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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  December 24, 2017 7:00am-7:31am GMT

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the rescue effort continues today after a tropical storm kills more than 180 people in the phillipines. dozens more have been injured and around 40,000 people have been forced to leave their homes. good morning, it's christmas eve on sunday the 24th of december. also this morning: political leaders pay tribute to those who help others in their annual christmas messages. travel trouble over christmas as rail lines close for more than 250 engineering works. after warnings about a "busy—body" approach to anti—social behaviour the government issues new guidance for councils in england and wales. a very good morning. in sport — a late goal damages manchester united's slim title hopes, they draw 2—2 at leicester, leaving them 13 points behind runaway premier league
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leaders manchester city. and louise has the weather. a grey, damp and dull start for england and wales. leigh good morning. first our main story. a relief operation is under way in the philippines — where nearly 200 people are known to have died in flash flooding and mudslides. the president of the philippines will today visit communities devastated by tropical storm tembin. sarah corker reports. in the raging floodwaters, rescue efforts are frantic and dangerous. ropes are all these villagers have the pull each other to safety. storm tembin tore through mindanao, the philippines‘ second largest island of home to 20 million people. flash floods and landslides have cut off entire communities and washed away homes. and with more than 100 people
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missing, that death toll may rise. the remote village of dalama has been buried. 0fficial help has been slow to arrive and volunteers use their bare hands to search for bodies. translation: there used to be 103 houses here, but when the flash flood happened everything was washed out. all their homes and livelihood is gone. tens of thousands of people have been forced from their homes. blocked roads and power cuts are hampering the rescue effort. the authorities are too many people ignored warnings to leave. the call for people to evacuate in good time, before the storm, actually did not have an effect. the storm passed over some of the absolute poorest areas in the whole philippines, and people live in hard to reach areas. this disaster comes just a week after another tropical storm hit the central philippines. the resources of this disaster—prone nation are under strain. the un says it is ready
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to step in and help. sarah corker, bbc news. north korea has described the latest un sanctions imposed on the country as an "act of war". on friday, the united nations voted for measures that include limiting the country's petrol imports by up to 90%. the sanctions were in response to pyongyang's ballistic missile tests. four people are being treated in hospital after a serious collision involving several vehicles on the mao motorway in 0xfordshire. it happened between junctions 10 and ii of the northbound carriageway, which remains closed. two other people were treated at the scene of the crash which happened shortly before midnight. britain's political leaders have used their annual christmas messages to pay tribute to those who help others. they also urge people to support those in need over the festive season. 0ur political correspondent, eleanor garnier, has more. wishing everyone a happy christmas, the prime minister thanked those
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who help others during the festive period. like volunteers at faith projects and international aid workers. theresa may highlighted the courage and dedication of the emergency services who went to the grenfell tower tragedy and terrorist attacks in manchester and london. and she thanked the country's armed forces. this christmas, as people across the uk celebrate this special time of year with family and friends, we will do so secure in the knowledge that the valiant hearts of our service men and women, many far away from their own loved ones at this special time of year, are working to keep us safe. in his second christmas message as labour leader, jeremy corbyn called britain a compassionate nation,
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urging people to think of those who may be lonely at this time of year. many older citizens, to whom we owe so much, who should be spending this time withjoy, are alone. we think of others such as carers and people with disabilities or dementia. and abroad, we think of people living in nations such as yemen, syria and libya in fear of bullets, bombs, injury and death. nicola sturgeon paid tribute to those working over the holidays and visited a community cafe in glasgow to thank volunteers. this cafe and the volunteers here are among thousands of organisations and individuals throughout scotland who do so much for local communities all throughout the year, not just at christmas. the lib dems leader highlighted the issue of homelessness. community has always been at the
