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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  January 12, 2018 9:00am-11:01am GMT

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hello it's 9 o'clock. welcome to the programme. there's a major fire at nottingham station. trains are suspended and passengers moved to safety as fire crews try to bring it under control. we'll have the latest. donald trump cancels a visit to the uk to open a new us embassy in london. in a tweet he calls the project a bad deal and says they "wanted me to cut the ribbon — n0!". but did the fear of demonstrations put him off? i think it's well know that there may have been demonstrations, there has not been a huge amount of love towards them from the british people and perhaps the president did not want to walk into that? there's still no date for a state visit, but theresa may has confirmed it's on the cards. we'll have the details. also today — as more children than ever are referred to social services there are fears that serious cases could be missed as staff struggle with their workload. hello.
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welcome to the programme, we're live until 11 this morning. we'll also be speaking to clare pooley — a mother of three — who's casual drinking turned into a serious habit. she's here to talk about giving up alcohol and the support she's had from other women in the same situation. so we'd love to hear from you if this is something you've got experience of. use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. a huge fire is blazing at nottingham railway station. nottinghamshire fire and rescue say they're dealing with a ‘large incident‘ with five fire engines at the scene. the station has been evacuated. east midland trains say all trains through the station are cancelled and they expect disruptions. on the line it's our reporter healy compton, bring us up to date with the latest you have about this fire?
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every street around nottingham train station is closed at the moment, find me there are 11 fire trucks that you can see and bearing in mind this is just that you can see and bearing in mind this isjust one that you can see and bearing in mind this is just one side of the train station which has been closed off. there are ambulance crews at the site currently but i am told they are here as a precaution. it is after unconfirmed reports of a fire ina after unconfirmed reports of a fire in a toilet on one of the platforms. as you can see fire crews are in attendance. i have been told that it's not a major incident and they have managed to get the blaze under control. there were reports of plumes of smoke, plumes of black smoke at 6:30am but i have been speaking to some people in the buildings around the train station who have told me this morning the first they knew about the fire was when they opened the front door this morning and were greeted by a sea of blue lights. thank you for bringing
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us blue lights. thank you for bringing us up—to—date with that. our reporter down at nottingham train station, it goes without saying we will keep you across that story with updates throughout the programme. donald trump has cancelled his planned visit to the uk next month. the us president tweeted that he had cancelled the planned visit as he didn't want to open the new american embassy in london — which he incorrectly stated had been commissioned by his predecessor, barack obama. dan johnson reports. after nearly 60 years flying above london's grosvenor square, the stars and stripes were lowered, ready for the opening of the new us embassy. it's billion—dollar building on the southbank and donald trump was due to open it next month. now we know he won't and early this morning, he posted his reasons on twitter: but did the prospect of protests like this
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also put him off? this was the response to his ban on travellers from certain muslim countries. a petition drew 1.8 million signatures with calls to ban him. it shouldn't be a state visit because it would be embarrassing to the queen and the rest of the uk. theresa may was the first world leader to reach out to the new president and a return trip, a state visit, was promised soon. but then the president strained the special relationship by sharing online far—right videos from the group called britain first. when theresa may condemned, he then retorted. just last weekend, she confirmed the invite still stands. he is taking decisions in the best interests of the united states. and he is coming to this country?
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he will be coming to the country. the foreign secretary denied the queen would be embarrassed. i think her majesty the queen is capable of taking this american president or any american president in her stride, as she has done over six remarkable decades. let's be clear. opening this place was never the same as a state visit. it would have been a shorter, less formal trip. meeting the queen is still on, expected this year, but no date has been set. the president is denying this decision is down to politics but after he offended more countries with a foul—mouthed remark last night, the list of places he is welcome certainly isn't growing. jon donnisonjoins me now from outside the new us embassy in central london. what are we to make of this trip been cancelled 7 what are we to make of this trip been cancelled? some of the workers
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arriving here this morning in this "off location" are pretty bemused by all the attention, asking what it's all the attention, asking what it's all about, and some fruity language from some of them when i told them donald trump had cancelled the visit. this is the building in question, this is what $1 billion gets you. when you look at the tweet from donald trump he was blaming president obama for agreeing to move the old embassy from its location in gross the old embassy from its location in gi’oss square the old embassy from its location in gross square to here in vauxhall. it's interesting because that decision was actually made back in 2008, not by president obama but by his predecessor president george w bush. as was pointed out in the report, this was not a state visit planned, it was something a bit on a smaller scale but it does make i would imagine the possibility of a
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state visit later in the year probably even more likely to be shelved i would have thought. thank you. now to the bbc newsroom for a summary of the rest of the days news. a study of women with breast cancer suggests that having a double mastectomy does not increase the chances of survival in younger patients who have what's known as the brac1 gene. the researchers also found that women treated for breast cancer had the same survival rates — regardless of whether or not they had the mutation. the bbc is said "deeply unimpressed" with an off—air chat in which two of its presenters joked about the pay gap between the sexes. that's according to a source at the corporation. bbc radio 4 today presenter john humphrys and north america editorjon sopel were discussing carrie gracie, who had just quit her china editorjob over equal pay. in an exchange before monday's show, it's reported they theyjoked about "handing over" pay to keep her in post. a bbc spokeswoman said
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the presenter regrets the "ill—advised" conversation. there's been a breakthrough in talks in germany on forming a new coalition government. after working through the night, chancellor angela merkel‘s christian democrats and their former coalition partners, the social democrats, have now agreed a basis upon which a coalition treaty can be negotiated. mrs merkel has been unable to form a government since inconclusive elections in september. nigel farage has clarified remarks he made yesterday calling for a second eu referendum. the former ukip leader has said although another vote was the "last thing" he wanted, he thought it might be forced on the country by parliament. his initial remarks were seized upon by remainers, with labour's chuka umunna saying mr farage had made "a valid point for the first time in his life". the conduct of the media is expected to be examined by the independent review into the response to the manchester arena bombing. 22 people were killed when a bomb was set off after a pop concert at the venue in may.
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several of the bereaved families have raised concerns about the reporting of the attack. the review will also look at the role played by social media. an 18—year—old from the scottish highlands has died after contracting the flu virus. bethany walker was airlifted to hospital in inverness from her home but the illness had become pneumonia and doctors were unable to save her. police have released the names of 17 people including four children confirmed to have died in a mudslide which struck a small town in southern california. all of the dead were residents of montecito, the ridge from age three to age 30 nine. one official
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estimate puts the missing figure as high as a3. the queen has been talking about some of the challenges she faced at her coronation 65 years ago. as part of a bbc programme, she spoke candidly about the heaviness of the crown she wore, and noted it was lucky she and her father, king george vi, had the ‘same sort of shaped head'. ‘the coronation‘ will air on bbc one at 8pm this sunday. facebook has announced what it says is a major change to it‘s news feed. the social website will refocus on interactions between family and friends rather than media and business content. it means that people will see fewer posts from companies and public organisations. a butcher who got trapped in his own freezer has described how he freed himself using a frozen black pudding. chris mccabe thought he was for the chop after the freezer door in his shop in totnes, devon, blew shut behind him. stranded in temperatures of minus 20 degrees, he said he used the sausage as a battering ram on the door‘s release mechanism. do excuse thatjoke, strong stuff
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that black pudding. i think that is the best use of black pudding but i might get in trouble for saying that! do get in touch with us throughout the morning. we will be talking to a mum who gave up we will be talking to a mum who gave up drinking after she discovered she was drinking ten bottles of wine in a week. use the hashtag #victorialive and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let‘s get some sport with hugh woozencroft. hugh, billiejean king has once again called for a change ahead of the australian open? good morning. well, the australian open starts in melbourne over the weekend but already the tournament is making controversial headlines, and not for the first time. last year, you may remember, margaret court — the 11—time aussie open winner, a devout christian — voiced her opposition to gay marriage, as well as derogatory comments regarding tra nsgender people. the great billiejean king
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is now calling for the stadium in melbourne named after court to be renamed. earlier, our tennis correspondent russell fuller told me what king had to say. billiejean billie jean king was billiejean king was reigniting the debate which started in may when margaret court the winner of 20 for a grand slam titles during her career had some very outspoken views on gay marriage and added that tennis was full of lesbians and transgender children will work of the devil. the margaret court arena here in melbourne park takes her name and tennis australia at the time said they would not change the name even though they distance themselves from views. today dolly jean king speaking in melbourne said it should have its name changed and that if she was playing today she would not play any matches on that court. she went on to say that i think if you were talking about indigenous people orjewish people
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01’ indigenous people orjewish people orany indigenous people orjewish people or any other people i cannot imagine the public would want somebody to have their name on something. we are all god ‘s children she said. ijust feel like she has got really derogatory. a lot of talk about inclusivity, was there a response from the tournament organisers? to be fairto from the tournament organisers? to be fair to the australian open there was a press conference called to mark the fact billie jean was a press conference called to mark the fact billiejean king who is here to celebrate 50 years since first winning the title and is the australian open‘s woman of the year was able to express her views. the tournament director was alongside and he said what they said six or seven months ago that once again they would not condone what margaret court said, we do not agree with what she has said, but that the court is named after her because of her achievements on it. he also said it was congregated, it is notjust tennis australia who makes this decision, the government own melbourne park so there are many
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stakeholders and he said there was no active proxies to change the name but there is something subject to discussion. staying down under it's been a good warm up for heather watson. she missed out on a first wta final in two years, beaten in 3 sets by belgian second seed elise mertens. and missing out isn‘t always a negative. at least that‘s what british bobsleigh are hoping for after a minor stroke ruled bruce tasker out of the upcoming winter olympics. his teammate john jackson says that ‘heartache‘ can help inspire the squad. tasker is expected to make a full recovery and resume his career next season. jackson says although he‘ll be missed, team gb has the ‘strength and depth‘ to step up to the challenge. looking forward to those games in south korea as well. we will be back
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with more sport later in the hour. when toddler peter connolly, better known as baby p, died in horrific circumstances just over ten years ago, the government said it was essential to learn lessons and restore the public‘s confidence in social services. his death was the highest profile, but by no means the only, case where professionals failed to protect a child. various agencies were urged to talk to each other more and be more vigilant for the signs of abuse. but have things swung too far? new figures from the local government association sure there we re over government association sure there were over 600,000 referrals in england and wales last year. that is one child every 49 seconds. the lga says councils are struggling to cope and facing a £2 billion funding gap. let‘s speak now to adelejoicey, mother—of—four, who took her two—year—old twin son ryan to the gp with a high temperature but within hours, social services were investigating her for possible child abuse. melanie adegbite, who works as a social worker and says despite the case pressure, every case still needs to be investigated.
