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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  February 2, 2018 9:00am-11:00am GMT

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hello. it's friday, it's nine o'clock, i'm chloe tilley. welcome to the programme the number of men dying in britain from prostate cancer has overtaken the number of women killed by breast cancer for the first time. it really is time to get behind this and realise that we need to get on top of it now because it's just going to become more common and kill more men if we aren't able to do that. we'll be speaking to two men who have the disease and also talk to an expert who will tell us what symptoms men should be looking out for. theresa may is on her way back from her trade trip to china. she is under ever increasing pressure from her own party to do a much better job of leading. we will be speaking to tory mps. i'm not a quitter — i'm in this because there is a job to be done and that's delivering for the british people and the future prosperity of our country choosing civil partnership over
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marriage, we speak to a heterosexual couple fighting for a civil partnership, the problem is they are only available to same—sex couples. this is being debated in the house of commons today. should the law be changed to allow it to be available for everyone? hello. welcome to the programme, we're live until 11 this morning. we'll be talking about prostate cancer. the number of men dying from this has now overtaken the number of women dying from breast cancer for the first time in britain. we'd like to hear from you. are you suffering from prostate cancer? or maybe someone in your family? or have you survived it? do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning. use the hashtag #victorialive. and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today. theresa may has insisted she is delivering what the british people want on brexit,
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despite persistent criticism of her approach from within the conservative party. the prime minister has ended a three—day trade visit to china in which downing street says £9 billion worth of deals have been signed. speaking in shanghai to the bbc‘s political editor laura kuenssberg, mrs may rejected the idea that she had to choose between maintaining close ties to the eu, or making a cleaner break. it is important that we deliver what people want, which is control of our money, our borders and our laws. it's exactly what we are doing. what i am showing in china is how we can ensure that we actually enhance our trade with the rest of the world as well. why do we want to do that? it is good for people in britain, it's good forjobs in britain. prime minister, can you stay on? because people are asking you again and again to be clearer about your priorities. how long can you stay on, do you believe? well, let's be very clear about this — i've set out what my vision is. i have set out and i have said to people that at every stage where we can fill in the detail, we will do so, and that is exactly...
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but how long can you stay on? the idea that we have to have — that we are about to complete the negotiation with the european union on ourfuture relationship is wrong. we are just at the beginning of the process of negotiating with the european union. so we will be out there ensuring that the deal we get delivers on what the british people want. that's what this is about. and i know that what the british people want as well is good jobs for themselves and their children, and that is why it is important for me to be here in china where businesses have been signing deals, selling more uk products, great uk products, into china, ensuring there are more jobs for people in the uk. do you want to be the tory leader at the next general election? well, i have been asked this on a number of occasions. i've said very clearly throughout my political career i have served my country and i have served my party. i am not a quitter. i am in this because there is a job to be done here, and that's delivering the british people and doing that in a way that ensures the future prosperity of our country. global britain, global britain is a real vision
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for the united kingdom. i want the british people to see a government that is delivering for them around the world, and that is exactly what we are doing. our viewers see day after day the tory party fighting amongst themselves. how do you reassert your authority? i am doing what the british people want, which is delivering on brexit but also getting out around the world ensuring that we bring jobs back to britain. companies will be selling more great british products to china as a result of this trip. there will be more people injobs in the uk as a result of this trip. that's global britain in action. prime minister, thank you very much. thank you. let's speak to iain watson at westminster. theresa may saying she is not a quitter, people at westminster? they are not necessarily overly chuffed. the prime minister has some animation to say this is why she
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should be carrying on —— ammunition. she has called it a global britain. a confident nation going forward. she doesn't yet have a confident party. i have been speaking to mp5, candidates, business people about her position on the home front. some people are concerned, some mps want to set a date for her departure from downing street. she said she wasn't a quitter. the question she was asked was whether she would lead the party into the next general election and she sidestepped that. some would like to see her go sooner, local councillors think they fared badly and will fare badly in local elections in may triggering her stepping down. others feel let down she is blocking rather than
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delivering radical change. it is against that backdrop. downing street would say this is a prime minister delivering, in china, on trade deals, and will do the same with the eu. if that happens, then that feeding frenzy will abate. annita is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. the number of men dying in the uk from prostate cancer has overtaken the number of women killed by breast cancer for the first time. the charity prostate cancer uk says advances in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer have paid off and similar benefits could be seen if more money was allocated to the fight against prostate cancer. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. prostate cancer does not discriminate. last year, keen runner tony collier discovered he had the disease
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while training for an ultramarathon. his diagnosis was late, and he knows cancer will eventually take his life, so tony is using the time he has left to warn other men about the dangers. i think it's really important that people are aware of what the symptoms are and i would actually urge men to talk to their doctors, if they have any urinary issues at all. my issue is that i didn't actually have any symptoms and they think i had the cancer for ten years beforehand. more men are living to an age where they have a greater chance of developing prostate cancer. so, in 2015, more than 11,800 men died of the disease, compared with just over 11,400 deaths in 2015 due to breast cancer. and while the proportion of people dying from prostate cancer, the mortality rate, has fallen in the past decade, down by 6%, the decline in deaths from breast cancer has been even greater, at more than 10%. it is time to get behind this and to realise that we need to get
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on top of it now because it willjust become more common, and it is actually going to kill more men, if we are not able to do that. tony has joined those calling for increased funding for research and the development of a reliable prostate screening programme, so the gains seen in the fight against breast cancer can be matched in the fight against the disease that he knows will eventually claim his life, too. the nspcc has accused the government of "dragging its feet" when it comes to protecting children online. the charity says ministers have failed to implement half of the recommendations made in a report which was commissioned a decade ago. mps say they are planning a voluntary code as part of the internet safety strategy. sarah campbell reports. this is the online generation. over the past decade the internet and its use has expanded rapidly. instagram, snapchat and whatsapp didn't even exist in 2008. back then, professor tanya byron
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was asked by the then prime minister to look into children's safety online. ten years on, the nspcc says less than half of the recommendations have been put into place. a uk council on child internet safety was established. video games now have to have an age rating, but the charity says there's been no improvement to parental controls for games consoles and no code of practice is yet in place for the online industry. the government has really dragged theirfeet in implementing recommendations from what was a landmark report ten years ago by professor byron that was supposed to be a comprehensive package to keep children safe. those measures haven't been acted on and is clearly essential that 110w we do see the government take steps, in particular introducing a code of practice and an independent regulator to make social networks keep children safe. the government says it does intend to introduce a voluntary code of practice for social media networks and it says changes to the law will also be
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considered to compel companies to reduce the risks their science pose to children. health leaders have written to thejustice secretary urging him to reform the pay—out system for negligence claims against the nhs. they say the nhs would have to pay up to 365 billion if all current claims were successful. the government says it is looking at measures to control costs in such cases. a shooting by a 12—year—old girl at a californian school is thought to be unintentional, according to police in los angeles. the girl has been charged with "negligent discharge of a firearm" after the incident left five injured. a 15—year—old boy who was shot in the head, and a 15—year—old girl who was shot in the wrist, are both in a stable condition and are expected to make a full recovery. police investigating the death of hollywood star
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natalie wood 37 years ago say her husband robert wagner is now being treated as a "person of interest". the actress was found dead after going missing from a yacht off the coast of california. our los angeles correspondent james cook reports. natalie wood was a hollywood superstar with three oscar nominations when she died suddenly in 1981 at the age ofjust a3. her body was found floating in the water off the coast of california near the yacht on which she was sailing with her husband robert wagner, co—star christopher walken and the boat's captain. initially, the death was ruled an accident, but the inquiry was reopened in 2011. police now say that two new witnesses have corroborated accounts of a fight between mr wagner and ms wood on the night she disappeared. detectives say it appears she was the victim of an assault and they believe her husband was the last person to see her alive. police say robert wagner has refused to speak to them since the case was reopened.
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they've not declared the death a murder and no charges have been filed against the actor. he is now 87—years—old and has not commented on the latest developments. all 955 workers from a gold mine in south africa have been safely brought back to the surface. they had been trapped underground since wednesday night when a thunderstorm brought down power lines, cutting electricity to the mine‘s lift systems. south africa is a leading gold producer, but safety in the industry is often questioned. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 9.30. do get in touch with us throughout the morning. do you think straight couples should be allowed to have a civil partnership? we will be talking to a
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couple who want a civil partnership, they have been together 26 years. but they can't do it. use the hashtag #victorialive. let's get some sport with hugh. and we start with the women's super league, and it's not great news for the new england head coach? yes, it was a big big game in the women's super league last night — chelsea missed the chance to go to the top of the table, but they did end leaders' manchester city's 100% start to the season. the match ended in a goalless draw so not much action for new boss phil neville to mull over, but he will be concerned to see his goalkeeper, city's karen bardsley hurt after a heavy fall. bardsley was sent to hospital for x—rays on her left shoulder after the incident which came just two minutes into the game. she has gone off to hospital to be checked, she has a little bit of pain in herarm checked, she has a little bit of pain in her arm and shoulders but she is talking and she seems ok and
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in good spirits. we will trust the medical team to carry on from there. it meantjust a week after 18—year—old ellie roebuck signed a professional contract, she got her chance in goal and pulled off some great saves, keeping a clean sheet. these were the pictures she tweeted upon signing that contract. neville also saw city and england captain steph houghton limp off with what looked to be an achilles injury so not the best preparation for phil neville — his first match is a tough one against france in a month. and last night we had the start of rugby league's super league — and an early exit for the warrington captain, but he wasn't sent off. yes, and it's a great time of year — i'll be watching our local side here salford take on wigan tonight, but things kicked off with grand final winners leeds rhinos, who made the trip to warrington wolves. the excitement was clearly too much for some. warrington captain chris hill, on the left here, had to leave the game early after his wife went into labour — congratulations to them on the birth of their little girl.
