t really been followed through. what
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you have is a library or cafe, see a policeman for a coffey, that concept isn‘t, according to the daily mail, working. you will have people that are victims of rape or domestic abuse going to a library to report concerns. people use touch—screen devices outside authority buildings to make a complaint, and you have situations where visiting a police officerfor a hot drink, and the daily mail‘s concern is, having lost the local connection, people are dissuaded from reporting. if a reporting, they are doing it in circumstances which we wouldn‘t necessarily think the right things to do. the daily mail says, on thursday this week, three police officers were waiting in a cafe in chiswick to talk to people, reach out to the community, receive information, and they spent 85 minutes there, and nobody came in. it is knowing where they are going to be. the lost every community
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engagement, when you talk to a neighbourhood officer, you get all sorts of intelligence, and you miss and lose that. it is a big loss here. they are being seen in the community and where people are. having a confidential chat might not be the best place. this is an interesting story, fears over dna kit gifts. privacy fears. people have been buying ineffective kit that enables you to find out where you are from and what your heritage and ancestry is. you find out you are 50% south asian, 10% alien, whatever it is, what has happened is, nobody knows what is happening to the information that the dna kit provides you with. the agency that comes back with that data keeps hold of that data, potentially, they could sell it to pharmaceutical companies, insurance companies. they say they don‘t and won‘t, but there is a concern that this is your building blocks, and your building blocks are sold to
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insurance companies to say whether you are reliable for insurance, and whether they can trust you with insurance. a company could find out you are more likely to get this disease later in life, and they will start selling you medication. it‘s great you find out your heritage and ancestry, but be mindful of the fact that this information is saleable. this is so interesting. i didn‘t know this. people buy this as christmas presents. 1.5 million testing kits are sold between black friday and cyber monday. testing kits are sold between black friday and cyber mondaym testing kits are sold between black friday and cyber monday. it is a personal thing to sell to somebody or give to somebody as a gift. it is not just television or give to somebody as a gift. it is notjust television reality or give to somebody as a gift. it is not just television reality shows, it happens all the time. you have to be careful about the information gathered. can i ask you quickly, the fudge story. fages out of the selection boxes, or some of them. in the milk and other chocolate is
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reducing in size, less chocolate and what is now happening is cadburys have taken fudge out and puts oreo in and people are very upset. it is symbolic, there is a market they have two reach and they think they have two reach and they think they will sell more of what oreo barn with fudge. but of course you can buy fudge separately, they would argue. but if we‘re going to pay less and costs are going up you are going to get less for that. they say fudge is still available in the bigger ones, but not in the smaller one. thank you. we will be back with you a bit later on. the headlines are coming up. please, stay with us. this is bbc breakfast. a summary of
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this morning‘s main news. some breaking news this morning, 10 fire engines and around 70 firefighters and officers are tackling a fire in a cafe and shop at london zoo. they were called at 6:10am this morning. we had this picture from the london fire brigade, they say the fire is in the cafe and shop associated with the petting zoo, in regent park, not farfrom central london, a busy part of the city, it will be easy today in the capital, people doing last—minute shopping and going off to do various christmas events. so far, we are told no injuries have been reported, but the battle to bring the fire under control is ongoing. fla mes flames broke out near to the meerkat enclosure and the fire servers and say they were phone this morning. 70
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firefighters and ten five engines, clearly a sizeable response to this. one of london‘s biggest tourist attractions, you imagine it will be busy today so we will bring you up—to—date with any more details we get on that as and when we we receive them. the former us marine has been arrested by the fbi on suspicion of planning a terrorist attack in san francisco on christmas day. he allegedly planned to target an area popular with tourists. he allegedly wrote a letter referencing the attack and making reference to donald trump‘s recent decision to designatejerusalem donald trump‘s recent decision to designate jerusalem as the donald trump‘s recent decision to designatejerusalem as the capital as well. here, the man is due in court today after being accused of stabbing a mother to death who was
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working in algae. he will appear before magistrates in york later today. the un security council has passed tough new sanctions against north korea aimed at cutting oil supply vital for its missiles. korea aimed at cutting oil supply vitalfor its missiles. it korea aimed at cutting oil supply vital for its missiles. it was proposed by the united states delegation. 2017 has seen north korea conducts a series of ballistic missile launches and enter into a war of words with donald trump. this council stand united against the north korean regime that rejects the north korean regime that rejects the proceeds of peace. the regime continues to defy the resolutions of this council, the norms of civilised behaviour and the patience of the international community. their arrogance and hostility to anything productive has said other country on a destructive path. the chimes of big ben will ring out or london today from 9am and will
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continue right through christmas until new year‘s dave. they were silenced over the summer because of restoration work that needs to happen on parliament‘s elizabeth tower. it is 157 years old, so not much of the surprise repairers are due but they are not scheduled to be finished until 2021 but they will be back making lies in less than 20 minutes time. well, 24 minutes. we will bring you that live. the holiday home work the offer was writing has been given a grade two listed status. —— author. for a city so used to
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producing films about alien invasions, it is not that surprising that when residents in la so mysterious life in the sky last night, quickly turns to givens. thousands of people sort that last night and started posting on social media and wondering about this strange white light overhead. not quite as exciting as they thought. it was claimed by spacex as one of their rockets that have taken off from 150 miles north of le. —— 150 miles north of la. those are the main stories. and mike is here the sport. and what a start last night.
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it finished three all between liverpool and arsenal. it was the first time, arsenal had played liverpool, on a friday night, since the since the title decider, back in 1989, she and what a match it turned out to be. liverpool took a 2—0 lead, the premier league‘s top scorer, mo salah, with this one. but arsenal hit back with an incredible three goals in five minutes — what a spectacle for the home fans. liverpool weren‘t finished, though, roberto firmino‘s strike, just too fierce for petr cech to keep out. 3—3 it finished. overall, we didn‘t give up and the spirit in the team is absolutely fantastic and you have to acknowledge that and on that front i‘m quite proud of the players, who responded and showed the strong mentality. usually with arsenal if you get
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a point that's an ok result. for most teams in the world it's pretty unlikely to get it. we deserved more, we got only one, but that's how it is and, yeah, it feels not too good at the moment. dan walker is with us for a look ahead to the christmas edition of football focus. i have to say, the most tasteful christmas jumper i‘ve seen. usually they are hard to look at but thatis usually they are hard to look at but that is subtle. just gently bringing it in but not too much. i can add the glitter later. it's the glitter later. it‘s easy on the eye. thank you. i‘m glad i got the triple seal of approval. let me tell you what‘s happening and football focus. we have all the action from
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liverpool and arsenal and then we will get some analysis on that and the positive and negative is both teams. i think a clear indication of why they are both not at the top of the table because they are illegally at the back. we also have the burnley manager on, they have had a great start to the season. but he still lives in the midlands so each week he does the long commute. so have a look. lets not run away with it because we know how unforgiving the premier league is it can teach you very fast. that‘s the phone going off. that‘s all right. harsh rules then the dyche cara. ashley young was arrested, for the
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game, but you speak to him and he speaks of some of the issues circling around young players today and also his desire to be a dj. and mark hughes and lots of pressure at stoke so we will be live there. with the player who played for stoke in the player who played for stoke in the 19705 will be on talking about stoke but he also his bed and tae kwon do. so make —— big and tae kwon do. so make sure you watch today for football and tae kwon do coming together. and craig david is doing premier league predictions. he is a big southampton fan which comes out in the peace. we are on at midday on bbc one. it is a very busy day of
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football so we will try and cram in as much as we can. no christmas jumper then, this as much as we can. no christmasjumper then, this is just for you. if my mum is watching, she is probably saying, why are you wearing your christmas jumper? what is that voice? graeme murty says he wants to make himself irreplaceable at rangers, after being given the job of manager until the end of the season. they‘ve won six games in nine since he took temporary charge two months ago, when pedro caixinha was sacked. murty said, "if i‘m good at it and stand out hopefully i can get to do it for longer". rangers are away to kilmarnock today, and the big one is between the top two. celtic, five points clear at the top, take on aberdeen, and the visitors are confident they can — like hearts, did last week — also cause an upset. we know we‘ve got to be our best.
