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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 2, 2018 8:00pm-8:46pm GMT

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this is bbc news. white the us congress has released a controversial memo accusing the fbi of abusing its power in its investigations into donald trump's presidential campaign. the memo was sent to congress, it was declassified, congress will do whatever they want to do but i think it isa whatever they want to do but i think it is a disgrace what is happening in our country. darren osborne, the man who drove a van in to a crowd of muslim worshippers in north london, is jailed for a minimum of 43 years with the judge describing his actions as a suicide mission. northamptonshire county council
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says it's facing "severe financial challenges" and has banned all council expenditure and dramatic scenes in the us courtroom where the hearing of sex abuser larry nassar continues. a man whose three daughters were abused by the former team usa gymnastics doctor, lunges at him in court. and more than 20 years after they first formed, the spice girls appear to have confirmed that they're getting back together good evening, welcome to bbc news. a controversial republican memo has been released which accuses the fbi of bias in its investigation into possible collusion between president trump's election campaign and russia. democrats had opposed the document's publication, saying some of the allegations were untrue and aimed at discrediting the inquiry led by special counsel robert mueller. but after approving its release, mr trump said the four—page memo told a disgraceful story,
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and a lot of people should be ashamed of what it revealed. this is what he had to say in the past few hours. i think the, i think it is terrible, you want to know the truth, i think it isa you want to know the truth, i think it is a disgrace, what is going on in this country, i think it is a disgrace, the memo was sent to congress, it was declassified, congress, it was declassified, congress will do whatever they are going to do. i think it is a disgrace what is going on in our country. when you look at that and see that an so many other things what is going on, a lot of people should be ashamed of themselves and much worse than that. sol should be ashamed of themselves and much worse than that. so i sent it over to congress, they will do what they are going to do, it was declassified, whatever they do is fine. let's see what happens. a lot of people should be ashamed, thank you very much. well a little earlier i asked our washington correspondent jane o'brien
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what we can learn from the memo we learn of the allegation that the fbi at abused powers, by carrying out surveillance on a former member of trump campaign team, in order to obtain the warrant, the accusation is that they use information from a dossier that had been compiled by a former british spy, who was being paid by the democrats, and who had also said that he was passionately against donald trump becoming president. the republicans and the white house claimed that that shows that there was bias at the very top level of the fbi, and of the department ofjustice, which has opened up a huge war between donald trump and members of his own apartment of justice and trump and members of his own apartment ofjustice and the people he appointed to oversee these departments. the democrats say that this memo is incomplete, misleading, does not tell the whole story. the fbi says it has grave concerns but
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republicans are saying that it shows there was bias that should undermine there was bias that should undermine the russia probe. and, jane, we are hearing some tweets from the american attorney general, jeff sessions, he is saying that he has great confidence in the men and women of this department, and he also says he is determined, " we will fully and fairly ascertained the truth. where does this memo leave that crucial investigation, robert mueller‘s investigation, and his hopes of talking to, interviewing president trump, to ask him about this crucial issue. those are very separate matters, this memo has no impact on the russia investigation in that it continues, it does not have any impact on whether robert mueller will be able to talk to donald trump or not. this
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is about one small part of an ongoing investigation, do not forget, there are many investigations going on at the moment, but this pulls into question the process by which the fbi and the department of justice the process by which the fbi and the department ofjustice obtain evidence. that is what this is about. the actual investigation is not necessarily affected, and the white house goes on to say that the main reason they supported its release is because it raises serious questions about the integrity of decisions at the highest level of the department ofjustice and fbi to use the government's most obtrusive surveillance tools against american citizens. in other words, should the fbi have this power to be able to spy fbi have this power to be able to spy on american citizens when there is not any real oversight as to how they obtain it? the man who drove his van into muslim worshippers outside a mosque in north london has been sentenced to life with a minimum of 43 years in prison. darren osborne killed makram ali, who was 51, and injured 12 other
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people in the attack in finsbury park lastjune. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford reports. darren osborne was seized at the scene of the finsbury park attacked after ploughing his van into a group of muslims trying to kill as many as possible. just have a seat up there for us. convicted of murder and attempted murder yesterday, his 102 previous convictions for violence, dishonesty and drugs offences were outlined to the court today. as was the devastation caused to the family of ali, the man he murdered. outside court, his daughter, with his tea rful wife court, his daughter, with his tearful wife by her side spoke of the family love for him. —— makram ali. you will never be forgotten, he will always stay in our hearts, his laughter will echo the walls of our home, his smile will be reflected in
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oui’ home, his smile will be reflected in our eyes, and his memory will be alive in our conversations. darren osborne's absurd defence, that a man called david was driving during the attack, was scorned by the judge. addressing him directly, misses justice —— it was said: —— today, in handing darren osborne a life sentence, thejudge, mrs justice cheema—grubb, said: thejudge also praised the judge also praised the thejudge also praised the imam the judge also praised the imam who protected erin osborne, saying that he chose to do good when faced with evo. —— darren osborne.