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heart of liberalism. community has always been at the heart of liberalism. this is a time of year to make that commitment. that is why i am asking you to take out some time this christmas and help with a local charity near you. the party leaders‘ festive messages were shared on social media to wish voters a merry christmas but also remind people to spare a thought for those in need. plans to scrap the army's crest and the slogan "be the best" have been halted by the defence secretary, gavin williamson. according to the mail on sunday, a leaked internal army document suggested the slogan was regarded as dated and elitist. the mod says mr williamson believes the army to be "the best of the best" and had put the proposals on hold. rail passengers are being warned they could face disruption as network rail carries out its biggest ever christmas engineering programme. works are taking place across england, wales and scotland during the festive period. the travel editor of the independent, simon calder, is at london paddington station this morning. that place is very deserted for
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reasons you are about to explain but these works really cover the whole country. lamb they certainly do. here we are at one of return's busiest rail way stations. —— they certainly do. today, there isjust a trickle of foreign tourists who are finding the heathrow express service isn't running and the next train of any sort of all isn't going to be and to thursday. we have also got disruption on the other side of london. liverpool street station and the main lineout to ethics, suffolk —— —— essex. southampton central going up towards london, the main line is closed to much for the new year. as is the link on the west
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coast main line from preston up to lancaster. also problems between birmingham and wolverhampton. if the engineering works don't get you, these strikes might. we have strikes today and wednesday. country trains. 0ther strikes coming up later in the week. you'd better tell them behind you. —— those people behind you. new guidance on how local autorities combat anti—social behaviour has been issued by the government, following concerns that some councils are misusing the measures. critics say so—called public spaces protection 0rders have been used inapproriately to target groups such as rough sleepers and dog—owners. andy moore reports. some charities working with the homeless say the new powers can be used indiscriminately against rough sleepers. others say so—called public spaces protection 0rders, which can cover large areas, are being used to target groups like buskers or dog walkers.
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but councils argue they are working with their communities to crack down on serious problems. the manifesto group campaigns against what they call the overregulation on ordinary life. it says hundreds of these orders have been issued, making a wide range of activities a criminal offence. on begging, blackpool wanted to ban loitering around shop entrances. doncaster wanted to target people being a nuisance. brighton wanted to stop anyone and sleeping in a car, caravan or tent in the town. fines of up to £100 can be issued for any breaches of these orders. the local government association says it will work constructively with the government to introduce the new guidelines. public spaces protection 0rders are used for the really serious end of antisocial behaviour and councils don't choose to do this on their own.
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residents will come to us, businesses will come to us, and say there might be some aggressive begging, daytime drinking or even street racing. that is the sort of things that these orders are used for. the revised guidelines say councils must focus on specific problems rather than blanket bans on behaviour that are not in themselves antisocial. and they must make sure they consult the public before the regulations are introduced. andy moore, bbc news. london zoo will reopen today, after a fire left a number of animals dead and several members of staff needing medical attention. a 9—year—old aardvark died in the blaze and four meerkats are also believed to have been killed. an investigation is under way into the cause of the fire, which broke out in the zoo's children's area, before spreading to a shop. tributes have been paid to the reality tv star leon bernicoff who died yesterday at the age of 83, following a short illness. the retired teacher appeared on the channel four show gogglebox
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alongside his wife. the network said he would be remembered for his "unique personality and sharp wit". you are up—to—date with the main stories. as we have been hearing, a state of emergency has been declared in the philippines after a tropical is to cause widespread devastation and light flights. the red cross is co—ordinating the relief effort and we can talk to the charity's international programmes manager. alice, good morning, merry christmas. bring us up—to—date on the situation in the philippines as you understand it. it sounds like a grave situation. the floods in the philippines are really devastating. the philippines red cross had been prepared in a vance and they have stocks. now they are working on search and rescue and also is some
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shelters to provide hot food, water and shelterfor shelters to provide hot food, water and shelter for those who have lost their homes. in terms of the problems it you will face there now, obviously once people have lost their homes, as the storm passes, disease and illness become a problem. that is exactly right. that is why they will be of providing clea n water is why they will be of providing clean water and making sure there is medical services around to support getting people back into adequate homes as quickly as possible. on a broader note, i notice, reading this morning, that 2017 has been the british red cross's busiest year since world war two. astonishing, really. give us a flavour of some of the things you have been involved with. this year, ten really big events. on top of the normal, sort of, smaller events we don't hear so much about in the news. 0bviously, the uk has been hit really badly this year with the london bridge at