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unfortunately hill was absent as england winger ryan hall provided the highlight with two tries on the night, helping leeds warrington captain chris hill, on the left here, to a 16—12 win on the night. elsewhere hull fc began their campaign with a six—try win over huddersfield. and there is some more live sport to come today, as great britain's men begin their davis cup campaign with a tie against spain in marbella. they'll be without the british number two kyle edmund, who misses out after picking up a hip injury in the semi—final at the australian open. andy murray is a long term injury casualty, and with dan evans suspended it means liam broady and cameron norrie will be flying the flag. broady will take on albert ramos—vinolas, who's ranked 144 places higher. there's no pressure on ulcer, and i'm just going to focus solely on myself and see of albert can handle what i have to offer —— no pressure
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on us, and i'm just going to focus. he will have to play has a game because i'm not going anywhere. great opportunity to play in spain away on the clay. i couldn't be more thankful for the opportunity and just pumped to show the world what i can do. a big day to come for both of those men. you can follow the action on the bbc red button from 9:45, orfrom1pm on bbc two. back to you, chloe. thanks, hugh. we will carry on speaking to you throughout the morning. for the first time, the number of men dying from prostate cancer has overtaken the number of women dying from breast cancer. that makes prostate cancer the third biggest cancer killer in the uk behind lung cancer and bowel cancer. figures released by prostate cancer uk reveal thatjust over 11,800 men die from prostate cancer every year in the uk and the charity is calling for it to get the same attention and resources as breast cancer. lets talk now to kevin webber who was diagnosed with terminal prostate cancer in 2014, phil kissi who was diagnosed in 2006
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and has now recovered, catherine stewart who lost her husband to prostate cancer in 2011, and caroline moore a consultant urologist from ucl. thank you all for coming in to speak to us this morning. kevin, i want to speak to you first of all, because with prostate cancer there is often no symptoms are very few symptoms. did you have any? yes, i had to get up did you have any? yes, i had to get up in the night for wee, and that is what you call a prostate wee, when you go to the toilet bursting for the loo, and then it only lasts about four seconds, so it is your prostate telling you something is wrong. where you much aware of it? even though my father had it my doctor never told my father to tell me that increased my risk, so i wasn't aware. so you have this
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crushing diagnosis, four years ago? three years ago. three years ago. what does that go you?” three years ago. three years ago. what does that go you? i don't think anything prepares you to be told you will only lead to for two more years, which is what i was told. my wife and i bothjust years, which is what i was told. my wife and i both just burst into tea rs, wife and i both just burst into tears, the normal reaction, i would think, but then when i started chemotherapy a couple of years later i realised i had a choice, to either give up on everything ought to live my life still. i went out for a run. my my life still. i went out for a run. my wife said i can't, but i did, and since then i haven't stopped. we will talk about some of your ultra marathons which are pretty incredible, but at this point i want to bring in phil. did you have any symptoms, back in 2006? not at all. it was back in october 20051 symptoms, back in 2006? not at all. it was back in october 2005 i saw a programme about prostate cancer, and i thought, what is prostate? i had never heard what a prostate was before, until then. after the programme the key message i got from
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that was about going to your doctor and getting tested, so i straightaway went to my doctor, got tested, and my doctor then referred me to the hospital. i had a biopsy andl me to the hospital. i had a biopsy and i found i had aggressive cancer, so and i found i had aggressive cancer, so the clock was ticking straightaway, and i wanted to live, ididn't want straightaway, and i wanted to live, i didn't want to die at that time, as you said earlier on, i didn't wa nt as you said earlier on, i didn't want to be one of those statistics, from the 11,000 dying, one every 45 minutes. i didn't want to, i had lots to do in my life i then went through the operation and it was very challenging, i had to ensure that everybody in my family, friends, loved ones, knew what i was going through. and also, not to be scared. it was quite important not to be scared or be shy to talk about it. so once i had that operation and i went through the recovery, people
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knew what i was going through, and also getting my regular checkup until i was signed off, and as you see today i am here. well, caroline, i want to bring you in, because two dies here talking about, yes, symptoms, sometimes yes, sometimes no “— symptoms, sometimes yes, sometimes no —— two guys here. but that message, it sometimes isn't getting through. why is that?” message, it sometimes isn't getting through. why is that? i think that one of the difficulties is not everybody has symptoms. as we heard from phil, some menjust get their blood tested and find out. i think we need more of a message that men who are at high risk, so black men and men with a family history of prostate cancer, they should get tested early. the other difficulty is that the tests we used to use
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ten, 15 years ago, they are not as accurate as the tests we have today, so accurate as the tests we have today, so it is good news we have more accurate tests including mri that people can come forward and get. for you, catherine, to lose your husband, were you aware of prostate cancer? was your husband aware before his diagnosis? very vaguely, and before his diagnosis? very vaguely, a nd exa ctly before his diagnosis? very vaguely, and exactly the same as this gentleman here, he used to get up in the night. we had an ensuite bathroom so i hardly walk up when he used to do that. we used to stay in a big old cranky house with the toilet two flight up and december with snow outside, and i suddenly realised he was getting up in the night with freezing cold feet, and i marched into the doctor the next day and ourgp was marched into the doctor the next day and our gp was very good —— we didn't live in an ensuite —— with an ensuite bathroom. the warning bells went off in my head and it was picked up very quickly, it was quite aggressive, and it was downhill from there, but a bit like you. we had a
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very positive outlook on it and we just got on with living life in the fast lane, i think. and important for you now to get the message out there for men, because i guess one of the problems, and maybe i am being unfair, and you can correctly, but blogs are not too good at talking about things, well, anything vaguely implement or about emotion or feeling are worried? vaguely implement or about emotion or feeling are worried ?|j vaguely implement or about emotion or feeling are worried? i think you are dead right. it is the natural image, it is about —— it is the macho image, oh, that is not the sort of thing i talk about, but i think is the public get to know more of the information on prostate cancer, they know if you go to your doctor and get tested early, you could be one of those people that are saved today and i think that is the message we have to get out there. early testing, and we need more research. and talking about more research. and talking about more research, we are doing a campaign in march, and it is
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glasgow, nottingham, bristol, london, manchester. and we want people to sign up to this. it is 2k, 4k,10k, people to sign up to this. it is 2k, 4k, 10k, and it is so important we get funds to do more research around the prostate cancer agenda and programmes like this give us platform to speak to the general viewers. kevin, what do you make of this? yes, quite right. i am one of the people quite happy talking about things, as my friends know, so i am absolutely honest about it and there are no questions that are bad christians. a great story for me, a client of mine at work who i actually talked to quite a lot went actually talked to quite a lot went a bit quiet on me, and i thought maybe it was a surprise for them when i had prostate cancer, and he later phoned me up and said he had read one of my blogs, he had symptoms, went to the doctor, had
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prostate cancer, and because he went early to the doctor he was cured and he felt he couldn't phone me up because i was going to die and he felt embarrassed about that, but i said, to make me feel i have done something good, it is an amazing feeling, and i hope edessa mackie talks now to a lot of men, and joining the fight for prostate cancer uk, signing up to marches and doing things, it is a massive difference —— i hope that man talks toa difference —— i hope that man talks to a lot of people now. people see it as to a lot of people now. people see itasa to a lot of people now. people see it as a man's disease, but ask my wife and kids that? they have to see me go downhill, far worse for them. that is why as a female i think important for us to bang the drum, and because we are more able to talk about these things. the number of men at dinner parties, who i have sat next to, you know, i don't get invited any more! laughter but it is what we have to do. we have been sent so many messages, people getting in touch with us about this. an e—mail from
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people getting in touch with us about this. an e—mailfrom sharon. my about this. an e—mailfrom sharon. my father was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2007 and the living years on he is still under what the nhs called watchful waiting, so his cancer is still within the prostate and requires no intervention. my issue with this is dad's cancer has changed during this time, that his reviews are cancelled or postponed. a worry that an ever straining nhs means he will fall through the net and it will be too late for. this is presumably your worry as much as it is the people affected by the disease hit personally? it is about funding as much as about awareness? that's right because once a man comes forward for testing, we want to make sure he is able to get the most effective tests, wherever he is in the country. and that is not differing by hospital or by which consultant you see, but that we have national standards for doing the best tests. ijust national standards for doing the best tests. i just want to read a couple more messages before we talk about your ultra marathons which are quite incredible. text. i was
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diagnosed with prostate cancer in march 2016, had no symptoms as such. it was caught early enough and i had keyhole surgery and code myself very lucky, also due to the diligence of my doctor and i will be ever grateful. roger e—mailed to say he was diagnosed with prostate cancer backin was diagnosed with prostate cancer back in 2013, aggressive and invasive. the count was 1741, astronomically high. didn't have any classic symptoms, wasn't frequently going to the loo, i am taking medication and my numbers are controlled. leading a normal life at the moment, get a bit tired but i am 71 so not all that surprising. good to hear roger is coping. one way you're coping with your diagnosis of terminal cancer is to do some incredible ultra marathons.” terminal cancer is to do some incredible ultra marathons. i always rana bit incredible ultra marathons. i always ran a bit but not that much and i entered the brighton marathon before i was diagnosed, and when i started chemotherapy i asked if i could actually run a marathon, my
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oncologist, and he said no but i did it anyway, run the london marathon two weeks later on chemotherapy, then i set myself... how did you do that, seriously? i know people who have been on chemotherapy and it is just utterly training, physically and mentally. it is a bit but because i had something to look forward to, reason to get out of bed every day, to go and train, and the buzz of the marathon is fantastic, if you're healthy. if you are ill it is even better. when i crossed the finish line i got a better buzz than anyone will add london this year, because i never thought it was possible, to do something you didn't think was possible yourself is amazing. so the following year i thought i can't ask people to sponsor me again running just a marathon again, so i ran one across the sahara, 250 colour matters, carrying everything on your back for a week. at that, loved it, did that again the next year, did a few more races, 15 marathons in 15 days, and ultramarathon in iceland, and infour days, and ultramarathon in iceland, and in four weeks' time i am off to
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the arctic for the arctic ultra, 350 miles nonstop across the arctic cooling a sledge. i have reached temperatures of —— tempters of about -40, temperatures of —— tempters of about —40, had a cold, then two weeks later back to the day has owed for the sahara again, but it keeps me alive, keeps me buzzing, makes people aware, gives a profile, people aware, gives a profile, people sponsor me, so all those things are so important and i don't expect everyone to run ultra marathons like i can, butjust sign up marathons like i can, butjust sign upfor marathons like i can, butjust sign up for these marchers, walking the 2k, it makes a massive difference. incredible story. blown away —— sign up incredible story. blown away —— sign upfor incredible story. blown away —— sign up for these marches. thank you all. still to come, theresa may back from her three—day trip to china but what of which are back home? she is under pressure from her own party to do a betterjob of leading. we will be speaking to tory mps. former gymnastics coach of the us larry nassar is thought to have abused
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more than 265 victims. he's already been sentenced to 165 years in jail. we'll hear from one of the lawyers of the victims before ten o'clock. time for the latest news with annita. it is important that we deliver what people want, which is control of our money, our borders and our laws. it's exactly what we are doing. what i am showing in china is how we can ensure that we actually enhance our trade with the rest of the world as well. why do we want to do that? it is good for people in britain, it's good forjobs in britain. there have been violent clashes
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between migrants in calais. four eritreans between migrants in calais. four eritrea ns migrants are between migrants in calais. four eritreans migrants are in critical condition after being shot in clashes with afghan asylum seekers. health leaders have written to the —— health leaders have written to thejustice secretary urging him secretary urging him to reform the pay—out system for negligence claims against the nhs. they say the nhs would have to pay up to 365 billion if all current claims were successful. the government says it is looking at measures to control costs in such cases. the nspcc has accused the government of "dragging its feet" when it comes to protecting children online. the charity says ministers have failed to implement half of the recommendations made in a report which was commissioned a decade ago.