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alsojon brown from the nspcc, who says there are still many cases that are going unreported and these figures are still not painting the full picture. and dr lauren devine from the university of the west of england, who thinks too many cases are being referred. thank you all forjoining us today. doctor divine comedy have looked at these statistics and pulled a report together, tell us your findings. very briefly, i am interested in the very current interest in the high number of referrals, because the data shows that has been an increasingly high number on a trajectory for a number of years. what is also very interesting is that the data shows that the higher the referrals, the less addition to the referrals, the less addition to the system becomes in detecting serious child abuse. in fact, it is no surprise to me, and everybody who
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works within the system, either as an academic or social worker, that users will be missed. that is less to do with the bother of any individual local authority, although in some cases clearly they have been missed when they should have been spotted, but it is more to do with an overwhelming number of referrals, that does not necessarily reflect the number of children being abused. in other words, from arnold referred who are abused and vice versa, there are children in the system who have not been abused and it is clogging it up. melanie, i can see you were nodding. what i would say is that in my experience, families that we are working with nowadays, the families who, into the social work services, theissues who, into the social work services, the issues are really much more complex than was previously. i think there are lots of reasons for that. one of the reasons would be that the thresholds are higher in local authorities because of austerity,
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because of the lack of funding, the lack of resources. so the situation has to be worse for a child, currently, to be seen by social services than in years gone by because of cuts? thresholds have become higher, so what's the point of intervention, it is, you know, it is very different in terms of ten years ago, 15 years ago. families would be, probably, in dire need at that point or in child in need, child protection cases. it is to do with the lack of resources. adele, i wa nt to with the lack of resources. adele, i want to bring un, because you‘re a mother of four, and as i said, due ta ke mother of four, and as i said, due take your two—year—old ryan to the gp, he was unwell, and this is related to a stage where they said they were going to take him away from you? that is correct. i went to the gp and he referred me, there was
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a mark there that i was not sure where it had come from, so he explained he would refer it to social services and the key about, and that night they came out, and because my partner works away, i nobody to stay with me overnight so they were not prepared to leave me with ryan overnight so were making steps to remove him. i had to go and pack a bag. but he was not taken away? no, we were at the gp for a couple of hours waiting for social services to come out. by that time, his temperature was continuing to go up. he was poorly. when social services came to my home and were talking about it after we had left the gp, ryan has become very poorly, so the gp, ryan has become very poorly, so he went floppy and i took him to bmd. what the social worker said was it could all be straight about at the hospital, because a safeguarding doctor was there. —— to come to
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accident and emergency. they could examine ryan giggs review on the mark. so they were then happy that the mark was innocent and orion stayed with you? it turned out there had been an error in the way it had been recorded. when the gp telephoned social services, he explained that he had seen an unexplained mark on a mobile child. ryan was quite mobile. however, social services dealt with it as a nonaccidental injury on and a mobile child, which triggered a totally different response, which is why that path started. —— on a not mobile child. john, i want to bring un. clearly, in adil‘s situation, m ista kes un. clearly, in adil‘s situation, mistakes were made. is that inevitable with the sheer amount of cases being referred ? inevitable with the sheer amount of cases being referred? inevitably m ista kes cases being referred? inevitably mistakes can be made on occasions and it can be extremely stressful.
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of course being in the midst of a situation where you are being referred to children‘s services because of concerned. what is critical is that where those rebels are made, because of the volume of referrals coming through, and that is not necessarily a bad thing, that there is adequate reserves into assets and trieste was referrals so they can be filtered where appropriate to family support. we need much more investment in family support to assist families where they need help. where there are not immediate concerns about abuse or neglect but where they need help. and then add resources to ensure that where job protection action does need to happen, it is taken swiftly. we have learned a lot over recent yea rs swiftly. we have learned a lot over recent years in relation to that accurate assessment. the development of multi—agency safeguarding, but we still do not know the overall scale of the problem, and that of a real issue. some research that we did in 2011 showed that for every one child on thejob protection plan it is
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estimated there are another age children who are being subject to abuse or neglect your not in the system. —— and other aid children. we are still looking at a significant unknown figure and that is why we are calling on the government to undertake a prevalence study to double as a better idea of the extent of abuse right across the uk. ‘s if there is there amongst social workers, we mentioned baby p in the introduction, is the worry with you and your colleagues about worrying some —— missing something critical? we want to do the best that we can do, and especially when we are working with families, we wa nt to we are working with families, we want to make sure that we are fair, that our assessments are reflective of the child‘s experience, i‘ve worked with children and families for almost 20 years, so we want to make sure that our assessment is reflective. but the difficulty is very similar to what i am hearing my collea g u es very similar to what i am hearing my colleagues say, and that is it is about funding. it is about being
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able to provide the right support once they have identified that. it isa once they have identified that. it is a lack of resources, it is the lack of experience that is leaving the front line because of the difficulty in actually being able to do your role of the way in which we know it needs to be done. are all cases treated exactly the same when they come in? they cannot be. all families are different. all issues, circumstances, situations. the assessments, the risks. circumstances, it is all different. it cannot be treated the same. should it be? no, and i think that links back to the point made by the nspcc. it is a case of appropriately triaging. if you are family in the uk, underthe current triaging. if you are family in the uk, under the current statistics, you have a 19 chance of being referred. under the nspcc's stats on
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prevalence, that is roughly equivalent. if the rates children are in the system, we would have pretty much eradicated child abuse. but when you add in that 88% of the nine referred are not even meeting the statutory threshold, you can understand... why are they being referred? 88% of people are being referred? 88% of people are being referred when there is no abuse taking place. because the government's policy at the moment, from the department for education, has not taken into account this point about triaging. when a cases referred, and it may not be an abuse referral, it may be a request for support. the problem for a social worker is they have to triage. since 2013, the government's guidance and department for education's policy has been to treat all cases under what we called a continuous assessment. that is where some of this problem lies. it is a triage issue. it needs to happen earlier and spare innocent families the pain of assessment and severe trauma that is inevitable. it needs to be much
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more robust response, or there is a realistic suspicion of abuse. it can either be eradicated or substantiated. what is the stand your relationship with your social workers? two of your children have disabilities and your children have disabilities and you work carefully with social services. the effect of them threatening to take ryan away from you, what effect has it had on that relationship? it leaves me quite concerned to seek help. i mean, prior to this happening, the relationship of social services has always been one of support and trust. i have kind of lost about now. i kind of worry, especially with the children who are disabled, like, ryan harris cerebral palsy and falls more than a typical child. if you fall the advance himself and you are like, " is that going to be
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looked at?" are like, " is that going to be looked at? " my are like, " is that going to be looked at?" my eldest, my daughter, is also nonverbal and you have that kind of worry, like something happens to herand kind of worry, like something happens to her and she cannot explained happened. are you going to be looked at? it is a shame that that relationship went from one of support to do not feel so comfortable night. thank you all so much for coming in to speak to us today. i am very grateful you for that. let‘s head back to nottingham for the latest on that station fire. our reporter is in nottingham. tell us what you know. well, we are standing outside the bus station, sorry, the car park of nottingham train station, and behind that or the platforms at the station. as you can see, there is still strong emergency service presence. the fire crews were called at around presence. the fire crews were called ataround 6:20am, presence. the fire crews were called at around 6:20am, and that is where we saw plumes of smoke coming out of the station. we have had reports
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that the folly of nottingham train station was filled with smoke and one on reported sighting of smoke coming out of a toilet on the platform. as you can see, it is fairly quiet now, in the sense that the smokers disappeared. the crews have put that out. as you can imagine, it has caused travel chaos. trains in and out of the station have been stopped and cancelled and we understand there will be nothing going in and out and we understand there will be nothing going in and outand it we understand there will be nothing going in and out and it has also had an effect on roads around the station and on commuters coming in and out of the city. still to come: you may be familiar with the hit blog ‘mummy was a secret drinker‘, about clare pooley‘s realisation that her casual drinking was getting out of control. she‘s giving us herfirst tv interview shortly. the roll—out of universal credit has not been without problems but a new report warns that vulnerable people are at risk of financial difficulties when they transfer over from tax credits. we‘ll hear one man‘s experience. time for the latest news.
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the bbc news headlines this morning. a huge fire is blazing at nottingham railway station. nottinghamshire fire and rescue say they‘re dealing with a ‘large incident‘ with multiple fire engines at the scene. the station has been evacuated. east midland trains say all trains through the station are cancelled and they expect disruptions. donald trump has cancelled his planned visit to the uk next month. the us president tweeted that he had cancelled the planned visit as he didn‘t want to open the new american embassy in london — which he incorrectly stated had been commissioned by his predecessor, barack obama. a study of women with breast cancer suggests that having a double mastectomy does not increase the chances of survival in younger patients who have what‘s known as the brac1 gene. the researchers also found that women treated for breast cancer had the same survival rates — regardless of whether or not they had the mutation. an 18—year—old from the scottish highlands has died after contracting the flu virus.