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we know that. but we‘ve got players who can do that. we‘ve got a squad that we‘ll call upon and we will make sure we are putting in our best chance to win the game. we‘ve done a lot of work and we will make sure we use that confidence that the boys have got from the last two performances and go into the game looking to get that win. england all—rounder ben stokes is returning home to the uk for what he called "family reasons", after a month—long spell with the new zealand side canterbury. he signed as an overseas player and flew outjust after england had lost the first ashes test, sparking speculation he could be about to return to the side, but he‘s still suspended following his arrest in september. it was a record breaking day, for rohit sharma yesterday as he equalled the fastest century, in t20, international history. he made it injust 35 balls against sri lanka — the same feat as south africa‘s david miller. rohit was eventually out for 118 — a record high
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t20 score for india. premiership rugby union is back this weekend after the european break, and last night, worcester warriors eased their relegation fears, beating london irish to move 10 points clear of them at the bottom of the table. it finished 23—8, welsh wing josh adams, scoring both tries for worcester. the defending champion, michael van gerwen, is in frightening form, at the pdc darts world championship, at london‘s alexandra palace. he was up againstjames wilson — known as the lethal biscuit — but if wilson was hoping mighty mike would crumble, he was disappointed, as van gerwen won 4—0 to reach the third round. also in action later today phil taylor, in his last championship, trying to win it for the 17th time. and later today to find out what he has got in common with robbie
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williams, hacker the dog from cbbc. do you know what his secret weapon is, he links to terror his opponents with his handshake? -- he likes to scare his opponents with his handshake. great stuff. we will see you later. the government is starting a 12 week consultation on which key a—roads in england will benefit from new funding. roads will be eligible for money under the new roads fund. local authorities will be able to apply for up to £100 million of spending. critics say that the money would be better spent maintaining the current road network and improving public transport. bridget fox, sustainable transport campaigner, campaign for better transport joins us now. good morning. what do we think of this unlocking potential not reaching new communities and extending the network? -- reaching new communities. we think it is good
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news money is being passed on to local councils but the top priorities for motorists is maintaining the roads we have got and fixing potholes. that is a £12 billion poppel backlog and local authorities are now setting their budgets for the new are being told there is money for new roads when there is money for new roads when there is money for new roads when there is so much money needed for roads we have already got, it seems like the wrong priority. talk about building bypasses and connecting up dual carriageways, how far is £100 million go across england? not very far, a major road scheme may cost £1 million is that is not very many schemes. this is taxpayer‘s money from all over the country and to spend it onjust from all over the country and to spend it on just if you bypasses will not benefit the country as a whole, whereas maintaining roads as
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a whole would meet people‘s needs. if you have a business and are transporting goods are people around, those new bypasses could make a big difference and make business better at a time when we need to make business better, whereas fixing potholes and making cosmetic repairs might not have the same kind of benefit. some of these repairers are vitalfor same kind of benefit. some of these repairers are vital for safety and we have seen problems when roads scale and appeared and in severe insta nces scale and appeared and in severe instances you have roads have been taken instances you have roads have been ta ken completely out instances you have roads have been taken completely out of action so they are more than cosmetic. but it‘s a fallacy somehow building a new road will solve traffic problems, experience shows they quickly fill up with new traffic. it's quickly fill up with new traffic. it‘s an expensive and temporary fix. giving more people the opportunity to use public transport and frees up roads for essential road users would
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be much more efficient. the front page of the times today is talking about the government getting closer to a system where we have to pay for driving, road charging, lorries to start with and perhaps all vehicles to follow. what about that as a direct way of funding these projects? that makes sense. we are used to the concept of travelling by other modes of transport gpo. but aren‘t we already paying with road tax? all taxpayers to fund the roads, whether they drive or not. most local roads will still be funded from general taxation. as far as this extra money, 100 million, that we are talking about today for england, when will we see the difference? it is all very well having different places competing for the money for their community
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but how long until this happens? the government is outlining an investment programme from 2020. that is the time frame, when the next level of investment strategy for the motorway network starts. the plan is to introduce this funding for a—roads looked after properly by local councils on the same timescale. so over the next five yea rs or timescale. so over the next five years or so people will start to notice the difference, but we already are living with this large backlog and people will see that as priority. it is a big issue for people and there is a real problem with infrastructure and investment and we do not maintain it. it is something we have spoken about a lot and i know it is something our audience cares about a lot as well. thank you for talking to us this morning. let‘s get a check on the weather.