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mps say they are planning a voluntary code as part of the internet safety strategy. loads of you getting in contact regarding our story about prostate cancer. we have had a tweet from tom who is 26, he says the biggest embarrassment is getting checked. jeff says by e—mail, if gps do not perform the appropriate tests or refer you, then the system fails. i have had symptoms other two years before by gp preferred me. gps are discouraged from referring to hospital. tim says men ignore symptoms. there is an assumption seemed a gp will
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result in misdiagnosis or wasting time. here's some sport now with hugh. eddiejones has eddie jones has named eddiejones has named his team to face italy in their opening six nations match in rome on sunday. their centre has been preferred to jonathanjoseph. their centre has been preferred to jonathan joseph. alex hepburn their centre has been preferred to jonathanjoseph. alex hepburn should make his debut from the bench. karen bardsley was taken off after just two minutes in the women's super league. she has had x—rays on her left shoulder. and in the super league, ryan hall seen and in the super league, ryan hall seen here scoring twice. and lee brody goes into the opening day of the davis cup tie in marbella,
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shortly. theresa may is on her way back from china after a three—day visit. but it's been a tricky week. as the prime minister tries to keep the different factions in her party onside over brexit, she's also come under pressure from some of her own mps to do more at home and regain control of the political agenda. so how can she do that? and how long can the irreconcilable differences over what the conservatives want post—brexit britain to look like continue? in a moment we'll speak to two of the party's mps but first let's take a look back at the prime minister's week. you can't put the date on how long has she got. she is the prime minister. sorry to interrupt. by using the phrase, the window is closing, you are thinking about a time frame. you can feel in politics when people are extremely popular like they were going into the election, you can feel when that starts to wane. it is
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not about saying theresa may has a certain amount of time. a change in leadership is absolutely not what is required going through brexit the negotiations. what concerns me is a hard—core of brexiteer mps who appeared to refuse to offer any support unless she delivers brexit as they interpret it. they are doing their utmost to undermine our chancellor, to force him out and resign, that is not acceptable. i hope theresa may will come out firmly behind philip hammond, point out they are worried great team at the top of the conservative party, and make it clear she leads the party and will set the direction of travel and not be bullied. i tend to disagree with the chancellor on many things but on this issue he seems to be disagreeing with government policy, the conservative party manifesto. this is a real trouble for the
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government. the history of chances being in opposition to prime ministers is not a good one or encouraging. the prime minister is carried out a very complex and difficult negotiation, she needs the support of all of her party, the support of everybody in britain as she goes about this task. it is in our interests we get the best possible deal with the eu and that is what the prime minister is determined to deliver. i don't think anyone should be sacked people should be able to have opinions and voice them, that is all thatis opinions and voice them, that is all that is happening. the conservative party which i have worked very hard over my lifetime to put that in a position to be government, must offer to the country a big plan for the future, big ideas, big vision, whether it is transforming schools in the north of england, a plan to engage with the rest of the world, or a form of brexit which is not as economic
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league damaging as some forms proposed. let's talk about that with sir bill cash, a leading supporter of brexit for many years. katy balls who's a political correspondent at the spectator magazine. and with us from his essex constituency is conservative mp rob halfon. i have like to find your assessment of the prime minister's week, she has been in china for trade talks, with ceremony people discussing whether she should stay or go. i would describe the promised a bit like zebedee from the magic roundabout. she is resilient. i do not support people who say she had to go, it is right we support a sitting prime minister. we need to be much more radical in our policy making and focus on five big challenges, skills, housing, the nhs
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the cost of living, social injustice, things the prime minister inspired many when she stood on the steps of downing street. her policy making can be taught is like and she needs to be more like a lion, be radical, clear with the message our party is a ladder of opportunity, offering hope to people to climb that ladder forjobs, security offering hope to people to climb that ladder for jobs, security and prosperity. bill, how would you assess her week? robert is right in looking at the question of housing, the health service and so on. but you need the money to pay for it. it is my belief that actually the brexit process will lead us as we have seen from china, with the £9 billion trade deal, into a situation where we can generate income to pay for the public services. a very positive vision. the eu doesn't work. massive
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youth and implement, up to 50% in some eu countries. the position is brexit is about regaining our sovereignty, our borders, and also having a massive opportunity. the eu doesn't work for us all for them. going outside into the rest of the world, global trading, going outside into the rest of the world, globaltrading, is the future. isn't this the problem? you have the two sides of the conservative party with their own agenda wanted to be made happy by theresa may. she can't win. i don't think there is any clear option, she will upset one part of the party. it is worse, the brexit side who want specific things, the remain side pushing for a customs union. and last week there is anger at the lack of domestic agenda, like nick boles,...
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went theresa may stood in downing street talking about opportunity, helping people who need a leg up in society, that has been brushed aside, it is brexit will stop no, it isn't. other things are going on. in terms of the health service, more money has been put in. what i am arguing for is to get the brexit issue, the biggest issue facing this country for generations, we were in the eu, we thought it would work, some voted yes in 1975. we concluded it didn't work. the british people were given the chance to govern themselves. that is the big picture. we had to pushit that is the big picture. we had to push it through, we have the withdrawal bill, the bottom line is
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the house of lords looks like it won't oppose it. so, get on with it but also have a very positive vision. the opportunities are huge. talking about positive vision, should the prime minister be saying, i will be talking about the nhs, housing, things people can relate to. banging on about brexit, many people are frustrated and bored. brexit is important but my huge concern is we brexit is important but my huge concern is we are not brexit is important but my huge concern is we are not talking about these other issues. we should be thinking of radical solutions on housing, using the extra monies raised from cutting corporation tax to redistribute to build social housing and affordable housing for those in overcrowded accommodation. we have the march of the robots, jobs will be taken over by artificial intelligence, we need to rocket boost skills and spend money
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on that, and reform technical education and universities. we need a new nhs tax, a conversation about how much should be spent on the nhs above the real terms increase. we have deep social injustices, so many who take free school meals who don't get good gcses, children excluded. the prime minister made it her mission when she got to downing street, of course brexit will always be there, but it is like groundhog day. i thought that was a fairy tale now every day on the radio, groundhog day is true, hearing about brexit. i say to the prime minister... hang ona minister... hang on a minute basically, all the objectives you set out are right, robert. the problem is, you want to
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have your own laws to make the changes needed. you need the money. lam not changes needed. you need the money. i am not disagreeing. i am saying you have to get the priorities right. this is the greatest issue of our generation, about who governs us. our generation, about who governs us. the eu has never worked for us. you have made that point. there is another problem. there is no majority for the conservatives, they are working in a hung parliament. that restrained what they can do for domestic policy. with the snap election manifesto, some ideas weren't popular, they had to be the end. the core of government plans has been stripped out. brexit is the most obvious thing to replace it. all this talk about... hang on. about finding a new leader,
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theissueis hang on. about finding a new leader, the issue is i don't think that the main things won't change. even with a more charismatic leader, the issue is there is no majority. it is true we don't have a big majority, that is a constraint. if the prime minster had said these are the prime minster had said these are the five things i want to change for our country, i will do everything i said whenl our country, i will do everything i said when i got into downing street, evenif said when i got into downing street, even if we lose votes in parliament, it doesn't matter because the public would see us doing the right thing. let us make the argument, stand up for all the things we believe in, skills, housing, nhs, cost of living, socialjustice, skills, housing, nhs, cost of living, social justice, and skills, housing, nhs, cost of living, socialjustice, and go out there. i would say one thing, the last thing the country needs isjeremy corbyn and his government. that is another factor we haven't mentioned.
