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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 29, 2017 11:00pm-11:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11. knight fever — bee gees singer barry gibb and beatles drummer ringo starr are knighted while strictlyjudge darcey bussell made a dame, in the new year honours. labour peer lord adonis resigns as the government's infrastructure chief — with a scathing attack on the government's handling of brexit. the, which i think is being handled very badly, taking britain out of the key economic institutions of the european union, the customs union and the market, it is affecting the whole conduct of britain. snow, ice, and strong winds disrupt many parts of the uk, with more forecast over the new year weekend. also this hour — the dog who's had pioneering treatment to save a leg to save a leg from amputation. scientists at glasgow university will now begin trials to see whether a newly—discovered technique for re—growing bone tissue will work
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on humans. in halfan in half an hour we will have more from the papers. good evening and welcome to bbc news. the new year's honours list has been published — and among the many honoured is the former deputy prime minister and ex—leader of the lib dems nick clegg, who's been knighted for his services to politics. he's joined by bee gees star barry gibb and strictly come dancing judge darcey bussell, who has been made a dame for her services to dance. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba has more details. # twist and shout... more than 50 yea rs # twist and shout... more than 50 years after beatlemania, the fab
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four‘s drama has been honoured with a knighthood. # what would you do if ising a knighthood. # what would you do if i sing out of tune... a knighthood. # what would you do if i sing out of tune. .. recognising ringo starr's up the century long contribution to music. # tragedy... former bee gee barry gibb said he was humbled and very proud to be paid sir barry. war horse author and one—time childom's laureate michael morpurgo who has been made a night at his award highlights the importance of literature for young people. reading is a great bastion against stupidity and bigotry and ignorance. it is the greatest weapon we have, really, and it is the greatest assista nce we have, really, and it is the greatest assistance we can give them
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is to make them readers. former deputy prime minister nick clegg has also been knighted for political and public servants. strictly judge darcey bussell, who has occasionally performed on the programme as well, is made a dame. i am to give roper, iam the is made a dame. i am to give roper, i am the night manager. those being made cbes, the next highest level of award, include actor hugh laurie for services to drama. former british vogue editor, who left the magazine earlier this year after a quarter of a century at the helm, and bestselling riders authorjilly cooper. thrilling. i could not believe it. suddenly two get a letter, i thought it was a gas bill oi’ letter, i thought it was a gas bill or something, the most heavenly thing saint you are a seedy. it is wonderful. hull had a hugely
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successful year as a city of culture. members of the team behind the 12 month celebration have been made cbe and obes. # i've got to runaway. . . made cbe and obes. # i've got to runaway... also becoming an singer and campaigner mark on that for services to art and culture. it is great to have that recognition for things that you may be made a difference to many people, you made a difference really. i tried in music over the years to be a voice for people who felt a little bit like an outsider. musician and producer whiley, known as the godfather is made an mbe. brilliant coach by the captain. in the world of sport, sam warburton, who has captained wales and the british lions is made and obes. england cricket players have been recognised, including anya shrubsole, her recognised, including anya shru bsole, her bowling recognised, including anya shrubsole, her bowling helped britain win the world cup. shrubsole, her bowling helped britain win the world cupm shrubsole, her bowling helped britain win the world cup. it has been a landmark year. it says a lot
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about the whole tournament and women's cricket in general, it shows how much the game has grown and how big that tournament was that it would be recognised in something like the new years honours list. most of those being honoured ordinary people doing extraordinary work, like effie ezequiel who acts asa work, like effie ezequiel who acts as a mentorfor work, like effie ezequiel who acts as a mentor for young work, like effie ezequiel who acts as a mentorfor young people. work, like effie ezequiel who acts as a mentor for young people. young people are everything to me. i am passionate about them and about their life and well—being and their welfare. for me to be recognised for my pattern is one of the greatest honours ever. so i my pattern is one of the greatest honours ever. so i am my pattern is one of the greatest honours ever. so i am in complete gratitude and appreciation. the majority of honours to go to people who aren't in the public eye, but who aren't in the public eye, but who have given exceptional service and in 2018 the honours committee say they will be looking to particularly recognise individuals who are involved in the response to and the aftermath of the london and manchester terror attacks and the fire at grenfell tower. lizo mzimba, bbc news, buckingham palace.