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how is it looking? distinctly disappointing if you want something festive from your weather forecast. not quite dreaming of a white christmas. mild and clothing sums it up christmas. mild and clothing sums it up foremost, quite windy in north. the chance someone will see something called on christmas day. at the moment it is very mild for this time in december, holding at 13 celsius in north—east scotland. lots of cloud. best of the breaks in eastern scotland, some morning sunshine, turning work across north—west scotland and in west of england‘sjust be north—west scotland and in west of england‘s just be wary that could be some fog and also at times in the channel islands. mystique of higher ground into the afternoon, when is
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not too strong in the south, we will see some bricks and the cloud, all the way from the bristol channel. we will seek some sunshine come and go in north—east england, timing more wets and the far north—west and southern and eastern scotland should see some bricks. tonight the ukraine moves southwards, some strong winds —— tonight the rain moves southwards and as it moves it lost words after that so some rain across scotland taking us into christmas eve. if it is last—minute christmas shopping it will not be to cold. quite a breeze across the country but further south you are likely to stay dry but more lost you are it is wetter. —— more
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loft you are. law. by the end of the afternoon the far north of england could see some rain as well. the odd spot of light rain and drizzle and some more cloud breaks going into christmas eve. for the children, good news as a certain man departed north pole tomorrow on his journey around the world. as he leaves salt fla kes around the world. as he leaves salt flakes of snow, that should not stop him leaving and the elves will be ha rd him leaving and the elves will be hard at work. by the time he reaches us there will be some overnight raid but it will brighten up and potentially some snow on the scottish mountains —— overnights rain. staying dry until late in the
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day in the south. but it will be a day in the south. but it will be a day for watching the tv in the north and west of england as rain sweeps across. it looks like it‘s been a big week of song here on breakfast, as our big sing brought together six choirs for a sing—a—long that crossed the country — and we asked you tojoin in! well, you did it in your vests. you did it in your dressing gowns. you did it in your bathrobes. you even filmed your dogs doing it. some didn‘t know all of the words. many didn‘t even know the tune. but you tried and for that we would like to say thank you! here‘s your best bits. #0
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# 0 come, all ye faithful to bethlehem # i # i don‘t # i don‘t know # i don‘t know the # i don‘t know the words # i don‘t know the words to # i don‘t know the words to this # i don‘t know the words to this bit # i don‘t know the words to this bit i don‘t know tr # i don‘t know the words to this bit #0 # i don‘t know the words to this bit # 0 come, let us adore him # let‘s give them a massive round of applause, everybody who was listening into that this morning. lovely. it is 8:55am. we had the singing, big ben would sound, we thought this year we might not get it because of the repairs, we spoke in the past about the bpo is being carried out on the bell in the elizabeth power. , it fell silent in august but apparently it is going to ring over christmas and then the next few minutes it will resume it
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chimes every hourfrom main next few minutes it will resume it chimes every hour from main am this morning until new year‘s day. —— 9am. our reporter is on westminster rooftop. contain yourself, please. it is very exciting, one of the most famous london landmarks and for tourists who have been coming to see it over the past few months they have not been able to get the full effect because it has been too much silent since the summer because of those extensive renovation works being carried out. it is covered in scaffolding but we have been given special access to the roots of the houses of parliament this morning and very shortly will hear the chimes for the first time live here on bbc breakfast. the reason it will not shame for the next four years is because big ben is very loud and if you are working in there while that is happening that shaming is
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deafening and potentially a safety risk for those people working on an innovation. the decision was not taking likely, aside from brexit and everything else that happens here, talk about big ben going silent has been a hot topic of conversation in the corridors of power. mps and even the corridors of power. mps and even the prime minister spoke about it saying that four years was too long and winding until 2021 for them to return was not good enough. —— waiting until 2021. what they have expressed it will be sounding at very special occasions such as remembrance day and of course over the festive period. those chimes will carry all the breakthrough right until the of january at will carry all the breakthrough right until the ofjanuary at 1pm. the extensive renovations will take
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quite some time and someone who knows lots about that is joining us this morning. your official title is keeper of the great clock, an impressive title. were you surprised by the reaction from people when they found that it would not be chiming? i was budget got to understand this is the elizabeth power, to big ben, an international symbol of democracy thatis an international symbol of democracy that is low in worldwide and we have a moral obligation —— that is recognised worldwide and we have an obligation to preserve this time for future generations. what is being done that will take four years? the scaffolding work is rapidly approaching completion, they are almost at the top of the tower, that will be finished early next year and after that we start undergoing restoration and conservation works to preserve the tower. it will start
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at the top with the cast iron roof. that cast iron roof is in a state of disrepair, it is rusty, with any building of that age, and each tile will be individually marked and like a big jigsaw and each one will be taken off and sent away for conservation work and then brought back to the site and replaced in exactly the same position. are you nervous? we have 20 seconds until we hear the chimes. will it happen? nerves are a good thing because it means people care and i have every confidence in my highly skilled clockmakers this will work on time. i will stop talking because we want to hear the chimes live on bbc brea kfast to hear the chimes live on bbc breakfast this morning. since 1923 they have been ringing out on new year‘s eve on the bbc and they will do this year as well. let fall silent for big ben returning.
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ben ben chimes. big ben chimes. big ben chimes the big bong ‘s are back. big ben ringing for christmas and will do so until new year. shall we listen ain? big ben chimes a promise was made to sound the bells. they kept their promise.
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hello, this is breakfast, with tina daheley and jon kay. more than 70 firefighters tackle a fire at london zoo. the london fire brigade say half of the adventure cafe at a shop that contains an animal petting area is currently a light, no reports at the moment of any injuries. we will be live at london zoo any few moments. the fbi says it has foiled a christmas day terror attack in san francisco. a former us marine has been arrested, accused of planning a suicide mission at the
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city‘s pier 39 tourist attraction. a man‘s due in court in york charged with the murder of a woman who was stabbed to death at the supermarket where she worked. we are live at a homeless shelter, the number of hidden rough sleepers is higher than previously thought. in sport, there‘s a festive feast at the emirates. three goals in five minutes for arsenal, but it‘s not enough, as liverpool strike back to earn a draw, in a cracker to kick off the christmas fixtures. one of the world‘s rarest pigs, caught on camera. scientists thought the javan warty had been driven to extinction, we‘ll hear how it‘s now been rediscovered. looking ahead to christmas, matt has the weather. good morning, matt. good morning. well, it‘s another incredibly mild day across the uk today. fairly grey for many of you, too. but there is some colder air getting closer. will it arrive in time for christmas day? i‘ve got your full forecast coming up.
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0k matt, ok matt, we will see you very shortly. more than 70 firefighters are tackling a blaze this morning at london zoo. it broke out in a cafe and shop near to a petting area. london zoo is in central london, not farfrom london zoo is in central london, not far from the centre of the capital, where lots of people will head for shopping and various other christmas activities near regent‘s park. we understand, just after 6am this morning, the fire broke out in a petting zoo area. three hours ago, but we understand it is still burning. our reporterjane francis kelly is at the scene for us this morning. what can you tell us? the fire brigade is still there in force. yes, they are still there in force, about 72 firefighters attended, it was a ten pumps or so attendance, the fire brigade were called at 6—
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08 this morning. the fire broke out in the adventure cafe and shop, and there is a petting area there —— 6:0 eight. it is not believed animals have been affected, animals were there. the press association say it is near the meerkat enclosure, but asi is near the meerkat enclosure, but as i say, it is believed that animals hadn‘t been hurt and there are no injuries. the good news is, speaking to the firefighters coming out, they say it‘s largely out. it's, out, they say it‘s largely out. it‘s, you know, no longerflames can be seen. we can just see smoke. luckily, it has been contained, and it would appear, major damage has not been caused. i have tried to get hold of london zoo to see if it is going to affect their opening, but so far, they haven‘t called me back.