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in this context with brexit and these options, it is important we focus on the kind of things robert is mentioning but also with a slender majority, it is true, the fa ct slender majority, it is true, the fact is we have to stick together in order to be able to deliver it. but it is not working. we have seen, three sides of the party is arguing. argument is one thing, votes is another. almost every week we seem to be having conversations about whether theresa may can survive. that can only go for a period because it is distracting. the sorry thing is it can go on for a long time. rob has won groundhog day, this is the second. the alternatives is undesirable. it is the lack of discipline, people calling for philip hammond to be sacked. it
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seems to be theresa may doesn't have control of her cabinet. i understand control of her cabinet. iunderstand in control of her cabinet. i understand in the context of the westminster bubble that is the case but when it comes to votes we have been winning all the time, consistently. that demonstrates the fa ct consistently. that demonstrates the fact when push comes to shove, we are having arguments, it would be surprising in this context if there weren't differences. but i think a grown—up approach is to concentrate on getting things sorted out. my european scrutiny committee is looking at the transition period. let us have a grown—up discussion. it involves a lot of differences. thank you. a 12—year—old girl is in custody after a shooting at a school in los angeles injuring five people. it's thought that the girl fired the gun accidentally. we'll have an update
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from a reporter in la before 10. a boy was shot in the head and is described as critical but stable. brenda gazza from the los angeles news has been following the story. we know a 12—year—old girl was arrested on thursday and she was booked for negligent discharge of a firearm. after two students were shot at this middle school in central los angeles. all students who were wounded by gunfire, won a 15—year—old boy shot in the temple. he, miraculously, is going to be ok, they believe, and another girl who was shot in the wrist. a classroom at this middle school called salvador castro middle school. both we re salvador castro middle school. both were taken to hospital and is thought they will —— both are going
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to survive and they will be fine, which is great news, and we know that the girls take into account a juvenile facility, booked on suspicion of negligently discharging a firearm, meaning they don't believe it was intentional, and she is expected to be charged soon. three other people were injured with minor injuries, they were not shot, including two children, and we are waiting for details about how this 12—year—old girl was able to get this garden, how she got it, how she was able to bring an on—campus. that was going to be my next question.
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is it clear whether it was the girl who brought the gun into the school or whether the gun was somebody else's in the school? at this time, we do not know where she got the gun. it's a great question, how she got the gun. it isn't clear at this point. we are still waiting to hear from authorities exactly where she got it and how she brought it on campus. i was reading a little bit earlier on, there were some reports suggesting from a student who was in the classroom at the time, that the girl had thought the weapon was a toy gun. if that something that you've also heard? i saw that same television report of a little boy being interviewed, saying that they all thought it was a toy gun. authorities have not commented on that yet, at least to us, so at this stage we do not know. but the fact that she was booked for negligent discharge of a firearm could mean anything, so we are waiting to hear. it's very possible that she did think it was a toy gun but we don't know that for sure. we only had one child at this point on television saying that.
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and the details of the gun. this was a handgun, was it? that's right. it was some kind of firearm. i'm sorry, i don't have the details on exactly what kind of gun it was. just remind people here in the uk — to hear that a 12—year—old girl has by accident shot people in a school is so shocking for us, but we of course know that the number of shootings that sadly happen at schools in the us, this is sadly a problem that is lived with in your country day in, day out. yes, unfortunately, it seems we are hearing these incidents more and more. in fact, this was reported to be the 14th school shooting so far this year in the us, which seems very shocking since we have only had a month of the year so far. because of course it is notjust schools we are talking about, we are talking about university and college campuses. this seems like a widespread problem, isn't it, in the us? it does seem that way. every time there is a mass shooting, whether it's at a school,
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campus or in a mall, it does renew the gun debate, so i'm expecting that will happen again. and whether any significant gun control legislation will be introduced remains to be seen. that was brenda gazzar speaking to mea that was brenda gazzar speaking to me a little earlier on from la. larry nassar — the former gymnastics coach who has been exposed as a prolific paedophile. his victims have said they're "overwhelmed by the truth of his abuse." nassar gave medical treatment to hundreds of girls and abused and manipulated them. there are now more than 265 victims. questions remain over whether the gymnastic world allowed into continuing that allowed him to continue abusing. questions remain whether the gymnastics world
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allowed him to continue abusing and whether his victims were not believed. many are now suing nassar and the other institutions they accuse of ignoring early allegations. i would like to say something to my abuser, larry nassar. you took advantage of my innocence and trust. you were my doctor. why? i ask myself that question all the time, especially while i'm lying in bed crying myself to sleep. what you did to me was twisted. you manipulated me and my entire family. how dare you? no one should ever do that and if they do, you should tell someone. well, larry, i'm here, not to tell someone but to tell everyone. he's going to jail for the rest of his life we on the other hand are going to move forward. we are going to live our best lives because we are fighters and we are strong. well, rajini vaidyanathan has been following the trial for us. she explained why larry nassar was back in court again. yes, well, basically this is the second sentencing hearing, because he pled guilty to seven counts in one county and then three counts in another. that's why there are two different sentencing hearings, but the total number of women
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who now say that they were sexually abused by larry nassar is a staggering 265, i think, so it has certainly gone up since the first sentencing hearing i was at in lansing, michigan, just over a week ago, where there were just over 150 women who came forward sharing their story. so it really is staggering, and of course they believe that that number could be farfar higher. rajini, i know you have followed this case so closely. you sat through so many of those incredibly brave and powerful testimonies by those women, who werejust children at the time of the abuse. for people who haven't followed it as closely as you, give us a sense of some of those stories and the bravery of those women. well, i think what was really outstanding being in the court is at the beginning of this sentencing hearing... so larry nassar had already pled guilty to seven counts in that particular case of child — criminal sexual conduct, should say — and so as part of the sentencing hearing, at the beginning about 90 women said that they were going to deliver
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testimony sharing their stories as part of that sentencing process, but by the end of it 156 women came forward. day by day in the court room more women said, "no, i want to with my anonymity, i want to share my story." but what is so unusual about all of this is it is very rare to see survivors of sexual abuse with their anonymity, first of all, and second of all stand in court, and then stand in court only a few meters away from the man who abused them. let's talk now to casey copp — he is a student at michigan state university and has been leading protests against the staff there about how the survivors have been treated. we were also top to wreck who has been following the case for michigan public radio —— we will also speak to rick pluter, who has been following the case for michigan public radio. first of all, casey, say something
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about the gravity that has her —— the gravity of what has happened. yes, a lot of these people at the university were highly respected and a lot of people trusted them, and with each detail that comes out it seems to be that everyone was acting very inappropriately, and it is very u nfortu nate very inappropriately, and it is very unfortunate because we have all kind of just been devastated unfortunate because we have all kind ofjust been devastated with each day of these trials, something new comes out each day, and different media outlets find different scary details, and it hasjust been media outlets find different scary details, and it has just been very tense around here because each day we wa ke tense around here because each day we wake up expecting something you bad to come out about our university, and the administration has handled this whole case frankly very badly, so we as students have felt that we needed to rise up in whatever way we can assure the
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community that we stand with sexual assault survivors and we will not tolerate our university administration the case so poorly. rick, i want to bring un. it is worth pointing out our viewers in the uk that larry nassar was a former university of michigan physician and that is why it has affected the university so much. is there a sense of your reporting in there a sense of your reporting in the story that many people were turning a blind eye, or they simply didn't know that it was going on? yes, the issue here, and there are multiple investigations, and we have a state attorney general investigation, we are expecting congressional hearings, there are lots of other inquiries going on, and the issue here isn't so much that people seemed to know, but that people didn't ask questions after
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athletes who were patients of larry nassar complained that they had been molested, that they had been assaulted, and like you said turned assaulted, and like you said turned a blind eye. do you think that this isa game a blind eye. do you think that this is a game changer in sport now? that athletes will not only be protected more, but also believed, because that was a big thing, wasn't it? these girls, these young women, they we re these girls, these young women, they were not believed. an unanswerable question at this moment, but a critical one because that is what a lot of people are wondering, and not just at michigan state university but a lot of big universities and colleges, they are wondering whether or not this is going to be a change in sports culture where, you know, that high—ranking university officials have to be aware of what
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is happening because the issue here isn't whether or not people knew what was going on so much as whether or not they actually followed up when students, when patients complained. is that your view as well, casey? yes, because it has been proven that the university president knew about potential problems with doctor nassar two yea rs before problems with doctor nassar two years before he was eventually dismissed, and when those details come out that is when we, as students, have been demonstrating our very just students, have been demonstrating our veryjust anger at our administration's lack of doing anything regarding doctor nassar. but i think it is an important distinction that the president who has since resigned was not aware specifically about doctor nassar — she was that one of msu's doctors
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was being investigated, and what we don't know is why she didn't know specifically witch doctor, and why she wasn't informed, at least according to what we have been told so far —— with which doctor.” appreciate you both taking the time to speak to us, thank you. let's get the latest weather update — with simon king — called with the possibility of snow? yes, as you will see injust a moment there is an increasing threat of some snow —— cold with the possibility of some snow. some lovely sunrise pictures from our weather watchers and blue sky moments in staffordshire, abbot of cloud here and there, but on the hall for most of us this morning it has been dry and also fairly bright. we do have a few showers around and those are affecting eastern and western coasts but elsewhere they are few and far between.