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the pr guru lynne franks has been awarded an 0be for services to business, fashion and women's rights. shejoins us now. congratulations. when did you find out? thank you very much. well, i got a letter a few weeks ago as a supposed most people did, it is a big secret to keep. it is great news. i am big secret to keep. it is great news. iam particularly big secret to keep. it is great news. i am particularly delighted because of the acknowledgement to the work they have done for women and women's empowerment of the last 20 years, which has really been my passion. what does the letter actually say? i don't think i have ever asked anybody that. does it set out why you are being honoured bertelli yes, it does. you have a citation of the areas it covers. mine said business fashion and the empowerment of women. mine said business fashion and the empowerment of womenlj mine said business fashion and the empowerment of women. i don't know if that is a new category, the empowerment of women, but i really feel it is, 2018, it is the year of the women. i have been working prolonged time alongside many other amazing women on creating gender
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equality from every perspective, whether it be the pay gap, sexual violence to women and girls, and i feel, as thrilled as i am personally to ta ke feel, as thrilled as i am personally to take his award, that it is kind ofan to take his award, that it is kind of an award for all the women that have really worked, really timelessly, forever though they have been doing it, i'm getting some kind of equality for women in society, which we actually still don't have. still have a long way to go, haven't we? and shall be will hear a lot about in 2018. what particular achievement so yours do you think have stood out and have attracted this award? well, the work that i am particularly proud of is the work they have done with women in prisons in this country working in war zones, i was working in post—war bosnia are with unesco on projects with the women survivors there, and creating products there. agbim
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working in africa in the villages there. i think over the years the work is accumulating. the big thing is that my background is pr. and without banging drums and making sure that causes i believe in get out there and get awareness. the work i have done with sexual violence as a weapon of war in the drc, in the congo, it has taken quite a few years of my life as well as sexual violence to women and girls in this country and all over the world, ftm. —— fgm. i imagine it is in the world, ftm. —— fgm. i imagine it isina the world, ftm. —— fgm. i imagine it is in a kimi v would have done in many years and an acknowledgement of what they did in the fashion industry that it is an acknowledgement of what they've done. i suppose there is an of that. —— an aspect of that. encouraging women in my workshops in starting
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businesses. there has been a flood on it. there has been that. i think my book was the first published anywhere in the english speaking world or anywhere in the world that encourage women to start a business based on notes, like a garden, planting seeds, nurturing and using intuition and all the things women find a much more natural way of working, which were not taken seriously like the way we build relationships, we connect, and we do work intuitively. by encouraging that, i have always had great feedback from women, it is ok, they can do things their way, according to their values, because of my book. a lot of people have caught on. you we re a lot of people have caught on. you were a pioneer. lynne franks, thank you very much. congratulations. 0k, thank you so much. 0n the line is the broadcaster, author and labour peer melvyn bragg,
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who has been made a companion of honour. for services to broadcasting and the arts. thank you forjoining us. when did you find out? how much of a surprise was it? i was astonished. about six or eight weeks ago. i read the letter several times, put it down quietly and did not say anything to myself or if you days. and then it sunk in. i was surprised and delighted. what to be letters say in your particular case, the citation? the citation was for the a rts citation? the citation was for the arts and broadcasting. i spend almost my inch higher life in those areas. it was very moving. —— my entire life. working to get the arts toa entire life. working to get the arts to a lot of people in television, which i hope we did, a team of us, and getting ideas and such to a lot of people, as i hope we do, in our time on radio. it had been recognised. it is not an honour we
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hear a lot. companion of honour. i think there are only 65. you are in very select company. i think it is great company. not to mess about. people i admire, like philip larkin, he took no honours except this one. so it is great. i am chuffed. where does this rank amongst your many, many career achievements was to you have been made peer coming up on lots of awards. you can't rank them, can you? lots of awards. you can't rank them, can you ? the lots of awards. you can't rank them, can you? the best award you win is the first award. this equals it. lord bragg, congratulations, thank you very much talking to us. goodbye. we're also joined by the author jilly cooper, she's been awarded an cbe for services to literature and charity. i think this means you have had an upgrade, is that right?”