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bethany walker was airlifted to hospital in inverness from her home in wester ross, but her illness had developed into pneumonia and staff were unable to save her. elsewhere, in england, there has been a sharp rise in the number of flu cases seen by gps — up 78 % from last week. the conduct of the media is expected to be examined by the independent review into the response to the manchester arena bombing. 22 people were killed when a bomb was set off after a pop concert at the venue in may. several of the bereaved families have raised concerns about the reporting of the attack. the review will also look at the role played by social media. the bbc is said "deeply unimpressed" with an off—air chat in which two of its presenters joked about the pay gap between the sexes. that‘s according to a source at the corporation. bbc radio 4 today presenter john humphrys and north america editorjon sopel were discussing carrie gracie, who had just quit her china editorjob over equal pay. in an exchange before monday‘s
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show, it‘s reported they theyjoked about "handing over" pay to keep her in post. a bbc spokeswoman said the presenter regrets the "ill—advised" conversation. the queen has been talking about some of the challenges she faced at her coronation 65 years ago. she spoke candidly about the heaviness of the crown she wore and noted it was lucky her and her father king george vi had the same sort of shaped head. the correlation will be on bbc one at eight this sunday. that‘s a summary of the latest bbc news. here‘s some sport now. billiejean billie jean king has billiejean king has once again called for the margaret court arena in melbourne to be renamed after margaret court made the rocket ——
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derogatory comments about gay and transgender people derogatory comments about gay and tra nsgender people last derogatory comments about gay and transgender people last year. billie jean king said as a gay woman she would not play on the court that she was still on tour. heather watson missed out on herfirst was still on tour. heather watson missed out on her first wta final in two years after she was beaten in the semifinal of the hobart open. she lost in three sets to defending champion elise merson ‘s. alexis sanchez, he is likely to leave the fa cup holders this january if a suitable offer arrives and our replacement is secured. and anthony joshua‘s unification fight against joseph parker new zealand could be confirmed in the next 2a hours. parkeris confirmed in the next 2a hours. parker is set to arrive in london this weekend with the news conference planned for next week. we are keeping you updated on this fire at nottingham train station. hopefully we‘ll be able to speak to someone hopefully we‘ll be able to speak to someone in the next few minutes who has got in touch with the bbc
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weather own experience of what happened at nottingham train station. i arrived at nottingham train station at 6:35am when there was a fire engine at front but not clear what was happening, i got a lift towards the main concourse, walked towards the entrance and was greeted by a member of staff who said we had to evacuate. she goes on to say there is a strong smell of burning plastic and they were all moved away from the area. smoke filling the buildings. we will try to connect with them in the next few minutes and if we do manage that we will get their take on what happened. quite dramatic pictures coming in. when you stop smoking or cut back on sugar, people applaud you, but as clare pooley discovered, it‘s not always the case when you tell people you‘re going sober. clare is a mum of three and realised her wine habit was out of control when she was drinking up to 10 bottles a week and covering up how much drank. in march 2016 she decided to change her life and quit the booze for good. and in and effort to find support she started a blog called ‘mummy was a secret drinker‘.
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i‘m pleased to say clare is with us for her first tv interview. thank you for coming in. often when you talk to people who have some kind of addiction they say there was a defining moment, a turning point, did you have that? not really, it was more a creeping realisation that the thing i thought was my best friend, white wine, was my worst enemy. the amount i used to drink at the end of the day when i had put the end of the day when i had put the children to bed to relax, it started off as one glass, then it became two and then three and eventually i was drinking about a bottle of wine per day and more at the weekend. it was just a creeping realisation that it wasn‘t doing me any good physically or mentally. i was two stone over weight, i would wa ke was two stone over weight, i would wake up in the middle of the night unable to get back to sleep and i
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was anxious a lot of the time. my whole life was stuck in at. it became obvious to me that wine was to blame. did your husband picked up on it at all? he told me that he thought i should cut down. that is a difficult thing to fear from your partner. yes, i did not take it well, and my mother said something as well but that was all i heard. my friends and family mostly thought i was drinking the same way anyone else was. my facebook feed filled with jokes about money ‘s little helper and they accepted thing that that was what mums do at the end of the day. i don‘t think anyone saw it asa the day. i don‘t think anyone saw it as a major problem and nobody realised how much i was drinking, even i didn‘t realise because it took me a long time to add it all up. why did you drink, just to wind
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down or was there an element of boredom? i know you had a successful career and then became a full—time mum and sometimes it can be difficult to make that adjustment. mum and sometimes it can be difficult to make that adjustmentlj saw difficult to make that adjustment.” saw motherhood from both sides as i did it as a working mother and then a stay at home mother and both were incredibly rewarding and also quite stressful. sometimes boring, sometimes, it‘s hard work. so yes i drank asa sometimes, it‘s hard work. so yes i drank as a way of alleviating that i guess. but to be honest i drank to celebrate and commiserate, when i was feeling stressed or was feeling happy. was feeling stressed or was feeling happy- i was feeling stressed or was feeling happy. i drank for quite a number of different reasons. i have two young girls andi different reasons. i have two young girls and i know often as you are dragging the children back from school and one of them is having a tantrum, another mother will walk
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past and say, not long until you can have a glass of wine! there is a culture that sometimes it‘s the thing to get through. in your book you wrote that if you stood by the school gates and said if i am going to go home and have a line of cocaine that people would not say thatis cocaine that people would not say that is ok but going home to have that is ok but going home to have that glass of wine is encouraged. yes and i think that is part of the problem, it‘s so normalised. it is absolutely part of our culture. 80% of the adult population drink and mums, it‘s much more common than not. how did you go about it? did you start to limit your intake, did you start to limit your intake, did you go cold turkey? i tried for a number of years to moderate and drink normally and sensibly because ididn‘t want drink normally and sensibly because i didn‘t want to give up altogether, ijust i didn‘t want to give up altogether, i just wanted to i didn‘t want to give up altogether, ijust wanted to drink i didn‘t want to give up altogether, i just wanted to drink with the government guidelines. but what i realised as i am all are nothing and moderation is not my thing. i would
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set myself rules like i will only drink when i go out or i will only drink when i go out or i will only drink at weekends or i will need drink at weekends or i will need drink beer because i don‘t really like it and i could not stick to those rules and it was exhausting trying to keep a lid on it. ifind it so much easier and liberating just to give up altogether. now i have this sense of freedom, i don‘t have this sense of freedom, i don‘t have to worry about any of that any more. it‘s immense liberation. have to worry about any of that any more. it's immense liberation. how did you go about it, if you‘re drinking that much presumably it‘s quite hard physically if nothing else to withdraw? the withdrawal effects are over quite quickly to be honest. a few days of feeling mild flu but the tricky thing is retraining your brain. i spent 20 yea rs retraining your brain. i spent 20 years automatically reaching for a glass of wine for so many different reasons. if i was stressed.
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retraining yourself to find other healthier ways of dealing with everyday ups and downs takes quite a long time. that‘s tricky. and dealing with other people‘s reactions. that's what i wanted to ask, often if you go out and say you are not drinking people will try to convince you. yes, people's reactions are odd. often they want to know why you have stopped, they wa nt to to know why you have stopped, they want to know the horror stories, they assume you are a terrible mother and you were drinking first thing in the morning or whatever. or they think you will be very boring or they think you‘re going to judge them and none of that is true. other people‘s reactions are tricky to deal with. did people‘s reactions are tricky to dealwith. did youjudge people‘s reactions are tricky to deal with. did you judge yourself? did you think you were a terrible mother? i did and i think that is pa rt mother? i did and i think that is part of the problem with alcohol addiction, there is a lot of shame
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involved. i did not like myself by the end and one of the best things about quitting as i like myself again. you wrote this blogger and it was secretive at first, people did not know who you wear? yeah, i wrote it as therapy, it was my way of working everything in it out and i did not expect people to find it and idid not did not expect people to find it and i did not publicise it. but hundreds of thousands of women around the world and some men phoned me and saidi world and some men phoned me and said i have felt the same thing and iamso said i have felt the same thing and i am so relieved to find out i am not the only one. since my book came out ten days ago i‘ve had the same thing. hundreds of messages from people all over the world saying i thought this was just me and it‘s such a relief to find out it isn‘t. there are a lot of women, mothers particularly out there who have the same issue but have been too frightened to say anything because
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we worry about being judged.” frightened to say anything because we worry about being judged. i was reading one of your children noticed you had stopped drinking. yes, actually i asked if they thought i was different and at the time i think he was nine and i said do you think he was nine and i said do you think money is different sunjic she stopped drinking and he went yes, you are more, and i paused thinking what is he going to say? he said you are more money issue and i thought "hooray" because that‘s what i wa nted "hooray" because that‘s what i wanted to be. thank you so much for coming in. with president trump cancelling his visit to the uk is this the end of the special relationship? let‘s head
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back to nottingham and speak to someone back to nottingham and speak to someone caught up in the fire at nottingham train station. i was reading a bit of text which was sent an earlier on to the bbc. tell me what you saw, you got to the train station around 6:30am is that right? yes, just after for the 6:52am train to london. there was a fire engine at the front, i did not know if it was linked anything so i carried on into the station. went up to the concourse and as into the station. went up to the concourse and as i was into the station. went up to the concourse and as i was entering the doors there was smoke everywhere and a member of staff came out and said we had to evacuate the building. so we had to evacuate the building. so we did that, went outside and there was smoke billowing out the sides. quite a sight really. whether many people around at that time of day? not that many at that time. a few
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people, i would say no more than 20, just stood outside wondering what was going on. fire alarms were going off and the police and the fire engine at the front of the station so we engine at the front of the station so we stood around for a bit not knowing what to do then we were asked to move back because the smoke started getting quite heavy close to where we wear. the pictures look incredibly dramatic, do they do justice to what you saw? it was dramatic. i have never seen, been that close to a fire like that before. i could not see any flames from where i was stood but there was definitely smoke and you could smell burning and all that kind of thing. then we were asked to move away from the area and go across the bridge and that is when you could see it from a distance and you could see the top of the flames, this red he isaof the top of the flames, this red he is a of black smoke billowing out the top. that is when the wee side
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properly and realised how serious it was. whether a lot of fire engines at the scene and firefighters? yeah, 12—mac firefighters wandering around making sure nobody else was inside. it seemed every five minutes there we re it seemed every five minutes there were more emergency vehicles arriving at the scene so you knew it must have been quite bad if they kept having to call more people. were people worried, was there a sense of panic? or were peoplejust can‘t doing what they were told? nobody was worried, it was quite obvious what was happening and eve ryo ne obvious what was happening and everyone was calmly trying to figure out what they will do, how they were going to get where they needed to go. thanks ever so much for giving us go. thanks ever so much for giving us your eyewitness account of that fire. let me read you this which has
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come from the mayor of london sadiq khan. he has issued the following statement on the cancellation of president trump‘s visit. sadiq khan says it appears president trump got the message from the many londoners who love and admire america and americans but find his policies and actions the polar opposite of our cities values of inclusion, diversity and tolerance. his visit next month would without doubt have been met by mass peaceful protests. this just reinforces what a mistake it was for theresa may to rush and extend an invitation of a state visit in the first place. let‘s hope donald trump also revisits the pursuit of his divisive agenda. that isa pursuit of his divisive agenda. that is a statement coming in from the mayor of london, sadiq khan after president trump said he is going to cancel his trip. he is meant to be opening the new american embassy which has moved to vauxhall. he was unimpressed by it and blamed barack
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obama for the decision but the decision was taken during the george w. bush administration but the details of where iron out during the obama administration. but as we know theresa may has said a visit by president trump will happen at some point, she was talking to andrew marr on the bbc in the last few days. your experience as well, i whine o‘clock. do you find that if you‘re a stay at home mum, a working mum, do you often open a bottle earlier and earlier? do find that your drinking is starting earlier and earlier? i tried to modify her drinking and thought it was not possible to give up drinking. tina said she has not drunk and 27 years as she was a binge drinker and used it as an escape and now hate the
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thought of being drunk and much prefers to be in control of herself. i think we are also going to get some more information coming through on the fire from nottingham. of course, that train station fire. we we re course, that train station fire. we were talking to laura just a few minutes ago. lots of reporters down on the scene trying to get a sense of that scale of the fire. victoria norris is that the scene. john mills is the operational commander there. he has been speaking to reporters at the scene. he said that at 6:30am there was a call about a fire in toilets which had developed and spread. it was a demanding incident that had spread quickly. the fire has progressed into voids. there are no casualties or injuries. that has been confirmed. there are emergency services involved. he says nothing
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can be ruled out at this stage. police are investigating as well as fire investigators. the fire is still burning, it did spread very quickly. the operational commander went on to say this fire was about complexity, rather than the size. fire in voids, where you cannot see the orange flames, and the heat was very significant. clearly the station will be closed for the rest of the day. huge implications are for people who are trying to commute. many people commute from nottingham into london. no trains for the rest of the day. clearly, you need to have other plans if you‘re trying to get from nottingham station to anywhere else. we‘ve talked a lot on this programme about the difficulties some people face when they are moved onto universal credit — that‘s the new benefit system consolidating six payments into one. today the government is being warned that people claiming tax credits are at risk of financial problems as they transfer to universal credit.