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lincolnshire, perhaps at times in east anglia, the south—east, a few showers down here, and also cornwall. unlike yesterday where we had quite a few wintry showers into scotland, a much nicer afternoon in terms of more sunshine, drier weather, lighter winds. more terms of more sunshine, drier weather, lighterwinds. more in terms of more sunshine, drier weather, lighter winds. more in the way of cloud moving into northern ireland, making the sunshine here later on. we will see a bit more in the way of cloud across eastern areas as well. really for most of us lighter winds and temperatures about four, five, six celsius, and it might feel that little bit more pleasa nt might feel that little bit more pleasant out and about. through this evening and into the night, it will turn quite cold quite quickly with a bit of frost developing. out towards the west that band of rain will gradually push eastward. and as it does so it will start to turn to a bit of sleet and snow over the higher ground of scotland and northern england and we will have quite a complicated mixture of rain, sleet and snow during saturday and a lot of snow over higher ground even down to low levels for a time you
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can see wet snow, some sleet, and staying quite cloudy and wetter times, and it will feel cold throughout. drier weather on saturday across eastern areas. through into sunday, the weather front bringing that wet weather doesn't really move very far. it will stick around. it will weaken because it will be drier but we will have an easterly wind developing across south—eastern parts and that will bring in a few showers towards the far south—east of england, nothing too much at this stage but for most of us sunday is a dry day, brighter day towards northern and western parts but it will feel cold once again. i mentioned that easterly wind and that will still be with us through the early part of next week, then we have cold air coming in from the west as well. as you can see into mandy and next week, it will be cold, in fact colder than it is at the moment with that increasing risk of some snow and of course some overnight frost as well, so winter certainly isn't
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over yet. bye—bye. good morning. it's ten o'clock. here's annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. immunotherapy is seen as one of the most promising cancer treatments. we hear from most promising cancer treatments. we hearfrom one most promising cancer treatments. we hear from one patient most promising cancer treatments. we hearfrom one patient who most promising cancer treatments. we hear from one patient who says it saved her life. theresa may is on her way back from her three—day trade trip to china but what awaits her back home? she's under ever—increasing pressure from her own party to do a much betterjob of leading — we'll be speaking to tory mps. i'm not a quitter — i'm in this because there is a job to be done and that's delivering for the british people and the future prosperity of our countr and we'll hear from the heterosexual couple fighting for a civil partnership. they say it's not fair that's only available to same sex couples. the issue is being debated in the house of commons today — arrange their private sexual lives
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which we don't think is right. in many other groups where other civil rights types of cases came on programmes like this and said we want to live the lives we want, the question wouldn't be why do you want to do that, it would be how can we help you achieve that? here's annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. theresa may has attempted to brush off criticism of her leadership and approach to the brexit negotiations, insisting she will secure a deal with the eu that "delivers what the british people want." she was speaking at the end of a trip to china, during which questions about her future as prime minister have persisted. i have said very clearly i have served my country and my party.
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there is a job to deliver for the british people and do that in a way which ensures the future prosperity of our country. global britain is a real vision for the uk. people want a given —— want a government delivering around the world. our viewers see the tory party fighting amongst itself, how do you reassert your authority? iam doing reassert your authority? i am doing what the british people want, delivering on brexit. and ensuring we bring jobs back to britain. companies will be selling morejewish products as a result of this trip, more people will be in jobs. that is global britain in action. two army helicopters have crashed in southern france, killing at least five people. emergency services are still at the scene of the accident — which happened in the var region around 30 miles north—west of st tropez. both helicopters belonged to a military flying school, which trains pilots for the army and other military services. investigators say it's not clear
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what caused the crash. a man who carried out a far right terror attack driving a van into a crowd of muslim worshippers outside a mosque in north london is due to be sentenced today. darren osborne, from cardiff, ran down people outside the finsbury park mosque. he was convicted of murder and attempted murder yesterday at woolwich crown court. the number of men dying in the uk from prostate cancer has overtaken the number of women killed by breast cancer for the first time. the charity prostate cancer uk says advances in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer have paid off and similar benefits could be seen if more money was allocated to the fight against prostate cancer. health leaders have written to thejustice secretary urging him to reform the pay—out system for negligence claims against the nhs. they say the nhs would have to pay up to £65 billion if all current claims
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were successful. the government says it is looking at measures to control costs in such cases. the government is facing criticism for failing to implement adequate safeguards for children online. in 2008, the byron review, commissioned by gordon brown, put forward 38 recommendations on internet safety. the nspcc says fewer than half have been implemented. ministers say they are planning a voluntary code as part of their forthcoming internet safety strategy police investigating the death of hollywood star natalie wood 37 years ago say her husband robert wagner is being treated as a person of interest. the actress was found dead after going missing on a yacht off the coast of california. all 955 workers from a gold mine in south africa have been safely brought back to the surface. they had been trapped underground since wednesday night when a thunderstorm brought down power lines, cutting electricity to the mine's lifts. that's a summary of the latest bbc
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news, more at 10.30. we will be talking about civil partnerships, at the moment only available to same sex couple. we will hear from available to same sex couple. we will hearfrom one available to same sex couple. we will hear from one heterosexual couple who want the opportunity for a civil partnership. it is being discussed in the house of commons. diane says it is about time civil partnerships were made available to all couples. many couples want the right to acknowledge their commitment to each other. paul says he is a gay man in favour of civil partnerships for anyone who wa nts of civil partnerships for anyone who wants one. discrimination is discrimination. the only time i recall the majority being discriminated against. your thoughts are welcome. here's some sport now.
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a big weekend coming up. the 6—nation —— six nations is coming up. england head coach eddiejones has named his team the first match of their six nations title defence against italy in rome on sunday. worcester‘s ben te'o has been named at outside centre ahead ofjonathan joseph despite being out since mid—october with an ankle injury and not having played for england for almost a year. exeter forward alec hepburn is set to make his international debut from the bench. in tennis. great britain's men begin their davis cup campaign with a tie against spain on the clay courts of marbella. they'll be without the injured andy murray and kyle edmund and with dan evans suspended it means liam broady and cameron norrie will be flying the flag. you can watch the action right now on the bbc red button. second—placed chelsea missed the chance to go to the top of the women's super league last night, but they did end leaders manchester city's perfect start to the season.
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the match ended in a goalless draw so not much action for new boss phil neville to mull over but he was concerned to see his goalkeeper city's karen bardsley hurt after a heavy fall, she was taken off on a stretcherjust two minutes into the game. she has gone off to hospital to be checked, she has a little bit of pain in her arm and shoulders but she is talking and she seems ok and in good spirits. we will trust the medical team to carry on from there. the excitement of the start of the super league season proved too much for some last night, grand final winners leeds rhinos made the trip to warrington wolves whose captain chris hill — here on the left — had to leave the game early after his wife went into labour. unfortunately, hill was absent as england winger ryan hall provided the highlight with two tries on the night, helping leeds to a 16—12 win on the night. elsewhere, hull fc began their campaign with a six—try win over huddersfield.