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we have seen some pictures released this morning from london fire brigade, which show when it was still dark, the smoke and the number of firefighters there. 70 firefighters, ten fire engines, a sizeable response. i guess that is partly because of the position opposite. for people that don‘t know the capital, regions park is a crucial area of central london, really, isn‘t it. —— regents park. absolutely. london zoo is hugely popular, attracting thousands and thousands of people. it is supposed to be open at 10am today, and people haveit to be open at 10am today, and people have it booked, it is the school holidays just before christmas, a very popular time, so obviously, this is very worrying. people are also worried about the animals, a great deal of affection for them, and clearly, they wanted to make sure they contain it and no damage was done. thank you very much indeed
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for bringing us up to date from london zoo. london zoo. london fire brigade say around three quarters of the adventure cafe and shop, and half of the roof, was a light. it sounds like it was quite a big fire. they say it is mainly out now. no sign of any smoke at the moment, so it sounds under control. but clearly, for a while, it was a concern. the reason not unknown, but we will bring you that as we get it. a former us marine has been arrested on suspicion of planning a terror attack in san francisco on christmas day. everitt aaron jameson was held after allegedly discussing the plot with undercover fbi agents. from california, peter bowes reports. one of san francisco‘s most popular tourist attractions, pier 39, packed with shops and restaurants. the fbi says everittjameson planned to attack the area on christmas day. using explosives, he wanted to funnel the crowds into a location where he could inflict casualties.
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the alleged plot came to light after someone reported jameson for suspicious activity on facebook. he liked posts sympathetic with the so—called islamic state group, and he voiced support for the halloween attack in new york city when a lorry was driven on to a crowded bike path, killing eight people, and the mass shooting in san bernardino in 2015. jameson‘s home was raided on wednesday. investigators found several weapons and ammunition, and a will. agents believe the attack was to be a suicide mission. and there was a note that referred to donald trump‘s recent announcement that the us would recognisejerusalem as the capital of israel. it‘s really unbelievable, it‘s just hard to fathom right now. i really don‘t know what to say, what, you know, how to feel, really. it‘sjust shocking, you know? that‘s my son. in a statement, the us attorney generaljeff sessions said: the fbi says the public in san francisco were
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never in imminent danger. this time, the fbi got his man, but the concern is how many could there be out there that are not on the fbi's or local law enforcement's radar? and that's what keeps us up at night. the former marine has appeared in court. through his lawyer, he denied the allegations. if convicted, he faces a fine and a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. a man is due in court this morning charged with murdering a woman as she worked in a supermarket. neville hord, who is 44, will appear before york magistrates over the death ofjodie willsher in skipton. our north of england correspondent judith moritz reports. malcolm and jodie willsher looking forward to a family christmas. now he is left grieving, paying tribute to her as a doting mother and loving wife. jodie willsher was getting ready for the holidays,
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wearing her festive jumper while serving supermarket shoppers. jodie had worked at the skipton aldi since it opened two years ago. the store was full when she was stabbed. trolleys were abandoned as fearful shoppers scattered, while several staff and customers rushed to help. there was chaos inside the shop as people realised what had happened. and asjodie lay dying, the first person to intervene was a man in his 605, who grappled with the attacker for a long time as he tried to restrain him. despite efforts to savejodie, she died on the shop floor. the supermarket became a crime scene, forensics staff and police officers taking evidence away. the shop was closed, with customers coming instead to leave tributes for the popular member of staff. whenever i‘ve shopped in aldi, she‘s always been friendly, pleasant, you know, a lovely, lovely girl, and it‘sjust... what a shock, you know, an absolute shock, really.
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the community here is small and tight—knit. jodie willsher worked at its heart, well—known and well liked. a 44—year—old man has been charged with her murder. judith moritz, bbc news, skipton. the united nations security council has passed severe new sanctions against north korea, aimed at cutting oil supplies vital for its missile and nuclear programs. the sanctions, proposed by the us, also force north koreans working overseas to return home. nada tawfik reports. this is the tenth security council resolution imposing sanctions on north korea. none before it has convinced kim jong—un to abandon his nuclear programme. but diplomats hope this resolution will bite hard enough to change the regime‘s calculus, or at the very least, restrict its ability to carry out additional nuclear and missile tests. president trump specifically asked president xi of china to cut oil to pyongyang, believing it would be a pivotal step.
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mr trump celebrated the adoption of new sanctions, tweeting, "the world wants peace, not death!" today‘s resolution achieves an 89% total reduction of the kim regime‘s ability to import gasoline, diesel and other refined products. and should the north korean regime conduct another nuclear or ballistic missile test, this resolution commits the security council to take even further action. the resolution also requires countries to expel north koreans working abroad within 24 months in an effort to cut off an important source of revenue. 15 north korean officials in the ministry that manages logistics for the army will now be added to the un blacklist. nada tawfik reporting from new york. he‘s performed with lulu, victoria pendleton and anastacia and now brendan cole can add the duchess of cornwall to his list of dance partners.
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the duchess also welcomed judge craig revel—horwood and former strictly contestants judy murray, robbie savage and colinjackson to buckingham palace as they filmed a section of the strictly come dancing christmas special. brendan later said that camilla definitely ‘knew her way around the dancefloor‘. interesting. quite a compliment. the strictly special is on bbc one at 6:30pm on christmas day. you have to watch it to find out what happened. so many sequence at buckingham palace, ithought what happened. so many sequence at buckingham palace, i thought they would blend into the background. the last friday before christmas is traditionally one of the busiest night‘s for emergency services, mainly because of calls due to excess alcohol. ambulance services across the country drafted in extra crews and control room staff. our next guests are two people who braved the streets last night to try and ease the pressure on emergency services in manchester, laura harrison is from the newly formed welfare unit and james huyton
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is from manchester village angels. are you exhausted? a little bit, yeah. after this, iwill go are you exhausted? a little bit, yeah. after this, i will go home and wa ke yeah. after this, i will go home and wake up to presents on christmas day. you are going to sleep through? ? talk about your goals and what you were doing.” through? ? talk about your goals and what you were doing. i was out with vilic angels, established in 2011, a group of volunteers that go through the village and look after people and make sure they stay safe, look after people that can‘t look after themselves, and share a good time. how was last night? it was all right, not as busy as it was last week. people wanted to go out straightaway from last weekend, and then this weekend, they had gone home to their families ready for christmas day. last saturday as well was quite busy. we had some people,
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all the different incidents but we are there to help people. it is a big thing for us to look after people and make sure they have their phones charged, and to get homesick. what are you looking out for when you are out for? lots of people make their way home after a night out, how do you know someone might need your help and are in trouble?l how do you know someone might need your help and are in trouble? a lot of times, they will ask, do you have any means of me charging my phone? you can see we are there for a reason. people come up to us and speak to us. you find vulnerable people walking around on their own. you also see vulnerable girls, vulnerable men, intoxicated people that could be on their own, putting themselves in sticky situation is, quite close to roads, stuff like that. james, do you get cross with people? when you deal with somebody thatis people? when you deal with somebody that is drunk, falling over and