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i think this means you have had an upgrade, is that right? i had an 0be and think in 200a. it is lovely. upgrade, is that right? i had an 0be and think in 2004. it is lovely. you said you thought it was a bill when it arrived. i did. said you thought it was a bill when it arrived. idid. ithought it said you thought it was a bill when it arrived. i did. i thought it was a gas bill. i get lots of bills. i give to a lot of charities, i was going through my post and there was a letter from the going through my post and there was a letterfrom the prime ministers then you have a cbe. it could not believe it. i read it about ten times. better quality paper, i would think, then a tax bill. best gas bill. the taxpayers clip was money. not much better. we have read about the saucy books, the literature you have written over the years. what sort of charity have you been supporting over the years with fellow greyhounds. i love greyhounds. they run and run and run. can you imagine the horror when
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they stop running. they are hung up ina wood. they stop running. they are hung up in a wood. they have bets as to who will die first. can you imagine that? the greyhounds are so divine. i love children too. i did a sculpture thing. my charities about brilliant. —— are brilliant. sculpture thing. my charities about brilliant. -- are brilliant. are you surprised that your literature, your particular sort of best selling writing has attracted honours like this? a pop of being called literature, to suddenly be called literature, to suddenly be called literature is amazing, comforting a lovely. i don't think they deserve it. iam lovely. i don't think they deserve it. i am very grateful and pleased and happy. what are you writing at the moment? i am writing a novel about football. it is called tackle. i should have guessed. jilly cooper,
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thank you very much were talking to us. thank you so much. goodbye. 0n the line is the author michael morpurgo, who has been awarded a knighthood for services to literature and charity. thank you very much. congratulations. you have no doubt kept a secret for some time. yes, it has been a couple of months. i told my wife. that is about it. you have to keep quite. that is part of the deal. so many people say they are surprised. what was your reaction? stunned. it is one of those things where it takes a while for it to sink in. for me, because i write and read also, and have grown up with children's literature in my head, a knight, which i now am, really belongs around the roundtable with
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kinga per and should have a wonderful name like galahad —— king arthur. and i am micheal. many people will think that has a perfect ring to it. when my producer spoke to you was thrilled that we would have you on the programme. like many of us, he has read many of your books. you clearly have a very nice producer. what am saying is i would really like to be called lancelot from now on. i think you could change it. he will argue with you? we all love about your books, what are the charities in particular that you have been involved with and are now being recognised for? one, really, like a lot of people, i have an interest in a lot of charities. there is nothing remarkable in that. it is 0pposition you must do. but my wife and i started a charity called
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farms for city children. what it is we have children in the cities and they come and work on our three farms, they live and they work and they become farmers, effectively, for a week. we have had close on 100,000 children come work on the farms. it has been, i suppose, our main ally‘s work. i am very proud that it still goes on. it is thrilling to have it recognised with this award. the thrilling thing for me is that it goes on. there are wonderful people out there and farmers who have been working on it for 40 yea rs farmers who have been working on it for 40 years and young people now coming to run the charity. i am too old to milk cows and move sheep around, but they go on doing it. in around, but they go on doing it. in a week or so the first children will come down during the winter term and then be going out in the frost and then be going out in the frost and the snow feeding sheep with farmers. i hear that happening all around me. i get letters from these kids. it is
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wonderful that it goes on. the people who make these things continue are really important. i suppose because we were there at the start, my wife and myself, we began beating, it is our baby, but the baby has grown up —— began the thing. iam pleased it baby has grown up —— began the thing. i am pleased it has been recognised. michael morpurgo, or should i say, sir lancelot, thank you for talking to say congratulations. the government's infrastructure advisor lord adonis has announced he is quitting his role, with a furious attack on theresa may's brexit policy. in his resignation letter he said brexit was a "populist and nationalist spasm" and accused the pm of "pursuing a course fraught with danger". he also described the eu withdrawal bill as the "worst legislation of my lifetime". the former labour transport secretary is a high—profile campaigner against brexit. he has chaired the national infrastructure commission since 2015. earlier this evening lord adonis joined us in the studio and i asked him if he had resigned
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before he was pushed. resigned as the regret leaving. —— i resigned. i regret leaving, iam a huge infrastructure advocate, i am the one who got a chest to going and we we have done some great work cleaning crossroads in london to teach history linking the northern cities and sorting out the problems with four g and five g coverage in our mobile systems are. there is a lot of infrastructure to do. the problem i see with it, might fritters with the government have become too great, but only with brexit which is being handled badly, taking written out of the key economic institutions out of the european union. but increasingly brexit is affecting the whole conduct of government, we are seeing that including in infrastructure itself, the very misguided decision to bail out the east coast rail