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lee westwood has fired his best round 15 years for a share of the lead after the second round at the malaysian open. he landed 11 birdies ina ten malaysian open. he landed 11 birdies in a ten under 62 including this on the eighth hole. one shot behind the leader who is on 11 under. there was disppointment this morning for one of england world cup player of the tournament tammy beaumont made 50, but she was on the losing side in the women's big bash semifinal. the sydney sixers beat the adelaide strikers by 17 runs to set up a repeat of last years final against the perth scorchers. earlier, we talked about the rise of prostate cancer and how it's overtaken breast cancer to become the uk's third deadliest cancer. but now we're going to talk about
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something called immunothera py. it's seen as one the most promising forms of cancer treatment and involves using the body's own immune system to kill cancer cells. but it's still a very new treatment, and is only available to patients with specific types of cancer. so should it be made more widely available? let's talk now to dr christian ottensmeir who has just run a successful global trial using immunotherapy at southampton university. and to charlotte moss who was treated as part of the trial. you were diagnosed with skin cancer, melanoma. you were given just a 20% chance of survival? that is right. i initially was diagnosed in 2011. i had a number of biopsies and procedures. at that stage, i had found out the
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chemotherapy and radiotherapy want going to be effective. i was 35 and given a 20% chance of survival. that really completely shook my world. com pletely really completely shook my world. completely devastating. then i met a wonderful professor who saved my life! it is as simple as that? it is. the clinical trial i was invited to, it was such a clever solution, to use your own was such a clever solution, to use yourown immune was such a clever solution, to use your own immune system to help attack the cancer cells. i had found out there was a lot of cancer cells that had spread everywhere. not knowing where they may be, where they may realtor, was a huge worry. —— wrecker. this treatment gave me so much hope. how does this work? we know that in
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many patients, the immune system is still trying to attack the cancer. this wakes up the sleeping immune cells and make them realise there is something going on they need to be active against. we know if the immune system is trying and you can wa ke immune system is trying and you can wake it up, immunotherapy works well. what the puzzle is to work out whether in those patients where it doesn't work we can overcome the sleepiness in other ways. immunotherapy in this trial was the first really big step towards understanding this kind of approach can make cancer better, and now we need to work on how we can make that available to other patients. before we talk about the patient it didn't work in i was reading about a
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woman called abbey the trial, her story is equally interesting. abbey suffered from a cancer that was in normal terms at the end of the road. we thought she might not survive beyond this. giving her the kind of immunotherapy charlotte had but adding in a second drug, both of which are now licensed in the nhs, turned the disease around. within a few weeks, from being what we thought might be death's door, she felt entirely well. the real excitement for the team came when we did the first big follow—up scan which was clear. all of us, a team of four doctors, in large team looking after patients, had a merry dance of happiness at the result of the scan. extraordinary when these
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situations change dramatically. what is the treatment? is it a tablet? chemotherapy, radiotherapy?m is the treatment? is it a tablet? chemotherapy, radiotherapy? it was very simple. i went into hospital on a friday morning. it was an infusion, 90 minutes, straightforward. the worst part was getting the cannula in. i rested at the weekend and went back to work on monday. a really simple treatment. no side—effects? they were minimal. my no side—effects? they were minimal. my skin became more sensitive, my pitchers treat grand was effected so i need treatment with cortisone. this is an expensive treatment, £200,000 per patient? for a cash—strapped nhs, that is difficult. that is the problem. if we could work out who to treat and who will
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benefit, that would rationalise the use of resources. and work out who we would not make bill by treating them unnecessarily, that would be a big thing —— make ill. science is going ina big thing —— make ill. science is going in a direction of figuring out who other people most likely to benefit and treat those. then the treatment becomes a sensible investment. in half the patients in this trial, it didn't work? for the trial for charlotte, we don't really know about the individual because it was ina know about the individual because it was in a group of patients that had cancer removed by surgery and the patients were treated either with immunotherapy or a placebo. patients were treated either with immunotherapy ora placebo. it patients were treated either with immunotherapy or a placebo. it is only by looking at the different groups treated, the ones that received the control as well, that we note the drug makes a difference. the overall survival difference is
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relatively small. but when we use this drug in patients with recurrent disease, and in accommodation, we make half the patients better. and you are cancer free? it has been seven yea rs. and you are cancer free? it has been seven years. the scans are thank you so much for coming on and sharing your experiences. since the gay marriage law was passed in the uk, gay couples have been able to chose whether to get married or have a civil partnership. but straight couples can only get married. some say that's unfair, and there are some straight couples who say they'd prefer to have civil partnership and would like that choice. the issue is now being fought both in parliament and in the courts to equalise the law and make it the same for everyone. this week there's been some suggestion that the government is backtracking on the issue. this morning, the mp tim loughton will be trying to get a bill through parliament to
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force ministers to look again at the issue. earlier i spoke to him alongside martin and claire. they've been together for 26 years and would like to have a civil partnership. i started by asking why the couple felt marriage wasn't right for them. for me, marriage still is a sort of patriarchal institution, as we are finding out today. you don't have the mother's name on the marriage licence. it still has the connotations of the father giving away the daughter as a sort of piece of chattel, and married has come of chattel, and marriage has come an awfully long way since then, of course, but when we first met and when i was growing up that was my sense of marriage, so i've never felt it's for me, and what i'm looking for now is a purely legal recognition of our long relationship and our family status. tim, explain to us why you picked up on this issue and why you brought this to parliament? i think this is a really good example. there are three reasons.
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one, there is an inequality that was created by extending marriage to same—sex couples because same—sex couples, quite rightly, can get married now, can have a civil partnership. if you're an opposite sex couple you can only get married, and if married isn't right for you, for a whole range of reasons, as claire says, then you're just not recognised in the eyes of the law. you're a cohabiting couple without any rights, despite the fact you might have been together for 26 years and have children. that can't be right. secondly, the whole issue about having no rights at all. people think there is such a thing as a common—law wife or husband. there isn't, and you find out the hard way when somebody dies or somebody does a runner, and all of a sudden you have tax bills, and you don't have legal rights to property and things like that, and there's also the whole issue around family stability. also the whole issue i mean, i was a children's minister before — i want to see anything that has stable families and children brought up in stable families. it works in marriage. we have 3.2 million cohabiting couples, over half of whom have children, and if we gave them that label stability and recognition and protection, they are more
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likely to stay together, which is better for children, so it's a real bonus. so why can't we adapt? marriage and families takes many different forms in the modern world, and this is one of them, and we should make sure everybody has the opportunity. martin, you have actually had civil partnership on the isle of man? yes, that's right. and you were telling me about the ceremony — bits of the marriage were crossed out to make it adapt? well, yes, claire and me, we were the first heterosexual couple who live in mainland britain to go to the isle of man, which is the only place in the british isles now where you can get a heterosexual civil partnership, and it has been for about 18 months. and, yes, it was quite interesting that they went through the steps beforehand with us, and it was clear they were actually using the process for doing a marriage in a registry office, but applying it to civil partnership, so it wasjust understandable teething troubles as they added silver partnership to marriage. but in terms of the point, for us, we have been together
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for 26 years and we have to make teenage children. our relationship's working pretty well, and we don't feel the need to change that just to get, if you like, sort of stamp of approval from the state in writing through marriage that our relationship in the eyes of other people is on a sound basis. we just seek a legal footing for things like pension rights, inheritance rights, children protection and so on, and so many other couples like us do. and many people would absolutely understand why you want that security, particularly for your family, but people watching this may well say, why not just well say, why notjust have a civil marriage? you don't have to get married in a church, nowadays it can be quite flexible, you can get married outside, where you like, you don't have to have someone giving you away. that is true. why not go to that option? it is not so much the religious objection, but it is still an institution where we don't really feel we need
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to be part of it, and for us to get married now, having been together for 26 years, just for a sort of technical expediency, if anything i would say that would devalue marriage even more. that isn't the same with a civil partnership? there are issues on fidelity, consternation of marriage, all sorts of aspects that still are part of a sort of legal marriage contract that we don't want to have imposed upon us. dave mowat hasn't been consummated it is not valid —— is a marriage has not been consummate it is not valid and can be dissolved for reasons of adultery so the state is having a comment on how people arrange their private sexual lives which we don't think is right. in many other groups with civil rights type of cases they came on programmes like this and said we just want to live the lives the way we want to. the question is not why do you want to do that, but how can we help you achieve that? we see inclusion on all sorts of gender and politics issues and we wonder why we can't be included to organise our
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lives the way we want to. and it is all but a genuine partnership. that is why they are called civil partners. for many a marriage is not a partnership. i don't necessarily... really? i don't necessarily... really? i don't necessarily agree, but not on equal terms. the patriotic society... why isa terms. the patriotic society... why is a marriage not on equal terms? because of the institution of marriage, right back to the fact that the mother's name is not on the marriage certificate, which is what we are trying to change as well. it is still seen in patriotic or terms, not a proper partnership. i don't necessarily agree with that view but there are many couples who do and for them marriage is not the route they want to take, and as i said families take very different shapes and sizes in this day and age and this is a way of giving stability and security and protection to loving couples who have been together for a long time who have children, but have no recognition and no protection in the eyes of the law, and that isjust crazy in this
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day and age. yes, it can't go on and on the last couple of days this sort of outpouring of emotion and support for what tim has tried to do on the facebook page, on the campaign for equal civil partnerships, our facebook page, our website, equal civil partnerships, our facebook page, ourwebsite, it equal civil partnerships, our facebook page, our website, it has been alive with comments trying to support tim with the bill he is bringing forward today, so there is huge support for that. let's talk about that bill. it had got so far with the government and looked like it would go through and there are now concerns since the cabinet reshuffle that that is not the case? yes, it is quite complicated, the minister in charge of qualities who gave me her support, then there was a reshuffle so all the ministers responsible changed so i have had to start all over again. the home office is being a bit cautious, and therefore they
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are saying, 0k, we will now look at it again but we further consultation and studies. that is frustrating, but at the end of the day we all know there is a place for civil partnerships. the court case going through as well i think will make that absolutely clear that the government will have to do something about that so i think the government will come round to this. we are just going to have to go through a few more extra hoops to do it. the case for civil partnerships now is a strong now as it has ever been and we have to get on with it.” strong now as it has ever been and we have to get on with it. i would just make the point that civil partnerships clearly exist already in this country for same—sex couples so what we are asking and campaigning for is not a special change of the lawjust to sit us. we just want to join in change of the lawjust to sit us. we just want tojoin in an change of the lawjust to sit us. we just want to join in an institution that has been around for another group of society since 2004. and in other countries, in france and south africa at the fibres for years. in france there are some evidence that of same—sex partnerships, fewer end in divorce than marriages. before we