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getting abusive, it must be tempting to say, "you have done this to yourself." laughter it can be challenging sometimes, but we have a great team of volunteers. we are embedded within the community. you must get grief sometimes, too. not really, not often. we are quite visible in bright pink ivies jackets. people see us, they see us and say," here are the angels!" we work with the gmp and bar staff, and local bars as well. it is a good community thing. it is the kind of thing, from my own experience, if i was in that vulnerable state going out, i would wa nt vulnerable state going out, i would want someone vulnerable state going out, i would want someone from vulnerable state going out, i would want someone from village angels to be there for me. people understand that. people just want to get home, charge their phone... what is interesting about you, you work as a door supervisor, you see people at
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their worst in some cases, what made you decide to get involved with this? it was a gap in the industry. people leaving clubs and getting home safely, there was a massive 95p~ home safely, there was a massive gap. you could see the full clinic. this is how we came about last year. it was a massive hit last year and was really good, but it wasn't noticed as much as it needed to be. it wasn't as valued as much as it could be. this year, we are in partnership with the manchester city council and gmp, taking the strain of them as well. making sure that, we have a private ambulance as will, we have a private ambulance as will, we can be somebody's hospital when needed, we have two medics on site, you have myself, it is more about looking after people and we are there to help. we are not there for there to help. we are not there for the conflict side, but to make sure, when somebody needs to get home, they can get home. you have been working overnight in manchester, but
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similar teams do the same thing in towns and cities across the uk. you ta ke towns and cities across the uk. you take the pressure off emergency and accident. people don‘t have to go do was before and block the a&e department. nights like last night loss we can, the police should deal with most serious incidents, deal with most serious incidents, deal with things, but we make sure the police can focus on what they need to focus on. we will let you go back and have a say, i can‘t believe we made you come here after a full night! amazing, you say it is more quiet than it would have been, eve ryo ne quiet than it would have been, everyone has gone where they were down. last weekend was hectic, but this weekend, people may have gone home for christmas. is that it for you now? go to bed and do it again tonight. well done! 9:17, let's find out what is happening with the
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weather. i predict mild is a word you will use. not according to that picture. i thought i would recapture some of the previous christmases across the uk, the snowiest was back in 1981 in perthshire, we saw 47 centimetres of snow fall. we will not see anything like that this year. one or two spots in scotland may see a flake. but we are heading towards a milder end of things got my oldest was not long ago, 1920 in devon, when temperatures were at 15.6. not far off that this morning. temperatures starting the day around 13 in the north—east of scotland. widely in double figures now, rising further as we go throughout the day. eastern parts of scotland and north east england, sunshine through the day. cloud will break up elsewhere, but for some, under grey skies all day. in scotland, wet and windy weather,
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gusty wind on eastern high grant and the north—east of england, too. cloud on the hills and western parts of england and wales. if you are driving today, if yourjourney of england and wales. if you are driving today, if your journey takes you on high roads, welsh mountains, be prepared forfog. fog on the channel islands, but the breeze picking up to lift it a bit. you could see sunshine into the afternoon, and east of the pennines, temperatures up to ten, 12, 13 or 14 degrees. a splash of rain in the north and west. north—west scotland wet in the afternoon, but the north—east, 15 around the murray firth and aberdeenshire, with sunny spells. the best will be in the morning. through tonight into scotland, rain will ease, but turning more widespread late on. most will have a dry night, fairly cloudy, and again, a mild night to ta ke cloudy, and again, a mild night to take us into christmas eve. this is
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the chart for christmas eve, high pressure to the cell, keeping fog across other parts of western europe. the isobars are closer, more ofa europe. the isobars are closer, more of a breeze blowing away any full we have, lifting it off the mountain is, too. scotland, northern ireland, outbreaks of rain on christmas eve, heavy bursts and persistent in parts of western scotland. that will cause minor flooding, of western scotland. that will cause minorflooding, surface of western scotland. that will cause minor flooding, surface water on the road, edging down into the far north of england. north of scotland brightens up in the afternoon, and other parts of england and wales, spots of rain and breeze, spots of cloud break here and there. in the north, santa setting off on christmas eve, set to push towards the south pacific, very cold as sa nta the south pacific, very cold as santa set off on his journey, but nothing too significant to stop him leaving on time. as he arrives on our shores the christmas day, it looks like i‘m after overnight rain in northern ireland, things will brighten up, but england and wales, wet and windy weather will sweep its
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weight eastwards. and it will stay mild. wet, windy and mild. more now on one of our top stories this morning — more than 9,000 people in britain are considered ‘hidden homeless‘. that‘s people who are constantly sleeping on public transport or pitching a tent to avoid rough sleeping. the homeless charity, crisis, is warning the government that this number could increase by 50% in the next ten years if it doesn‘t take urgent action to address homelessness. breakfast‘s john maguire is at a crisis christmas shelter this morning. we have seen, over the next few days, they will be so busy, it has started already. 13 of these centres across the uk opening their doors for the first time last night, some are 24—hour is, some are day shelters, but they expect to see 4500 people over the next week or so. people coming in can get something to eat, a hot meal, hot drink, crucially, also
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legal and housing advice, and medical examinations, medical co nta ctors medical examinations, medical contactors will, jason warriner is responsible for organising that. what sort of issues do people come into the shelter at christmas with? a range of problems from colds, coughs, chest infections, a lot of skin problems, but notjust physical health, mental health problems as well. it can tie in with drugs and alcohol issues, what people may use of drugs and alcohol on the streets. often, this is the only medical check people will get all year. yeah, the only service they are co mforta ble yeah, the only service they are comfortable accessing. they have the confidence or maybe they have had a bad experience with the nhs, so we area bad experience with the nhs, so we are a vital service during this time of year. all the best for the next week also. good morning to paul and john. talking about figures today, research you have commissioned. the numbers seem surprising, did they surprise you? that is shocking. we
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wa nted surprise you? that is shocking. we wanted the most comrades of view we could get. we found 9000 people sleep rough, but another 9000 hidden sleeping rough, in tents, on cars, buses, which is really dangerous, and they are hidden from the help they really need. paula, in recent yea rs, they really need. paula, in recent years, you have been helped, but a few years ago, you found yourself at crisis point, really? absolutely. i slept in my car for three months before being moved into a hostel. it was quite scary to say the least! people might not be able to imagine what that is like, what was it like having to sleep in your car? you have no privacy. you have no privacy at all. it is like using blankets and towels to put up at the windows, so and towels to put up at the windows, so you get a little bit. nobody would look in agnew when you are trying to sleep dasher at you.
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the only good thing you have got is you can lock yourself in, and that is the only security you have got. but apart from that, it is quite scary, quite terrifying. thank you very much indeed to both of you. all the best over christmas. you will be extremely busy, as will the shelters across the country, nine in london, edinburgh, newcastle, birmingham, commentary, extreme you busy over the next couple of days. a line from the next couple of days. a line from the government saying about homelessness, "it is a compact city with no simple solution, but it is committed to halving rough sleeping by 2022, and eliminating rough sleeping by 2027." that is the objective the government has set to tackle this crisis situation. back to you guys. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news, it‘s 9:24.