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mps on the public accounts committee are particularly concerned that people are being over—payed in error and will struggle to pay it back. we‘ve reported extensively on the hardship faced by some people on universal credit. here‘s a clip from a woman who spoke to us last year. they‘ve turned round and said i have to wait between six weeks and three months before i get payment. and so, for the last two and a half weeks, you haven‘t had any money in at all? nothing, nothing whatsoever. and how have things been for you in that time? very, very difficult. last weekend, we‘ve had no food, my five—year—old‘s last food was school dinners. on the saturday, we were walking down the street, and she was searching in bins for food, cos she was starving. she was, like, ripping mcdonald‘s bags to see if there was any chips or anything on the floor. it was awful, broke my heart. sunday, there was no food, she was going to bed, her stomach was rumbling — "i‘m hungry, i‘m hungry, i‘m hungry." and she had no food saturday, sunday, went to school really, really hungry.
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you take her to bed, and her tummy‘s rumbling, and you‘re just giving her water, but she wants food, and you can‘t... i can‘t go into the shop and steal, it‘s awful. i can‘t keep asking neighbours forfood, because i shouldn‘t have to live like this. that is awful. i had to go to foodbank to get some food, you know. without that, they would still be without food now. i don‘t know if i‘m going to still have my house, because i need to pay my rent, council tax is due, i don‘t know. it‘s. . . my worst nightmare. what do i do next? do i beg on the street to get some milk and bread? i don‘t want to do that either. but it might come to the stage where i have to. now we will talk to shabana mahmood from the public accounts committee, it boyd is the managing directorfor
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the centre for socialjustice and brendan faulkner, a universal credit recipient who has had serious financial difficulty. do you understand some of the concerns, and there have been many that have been highlighted, although universal credit? there have been a number of rightful concern is to make sure that as people transition from the older to the new that it happens really smoothly and easily, and what was welcomed was assumed the government towards the last year put £1.5 billion more in to make sure that if somebody comes into the system with any financial hardship, that within 2a hours they can get their entire payment. we did not have that before. there was a bit of an issue but we have that now and we should see as new people come on, that should make a massive difference and stop people falling into poverty, which is a fantastic thing. this will be eloquently
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outlined any moment when mr mahmud joins us, but the concern that the public accounts committee has is that people are going to be overpaid, clearly not their fault, and then that money will be clawed back and, in certain cases, that means real, real hardship because the amount of money being clawed back every month, which is not their month, means they are struggling to survive. there is a huge issue here and there has been for decades. under tax credits, you would be overpaid and then at the end of the year somebody would say you need to give us thousands of pounds, we would like it back. often that request was made in one go at the end of the year. what is better about universal credit, and it was designed to tackle this problem, it is not waiting to be end of the year. is not waiting to be end of the yea r. every is not waiting to be end of the year. every single month is more limited back. generally it is about £30 per month, the maximum. that is a lot of money. if they are living on benefits, that is a small —— not a small amount of money. it makes
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the difference between being able to get food or putting the heating on. it is about 3% of the average amount, a sizeable amount, but this is where the work coaches on the front line need to make good calls. in what, it is set out that they should not ring back money any quicker, and in a way that would push people into poverty. the law clearly sets that out and there is flexibility for each work coached to do it merit by merit. if they think this will push somebody into poverty, they can reduce the amount to as little as £1 per month to make sure that people have enough to go by. those people need to use that discretion, they need to be trained really well and as the new system come on, but will be litmus test.” think that could be music to the ea rs of think that could be music to the ears of brendan faulkner, who is just over your shoulder. thank you for joining just over your shoulder. thank you forjoining us. edward wasjust talking to us about how there can be flexibility on the system. if you
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are overpaid on tax credits, they can reduce the amount you have to be back. tell us what happened to your tax credits when you removed over to universal credit. i was on child tax credits and then i got a letter to say i had been overpaid by, ithink, £110. that they would be in touch with me in the future to see how much they would be going back. they never got in touch with me. i have said the letters by recorded delivery to find out, you know, when this is from, what date it is from and until. they never gave me the dates that it was possibly overpaid until. they started taking the money out of my benefit, without consulting with me. so, they did not warn you that they were going to ta ke warn you that they were going to take the money? no, it is only 10.20 513 take the money? no, it is only 10.20 5p per month, i have checked this morning, but when i went myjournal, andl morning, but when i went myjournal, and i have —— ifi
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morning, but when i went myjournal, and i have —— if i had not gone on to that is emi other deductions are going, i would to that is emi other deductions are going, iwould not to that is emi other deductions are going, i would not have even known that i was... the money was being taken for tax credits. what impact is that money that is being taken away from you having on your ability to clothe yourself, feed yourself, pretty roof over your head? well, going over to universal credit, i did lose a certain amount anyway from myjobseeker's did lose a certain amount anyway from my jobseeker's allowance. roughly £30 per week. so, from my jobseeker's allowance. roughly £30 perweek. so, i from my jobseeker's allowance. roughly £30 per week. so, i have lost that on the universal credit and then this on top, it is a few days electric, this £10, or it is, you know, going towards my shopping. lama you know, going towards my shopping. i am a single dad, i have my son, i have got him to a deal to bring up between me and his mum. i have got to make sure that he is clothed and fed. it is not there to leave it all to his mother, obviously, and he is
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worth the week anyway. use a seven—year—old lad, growing, so i have to make sure he is ok. school shoes, keeping up with the friends of skill. obviously cannot afford the latest trainers, but a decent clothing. and they grow so fast. this one does! just hearing what edward said, that those payments... it is not your fault that you were overpaid, they could be reduced to £2 per week. without be betterfor you or would you rather get rid of it sooner? you know, it is £10 25 per month. i do not mind it carrying on at that amount. it is negligible, £2 per week, but it would mean nice to be informed about what would happen. i was not informed. i have three letters to hmrc to see, you know, what the gates were, to see if
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idid all know, what the gates were, to see if i did all this money, and i have heard nothing back. i have tried phoning, you are on the phone for ever and nobody gives you an answer. and that is frustrating. listen, i wa nt to and that is frustrating. listen, i want to bring and other speakers. someone from the public accounts committee has joined us. someone from the public accounts committee hasjoined us. can you outline what the concerns are the public accounts committee average tax credits and people moving over to universal credit? good morning. our major concern in the committee was that a large number of people have an overpayment on their tax credit accounts. it is mostly due to error, occasionally due to fraud. but we are particularly concerned about those who have an overpayment and as they are transferred on to universal credit, there is a risk that overpayment follows them and the department for work & pensions, who administer universal credit, have much greater powers when it comes to recovery of money by way of overpayment. they can take money directly from your earnings, which isa very directly from your earnings, which is a very different approach to what
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hmrc currently have in relation to tax credits. we were concerned that this might fall through between two different government departments and there has not been a conversation between both of those as to how they will work together to migrate claimants. my particular concern is a constituency mp, was a lot of constituents on tax credits, they might find that they are pushed further into poverty when they move into universal credit through no fault of their own. one of the important thing is universal credit, brendan‘s topic is fattening, —— fascinating, clearly there should be much more communication. it is worrying that you should not cure that. you said that he wrote to hmrc, it is one the dwp, they should be getting back to you clearly anyway. in terms of bishop people into poverty, if you step back from the detail where there is a few cases where communication has not been great, this should lead to 250,000 more people being in work.