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let you go, tim i want to ask you as a conservative mp, your reflections on theresa may's week, lots of discussion about whether now is the time for her to step aside, under a lot of pressure over brexit. what is your view? i'm not sure how we got from civil partnerships to theresa may! laughter just before you go, it seems fair to as you well you're here. if she is going to support this measure, absolutely, she needs to get on with the job of running the country and getting brexit sorted out, and i am not somebody who says, oh, yes, let's have another leadership competition. let's stop all the speculation and get behind the prime minister. she has a really important job to do, she will be back from china soon and carrying on with it, and i have an importantjob to do to make sure this anachronism in the law doesn't carry on any more and we get civil partnerships extended to couples like martin and claire without having to go to the isle of
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man. you have been sharing your thoughts on this drove the morning. from karen. isupport thoughts on this drove the morning. from karen. i support civil partnerships for all. one question is why the marriage certificates have not yet been changed to include mothers' details, point made in that discussion. if you have two mums, who goes on the certificate? civil partnerships certainly have space for both parents. police in the united states say the actor robert wagner is now being treated as a "person of interest" in an investigation into the death in 1981 of his wife, the hollywood star natalie wood. the actress was found dead in the water off the coast of california after going missing from her family yacht, the splendour. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba is here. a person of interest, lizo. what does that actually mean? it doesn't necessarily mean he is a suspect. what it means is the police are interested in talking to him because they feel he may, knowingly or unknowingly, have further information that hasn't been brought
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into the public domain or into the investigation into what happened exactly investigation into what happened exa ctly o n investigation into what happened exactly on the night when natalie wood died and was found drowned off the coast of california, so obviously the police say they are very keen to speak to robert wyatt now because they feel he could shed light on this, could help move things forward —— robert wagner. this has for many people been an unsolved death although it was ruled as accidental. what do we know about what happened ? as accidental. what do we know about what happened? we know that they we re what happened? we know that they were on a boat, robert wagner and natalie wood, big stars, he's the star of hart to hart, she of west side story, along with actor christopher walken, and she was found floating off the coast of california, dead, and wagner said he only realised she had gone missing when he searched the boat for her. it is thought she may have fallen off the boat trying to get into a
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dengue. that is what we know. further allegations have come since —— into ourdinghy. further allegations have come since —— into our dinghy. many years later the captain of the boat said robert wagner had had an argument with her, and other witnesses have come forward attesting to what seems to be an argument between the two of them and the police obviously think thatis them and the police obviously think that is worth expiring. also, the postmortem photographs from the original investigation have been re—examined by the police. they said at the time what was thought to be consistent with her accidentally falling into the water, they feel that now could be more consistent with some kind of physical altercation which of course is alive and they will want to investigate as well, so what has come out of this, nobody is sure what has happened at the moment, from the police force in california, but they think there are questions worth pursuing in case while it can be shed on what happened that night in 1981. thanks
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for dropping by, lizo, and updating us on for dropping by, lizo, and updating us on that story. still to come: hundreds of south african miners who've been trapped underground since wednesday have been rescued. we'll bring you the latest from our correspondent in johannesburg. and keeping cool under pressure — meghan markle laughs off a right royal mix up at an awards ceremony last night. we will show you what happened for the end of the programme. time for the latest news — here's annita theresa may insists she's delivering what british people want on brexit, and setting out a clear vision to the rest of the world. she was speaking at the end of a trip to china during which questions about her future as prime minister have continued. it is important we deliver what people want, control of our money, border and laws. i have shown how we can ensure we actually want ——
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enhance our trade with the rest of the world. it is good forjobs in britain. a man who carried out a far right terror attack driving a van into a crowd of muslim worshippers outside a mosque in north london is due to be sentenced today. darren osborne, 48, from cardiff, ran down people outside the finsbury park mosque. he was convicted of murder and attempted murder yesterday at woolwich crown court. two army helicopters have crashed in southern france, killing at least five people. emergency services are still at the scene of the accident which happened in the var region around 30 miles north—west of st tropez. both helicopters belonged to a military flying school which trains pilots for the army and other military services. investigators say it's not clear what caused the crash. staying in france, and the french interior minister has visited calais following violent clashes between migrants. gerard collomb says he will review the security situation there.
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four eritrean migrants are in a critical condition after being shot during clashes with afghan asylum—seekers. another 18 people were injured during the violence. a 33—year—old woman has been arrested in derby on suspicion of arson in connection with a huge fire at nottingham railway station last month. at its peak, ten fire crews were called to tackle the blaze, which caused extensive damage to the station. here's some sport now with hugh. england head coach eddiejones has named his team the first match of their six nations title defence against italy in rome on sunday. worcester‘s ben te'o has been named at outside centre ahead ofjonathan joseph despite being out since mid—october with an ankle injury and not having played for england for almost a year. exeter forward alec hepburn is set to make his international debut from the bench. in tennis. great britain's men begin their davis cup campaign with a tie against spain
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on the clay courts of marbella. they'll be without the injured andy murray and kyle edmund and with dan evans suspended it means liam broady and cameron norrie will be flying the flag. you can watch the action right now on the bbc red button. second—placed chelsea missed the chance to go to the top of the women's super league last night, but they did end leaders manchester city's perfect start to the season. the match ended in a goalless draw so not much action for new boss a man who carried out a far right terror attack driving a van into a crowd of muslim worshippers outside a mosque in north london is due to be sentenced today. darren osborne, 48, from cardiff, ran down people outside the finsbury park mosque. he was convicted of murder and attempted murder yesterday at woolwich crown court. someone has just run over a whole
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load of people. he ran over a lot of people. it isa it is a big fan. he hasjust run over everyone. angus crawford is outside woolwich crown court, take us through what is happening today? this was as the positives and pointed out in no uncertain terms and act of terrorism by a man who was in effect on a suicide mission. darren osborne we heard described as a loner, if rationing alcoholics, with years of mental health problems, he said he would attempt suicide in the months before the attack. he showed no contrition in court, no reaction yesterday when thejury handed court, no reaction yesterday when the jury handed its verdict of guilty of murder and attempted murder. thejury was guilty of murder and attempted
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murder. the jury was sent outjust before 3pm. less than an hour later they came back with their verdict. today we will hear mitigation from his defence barrister. his defence in court was described by the prosecution as absurd. darren osborne has said a man called dave, he couldn't give his surname, was actually driving the van on the night into the crowd of muslim men. while darren osborne was in the foot well of the vehicle. we will have defence mitigation speech this morning, then some information about his background, his previous convictions. he had a history of violence and alcoholism. later, the judge will give sentence on darren osborne. it's time to bring you up to date on the trial of former football coach barry bennell.
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it emerged yesterday that the 64—year—old has chosen not to take the stand and give evidence in his defence. our reporterjim reed has been following the trial. as you said mr bennell, who is a former coach linked to manchester city and crewe alexandra football clubs, is facing 48 counts of historical sexual abuse in this trial. he denies those charges. yesterday morning, the prosecution case concluded. mr bennell‘s barrister, eleanor laws, then said she would be calling no evidence on behalf of the defence. which means that mr bennell himself will not be called to testify in court. the judge then asked her if she'd warned her client that the jury may "draw such inferences as they see properfrom this". she replied that she had. the trial then will continue on monday with closing statements from both the prosecution and the defence. summing up by thejudge is expected
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to start on tuesday next week. as i said at the start, mr bennell is facing 48 counts of historic abuse against 11 boys, which he denies. still to come: we hear from the family of a prisoner who was stabbed to death in wormwood scrubs in west london who say he had complained to them about violence in the jail in the days before he was attacked. four men have been arrested. video game addiction is to be listed asa video game addiction is to be listed as a mental health disorder that the first time. ian, not his real name, was addicted to video games 26 years but has been clean for three years. he says he lost his job, but has been clean for three years. he says he lost hisjob, family, due to his obsession. more than 950 workers who were trapped underground
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in a gold mine in south africa have been rescued. they had been stuck in the mine since a power cut struck on wednesday night. south africa is a leading gold producer, but safety in the industry is often questioned. our correspondent has been following events in johannesburg. they our correspondent has been following events injohannesburg. they were trapped because of a power cut? correct. there was a severe storm on wednesday night which led to a power cut in the region which meant they could be brought back to the surface using the lift. on the side of it, the mine says the power generators failed, the worst outcome for them. there was no way to bring them to the surface until this morning when power was restored. we understand they have been taken to nearby
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hospitals for examination and no serious injuries have been reported. what were conditions like down there, they were there for 24 hours to mark correct, they were there for nearly 30 hours. they were being brought water, and food. there were concerned that some of the miners who had medical conditions that needed chronic medication and were able to receive that. for the most part, we understood —— understand they had air circulation, but they have been traumatised and that needs to be assessed. how were they brought to the surface? was it about power being restored or was there a different route? it was power restored. overnight, people on social media were calling on the power company to intervene,
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to prioritise returning power specifically. with the concern the miners had already been there for too long and they wanted them brought to the surface. at 3am local time power was returned and rescue workers were able to go down to the mind to bring them up with the lists. that if speaking to us. the mother of a man stabbed to death in wormwood scrubs prison says she thought he was in a "safe place". khader saleh died from his injuries after being attacked on wednesday. four inmates have been arrested on suspicion of murder. speaking exclusively to the bbc, said yusuf said his 25—year—old brother had told him he feared for his life while in the prison. she was devastated yesterday. we we re she was devastated yesterday. we were not here with her at that time to give her support. did she understand, was she on her
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own? she was with one cousin who was translating for half. if you asked your mum how she feels, ican if you asked your mum how she feels, i can see she is emotionally quite distressed. how does she feel now with the loss of her son? probably if i asked her she will be crying, to be honest. she is really in... in very bad feeling for her loss, and our loss as well. in terms of your brother... and she felt he would be in a safe place which was prison. if he was outside and we heard the news, probably we would think, we think