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time now for a look at the newspapers. former chief prosecutor nazir afzal is here to tell us what‘s caught his eye. first, let‘s take a look at the front pages. hopes the nazaneen ghaffar michael moffat. people may have forgotten, asa moffat. people may have forgotten, as a means of the is a dual national, she went on a family holiday to tehran in tehran, and was detained on charges of espionage and has been imprisoned for 20 months. there was an idea she might be even early release, but unfortunately, there has been an announcement from there has been an announcement from the iranian forages that she may face other charges of propaganda, whatever that amounts to. she may not be able to come back to her family. —— nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. she is not the
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only british national detained abroad on trumped up charges following secret courts, but we have to keep it in the public liked to remember she shouldn‘t be where she is, she should be back home with her family. boris johnson's visit to tehran earlier this month hasn‘t made a difference. he hopes it has, but it appears it may have backfired. a story in the daily mail and some of the others as well, princess michael of kent has had to apologise for wearing a controversial brooch. it is called a black, a 19th—century, popular during the british empire, of a black figure, as you can see. she wore it yesterday to a lunch, which was in honour of meghan markle. in many people‘s view, it is overtly racist. prince michael of kent has apologised, she didn‘t mean anything
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by wearing it, but it is so enormous. . . by wearing it, but it is so enormous... just a bit of context, black or is a genre figurines, sculptures or jewellery that black or is a genre figurines, sculptures orjewellery that depicts mostly men but sometimes women with black skin, popular in the 18th—century, but now considered racially insensitive. absolutely. it popular bent. —— popular then. racially insensitive. absolutely. it popular bent. —— popularthen. not racially insensitive. absolutely. it popular bent. —— popular then. not a cheap trinket. but not small either. people may consider it inappropriate. it is noticeable. attracting particular interest this year because meghan markle, who was at the press must lunch, spoke about her mother, who is black and american, and talking about racism she has suffered through her life. absolutely. moving onto this one, freak christmas hamper offer. this is the latest occasion, criminal sent
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m essa g es latest occasion, criminal sent messages out and said there is a free hamper with lots of alcohol and food, come and tell us when you want it delivered. they gave them the time and the police turned up, and they were under arrest. 21 people wa nted they were under arrest. 21 people wanted by the police now, as a result, brought to justice. wanted by the police now, as a result, brought tojustice. the police do it regularly, they have second—hand shops, where they invite people handling stolen goods come along. you think the criminals would get the message that there is nothing free in above. matt is plotting the route for sa nta, matt is plotting the route for santa, but this piece in the express , santa, but this piece in the express, santa not in good health. the royal college saying that santa is suffering from numerous diseases, they make the point that he leads an
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unhealthy they make the point that he leads an u nhealthy lifestyle. they make the point that he leads an unhealthy lifestyle. but they don‘t a nswer unhealthy lifestyle. but they don‘t answer the fact that he has been around for hundreds of years. that is where we have to leave it. but this is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one. bye for now. hello this is breakfast, with tina daheley and jon kay. a summary of this morning‘s main news: more than 70 firefighters have been tackling a fire at london zoo this morning. the blaze broke out in a cafe and shop near to a petting area. we do not believe any people or animals have been injured. these are the latest pictures from inside london zoo, no flames now but the smoke still rising. i believe we have an update.
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from the london fire brigade who say the fire is under control but earlier they said it affected three quarters of the cafe and half of the roof of that building. a former us marine has been arrested by the fbi on suspicion of planning a terror attack in san francisco on christmas day. everitt aaron jameson was allegedly planning to target the city‘s pier 39 area, which is popular with tourists. the fbi says he had written a letter claiming the attack and making reference to president trump‘s recent decision to designate jerusalem as the capital of israel. a man is due in court this morning charged with murdering a mother—of—one as she worked in a supermarket. neville hord, who is 44, is accused of stabbing 30—year—old jodie willsher to death at an aldi store in skipton, north yorkshire, on thursday. he‘ll appear before york magistrates today. the united nations security council has passed tough new sanctions against north korea aimed at cutting oil supplies vital for its missile and nuclear programs.
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china and russia voted in favour of the resolution proposed by the united states delegation. 2017 has seen north korea conduct a series of ballistic missile launches and enter into a war of words with president trump. for the tenth time we stand united against a north korean regime that rejects the pursuit of peace. they continued to defy the resolutions of this council, norms of saliva lies —— norms of civilised behaviour. their arrogance and facility do anything productive has set the country and a destructive path. —— has said their country on a destructive path. the chimes of big ben will ring out over london again from nine o‘clock the cornish holiday home where daphne du maurier wrote her first novel has been given protected status. du maurier wasjust 22 when she started writing the loving spirit at ferryside in bodinnick,
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on the river fowey. it has been given grade two listed status. for a city so used to producing films about alien invasions it‘s maybe not surprising that when people in los angeles saw a mysterious light in the sky last night, talk swiftly turned to visitors from another world. thousands of people living in california posted photos and videos online of this strange white light that appeared overhead. however, dissapointingly for sci—fi fans the ufo was swiftly claimed by spacex as one of thier falcon 9 rockets that had taken off from vandenberg air force base, 150 miles north of la. those are the main stories this morning. now let‘s get the sport. it‘s a bumper day and the bumper period ahead for the football and the rugby union as well. no peace for the
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wicket on christmas day, with training and a game on boxing day. but what a game for fans of arsenal and liverpool. it was the first time, arsenal had played liverpool, on a friday night, since the since the title decider, back in 1989, and although the stakes weren‘t as high, it was just as dramatic, as drew savage reports. much had been made of the history of this friday night fixture. the only thing up for grabs tonight, fourth place in the premier league. but these days that fourth champions league spot is all—importa nt. liverpool and philippe coutinho determined to grab it. arsenal were booed off at half—time and jurgen klopp‘s side should have had more. mo salah put them two up in the second half, but by then they could have had three or four. and the atmosphere at the emirates changed. first alexis sanchez rose to the occasion. no celebrations at this stage. arsenal were all business. less than three minutes later, this.
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liverpool keeper simon mignolet embarrassed. now arsenal celebrated. for the home fans it was to get even better. from 2—0 down to 3—2 up in less than five minutes, thanks to mesut 0zil. great entertainment for the neutrals, but both teams will be frustrated by the mistakes they made. the exposed petr chech couldn‘t keep out roberto firmino. regrets on both sides. a 3—3 draw not too much help to either manager‘s european hopes, but, for many different reasons, a friday night to remember for all concerned. overall, we didn‘t give up and the spirit in the team is absolutely fantastic and you have to acknowledge that and on that front i‘m quite proud of the players, who responded and showed the strong mentality. usually with arsenal if you get a point that's an ok result. for most teams in the world it's pretty unlikely to get it.