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franchise that will cost the taxpayer hundreds of millions of pounds. if we had proper conduct of government as happened before brexit, no way it would whitehall have allowed a hard right minister to have agreed the bailout of private rail companies as has happened. unfortunately my position has become unsustainable because of this. want to come back to that in the second, in the letter you wrote, you said you wanted to thank her for your curses he and personal dealings are. you also said in twitter i meant what i said, which makes it sad that number ten sources are up to dirty tricks. tomorrow's times will make it clear why hard brexit plus chris grady ‘s conduct and gave me no choice but to resign. pacey premise that didn't know what was happening, they briefed an early d raft happening, they briefed an early draft of my letter i have no idea how they can to do that and then they started saying that if i hadn't resigned then i might have been
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pushed. unfortunately this is the way that politics is being conducted and it is part of the brexit disease has spread across whitehall, it is much worse. i was transport secretary will be concentrated on the big things that athens, the public. getting rail services improved, plainly hate s2, london transport. at the moment we have a minister which is concerned with brexit and when he actually does his dayjob it is to do things like bailing out the east coast rail franchise, costing hundreds of millions of pounds. has a say in my letter, has been a nervous breakdown across whitehall and i am afraid it my position unsustainable. but the phrase spin doctor was invented for the labour government, there was a lwa ys the labour government, there was always spin going on, tricks, if you like. there was real substance in those governments making britain better. i think people accept that those years of government, which was
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better at the end of it. the big problem with brexit, which is what we are rubbing up against, is it will make britain worse off, not better off. you don't know that for sure. the majority of people who voted... lot of people will say we haven't even left yet and you are already writing it off. you accepted thisjob, in charge of infrastructure, advising on infrastructure, advising on infrastructure already knowing that the government was omitted to brexit. why would you do that when you are so at odds? i launched it when david cameron was prime minister. it was before brexit. i stayed in thejob, hoping minister. it was before brexit. i stayed in the job, hoping theresa may would adopt a sensible approach. the right approach was to stay within the union and the single market on which ourjobs and trade dependent and to my great regret what the problem that chose to do was to ally with ukip and wrench us out of everything to do with europe's key economic institutions.
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lord adonis speaking to me a short time ago. time for sport now. and for a full round up from the bbc sport centre, here's james pearce. an important few hours of sport. the play is under way in the ashes in melbourne. the weather is claimed to england, looking for our first win but you won't be surprised if it is jackson aren't being generous. slow progress so far, they have moved on to 112-2, progress so far, they have moved on to 112—2, trailing england by 52 and with smith and warner, england will need to make a breakthrough to give a realistic alive of winning the match. staying with cricket, a number of england's women feature in the new years honours list, which has just been announced. skipper heather knight receives an 0be. her teammates tammy beaumont and bowler anya shrubsole are awarded mbes. it turns out that shrubsole wasn't even the first person in her family to find out the good news.
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i had ihada i had a letter through the post that mum gave me when i came back. she had actually accidentally opened it because it didn't say the names, just the address and when she was opening the post and opened it. i think she knew a day before me. what we re think she knew a day before me. what were your feelings when you read that? firstly, i might get an opportunity to meet the queen, i love the queen. my best shot. i was surprised, it took a couple of minutes to take it all in the. —— ta ke minutes to take it all in the. —— take it all in. british and irish lions captain sam warburton has been awarded an 0be. welshman warburton has led the lions on their last two tours, including the drawn test series against world champions new zealand during the summer. a full list of all the sports stars honoured can be found on the bbc sport website. phil taylor is true to the pdc world
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darts xavi chip after beating gary anderson. it is his farewell tour. he will face the qualifier, jenny lewis in the semifinals. —— championship. in the other semi—final, michael van gerwen will continue his quest for back to back world titles after beating compatriot raymond van barneveld in a classic quarter—final. finishing 5 set to 4. five sets to four it ended and the dutchman will take on 20th seed rob cross next. there was one premiership rugby match this evening, and wasps won 31—25 away at bath. the visitors made a great start and were 19—0 up, but this score from gaby lovobalavu proved the difference in the end. wasps edging a bonus—point win to move ahead of saracens into second in the premiership. cardiff city slipped to a third consecutive defeat, losing 1—0 at home to preston in the championship. tom clarke got a last minute winner in a tight contest. preston are unbeaten in nine games and move to withn a point of the play—offs.