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when someone is inside prison, he will be safe enough not to be killed in that way. very difficult view. in of your brother, the people who didn't know him. he was 25. he was involved in drugs, you mentioned. but he was on remand, waiting for trial. and this happened. when was the last time you spoke to your brother or saw him? we spoke to him four days ago before he got killed. because a phone was smuggled in, so that is probably the same way they smuggle in nice. he spoke to us and was in a bad situation. guards were there but not looking
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after him. he was afraid for his life inside the jail. and a month ago, he had a fight inside the prison with other groups. have the police told you anything about what happened yesterday afternoon? the police. they have told us they have opened two areas. every area has about 140 prisoners. there were not a lot of guards around. they said he was talking to three other people. they went into a different cell, not his cell, and they locked the door, they said. these things we re the door, they said. these things were within five minutes. or they heard was the alarm of that cell,
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then they started getting the gods around to see what the issue was. —— the prison guards. did they tell you what happened?m is still under investigation. how'd you feel in terms of your brother saying before he was worried about his safety and feeling powerless to do anything but mark what you want to say to the prison and prison service? what i want to say is they have to create a safe environment, not only for us but for all the prisoners in their cell. they should have extra guards, certain time to send the people somewhere, not leaving all those people in the same place, definitely. if anyone is carrying any weapon or anything, something will happen. and the other thing is how they get to smuggle most of these things inside is really
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annoying. when we go to visit him, we feel the high security officers and everything, so i'm just surprised how these kind of weapons are going into the jail. and it was are going into the jail. and it was a knife? metal blade, the police told us, he was stabbed with seven times. are shocked they were able to get a blade into the prison? to be honest, i was shocked at the beginning, but in a way when i feel the smuggle other things, i thought there might be a link between... i don't know who or how they get these things inside, but it is really annoying when you feel someone inside the prison. if it was outside, you can understand, someone can carry a blade or anything outside, but inside the prison, with this high security, getting weapons like this inside, really feels bad. how do you want to remember your brother, in terms of what do you remember mostly about him? he has a
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child? he was a young man trying to move on with his life. he got married recently, he had a son. he was aiming to move to a different area than london because of the trouble and everything around. that was his plan. he ended up in the wrong place, but as i said we were waiting for him to come outside and then we were going to help him to move outside and find his life. but getting killed in that way, it's really shocking for us, the family. he leaves behind his wife and his child, children? yes, he left behind a wife and one child. the child is going to be two years old on the 15th of february. and obviously the mum is too traumatised to talk about it? yes, he was her younger son. the younger son, you always have a
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different feeling, than all of us, so it is the biggest loss for our mother. and us as well. do you think you will pursue a case against the prison? definitely, we have to, not only for us but for the safety of all the others. inside that prison. and we will talk for our loss in that way, and probably we will have to fight and find out how these weapons are getting into the jail, and why they don't separate the people are put enough guards around the whole place. that was khader saleh‘s family speaking exclusively to the bbc. earlier we heard how for the first in the men from prostate cancer has overtaken the number of women dying from breast cancer, which makes prostate cancer of the third biggest killer in the uk
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behind lung and bowel cancer. figures revealed thatjust over 11,800 men die in the uk from prostate cancer every year, and the charity is calling for the same resources as breast cancer. early i spoke with a man diagnosed back in 2014. phil kissi, who was diagnosed in 2014, recovered, and we heard from catherine who lost her husband in 2011, and from caroline, a co nsulta nt in 2011, and from caroline, a consultant who works in the field.” think one of the difficulties is that not everybody has symptoms. as we heard from phil, some people just get there blood tests done and find out. i think we need get there blood tests done and find out. ithink we need more get there blood tests done and find out. i think we need more of a message for men at high risk, so black men and men with a history of
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family cancer should get tested earlier. the other difficulty is the tests that we used to use ten, 15 years ago, they were not as accurate as the tests we have today, so there is really good news that we have more accurate tests including mri that people can come forward and get. for you, catherine, to lose your husband, were you aware of prostate cancer? was your husband we re prostate cancer? was your husband were before the diagnosis? very vaguely, and exactly the same as this gentleman here, he sort of use to get up in the night. we have an ensuite bathroom so hardly woke up when used to do that. but we went to stay in a big old cranky house where the toilet was two flight up and it was december with snow outside, and i suddenly realised he was getting up i suddenly realised he was getting up three times in the night with freezing cold feet, and i marched into the doctor the next day. our gp was very good. had a handwritten note through the door two days later
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with a hospital appointment. at which point the warning bells went off back in my head, and it was picked up very quickly, it was quite aggressive, and it was downhill from there, but a little bit late year, we had a very positive outlook on it, and we just got on with living life in the fast lane, i think. and important for you now to get the message out there for men. because i guess one of the problems, and maybe iam being guess one of the problems, and maybe i am being unfair and you can correct me if i am, blokes are not so good at talking about anything thatis so good at talking about anything that is vaguely internet, about emotion orfeeling that is vaguely internet, about emotion or feeling worried? i think you're dead right. it is the macho image, oh, that is not the sort of thing that i talk about, but i think as the public get to know more and more about the information on prostate cancer, they know that if you go to your doctor, get tested early, you could be one of those people that are saved today, and i think that's the message we have to
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get out there. early testing, and we need more research, and talking about more research, we are doing a campaign in march, men to march, and it is in glasgow, nottingham, bristol, london, manchester. and we wa nt bristol, london, manchester. and we want people to sign up to this. it is 2k, 4k 10k. want people to sign up to this. it is 2k, 4k10k. it want people to sign up to this. it is 2k, 4k 10k. it is so important we get funds to do more around the prostate cancer agenda and programmes like this give us that platform to speak to the general viewers. kevin, what do you make of that? absolutely right. i have a lwa ys that? absolutely right. i have always wore my heart on my sleeve so iam one always wore my heart on my sleeve so i am one of the people who are quite happy to talk about things, as my friends know. so i am absolutely honest about it, and there are no questions that are bad questions. a great story for me, a client of mine at work who are used to talk to quite a lot went a bit quiet on me andi
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quite a lot went a bit quiet on me and i thought, oh, maybe it was a surprise for them when i had prostate cancer, and later he phoned me up and said he had read one of my blogs, he had symptoms, went to the doctor, had prostate cancer, and because he went early he was cured and he felt that he couldn't phone me up because i was going to die, but i said to make me feel i have done something good on this planet, it is actually an amazing feeling, so don't be shy about it. and i hope he talks about it to a lot of men, and adjoining up, the marchers and things, it makes a massive difference. people often think there's a man's disease, but ask my wife and kids. it is absolutely terrible for them. they have to watch me go downhill and deal with it afterwards, for worse for them i think. i think that is why, as a female, it is just think. i think that is why, as a female, it isjust as important for us to bang the drum, and perhaps because we are more able to chat about these things. the number of people at dinner parties, the men i have sat next to. i don't get
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invited any more! laughter but it is what we have to do. we have been sent so many messages from people getting in touch about this. an e—mailfrom people getting in touch about this. an e—mail from sharon, people getting in touch about this. an e—mailfrom sharon, "my father was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2007. 11 years on he is still under what the nhs call watchful waiting. in other words, his cancer is still within the prostate and requires for intervention at this time. my issue with this approach is that dad's cancer has changed during this time, that his reviews have been cancelled or postponed. i worry that with an ever straining nhs he will fall through the net and it will fall through the net and it will be too late for him". presumably your worry as much as the people affected by the disease personally? it is about funding as much as awareness? that's right. once a man comes forward for testing we want to make sure he's able to get the most effective tests, wherever he is in the country. and that that is not differing by hospital or by which consultant you see, but that we have national
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standards for doing the best tests. ijust want standards for doing the best tests. i just want to read a standards for doing the best tests. ijust want to read a couple more m essa g es ijust want to read a couple more messages before we speak about your ultra marathons which are quite incredible. mick has got in touch via text. he was diagnosed in march 2016, no symptoms as such. caught early enough, he had keyhole surgery and turned himself very lucky, also due to the diligence of his doctor and he will be ever grateful. roger's e—mail to say he was diagnosed back in 2013. aggressive, invasive prostate cancer. his psa count was 1741, astronomically high. no classic symptoms, not frequently going to the loo, have been taking medication and numbers are
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controlled. he says he is leading a normal retired life, just get a bit tired, "but i am 71 is probably not all that surprising." that was the discussion we had earlier on and you have been sharing your experiences throughout the morning of prostate cancer. ronald said he felt uncomfortable and went to the doctor, he examined by prostate and thought it was ok but took a psa. thewhich showed a high psa. the hospital confirmed prostate cancer with a biopsy. i was told the options open to me have it removed, best decision i ever made. men should not be embarrassed to see their doctor on this matter. i am clear at the moment. and you will love this... things didn't quite go to plan when meghan markle was attending her latest official event as a royal financee. she acted cool under pressure as she laughed off a mix—up with the envelopes containing the nominees at the endeavour fund awards, which celebrate the achievements of ex—servicemen and women. didn't she handle it well? bbc newsroom live is coming up next. thank you for your company today. have a good day. good morning. it will be cold in the
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next few days but for most of us dry and fairly pleasant. with some sunshine. this is a scene of blue skies in scotland, and in much of scotland, northern ireland, england and wales we will enjoy the sunshine into the afternoon. quite a few share is affecting yorkshire, lincolnshire, east anglia and a few also in the west of wales and south—west england but with lighter winds compared to the last few days. temperatures 6—8 degrees, perhaps feeling more pleasant out and about. into the night, frost developing quite quickly across central areas then rain spreading in, turning to snow across scotland through the northern parts of england, mainly over the pennines. the risk of ice into saturday morning and we will have that complicated mix of rain, sleet and a bit of snow in northern and western parts during saturday, dryer on sunday but it stays pretty cold with temperatures about 4—8
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celsius. goodbye. this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at 11:00am: theresa may tries to brush aside criticism of her leadership, and her approach to the brexit negotiations. i'm nota i'm not a quitter. i am i'm nota quitter. iam in i'm not a quitter. i am in this because there is a job to be done here and that is delivering for the british people, and doing that in a way that ensures the richer prosperity of our country. —— future prosperity.
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calls for better prostate cancer screening — after new figures revealed the number of people killed by the disease has overtaken breast cancer for the first time. police investigating the death of hollywood star natalie wood 37 years ago say her husband robert wagner is being treated as a "person of interest". also, concern of the long—term future of polar bears.
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