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we deserved more, we got only one, but that's how it is and, yeah, it feels not too good at the moment. all the other sides are playing today — manchester city take their 11—point lead, at the top of the table, into a home match against bournemouth, who‘re dangerously close to the relegation zone. and who could have envisaged, at the start of the season that at christmas, burnley would be above tottenham in the table? that‘s exactly how things stand ahead, of the two teams meeting at turf moor this evening. burnley boss shaun dyche says he wants to calm expectations. we are not getting carried away, we are enjoying it and so hardy fans but we know every game is important and focus on the next game but in the bigger picture i am happy we are
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ina the bigger picture i am happy we are in a better position than we were and if we can keep edging forward each year than that is a real good sign of progress. you canjoin him in the car at lunchtime on football focus. graeme murty says he wants to make himself irreplaceable at rangers, after being given the job of manager until the end of the season. they‘ve won six games in nine since he took temporary charge two months ago, when pedro caixinha was sacked. murty said, "if i‘m good at it and stand out hopefully i can get to do it for longer". rangers are away to kilmarnock today, and the big one is between the top two. celtic, five points clear at the top, take on aberdeen, and the visitors are confident they can — like hearts, did last week — also cause an upset. we know we‘ve got to be our best. we know that. but we‘ve got players who can do that. we‘ve got a squad that we‘ll call upon and we will make sure we are putting in our best chance to win the game. we‘ve done a lot of work and we will make sure we use that confidence that the boys have got from the last two performances
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and go into the game looking to get that win. england all—rounder ben stokes is returning home to the uk for what he called "family reasons", after a month—long spell with the new zealand side canterbury. he signed as an overseas player and flew outjust after england had lost the first ashes test, sparking speculation he could be about to return to the side, but he‘s still suspended following his arrest in september. it was a record breaking day, for rohit sharma yesterday as he equalled the fastest century, in t20, international history. he made it injust 35 balls against sri lanka — the same feat as south africa‘s david miller. rohit was eventually out for 118 — a record high t20 score for india. premiership rugby union is back this weekend after the european break, and last night, worcester warriors eased their relegation fears, beating london irish to move 10 points clear of them at the bottom of the table. it finished 23—8, welsh wing josh adams, scoring both tries for worcester. the defending champion, michael van gerwen, is in frightening form, at the pdc darts world championship,
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at london‘s alexandra palace. he was up againstjames wilson — known as the lethal biscuit — but if wilson was hoping mighty mike would crumble, he was disappointed, as van gerwen won 4—0 to reach the third round. more dots litter and looking ahead to phil taylor‘s attempt at his 17th world title in about ten minutes —— more darts later. i am this on all day as i am going to see elf the musical with my daughter later tonight. it has got sound effects as well. you will hear them coming. thank you, mike. and merry
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christmas. can we jingle that? there we go. we are going to ring some bells in a slightly more professional way. big ben‘s iconic bongs have returned this morning to ring in the festive period. the great bell of the elizabeth tower, which you can see peeking out to the left of this shot, fell silent in august whilst repair work was carried out but will resume it‘s hourly chimes from 9 o‘clock this morning until new year‘s day. ricky boletto is getting a closer look from the palace of westminster rooftop. our reporter is there, getting a closer look from the rooftop of the palace of westminster. good morning. they worked, the chimes rang out at 9am live on bbc brea kfast. chimes rang out at 9am live on bbc breakfast. there was some trepidation, was it going to happen? and of course it did. the reason it‘s such a big deal is because big
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ben is meant to be silent for the next four years as essential maintenance is carried out on the elizabeth power. it is covered in scaffolding at the moment. it is a very windy here. we are hoping to hear the quarter chimes in a short while but it is quite winding up here. i am joined while but it is quite winding up here. iamjoined by while but it is quite winding up here. i am joined by two people who know a lot about the clock. thank you forjoining us. steve, can you tell us how hard was it to bring these chines back to life? it was not that difficult for the highly skilled team we have got working on it it isjust highly skilled team we have got working on it it is just a matter of re—engaging both of the striking and chiming mechanism is so not that difficult. you have to know what you‘re doing to do that, though.
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the reason they are falling silent is because big ben is obviously very loud and deafening for the workers working on the structure at the moment, but four years sounds like a long time. we have an obligation to protect the staff and workers on the elizabeth tower project. to protect their hearing. big ben is 118 decibels. when you are working in close proximity to it for such a long period it could affect your viewing so it was absolute to keep people safe and health and safety is a primary priority. work you nervous at 9am this morning, it did chime but were you ever concern it could not happen? iam ever concern it could not happen? i am always concerned and nervous but i say nerves are a good thing because it means people care about things. let me bring you in, one of the clockmakers and you look after not
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just big ben but 2000 clocks are on the palace of westminster? the whole parliamentary state has around 2000. how do you feel about these renovations and all the people working on this power? it is upsetting to see it the way it is to silence it but it is essential maintenance and we owe it to future generations, we are custodians and just looking after it for future generations. i am sure it would not be looked on kindly if we let it fall into disrepair. the main thing is while the scaffolding is up, it makes sense to do everything because we don't want to have to put it up again in five years' time. you will be able to hear those chimes of the next few days, starting today, all the way through to new year‘s day at 1am —— 1pm. after that they will fall silent and
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only be used for special occasions like remembrance sunday. and of course we will be hearing them throughout the firework display here on the river thames on new year‘s eve. since 1923 the bbc have broadcasted those chimes live and that tradition continues ever since and we will be hearing these bells are very soon. and we will be hearing these bells are very soon. in fact i think we have just a few seconds until the quarter chimes. that 13.7 time bell is very old, 160 years old, it is vital these works are carried out, to make sure it last that little bit longer but let‘s pause and waits for those chimes, the quarter bells, to ring. we think that is about 15 seconds to go but we will wait, for one week
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only and then silent again as the work continues. let‘s hear the quarter bells. big ben chimes there we have it. if you live in london you might hear it again, or you will hear it again at 10am! let‘s get some weather. very good morning. it is into the festive period now and the weather favours travels more than those christmas romantics because it will be miles and cloudy, the breeze may cause issues across northern
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scotla nd cause issues across northern scotland and eastern england, quite wet in scotland. the ahead of something more cold on christmas day for some and i will let you know where that is. not cold at the moment, temperatures are about 13 celsius all morning in north—east scotla nd celsius all morning in north—east scotland and widely temperatures into double figures today. some rain in the far north of scotland in shetland, turning wetter in the highlands later. north—east england with the best chance of sunshine, some breaks and northern ireland but plenty of cloud around. if you are on the move today, the higher ground of the pennines and the welsh mountains and the moors of south—west england fog could be a problem on and off the road today, some issues in the channel islands —— some breezes to clear the fog.