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tax, the manchester bombings, and the grenfell tower disaster where the grenfell tower disaster where the british red cross had been very involved. thinking about people who had lost someone this year in both disasters. 0verseas, the migration crisis. although asylum numbers to beat uk have decreased compared to the beginning of the year, there are still 65 million people around the world who are unable to live in their own homes at the moment. the floods we have just seen in the philippines remind us of earlier in the year when you had the floods in nepal, through india and down to bangladesh which left huge swathes of the countries under water and hundreds of people lost their lives, homes and livelihoods. we remember hurricane burma that hit the caribbean. 0ne hurricane burma that hit the caribbean. one of the worst storms that hit the caribbean and com pletely that hit the caribbean and completely devastated many of the
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islands in that region including the british territories. —— hurricane irma. the british red cross had a huge drop their especially to help the british virgin islands. we still have millions of people displaced, 6 million people not able to return to syria and 5 million people displaced within syria. and then yemen, the colorado, a million people, the largest cholera outbreak they have ever had. —— —— cholera. the famine continues in the country. do you look on 2017 as being unique or do you fear that we will see more and more of these events as the years go forward 7 i think we hope that 2017 was unique for the united kingdom in the scale of disasters we have seen. looking
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more globally, the predictions for 2018 and onwards are definitely not lightening up. we expect the conflicts to continue around the world. food insecurity continues in many pockets of the world. so yes, we still have a lot of work to do. thank you very much for your time this morning, and a happy christmas. alex is the international programmes managerfor the british alex is the international programmes manager for the british red alex is the international programmes managerfor the british red cross. here is louise with a look at this morning's weather. you may be travelling today, heading off to see family, but i think you are looking a little further afield to start with. i thought we were just take a look at the latest satellite picture from tembin. it moved away from the philippines and strengthening as the tracks through the south china sea, expected to make landfall perhaps christmas day towards vietnam. we will need to keep a close eye on this storm. it not over yet. it puts our weather
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into context, because if you are travelling today it will be a cry quiet christmas eve for most of us. some of us accompanied by gale force winds in the far north west of scotland, as we speak. winds so far this morning have been gusting close to 50 mph. some of the rain really quite heavy. for most of us are pretty bland weather story for the remainder of christmas eve. great news if you will be travelling to see friends and family, that is what we really want. quite a bit of cloud and a grey but chilly start across the south—west. temperatures a couple of degrees above freezing, but they will recover and generally speaking it will be a cloudy, grade, mild scenario. bits and pieces of cloud breaking up for some brightness, may be thick enough out west for the odd spot or two of drizzle. the real rainjust west for the odd spot or two of drizzle. the real rain just fringing northern ireland, but shouldn't be too bad in sheltered eastern areas of scotland. lighter and mild with it. as we go through the day, not
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that much in the way of change other than the fact the rain will gradually nudge its way steadily south and east, and perhaps push towards the lake district by the end of the day. looking at these temperatures, ten to 12 degrees, unusually for the time of year. the sign of something turning a little bit fresher into the north, and that will be the story as we move towards christmas day. this weatherfront will continue to bring some rain slowly but surely in the northern ireland and in the southern scotland. for most of us on christmas day across england and wales, a dry affair. the rain gradually nudging into the west of wales by the end of the morning. so that will be the story, but the kind that will be the story, but the kind that front, colder air digging in so we could start to see a few flakes of the light stuff on christmas day across scott on. so technically it will be a light christmas, but it is not really going to settle at lower levels. the rain quite heavy by the end of the afternoon into wales, and