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the result of that is huge. a child growing up any workless family, they are three times more likely to be in poverty. this supports people more to work. all the evidence from government and the ifs and everybody else says this is one of the most effective poverty fighting tool. to see it pushes people into poverty feels like it is stretching the ball too far. i think a misunderstanding — your too far. i think a misunderstanding —— your misunderstanding. it was not about whether universal credit is a good reform or not, that is a matter for another committee on another day. we are concerned about tax credits and overpayment on tax credits and overpayment on tax credits which are forecast to rise, and how they will be migrated onto universal credit. this is a matter of administration. it requires those two government departments to talk to one another and make sure they have a process in place so that accidentally we do not find that people, through lack of good administrative practice, are forced into greater poverty than is necessary. we want to make sure that conversation happens and that is why we asked hmrc to come back to us at
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the end of march with a proper plan of action. this is one of those things that willjust slept through the net, and as a constituency mp, i will have people coming to my advice surgery will have people coming to my advice surgery with those very specific problem and we are trying to get that off. thank you ever so much for joining us this morning, all of you. we asked the government for a representative to join us but were given the following statement from hmrc: just like the previous system, tax credit overpayments are recovered by regular deductions and people are told about this in advance. there are safeguards in place to protect claimants from large deductions being taken at one time and budgeting support is available to help people manage their money. let‘s get the latest weather update. how is it looking? always ready and waiting. i have got news of a change in weather take over the next few days. stay with me. things are said to liven up a little bit, for the weather. lots of great skies around for many. misty, foggy mornings but through sunday night and into monday, we will see
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heavy rain and strong winds for a spell. once that clears, a big weather change for next week. much, much colder, and clearer at times, but we will see some strong winds and wintry showers heading our way. bringing that weather change is a change of the jet stream is. this ribbon of fast flowing in is coming out of the us and canada, diving up and down, never really pushing towards us, so we have been stuck in this benign weather system for the past two days. if we show you what happens to that by sunday, it charges towards us. it is that which will engineer the change in weather type for next week. that is a few days away. i‘d fear at the moment it isa days away. i‘d fear at the moment it is a case of as you were. lots of great cloud outside. some mist and fog still lingering at the moment. the old spot are no good through central and eastern parts of england. most having a dry day and some of you already seen the function. a few more bricks bearing, particularly across parts of wales, england, cumbria, the central belt of scotla nd england, cumbria, the central belt of scotland and the far north of scotland. with sunshine and clouds,
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temperatures were they should be for a time of year. but it will feel much better when you have got the sunshine on your back. into tonight, the mist, some low cloud once again continuing. a bit more breeze tonight. follow not so much of an issue. what you will notice is the window strengthens towards the west. returns turns water towards northern ireland and later into pembrokeshire and also cornwall. main chance of frost, probably northern part of scotland, where skies remain clear as overnight. into the weekend we go. some sunny breaks, the north of scotland. one or two perhaps brighter breaks compared with recent days, but plenty of cloud in the west. outbreaks of rain coming and going all day long in northern ireland and turning water across the hill fog of wales, cornwall, devon and maybe into the western fringes of scotland. slightly cooler and eastern parts. through saturday into zombie, chance of frost, mist and fog, fairly cloudy day on sunday. we see the weather front line, grinding
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toa see the weather front line, grinding to a halt. patchy rain or drizzle here. many eastern areas will be dry. a bit of brightness breaking through the cloud but later on we see it turn water towards western scotla nd see it turn water towards western scotland and northern ireland. not just wet but windy, and that a spell of very windy weather as it sweeps beautifully southwards through sunday into monday. we will open the day too much, much colderfor sunday into monday. we will open the day too much, much colder for next week and a bit of sleet and snow on the forecast as well. donald trump cancels a trip to the uk to open the new us embassy. in a tweet he blames obama for the making a bad deal and choosing an "off location". the new billion—dollar embassy due to open next week, we will get reaction to this decision by donald trump, including from mayor of london sadiq khan. we‘ll be speaking to former british ambassador to the united states lord renwick. we will discuss how this decision
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will be viewed by the british government. there are no reports of casualties but travellers have been evacuated and trains cancelled after a fire breaks out at nottingham train station. a new study of women with breast cancer suggests that having a double mastectomy does not increase the survival rates of young woman who carry the brca gene. we‘ll speak to a breast cancer survivor. good morning. here‘s annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of todays news. donald trump has cancelled a planned visit to the uk. the us president tweeted that he no longer wants to open the new american embassy in london. he incorrectly stated it had been commissioned by his predecessor barack obama. john donaldson joins me from outside the embassy, this is what donald trump considers to be an
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"off location" but it was the republican predecessor to barack obama, george w bush, who decided the location should change. that's right, the decision was made in october 2008 which was before president obama took office so it was a decision by george w bush, he decided to move from the famous location in the gross on a square in mayfair to hearing vauxhall. this is the questioning belding, it cost more than $1 billion and the supposed open for business next week. we have got a reaction including from mayor of london sadiq khan who has said it appears president trump got the message from the many londoners who love and admire america and americans but find things policies and actions the polar opposite of our cities values of inclusion, diversity and tolerance. he went on to say the visit next month would without doubt
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have been met by mass peaceful protests. this is not the state visit people have been talking about which is also controversial, this would have been a much more low—profile smaller a fair, the state visit still expected to happen next year is still very much in doubt. a huge fire has ripped through nottingham railway station. nottinghamshire fire and rescue described it as a ‘large incident‘ with multiple fire engines at the scene. trains are cancelled and the station will remain shut all day. a study of women with breast cancer suggests that having a double mastectomy does not increase the chances of survival in younger patients who have what‘s known as the brca gene. the researchers also found that women treated for breast cancer had the same survival rates — regardless of whether or not they had the mutation. an 18—year—old from the scottish highlands has died after contracting the flu virus. bethany walker was airlifted to hospital in inverness from her home in wester ross, but her illness had developed into pneumonia and staff
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were unable to save her. elsewhere, in england, there has been a sharp rise in the number of flu cases seen by gps — up 78 % from last week. the conduct of the media is expected to be examined by the independent review into the response to the manchester arena bombing. 22 people were killed when a bomb was set off after a pop concert at the venue in may. several of the bereaved families have raised concerns about the reporting of the attack. the review will also look at the role played by social media. the bbc is said "deeply unimpressed" with an off—air chat in which two of its presenters joked about the pay gap between the sexes. that‘s according to a source at the corporation. bbc radio 4 today presenter john humphrys and north america editorjon sopel were discussing carrie gracie, who had just quit her china editorjob over equal pay. in an exchange before monday‘s show, it‘s reported they theyjoked about "handing over" pay to keep her in post. a bbc spokeswoman said the presenter regrets
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the "ill—advised" conversation. jewellery worth millions of euros stolen from the ritz hotel in paris has been recovered after one of the thieves dropped his bag while trying to escape. three men armed with axes we re to escape. three men armed with axes were arrested after being blocked inside the building on wednesday evening. two accomplices waiting outside on mopeds escaped but dropped the bag containing all the jewellery after crashing into pedestrians. that‘s a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30am. please get in touch on all of the stories we are discussing, if you are texting you will be charged the standard network rate. here‘s some sport now with hugh. you might remember last year margaret court the 11 time australian open winner and avowed christian voiced opposition to gay
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marriage and made derogatory comments regarding transgender people. ahead of the start of this yea rs people. ahead of the start of this years tournament the great billie jean king is now calling for the arena in melbourne after her to be renamed, here is russell fuller. billiejean renamed, here is russell fuller. billie jean king was renamed, here is russell fuller. billiejean king was reigniting the debate which started in may when margaret court, the winner of 2a grand slam titles during her career had some very outspoken views on gay marriage. she also added tennis was full of lesbians and that transgender children were the work of the devil. the margaret court arena here in melbourne park takes her name and tennis australia said at the time we are not going to change the name even though they distance themselves from her views. today billie jean king distance themselves from her views. today billiejean king speaking in melbourne has said the court should have its name changed and that if she was playing today she would not be playing any matches on that court. staying down under, a good warm upfor court. staying down under, a good warm up for heather watson, despite
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defeat overnight, missing out on her first wta final in two years, she was beaten in three sets in the semifinal. after 12 years at arsenal theo walcott looks like he may well be on his way out of the club very soon. be on his way out of the club very soon. this morning everton boss sam alla rdyce soon. this morning everton boss sam allardyce confirmed the teams have entered negotiations over the 28—year—old with a permanent tra nsfer 28—year—old with a permanent transfer everton‘s preferred option. sam alla rdyce says transfer everton‘s preferred option. sam allardyce says he would be a fantastic addition. and he might not be the only player leaving the emirates, alexis sanchez is likely to leave the fa cup holders this january if a suitable offer arrives and other placement is secured. finally anthonyjoshua‘s hopes of holding free heavyweight titles later this year look to have moved a step further. his proposed unification fight againstjoseph parker of new zealand could be
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confirmed within the next 2a hours. parkeris confirmed within the next 2a hours. parker is set to arrive in london with the news conference to announce the boat next week. that‘ll be sport now. is this an end to the so—called special relationship? donald trump has cancelled his planned visit to britain to officially open the new american embassy in london. that was planned for next month. the us president took to twitter to explain his reasons behind the decision, blaming the obama administration for selling the best location for ‘peanuts‘ and building a new embassy at great cost. as well as this visit, theresa has invited mr trump for a major state visit this year which has proved controversial. mr trump‘s ban on people from several muslim majority countries entering the us sparked protests in cities across the uk. and an online petition calling for us president not to receive a full state visit drew one point eight million signatures. during the queen‘s speech at the state opening of parliament last june
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the trip wasn‘t mentioned, raising claims it was in doubt. and there were signs of strains in the special relationship, including disagreements over mr trump‘s move to recognise jerusalem as israel‘s capital. and in november, mr trump clashed with mrs may after she said it was ‘wrong‘ for the us president to share videos posted by the far—right group britain first. but just last weekend she confirmed the invite for a state visit still stood. making decisions in the best interests of the united states. and he's coming to this country? he will be coming to this country. lord renwick is a former british ambassador to the united states, and has written a book called "fighting with allies," which looks at the special relationship between britain and america. thank you for coming in. is this bad news for the uk that president trump has pulled out of this visit?m news for the uk that president trump has pulled out of this visit? it is because the reason he has given for doing it is self—evidently not the