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these are the temperatures around the country. some brighter conditions in the north—east of scotla nd conditions in the north—east of scotland around aberdeenshire. guzzi highs of 15 celsius. wet in the west of scotland. then working at northwards and becoming more extensive in scotland on christmas eve morning. temperatures will hold up eve morning. temperatures will hold up tonight once again. these temperatures would be mild during the day, never mind at night. high pressure in the south causing more for problems, more of the breeze on christmas eve, these weather fronts move around of scotland and northern ireland. the wet start, rain spreading into northern ireland on christmas eve and by the end of christmas eve and by the end of christmas eve and by the end of christmas eve it will reach the far north of england. for most lots of cloud, but it will break a better at
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claims with the strong winds and temperatures could again hit 14 celsius and double figures for most. for christmas day itself, overnight rain in scotland and northern ireland will clear southwards and eastwards and an northern and western england and wales, christmas day will be wet and beginning quite windy. failing dusty in eastern england but staying dry until later in the day —— feeling ghastly. scotla nd in the day —— feeling ghastly. scotland and northern ireland something more cool, better chance of some sunshine further north you are and we see some wintry flurries and some snow on christmas day on the scottish mountains that is about it. enjoy your day and i will not hand you back tojohn and tina. looks like quite a miserable
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christmas day for many places. is anywhere likely to get snow on christmas day? only on the scottish mountains on christmas day, especially the far north. but is the chance of christmas night into boxing day some higher ground in northern england and wales could see some but it is a fine balance. not very a festive forecast for anybody to look wistfully through the window. you are so optimistic, tina. as he prepared for his last shot at the world title, phil taylor came to our studios in salford for some phil taylor has been meeting mike. with some of his celebrity friends and fans for some festive fun. as he prepared for his last shot at
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the world title phil taylor came to our studios in salford for some practice with some of his most famous friends and fans. like robbie williams‘s dad. # walking along, walking in a table wonderland #. he was the first to accept phil‘s three. challenge. phil short is why he has won 16 world titles. —— he showed us why. iama big showed us why. i am a big darts fan and i am lucky the best man in the world is one of my mates. how did you initially meet? we're both from stoke, there are only four of us! for me, it was dedication, dedication. i didn't spend a life going nightclubbing, i stayed in, i
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had a very boring life, really, what it paid off for me. after giving up his job it paid off for me. after giving up hisjob in the pottery industry and winning a first world title in 1990 he went on to become so well known he was even given a role in coronation street. 17,34... given a role in coronation street. 17, 34... another 17. given a role in coronation street. 17, 34. .. another 17. he is given a role in coronation street. 17, 34... another17. he is never ever going to be surpassed, 16 time champion, you know. like the one from america, which fell decided to leave behind.” looked at the bushes outside and decided that will do so i put the trophy inside a bush. can you see it? no, i can see it. i never saw it ain? it? no, i can see it. i never saw it again? no, i don't want to. he was inspiring all pages, from the pride
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of britain award winners to radio 4. not even when i summon up the power of format, could we beat the greatest of all time. are you retiring from the dance? what are you going to do? —— retiring from darts? go on, have a go. 0h, go on, have a go. oh, no, he‘s got 180. they co—opt to a thing and shock and a row at the round thing and then they drink some beer. if you doesn‘t look impressed it is because the sport has changed com pletely because the sport has changed completely now got too much for his liking. it is all changed now, when we would all be friends and have a drink together and socialise, now it is like walking into a doctor‘s
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surgery. is like walking into a doctor‘s surgery. they are all serious. i am really looking forward, there will not be any tears. i can‘t wait, i‘ll be honest. 30 years is a long time. phil taylor there, great pictures, that goes back to 1990. ican quite that goes back to 1990. i can quite believe he is retiring. i think he will come back next year, it just would not i think he will come back next year, itjust would not be the same. we will find out! just an update, we have been reporting about the fire at london zoo involving more than 70 firefighters and ten fire engines. the cafe area was on fire and part of the roof which is apparently near to the meerkat enclosure. we have an update from london zoo who say they would like to reassure the public the fire is under control and these zoo will be closed today until further notice.
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that backs up the fact it seemed to be quite a significant fire, to shut the whole zoo. the fire was clearly in an isolated area but that suggest there is damage to sort out. the first ever wild footage of this page has been captured from scientist from chester zoo. it is under threat from hunting and habitat loss, conservationists thought it might already have been driven to extinction but apparently it is safe and we can now get the latest. the javan warty pig, described by some as one of the world‘s ugliest pigs. the last surveys of the remaining catches of their habitat showed such dramatic declines in these animals the researchers thought the species might now be extinct. this is a really good place, ithink. but when this team from chester zoo
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hid motion—activated cameras in the forest here, they were in for a pleasant surprise. we had no idea if they are still there and how many are left. we were looking through the video, we saw some monkeys, some forest, something, and then we had the warty pigs and it was like yeah! this is the first footage ever captured of javan warty pigs in the wild. it was really fantastic and really good footage — like, the photos showed the big warts, so it was really good. this small wildlife centre in west java has just a few of the animals in a captive breeding program. these animals are incredibly shy, which is why they were so hard to find. but this captive population that have bred here at cikananga is an emergency population could be used to repopulate the wild if something does go wrong. at this point, we are really happy that they are still there so there is still hope and if we can design some effective conservation projects, then maybe
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we can keep them. for much of the forest wildlife here, habitat is disappearing rapidly. so while these particular creatures might not be java‘s most photogenic residents, scientists hope that rediscovering them might help in the fight to protect their home. victoria gill, bbc news, indonesia. the leader of the conservation effortjoins us in the studio. good to see you. tell us why it‘s so significant. it is not the most photogenic animal, why is it significant that has been found? there was a survey in 2004 based on interviews with local people and they thought 50% already had gone extinct and that is where chester zoo have now discovered the situation and said that we have to
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do something. it seems that after this survey we did last year and this survey we did last year and this year when we got the first footage, this decline is ongoing. when we first started to do this week were not sure if they were actually still out there. you must have been so excited? it was amazing, i was over the moon. almost discovering that they are still there, i was afraid they were already gone. they are very curious. these are camera traps with infrared sensors so camera traps with infrared sensors so they cannot actually see the flash so they are quite curious. tell us about what they are like compared to european pics, for example? they look quite similar, the males have these becky watts, they are slightly smaller and more
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—— of the males have these big warts. if you ask the local people they sometimes do not know these pigs are in the forest. there is the european whites pour so sometimes they are mistaken for another species. they are quite shy. catching them on camera is one thing but what can be done to preserve the species? we will do interviews with hunters or people who have hunting as a hobby and try to find out why they hug them. one could be because they protect their crops because the animals going to the rice fields —— why do they hunt of them? we could help them build structures to keep them out of their crops if they have it as a hobby, it could be something to think about alternatives, other hobbies, or put laws in place allowing them to fund the european wilds boar but if they
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encounter this pig they cannot kill it and have to let it go. but you have to work with the local people and save them with the local people. that is all from bbc breakfast today. thank you forjoining us. have a good day. goodbye. this is bbc news. i‘m shaun ley. the headlines at ten: a fire has broken out at london zoo, more than 70 firefighters have been tackling the blaze at a cafe. a man is due in court in york this morning charged with the murder of 30—year—old supermarket worker, jodie willsher. china and russia join the united states in approving fresh un sanctions on north korea. a former us marine is charged with planning to carry out a terrorist attack at a busy tourist area in san francisco over christmas. plans to tackle congested a roads — a consultation is launched to find out which routes need cash to bring them up to scratch. also in the next hour:
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the chimes of big ben ring out again. you can probably hear them behind me, the chimes of big ben are returning as they have been on hiatus since the
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