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that will gradually sweep its way steadily eastwards as we go into boxing day. the rain really quite heavy behind it but a noticeable difference in the story, because once that frontal system sweeps through, the wind sweeps around were north—westerly direction and it turns colder on boxing day. noticeably colder. worse for england and wales, but look at these temperatures, a28 degrees. and wales, but look at these temperatures, 428 degrees. just to be clear, you are not claiming it will be a light christmas —— four to eight degrees. it is christmas eve, which means festive traditions are well under way in homes across the uk. so we have been out and about with our giant bbc breakfast bauble, to find out what people do to make the holidays special for them. i like to sit with all the kids, and the mrs, and my mum, to watch christmas movies and drink lots of hot chocolate with marshmallows. mum
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andl hot chocolate with marshmallows. mum and i every year on the first of december whack on miracle on 34th street. we have done it since she was pregnant with me. street. we have done it since she was pregnant with melj street. we have done it since she was pregnant with me. i usually end up was pregnant with me. i usually end up having a really fun night out on christmas eve, and that is howl up having a really fun night out on christmas eve, and that is how i get through all the stress. going along to the grandparents to enjoy ourselves. our tradition was always the kids got into bed with us every morning, and even our 26—year—old stilljumps morning, and even our 26—year—old still jumps in the morning, and even our 26—year—old stilljumps in the bad, but he is not getting a stocking this year. do you like brussel sprouts? no, i like peas. the no cauliflower, no broccoli. tend to have a christmas dinner and boxing day we have the same thing again. just like a double whammy christmas dinner. it is nice to have something
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different the next day. but then you have cheese and crackers. it is nice to have that the day after, as well. i personally can remember my dad pretending to throw the letter up the chimney, and the awe and wonderment of it. on christmas eve we always get new pyjamas, we do christmas pyjamas every year. we also on christmas eve do something with my my mum, my dad, and my brother. and we have a cheeky drink and a nice meal together. the bbc breakfast bauble out on the road. that is it if you are watching on bbc one. a very merry christmas from all of us, enjoy your christmas eve. we continue on the bbc news channel. stay with us if you can.
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thank you very much for staying with us. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. let's take a look at the newspapers. edwina currie is here to tell us what has caught her eye. good morning. good morning. but first, let's look at the front pages. the telegraph — minister's tax grab. this is boris johnson this is borisjohnson and michael gove talking about brexiteers having to pay tax on the money to fund the leave campaign. the observer — health gap between rich and poor. the poor spend more time in a&e,
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says the observer. the mail on sunday — the army "be the best" motto. they have told us overnight that they are shelving those plans, so they are shelving those plans, so they may not drop them after all. and the sunday mirror has an interview with george michael's loved ones, saying his death still hau nts loved ones, saying his death still haunts them, all that time after he died. thank you very much for coming in on christmas eve to talk to us and takea in on christmas eve to talk to us and take a look at the papers. you have got all your christmas shopping done, iam have got all your christmas shopping done, i am sure? well, i don't believe in spending loads and loads of money on christmas. we didn't decorate the house until yesterday. gosh, you did leave it late. well, november 30 is not christmas, as far asiam november 30 is not christmas, as far as i am concerned. november 30 is not christmas, as far as | am concerned. 50 november 30 is not christmas, as far as i am concerned. so they are talking about people spending £845 million online. tomorrow, christmas day shoppers set to spend $895
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million online. and today will be a big day. and what is happening is that retailing is changing dramatically. people now spend, especially with tomorrow being a bank holiday and so on, people have time to sit at home and they will be online and taking advantage of all the sales which come up online. the world is changing. but i will tell you what. 0ne world is changing. but i will tell you what. one reason i pick this is i don't like the idea that you have adverts going on for a whole month saying to spend. if you want a proper christmas you have to spend, spend, spend. you are not a good person unless you spend a lot of money at christmas. well, that is not the message of christmas for me. i guess it is people hoping to alleviate their consciences, maybe. well, my 11—year—old granddaughter, i usually give my granddaughter adventures, take her to the theatre or give her experiences of some
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kind. this year she took me aside and said, grandmother, can i please have a present with wrapping paper? tankard as we have things like amazon wish list. other online retailers are available. —— thank goodness we have things like amazon wish list. and the evidence that was withheld and ended in people being cleared. i know your husband was a police officer. well, this was the headline from the mail on sunday. my first reaction is the police office don't bury the key evidence. they have failed to uncover it. my husband, johnjones, have failed to uncover it. my husband, john jones, was a have failed to uncover it. my husband, johnjones, was a senior detective in the met for many years and has worked on cases like this, and has worked on cases like this, and we talked about what is going on here. the mail has four cases which have collapsed as a result... all