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real reason. the real reason is he thinks if he does visit here there will be a huge amount of whining from half the political class including the minister of the opposition so he doesn‘t want to do that in present circumstances and who can blame him? from our point of view the bad news about this is that if you want to go on trying to have some influence in the world you have to talk to the us president. trump is not always wrong, he‘s been doing far better in the fight against crisis which is very important to us than president obama did. we need a free—trade agreement as we stop trading with everyone we badly need a free—trade agreement with the us and we need the support for that. if you want to persuade him not to tear up you want to persuade him not to tear up the nuclear agreement with iran you cannot do it by shouting at him, you cannot do it by shouting at him, you have to try talking to him. does he see there is a special relationship, does he value it? there is not a special relationship and there has not been for the last
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50 yea rs. and there has not been for the last 50 years. try reading my book! what there is is a close relationship, especially in defence, trade, investment and so on. special relationship is the impression we are completely different, trump has just made, he has been welcomed in paris by president emmanuel macron, he has been welcomed in china by president shi zheng he has been welcomed by the premised of japan. he has been welcomed by the premised ofjapan. i he has been welcomed by the premised of japan. i think he has been welcomed by the premised ofjapan. i think it‘s not a good development to have him not wanting to come here. theresa may says he is still coming here, do you think a state visit is on? of course the government will say that and probably at some point he will come here but not if he thinks is going to getan here but not if he thinks is going to get an awful reception. sadiq khan read out a statement earlier, he said this is good as he realised he said this is good as he realised he would face widescale protests, this is good he‘s not coming. he would face widescale protests, this is good he's not coming. that
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is frankly stupid. elaborate. the united states is our most important ally. how can it be good if the american president does not come to britain when we need american support in a lot of ways. the americans are quite worried about us at the moment, they are worried about brexit and they are extremely worried about the ever increasing defence cuts which are reducing the british army to an absolute shadow of its former self. the americans are great admirers of our armed forces and have told the government repeatedly that they will be extremely concerned if there are further defence cuts here. the fact is our importance is shrinking and if you behave as sadiq khan wants us to it will shrink faster and further. what about people who say that the things donald trump has done, limiting people from muslim countries, retweeting things from britain first, having views many
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people in this country find a warrant, is it difficult for theresa may to roll out the red carpet and say please be welcome there will be no protests. i have just say please be welcome there will be no protests. i havejust explained that the president of france, who has similar views to us on many things, welcomed donald trump at the 14july celebrations in paris and so did the paris crowd by the way. we should have invited him to the cenotaph celebrations to remind people what they relationship with america is all about. thank you ever so america is all about. thank you ever so much for coming in. well, let‘s discuss this further with bandy x lee — a forensic psychiatrist from yale university and editor of the book ‘the dangerous case of donald trump‘. and drew liquerman, spokesperson for republicans overseas. i want to ask you about some of the points that we picked up with lord raynet about the special relationship. do you think the
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special relationship exists between the uk and the us? i do think it exists. it is a better rocky, but i do not think that is necessarily a result of today‘s news about tramp. i think the jerusalem result of today‘s news about tramp. i think thejerusalem move especially really came off horribly on republicans and democrats. a lot of democrats also, the uk trying to tell the us where they can put their embassy in another foreign country. it certainly does not help that donald trump did not feel welcome in the uk whereas they have welcomed world leaders from despotic countries with for a time rule that persecute minorities and the man leading the fight against his visit, jeremy corbyn, had shared a stage with holocaust deniers and ask, his rain, so maybe donald trump feels this is rocky and donald trump would rather go and visit asian pacific
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allies, other european countries that would welcome them. ‘s so he is feeling a bit bruised. do you think president trump will still come to the uk at some point this year? i am sure he still will. this year... had to say. he will visit the uk at some point. iam more to say. he will visit the uk at some point. i am more than positive. i mean, even before he was president, i think the uk is one of the countries he admires the most, i just do not know if he thinks now is the right time. ‘s i want to talk to you both about donald trump‘s else. it is one of the huge discussion by now was happening in the usjust met. he is undergoing a medicaljust now, something all us presidents have done in recent years. there have done in recent years. there have been many presidents about his health. michael wolff‘s recent book has talked about his behaviour at the white house, seeing his inner circle regularly question the president‘s mental fitness. do you
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regularly question the president‘s mentalfitness. do you question his mentalfitness. do you question his mental fitness? thank you for having me. first, let me say i speak on my own behalf and not from a university. i have been voicing a great deal of concern over his apparent mental instability. —— and not for my university. and the ramifications that has brought national and international security. it is not his mental health itself thatis it is not his mental health itself that is of concern to the population and the public, but rather whether or not he is able to carry out his function. i have been advocating for a capacity evaluation, as well as a more in—depth neuropsychiatric evaluation. but apparently none of that will be happening today. none of that will be happening. let‘s examine, let‘s discuss some of the points that i‘ve made people, some people, question his health and mental state. forgetting the words to the us national anthem at a
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football game on monday. that is the allegation water people having seen that on social media, at times he was singing, at times he was not, at other times it was the wrong words. some people are putting that down to mental health issues.” some people are putting that down to mental health issues. i think the mental health issues. i think the mental health issues. i think the mental health issues, i mean, it is quite frankly ridiculous. the us, we have seen left—wing judicial activism wherejudges have seen left—wing judicial activism where judges have said let‘s not look at what donald trump did, let‘s not look at whether it is legal or not, let‘s look at whether it is legal. now we are seeing on university campuses we are seeing experts, we are seeing medical activists say trump said this, how does this show mental impairment? quite frankly, i think it is insulting to be bothered actually developmental disabilities and insulting to the profession. what would you put that down to? the fact that he did not single of the worst of the national anthem on monday?” would put it down to the fact that
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he did not then all of the worst of the national anthem. i highly doubt donald trump wrote the words. he sang a few of the lines, not the whole thing. —— forgot the words. i do not think he forgot the words to the national anthem. nobody was saying obama‘s four times he has been slow to put a handlers had, does he have a mental impairment that made him forget? —— to put his hand on his heart. i myself am very concerned about a stigma, and the influence this kind of rhetoric will have on those who are suffering from mental illness. that is why would like to emphasise it is not about mr trump's personal mental health condition, but by now he has shown such a wide range of concerning signs. it is notjust are not
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singing the correct words to the national anthem. in the context of numerous signs, psychological, cognitive, neurological, that we have observed in front of our eyes. if there are such concerning signs, it is incumbent on us to recommend an evaluation and for the public to demand a evaluation for somebody who is in charge of protecting the health and well— being is in charge of protecting the health and well—being and protection. let's bring drew back in. iwant protection. let's bring drew back in. i want to look ahead. if you look at the headlines today, there are reports that donald trump has used, shall we say, disparaging language about certain countries that immigrants come from. cnn are calling it a new rock bottom. it is almost daily, is it not, that we get some kind of controversy surrounding donald trump and his tweets? what do
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you see the rest of his presidency playing out like that? the controversy is about his truth about and off the record comments he made, but nobody wants to talk about the fa ct but nobody wants to talk about the fact that in the united states, black and hispanic unemployment rates are at an all—time low. walmart has just announced that 2 million people are getting there are legal wage raised to —— by $2 an hour. people are micro focus. trump golf that as he sees it. we know that from day one. —— hold it as he sees it. the rest of his presidency is going to go out with him getting results late week is going up in america. thank you very much for joining us, both of you. an 18—year—old woman has died in hospital after contracting the flu virus. bethany had been suffering
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from the virus at all before it developed into pneumonia. she was taken by airambulance developed into pneumonia. she was taken by air ambulance to hospital in inverness, where she died one week ago. her mother described her as the best daughter she could have ever wished for. the number of people contracting the flu virus has been on the rise. in england, around 5000 people were admitted to hospital with flu in the first week of january. so, how hospital with flu in the first week ofjanuary. so, how serious is this virus? let‘s speak to a doctor, who joins us now. what are the real risks and what you can actually do to protect yourself? it seems everywhere you turn of the moment, people seem to be coughing, spluttering and not well, but clearly there are levels of this. how serious is this current outbreak? the current flu outbreak is very serious. we have seen this tragic case of bethany, only 18, who died of pneumonia as a result of having the flu. as tragic as it is, it highlights a really important issue, which is that flu is notjust a bad cold. some people think that
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flu is. it is not, otherwise he would not have a vaccination problem about it. we would not have all this public health advice about it. it is a very serious and can be a fatal illness. we have had other deaths already this season. so, if people have not had a flu vaccination, should they think to go and get one or is it too late? it is definitely not too late. you can still have your vaccination is either in a high street pharmacist if you are not eligible or in an nhs pharmacy if you are. the under fives, elderly and pregnant women are more susceptible to this, serious illnesses like an ammonia, as a result of flu. so, before we talk about symptoms and what you should do if you get flu, what can you do now to protect yourself? is this about handwashing and really simple things? really simple things like
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hand hygiene. people think you can just get it from the aerosol spray, of people coughing on you. no, they can live on surfaces. hand hygiene and surface hygiene. put some clubs on when you‘re on the bus or on the underground, so you‘re not holding the hand drills. —— puts on. yourself isolated if you do have a flu ke. yourself isolated if you do have a fluke. you did not need to go to work. making sure you have remedies at home. paracetamol, ibuprofen and plenty of fluids. if you have a flu, you will not be able to get out of bed, so should you go and see your gp orjust bed, so should you go and see your gp or just stay bed, so should you go and see your gp orjust stay at home? well, gps do not have any treatment for flu. if you came to see me in my clinic, as some people did yesterday, i was saying to them that they need to be at home and drinking. you need to speak to a doctor, even if you are not in the vulnerable group. if you have any respiratory problems, if
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you‘re finding any difficulty breathing, if somebody is worried about you, if you are not passing water. thank you for coming in and talking to us about that. also coming up: we will get a new study that suggests that young people treated for first cancer have the same survival rates regardless of whether they have gene mutation. now, facebook has announced what it saysis now, facebook has announced what it says is a major change to its news feed. the social media website will focus on interactions between family and friends, rather than media and business content. also, in a separate development, the company has agreed to be compensation to a northern irish teenager after naked photographs of her were allegedly posted on the site. for more on both of these stories, we are joined by a reporter. i am confused by this. what is not going to be in our feed and what will be in our feet? it seems a bit willie.