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france is to deploy extra riot police in the port of calais following fighting between migrants. the violence involved afghans and eritrea ns. four eritreans were shot and are in a serious condition in hospital. eighteen people were injured. our correspondent gavin lee has been in calais for us. this is one of the smaller camps that has popped up, food hand—out going on at the moment, it was this time yesterday, where the violence flared, another food hand—out time yesterday, where the violence flared, anotherfood hand—out going on here, 50 afghans and about 100 eritreans in a queue, what triggered it is, gunshots were fired, four in hospital, serious conditions after being shot, one of them life—threatening conditions, 20 others with minor injuries including two police officers. this morning, the interior minister, said there had not been violence like this since the days of the so—called jungle, when there were 7000 migrants here, you can see part of
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the back of the jungle camp migrants here, you can see part of the back of thejungle camp in migrants here, you can see part of the back of the jungle camp in the distance here. let's show you around here, most of calais now, there are far fewer here, most of calais now, there are farfewer migrants, here, most of calais now, there are far fewer migrants, seven here, most of calais now, there are farfewer migrants, seven or 800, but they are in clusters of different areas, for example, he, this area, where we have around 60 to 100. what they do, the police have a clear and move policy, if they seek tents, then they move them straightaway, but they are set up again very quickly. and migrants are on the move. from talking to the migrants here, many do not want to talk on camera but they say that they felt things getting worse, a big part of this was two weeks ago, when emmanuel macron came here, they thought the french president might have something different to say, have something different to say, have strongly optimistic, they thought they would be a different narrative, a new deal. but he said there will be no newjungle camp, he's working on a new policy, swift returns of asylum seekers, —— failed
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asylu m returns of asylum seekers, —— failed asylum seekers, speeding up the process. there was a moment of despair, a lot of people getting more desperate. the other thing to point out, there had been a deal with theresa may and emmanuel macron, talking about and accompanied miners being bought to the uk, that has led to 200 people arriving in the past two weeks, thinking they would have a chance, also adding to the numbers given that food supplies have been short, just relying on charity. the government is stepping in, they say they will hand out more food, to manage the problem, given that it still exists in. all that time since thejungle still exists in. all that time since the jungle camp still exists in. all that time since thejungle camp in calais was closed. where do we stand tonight? given the violence yesterday, a 37—year—old afghan man is said to be on the run, police say he was a migrants mugler, not believe to be among the migrants here, but he is still missing. —— migrant smuggler. extra police are on guard but as we can see here, relatively calm and relatively peaceful. so what's the mood in kent after today's events across the channel?
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our correspondent peter whitlesea is in doverfor us tonight. whenever there is an incident in calais, ripples are felt here because every day thousands of travellers and tourists use the ferry, and the eurotunnel. haulage groups are saying that they want guarantees from the french government, that the routes around calais are safe, especially since la st calais are safe, especially since last night, firearms were involved. the mp for dover, who was until three months ago conservative until the party withdrew the whip has also waded in, saying that the prime minister theresa may was naive to make an agreement with the french president, emmanuel macron, to allow more child migrants to come to britain. he says things that agreement was made in sandhurst a fortnight ago, the numbers of migrants in calais has gone from 300 up migrants in calais has gone from 300 up to 800, giving strength to the migrant magnet, that is calais. other people in the cross—channel
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industry say that it is just coincidence that the number of migrants has increased since that announcement was made. meanwhile today, i have also spoken with lorry drivers who have crossed over from the channel. they say that in calais, in recent weeks, the situation has got worse, they are fearful to stay in calais. they believe if they stay, migrants will try to break into their lorries. they also say the situation is better than it was about three years ago, when up to 10,000 migrants were living in the camp known as the jungle. the latest headlines: president trump says a lot of people should be ashamed — after the us congress released a controversial memo which is thought to accuse the fbi of abusing its powers. darren osborne, the man who drove a van in to a crowd of muslim worshippers in north london, is jailed for a minimum of 43 years with thejudge describing his actions as a suicide mission.