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rape cases, and another in the court of appeal. there are two different aspects. the first is, you now have in one case 40,000 items. with the best will in the world, no single officer can do that. especially when numbers have been cut. they probably need to do some of that with civilians and have people doing that, and that is theirjob and they are trained to look out for certain things. the other is that this was a young police constable, a detective co nsta ble. young police constable, a detective constable. my husband's view, and i ta ke constable. my husband's view, and i take his professional line entirely on this, is a detective constable is far toojunior to be on this, is a detective constable is far too junior to be handling on this, is a detective constable is far toojunior to be handling rape cases. if you are going to take rape seriously, and we should, it is a very serious committal offence, somebody is convicted and could be put away for life, and that needs to be handled at a much higher level, and supervised at a much higher level. and i feel sorry
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and supervised at a much higher level. and ifeel sorry because and supervised at a much higher level. and i feel sorry because this young detective constable i think has been hung out to dry. he did not bury evidence. he didn't get the support to find the evidence. and it could have had a catastrophic impact for somebody. 0n could have had a catastrophic impact for somebody. on a much lighter note, there was a bit of a kerfuffle about a pantomime that i heard about in manchester which we reported on the programme about. some of the innuendos, and it is kind of part and parcel of pantomimes to a point. the picture is ofjulian clary. and parcel of pantomimes to a point. the picture is ofjulian clarym happens to be the same company doing the one at manchester 0pera happens to be the same company doing the one at manchester opera house. happens to be the same company doing the one at manchester 0pera houselj can't believe there is any innuendo aboutjulian can't believe there is any innuendo about julian clary. they have cleaned up the one in the palladium. and i like the comment, he says do you really believe if you are going to come to the palladium and see
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dick whittington, you are not going to have a joke about the name of the character? we are going to one next week in stoke, which we go to every year, which works on two levels. the kids find some bits funny, and i won't repeat the joke, one of my children asked why i was laughing at a particular bit. the idea that schoolchildren don't laugh and talk about all the rest of it, of course they do. i agree with you that often they do. i agree with you that often the local pa ntomimes they do. i agree with you that often the local pantomimes are the ones that really are lovely. i went to one in northwich, which i was in two yea rs one in northwich, which i was in two years ago, and we went on friday night and it was hilarious. very traditional, very funny. the slatwall is a bit, not all the queues —— the set wobbled a bit, not all the cues were met, but it was fun. good elfy fun. this gentleman
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is in birmingham. we don't know who he is. the nation does now. the negative thoughts that come from this site, i hope they didn't get absolutely paralytic and cause paramedics and ambulance crews a lot of trouble. i hope they got home safely. i hope he didn't get too much of a hangover. but in the end, there is something madly british about that. you have a feeling that they don't do it like that in paris. you look at this one here, it is in liverpool and it says heartfelt hugs for the homeless. there is a young lady who has not down and is giving a chapa lady who has not down and is giving a chap a hug. absolutely right. and a chap a hug. absolutely right. and a little bit low that there is a reveller slumping on a postbox in liverpool. i come from liverpool. we know how to enjoy ourselves. i say fine, just be safe. exactly, be safe
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and don't be loud. thank you very much indeed. we will see you again in an hour. stay with us. headlines coming up. hello. this is breakfast with rogerjohnson. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. the president of the philippines is to visit victims of a tropical storm that's claimed nearly 200 lives. a relief operation is under way following flash flooding and mudslides. a state of emergency has been declared in several locations across the region, where tens of thousands of people have been forced to flee their homes. the storm is now heading west towards vietnam. north korea has described the latest un sanctions imposed on the country as an "act of war". on friday, the united nations voted for measures that include limiting the country's petrol imports by up to 90%. the sanctions were in response to pyongyang's ballistic missile tests. four people are being treated in hospital after a serious collision involving several vehicles on the m40 motorway in 0xfordshire. it happened between junctions 10 and 11
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of the northbound carriageway, which remains closed. two other people were treated at the scene of the crash, which happened shortly before midnight.

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