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millwall beat qpr 1—0 in the night's other game. jurgen klopp says it was not nice paying £75 million virgil van dijk, but there was little choice, he says. dutchman will become the world ‘s most expensive defender in a tra nsfer ‘s most expensive defender in a transfer window opening in the new year. it doesn't mean that all tra nsfers year. it doesn't mean that all transfers will now be in this category but it is the same like it was before. there was a big transfer foran was before. there was a big transfer for an offensive player and now we have a big transfer of four a defensive player and it is a roundabout third. that is it. not nice, but that is the market. that is the world and we have to adapt. that's all from sportsday. 114-
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114— two it is now. all on the bbc website. don't forget a test match special also. i will be back soon. bye for now. thank you james. researchers in scotland, who saved the leg of a dog using a new technique to grow bones in a laboratory, say they now hope to try it on human beings. the dog, eva, would have had her leg amputated had it not been for this pioneering treatment. the team at glasgow university say the first human trials are due to take place in three years' time. 0ur science correspondent pallab ghosh has this exclusive report. eva! there's no holding her back, but last year eva's front right leg was broken in a road accident. her vet tried everything, but nothing worked. her entire leg was going to be amputated. well, nine, ten months, she'd been unable to get out and have walks, anything other than go out to the toilet. but to fiona kirkland's delight, her dog was saved by an experimental bone—growing technique. it's absolutely fantastic.
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we're just so pleased to have our dog back, fit, active, healthy. eva's vet showed me the problem. the blood supply to the edges of the bones has failed, so it wasn't able to heal the break. the scientists coated the dead areas with their artificial bone, and afterjust six weeks, it was completely mended. the artificial bone mix was made at glasgow university. it consists of sterilised chips that are coated with bone cells and a chemical that make them grow, rather like a fertiliser. well, clearly, we want to look at treating more dogs and possibly even cats who have had broken bones, but also other areas we can help these veterinary patients, so things like joint fusion, where they've had a tendon injury and they need theirjoint held together so they can walk properly. the researchers are so amazed at the success they've had in treating eva they want to try out
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the technique on people. they plan to be the first researchers in the world to grow bone in their lab and put it into a patient in three years' time. and these are the people that could be most helped. it's 20 years since princess diana brought the issue of landmine victims to the world's attention. their limbs usually have to be amputated. landmine campaigners are funding the new research so it can be used to grow some of their bone back and attach an artificial leg. well, if they are able to have a prosthetic limb, it would make all the difference to their life, being able to provide for their family, instead of having to be a burden on theirfamily. it's been a happy outcome for eva and her owners. thousands of people could soon benefit from a technology that has put a spring back in her step. pallab ghosh, bbc news, glasgow. snow and ice have led to another day
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of travel disruption in parts of the uk. passengers at glasgow airport faced delays, after heavy snow caused flights to be suspended for a while. there was snow too across northern england and the southern pennines. the rac has warned that driving conditions will be very difficult, if not impossible, in the worst—affected areas. 0ur correspondent judith moritz reports. grounded at glasgow — flights at the city's airport were suspended after snow settled quickly overnight. the airport reopened by mid—morning, but managers have apologised for the knock—on disruption which was caused. temperatures plummeted to as low as minus 12 celsius in scotland. the ploughs were out, shovelling industrial quantities of snow on the m90 motorway near dunfermline, though it wasn't enough to keep all drivers on the road. in towns and villages nearby, the spades were out to clear the way.
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she's just come in for a packet of cigarettes, and she's decided to clear my front path away, and that's community spirit for you. heavy snow also fell in the north of england, where 100 gritters were sent out onto the road network to keep traffic moving. the snow has been falling steadily all morning across swathes of northern england. as predicted, it's been settling most in areas like this, just outside huddersfield, up here on the higher ground. in cumbria, hazardous conditions left some vehicles stranded on the a590, and there were also delays on other main roads. staff at the highways england control room in wakefield have been monitoring the motorways and a—roads. the next thing we're looking towards is the threat of ice

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