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it does. mark soderberg says this is the first of a series of changes that are going to come to this book and are —— the ceo. i do not know a fewjoined facebook and are —— the ceo. i do not know a few joined facebook way and are —— the ceo. i do not know a fewjoined facebook way back and are —— the ceo. i do not know a few joined facebook way back when and are —— the ceo. i do not know a fewjoined facebook way back when it was just about sharing pictures and post with your friends and family. by post with your friends and family. by all accounts, it sounds like a default going back to that. they are scaling back on a much news and other bits that you getting your feet and are going to, as he says, prioritise what you share with your friends and family, because he feels that actually personal social media sharing is more enhancing than getting random bits of news that other people have prioritised. they will not make money then, will they? this is the thing, facebook made money from advertising and that is not changing as far as we know. advertising still be there —— is still going to be a thing and there, limited, , still going to be a thing and there, limited,, located
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still going to be a thing and there, limited, , located —— still going to be a thing and there, limited,, located —— their complicated algorithm will shoot at first that may interest you your way. however, they are doing this, mainly that people do not use the site of much in the early stages, he admitted that might be a problem, which might take a tiny head out of their $36 billion... they will probably hope! a really serious story about compensation being paid to a 14—year—old girl about nude pictures appearing on facebook. yes, between 2014 and 2016, she had naked pictures of herself posted on a so—called shame page on facebook. she went to the police and by the time they got involved, ordered the investigation, the device which had the pictures had gone, so you cannot really prove who put the pictures up on the first place. she then took a case to the high court and actually won an out—of—court settlement against facebook, so we do not know
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exactly how much she got. for these pictures being up on this page. our lawyers actually said that there could change the way that social media platforms like facebook, twitter, instagram are responsible for indecent images and indecent posts. this is not possibly going to be the only case to come forward now that she has effectively won this out—of—court statement. also coming up: the latest on barry purnell‘s trial. we‘ll look at a new study that suggests young women treated for breast cancer have the same survival rates regardless of whether they have the brca gene mutation. time for the latest news — here‘s annita. the headlines: a huge fire has ripped through nottingham railway station. nottinghamshire fire and rescue described it as a ‘large incident‘ with multiple fire engines at the scene. firefighters spent much of the
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morning tackling the blaze and the station was evacuated. trains are cancelled and the station will remain shut all day. donald trump has cancelled his planned visit to the uk next month. the us president tweeted that he had cancelled the planned visit as he didn‘t want to open the new american embassy in london — which he incorrectly stated had been commissioned by his predecessor, barack obama. a study of women with breast cancer suggests that having a double mastectomy does not increase the chances of survival in younger patients who have what‘s known as the brca gene. the researchers also found that women treated for first cancer had the same survival rates — regardless of whether or not they had the mutation. an 18—year—old from the scottish highlands has died after contracting the flu virus. bethany walker was airlifted to hospital in inverness from her home in wester ross, but her illness had developed into pneumonia and staff were unable to save her. elsewhere, in england, there has been a sharp rise in the number of flu cases seen
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by gps — up 78 per cent from last week. the bbc is said "deeply unimpressed" with an off—air chat in which two of its presenters joked about the pay gap between the sexes. that‘s according to a source at the corporation. bbc radio 4 today presenter john humphrys and north america editorjon sopel were discussing carrie gracie, who had just quit her china editorjob over equal pay. in an exchange before monday‘s show, it‘s reported they theyjoked about "handing over" pay to keep her in post. a bbc spokeswoman said the presenter regrets the "ill—advised" conversation. that‘s a summary of the latest bbc news. here‘s some sport now with hugh. billiejean billie jean king has billiejean king has once again called for the margaret court arena in melbourne to be renamed, that is after the 24 time grand slam winner made to robert trigg comments regarding lesbian and transgender people. billie jean king regarding lesbian and transgender people. billiejean king said she would not play on the court if she was on tour. heather watson missed
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out on the first wta final in her career in two years after she was beaten in the semifinal of the hobart international, three sets the defeat. theo walcott looks set to be on his way out of arsenal, everton boss sam alla rdyce on his way out of arsenal, everton boss sam allardyce confirming the teams have entered negotiations over the 20 jewelled england international. that‘s all the sport for now, we will be back with more after 11. the trial of former football coach barry bennell continued yesterday. a court in liverpool heard from an alleged victim who said he was abused in a car on the way to training and matches. let‘s get more from our reporterjim reed. bring us up to date. this is the trial of barry bennell also going by the name richard jones at this trial at liverpool crown court. yesterday thejury at liverpool crown court. yesterday the jury heard from chris unsworth, he gave evidence to say in the late
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19705 he was a youth footballer in the manchester area when he first came across barry bennell three he was told was a scout for manchester city at the time, mr unsworth alleges he was abused by the ages of nine and ten and 14 and 15. he told the court he prick his parents were very busy and the trusted mr he went on to say abuse occurred at the home of barry bennell near the peak district and also in north wales where mr bennell would take groups of boys. mr unsworth was asked why he did not tell anyone at the time and he said they would not believe it and that he would be jeopardising where he wants to go as a professional footballer. jeopardising where he wants to go as a professionalfootballer. he did contact police back in november in 2016 after he saw another
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footballer, andy woodward, speaking out on this programme and he said after seeing that interview mr u nsworth after seeing that interview mr unsworth went forward and told police what he alleged occurred. and mr unsworth was cross—examined by the defence? that's right. mr u nsworth the defence? that's right. mr unsworth was asked about discussing possible financial compensation with either a solicitor or other alleged victims and he denied that, saying it‘s not about compensation, it‘s about justice. it‘s not about compensation, it‘s aboutjustice. mr it‘s not about compensation, it‘s about justice. mr unsworth it‘s not about compensation, it‘s aboutjustice. mr unsworth said he had only spoken about the details of this case, or this abuse three times, on the victoria derbyshire programme, to the police and to the court yesterday. the court was ready transcript of the police interview barry bennell even bigger the 2017 in which he denies abusing mr u nsworth in which he denies abusing mr unsworth but admitted the boy stayed at his house and slept in his bed. mr bennell said chris unsworth was too young for him to be attracted to
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when they first met. he told officers he was abusing another boy at the time. he said i had a victim, idid not at the time. he said i had a victim, i did not need two, three orfour. barry bennell denies the charges, before the trial he had admitted seven further charges, the trial continues and is expected to last another seven weeks. thank you for bringing us up to date, we will follow that on the programme. the conduct of the media is expected to be examined by the independent review into the response to the manchester arena bombing. 22 people were killed when a bomb was set off after a pop concert at the venue in may. several of the bereaved families have raised concerns about the reporting of the attack. judith moritz is in manchester with the latest. what have we heard today? what we have today is a progress report which has come from the team which is reviewing the response to the
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manchester arena attack last may. it isa manchester arena attack last may. it is a review being chaired by the former head of the civil service bob kerslake former head of the civil service bob kersla ke and the former head of the civil service bob kerslake and the full report is due to be published by the end of march. today the team behind it have explained a little bit more about work which they are now doing which wasn‘t originally part of the terms of reference when the review was set up. in particular as you say they are going to be examining the role of the media in responding to the attack. how the story was covered both by the mainstream media and also by those using social media, how that fed into the experience of those who were both directly affected and in particular how it affected and in particular how it affected the families, the bereaved and surviving people who were right in the eye of the storm and having to cope with terrible loss and pain alongside the publicity that went with it. bob kerslake said this
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morning it is something he will examine and it‘s partly because he‘s been hearing evidence from families which, they have been telling him they had a mixed experience. plenty of positive experiences they had from the media but some families have also seen the flip side of that and we heard for example the family of martin, one of those killed in the attack, they had been doorstep by some reporters before martin had been identified as officially having died. it‘s an experience which has been exposed through this review and the kerslake been exposed through this review and the kersla ke team been exposed through this review and the kerslake team will look further to see if they can learn anything. the other thing to tell you about is what the team are advising is that all of the organisation, or the public organisations have responded one way or another should shine up
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toa one way or another should shine up to a charter which was developed recently by the former bishop of liverpooljames jones recently by the former bishop of liverpool james jones who recently by the former bishop of liverpooljamesjones who himself was looking at the experiences of the hillsborough families, families bereaved in a very different set of circumstances almost 30 years ago. there is a charter he has created which urges organisations to put the enquiry team are suggesting that the way to go and that organisations sign up to that charter. thank you for bringing us date with that. still to come: she‘s just been announced the winner of bbc music‘s sound of 2018 — we‘ll be speaking to norwegian singer sigrid shortly. a study of women with breast cancer suggests that having a double mastectomy does not increase the chances of survival in younger patients who have what‘s known as the brca gene. the researchers also found that women treated for breast cancer had the same survival rates
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regardless of whether or not they had the mutation. but it did find that there are the same survival let‘s talk to the study‘s author, professor diana eccles, of the university of southampton, laura pearson who had a double mastectomy, and dany bell is a specialist advisor for treatment and recovery at macmillan cancer support. thank you all forjoining us. professor first of all the pros and cons as is often the case in the studies, give us the details? the first thing to absolutely stress is that all of the patients in this study came along with a diagnosis of breast cancer. these were not people who did not have cancer but knew they were at high risk and were electing bilateral mastectomy. these
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are very electing bilateral mastectomy. these are very different circumstances. our study was looking at young women between 18—40 who had developed breast cancer, usually finding a lump so they were not being screened. most of them did not know they were brca gene carriers so we followed them for a long period of time, looking at ladies diagnosed between 2000 and 2008 and following their medical records ever since. we have finally been able to work out who does and who does not carry the brca gene mutation. the findings of the study are that 12% of those younger women with breast cancer had a brca gene mutation and the outcome from the conventional breast—cancer treatment for those people was no different to those who did not have the brca gene mutation when she took all the best character characteristics into account. the treatment was based on their brca, based on their breast—cancer status
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rather than the brca status.” based on their breast—cancer status rather than the brca status. i want to bring in laura, who is that on your knee? this is inaudible . this is joseph. your knee? this is inaudible . this isjoseph. and who else is there with you? this is elderly. and is that someone else in the background? is that someone else in the background ? your is that someone else in the background? your mum! it is lovely to see you, i know you had a double mastectomy, is that because you had the brca gene? i had breast cancer in april, i was diagnosed in april 2016. after i in april, i was diagnosed in april 20 16. after i had finished my treatment i had a double mastectomy because i had the brca two gene. so when you hear this report one hand it is great news that survival rates are the same for women with this gene but so many people will remember angelina jolie saying she was going to have this double mastectomy to save her life. how are
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you feeling today hearing this report? i mean... it's difficult to hear that what i have had done might not have been necessary because i have been left with the reconstruction i'm not happy with andl reconstruction i'm not happy with and i had my ovaries removed because of the high risk of ovarian cancer, lam of the high risk of ovarian cancer, iam37 of the high risk of ovarian cancer, i am 37 and going through menopause. i have got two young children. it's a bit galling to hear it might not help me at all. but at the same time, with the information i was given at the time i did everything i could to increase my chances of being around for my children. that is the thing, i guess information is increasing all the time. it‘s difficult isn‘t it for women to make that decision when you are presumably overwhelmed with information and try to come to terms with what you‘re being told. absolutely and that was a good point made about the information at the
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time. we have new insight all the time. we have new insight all the time from research which helps aid decision—making around treatments and it's not saying that a double mastectomy is not an option and it's also people want to live 20, 30, 40 years. the key thing is in terms of longer term survival they are not saying a double mastectomy is not something people should consider, what it is saying is that people have more time to think about the options and there is more insight and therefore there is more information which can be discussed ata time information which can be discussed at a time when they are making a very difficult decision about their future and treatment options. professor, pick up on that, this was just looking at those ten years so is there a chance that having a double mastectomy after the ten yea rs years would benefit health or you don‘t know? years would benefit health or you don't know? there is a very good chance that is the case and there is a very good rationale for having your ovaries removed and fallopian
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tubes because that is a risk we cannot screen for. so this study is not saying that that is the incorrect decision, it is just saying that women have more time to think about it, it doesn‘t have to be wrapped up with the primary cancer treatments. for brca two carrier is the risk is later and we did not see any ovarian cancers in the patients we were following up who were all diagnosed under 40 who had brca two gene variants but he did in brca one. did you feel overwhelmed and rushed into making any of your decisions? mol—mac, not at all. i into making any of your decisions? mol— mac, not at all. i actually into making any of your decisions? mol—mac, not at all. i actually was told, for the ovaries, to wait in case i wanted to have more children. they said i could wait until i was in my 40s, but i knew that i only
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wanted two children so it was me that was for that to happen as soon as possible. and the double mastectomy, i think my oncologist was keen from it to happen but i did not feel rushed. thank you all for speaking to us and, laura, well done for such a beautifully behaved children, and to mum in the background! now, the queen is sharing memories of her coronation and describes what it is like to work her imperial state crime. here, she tells royal commentator whilst you cannot look down whilst you‘re wearing it. —— why you cannot look down. the most important items used in the coronation andy morgan‘s two crones. if the queen has only worn at saint edward‘s called crown once, she is much more familiar with this, the diamond encrusted imperial state crime. she worked at the end of her coronation and for a state openings
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of parliament since. —— she wore it. it is much smaller, is it not? it was the same height. you know, it would have been up to about there. when my father wore it. it was huge then? yes, very unwieldy. it is difficult to always remember that diamonds are stones, so very heavy! yes, fortunately my father and i have about the same sort of shaped head. but once you put it on, it stays. i mean, itjust remains itself. you have to keep your head very still. yes, and you cannot look down to read the speech, you have to ta ke down to read the speech, you have to take the speech up, because if you did, your neck would break or it would fall off. so, there are some disadvantages to grounds, but
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otherwise, they are quite important things. and the coronation will be on bbc one at 8pm on sunday evening. lots of you have been getting in touch with us about the interview we did was clear poorly. she was the mother, a working mother, and then a stay at home mother, and she found her drinking was getting out of hand. she was drinking up to ten bottles of wine a week, hiding from her husband. she tried to give up drinking but in the end, she wanted to drink moderately but said that she needed to stop. you have been getting in touch with your experiences. barbara e—mails. the lady on your shoulders well to quit but i used to drink a bottle of wine before i could even get out of bed. i used to work in pubs and hotels and it was just too easy to drink. this was over at least 30 years and i ended up in hospital twice. i nearly lost my family, but starting a blog was furthest from my mind. i was ina a blog was furthest from my mind. i was in a really bad state but i went cold turkey and it nearly killed me.
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i finally cold turkey and it nearly killed me. ifinally got cold turkey and it nearly killed me. i finally got better and i‘ve not touched any alcohol for about 17 yea rs. touched any alcohol for about 17 years. then we have also had a diane on twitter thing but many of us do not think we have a problem because thatis not think we have a problem because that is one that we choose to drink rather than vodka or gin. wine is somehow perceived differently from spirits. do keep coming. —— do keep those bolts coming. the winner of bbc sound of 2018 has just been announced and in a moment we‘ll be speaking exclusively to them. the awards honour the artists who are making waves on the music scene and tipped as the ones to watch this year and, what‘s more, they‘re voted for by their peers. we‘ll reveal the winner in just a moment, but for now let‘s take a look at some of the previous winners. it‘s a pretty impressive pedigree. # but #butl # but ijust keep on chasing pavements # should ijust keep on chasing pavements? #
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# and everybody knows. # # and everybody knows. # #do it # and everybody knows. # # do it like a brother, do it like a dude. # #do it dude. # # do it for the love. # # do it for the love. # # these streets, these streets. # well, joining me now in the studio is this year‘s winner, sigrid. we‘re also speaking to bbc music reporter mark savage. congratulations! thank you. it must be pretty exciting when you look at our dell, sam smith, the list goes on and on, people who have one before, to be in that kind of company? it is absolutely amazing.
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adele is one of my biggest inspirations, rolling in the deep is one of my biggest inspirations in p0p one of my biggest inspirations in pop music. i cannot see anything else. you are quite young. 21. if people have not heard your music, let‘s listen to strangers. #just like in # just like in the movies # just like in the movies #it # just like in the movies # it starts to rain and we... # it starts to rain and we... #we # it starts to rain and we... # we are the broken beauties # we are the broken beauties # blindfolding # blindfolding # when the curtain drops # when the curtain drops # are touch is just a touch # are touch is just a touch # not late in the movies # not late in the movies # are # not late in the movies #area # not late in the movies # are a story is after the end # are a story is after the end # like strangers # like strangers
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# perfect pretenders # perfect pretenders #we # perfect pretenders # we are falling head over heels for something that isn‘t real #it something that isn‘t real # it could never be as # it could never be as #just # it could never be as # just you and i # just you and i # strangers # strangers # perfect pretenders # perfect pretenders # and we are falling head over heels for something that isn‘t real #it for something that isn‘t real # it can never be as... # ‘s for something that isn‘t real # it can never be as... # ‘5 you we re # it can never be as... # ‘5 you were saying it was great fun to shoot that. mark was seeing was a challenging to do that single shot? there was a couple of shots. i was listening to do, don‘t kill my vibe, and the clarity and crispness in your voice, it is very beautiful and unique. thank you, i appreciate it. to people say that what? you have a very unique sound. yes, quite a bit,
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but i had a lovely vocal coach to my junior high and high school years, and shejust junior high and high school years, and she just knew that we needed to keep that arrived in me. she did not wa nt to keep that arrived in me. she did not want to make me sound anything else. it has been a very organic process. we will talk to mark in a minute but i want to talk about don‘t kill my vibe because there is an empowering story behind those lyrics? yes, so i was any writing session with two older men and i felt that i was being patronised. it wasjust older men and i felt that i was being patronised. it was just a general feeling of not being welcome. i thought this is not how it should be and i was quite mad at myself for not speaking up, because i thought i was the type of person to do that. and i did not, but later on, a couple of months later, i was only session with martin shirley, a lovely writer from norway, only session with martin shirley, a lovely writerfrom norway, and only session with martin shirley, a lovely writer from norway, and we wrote about this previous session. it is angry but assertive, that song. would you agree with that? yes, i think the interesting thing
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about lyrics in particular is that they are not the standard pop fire. there is another song about the friends about people in school, or your life about people who are 2—faced. there is dynamite, where work is taking you away from the person you want to be with. it is an interesting, conversational, unusual way and that is one of the reasons why she has won this award. and you‘re been incredibly modest, because i wanted to put into context, mark, the significance of winning this award. it is huge because one of the most difficult things for a new artist is to break through and get hurt. you saw it la st through and get hurt. you saw it last year, how energy and took over all of streaming. he was in the charts every week, he had 16 songs in the top 20. for somebody who is not known to cut through that kind of noise is really difficult and this list has a great track record. adele, lady gaga, it shearing, and to get a platform, to get a bit of promotion, for people to know who you are right at the start of your
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career you are right at the start of your career is massively important. is it important that this was chosen by peers? yes, well, it is a huge honour. it is quite hard to believe that it has actually happened, since iam from that it has actually happened, since i am from norway. i come from a small town in norway, 50,000 inhabitants, i never thought my music would take me to the studio, sitting here and announcing the winner of this year. i can just say a huge thank you to 19, they have fought so hard for this. so, talk to us about what you have been doing over the last year and what your plans are for the next year. i am guessing things are going to change! it is quite a packed schedule. tell us about last year. we have been doing lots of festivals. glastonbury, denmark was cool. we are doing coachella in april, in us. last year, i was also part of the
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apple music campaign. we did james corden. a lot of stuff happened. the television show? yes. so, exposure more and more? yes, for next year is all about going on tour. i am going to australia for the first time in my life. working on new music. it is going to be a fine year. do you think things are going to change? i am so think things are going to change? i am so impressed by how down—to—earth viewer. most people, i have met people in the music industry before, not everybody is quite so down to earth. yes, and i have met sigrid a couple of times over the past couple of year, we followed you around when you played in brighton, and then at glastonbury, you have not changed a bit! why? you see people who are very humble at the beginning who started not to be. it is a special industry and i can understand, with the amount of pressure and exposure, that it can be difficult, but i do
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not know, i am myself and hang—out with my family and best friends and my band are my best friends. i am so lucky to have them on here with me. it is great. what is sigrid‘s you‘re going to be like? you know from watching this. honestly, ithink going to be like? you know from watching this. honestly, i think she is going to be huge. there is a quirkiness and humour to her music thatis quirkiness and humour to her music that is quite unusual for pop. it sounds different to the other stuff thatis sounds different to the other stuff that is out there at the minute. every song isjust packed with hook after the hook. ithink every song isjust packed with hook after the hook. i think you are going to go a long way. and you talked a little bit about how hard it is for artists, unknown artists, or not so well—known artists, to break through. clearly, this is an opportunity for you, but how many other opportunities either? opportunity for you, but how many other opportunities either7m opportunity for you, but how many other opportunities either? it is important for the bbc is doing. absolutely. artists at the beginning of their career, there is something called bbc and tradition, where artists can upload songs to get played on the radio, and there are
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16 people on the long list and almost all of them had come up through bbc and tradition. there are other places, in amy 's belbek said new artists from time to time. q magazine. all of the big publications, billboard in the us. but it is hard to get hurt and the more that radio stations consolidate, the more they make their playlists more focused on... did i hear you want to work with stormzy? i listened a lot to his music, but as is a part in the chorus that is faster than my usual writing that i did at that point, so i think that really inspired me. we will see what we can do! i am not sure that we have any links to stormzy but thank you so much for coming in to speak to us.
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bbc newsroom live is coming up next. thank you for your company today. have a good day. good morning. for many of us, another great start to the day. patchy drizzle across eastern areas and patches of mist and fog around as well but, across western products, weather has been some vlogger, also some clear skies and sunshine breaking through. for south west england, parts of west wales, it is north—west england and the north and north—west of england, some sunny north and north—west of england, some sunny spells. it will stay quite cloudy. a bit grisly across central and eastern parts of england into this afternoon. maximum
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temperatures up to about 9 degrees. tonight, some rain moving its way into northern ireland. otherwise, we have got lots of cloud and hill fog. another fairly have got lots of cloud and hill fog. anotherfairly mild have got lots of cloud and hill fog. another fairly mild night to come. through saturday, this weather front, this area of rain does not really move very far. staying quite damp in those western parts. also cloud around on sunday. a dry day for most of us but looking very wet and windy towards the north—west later on sunday. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11: donald trump has cancelled his visit to the uk.
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the us president has criticised the location of the new american embassy in london. does a large fire has closed nottingham railway station, causing major travel disruption. there‘s been a breakthrough in talks to form a new government in germany between chancellor angela merkel‘s christian democrats and their former coalition partners, the social democrats. young women treated for breast cancer with the faulty brca genes are not less likely to survive, according to new research.

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