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the primus is under pressure to set out exactly where she stands on britain's trade agreements after brexit. —— the prime minister. lets get a full round—up of sport, from the bbc sport centre. first weekend of the six nations rugby tournament this weekend, getting underway tomorrow, the first match in the women's championship already over, and it has been a real thriller in colwyn bay, three tries put the welsh ahead, 13—0, in the first half. hannah black scored the third, that was before scotland fought back in the second half. a double. really putting them on the path. but this try for the welsh by la ke path. but this try for the welsh by lake was enough to see them win it, a nailbiter, 18—17. fantastic fightback from camera nouri on the
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mob a clay this afternoon to level great britain's davis cup tie with spain, at one apiece, with no andy murray or kyle edmund, liam broady lost the opening rubber, then it looked like it was heading the same way, but a gutsy performance saw him win the last three sets, to help him beat another tester agu. —— cameron norrie. voiceover: ever popular with brits abroad, this contains unfamiliar travellers, first into the glare, liam broady, new to this service and the davis cup. facing ram is, comfortable in the shade of the palm trees, taking the first set, never allowed to fully retreat toa set, never allowed to fully retreat to a hammock, the competition and occasion inspiring him to levels far above what was expected. he broke but then folded with the set at sta ke but then folded with the set at stake and so again in the third, the match placed agonisingly out of his reach by the world number 21. for all the undoubted effort, this was
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simply too much of a stretch, straight sets to spain. now, another new boy, who came to britain via south africa and new zealand, cameron norrie, the early break set cautious confidence, it took ten minutes for roberto bautista agut to haul the set around and take it for himself, none of the frenzied energy of cameron norrie, but he seemed to have the crucial weapon of control, the world number 23 always gave himself just the world number 23 always gave himselfjust enough time, that is ultimately on cameron norrie's site, the player he could become started to emerge, the 22 your old was rewarded, taking the third. the brits had tails on most sunbeds —— the 22—year—old. —— the brits had towels on most sunbeds. making a nonsense of the rankings, smashing match level, 2—2. chapeau. roberto bautista agut was unable to turn the
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tide, cameron norrie, 114th best tennis player in the world, squared the tie. i looked at my forehand whole match and thought i was tougher than the guy, physically i have problems but i was calm with my efforts, it has given me a lot of confidence, my first match on clay, lam confidence, my first match on clay, i am stoked. in a weekend in which british tennis has had to fall back on supporting actors, the lead man is not kyle edmund or andy murray but a young man named cameron norrie. director of player recruitment tony henry has been sacked by west ham united over claims that he said the club would not sign any more african players, a newspaper report carried quotes stating that african players cause mayhem when they are not in the team. the club said his comments we re team. the club said his comments were unacceptable, saying they conducted a full and thorough investigation. david moyes says the scandal has not damaged team morale ahead of the match at brighton. the
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comments are wrong. we were signing two players from africa on deadline day! i can only say that they are wrong. inaudible you can see the players we sign and that the club has signed over the yea rs that the club has signed over the years full of we sign good quality players. the best players we can get. does not matter where they are from. that is all we have time for, now, we will have lots more in sportsday, 10:30pm. the prime minister is under pressure about being specific about what the future trading relationship should look like. theresa may is returning from china, negotiations on "brexit" are due to resume with brussels on monday. mrs may said the uk should not face a choice between a free trade deal with the eu and striking deals with the rest of the world. she was speaking in shanghai to our
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political editor, laura kuenssberg. how precisely will she broke a brexit? is she ready to decide? what has happened here is that we have seen has happened here is that we have seen the businesses i have brought with me on this trip signing deals that mean more jobs for people back in britain, that is good news for britain, global britain in action. on top of doing business around the world, everybody wants to know do you favour a really close relationship with the european union once we are out, or a more dramatic break? i favour a deal, an arrangement, for trade, which is going to be good for trade for the uk and the european union and jobs in britain. fundamental choice here, your chancellor has said, he
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believes changes may be very modest, one of yourformer believes changes may be very modest, one of your former brexit ministers one of your former brexit ministers on your side has said, the government is yet to make clear choices, and you are risking ending up choices, and you are risking ending up with something that looks like meaningless waffle. the point is the deal, which many people said would not be done, was done. we got what we wanted, we ensure that we dealt with issues in the first phase and now we start negotiations for the second phase. images for the couple to treasure but maybe not much serenity when she is home, the decision to bind tightly to the eu after brexit or pull further apart is the line right down the middle of her party. her supporters believe she's the only person who can hold it together, that she is agonisingly pulled by detractors on both sides. if you are reluctant to explain your priority and big choice... wait a minute... can you stay on? people are asking you again and again to be
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clearer about your priorities, how long can you stay on? let's be very clear about this, i have set out what is my vision, i have set out and said to people, at every stage where we can fill in the detail, i will do that and that is what i have been doing. do you want to be the tory leader at the next general election? i have been asked this question on a number of occasions and said clearly throughout my political career, i have served my country and my party, iam nota have served my country and my party, i am not a quitter, i'm have served my country and my party, iam nota quitter, i'm in have served my country and my party, i am not a quitter, i'm in this because there is a job to be done here, and that is delivering for the british people and doing that in a way that ensures the future prosperity of our country. global britain, global britain is a real vision for the united kingdom. i wa nt vision for the united kingdom. i want the british people to see a government that is delivering for them around the world and that is exactly what we are doing. prime minister, if i may, the tory party fights amongst it sells, how do you reassert your authority? -- fighting among itself. i'm delivering on
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" b rex it" among itself. i'm delivering on "brexit" which is what british people want, but also getting out around the world, ensuring we bring jobs back to britain. companies will be selling more british products to china as a result of this trip and more people will be injobs in the uk as more people will be injobs in the ukasa more people will be injobs in the uk as a result of this trip, that is global britain in action. number ten hopes it is by seeing and doing that the prime minister can re—establish control but her and the country's ha rd est set control but her and the country's hardest set of decisions will follow her around the globe. so, a delicate time for the prime minister as she balances brexit, with the uk's strategy on future world trade relationships. we can unpick this now with quentin peel, who is an associate fellow at chatham house, and attached to the europe programme. we heard the prime minister talking about how this is a global written in action, £9 billion worth of trade deals, is she right to be upbeat? cannot be dismissed as an
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irrelevance, the trade we have with china is very important. ifear irrelevance, the trade we have with china is very important. i fear that these things are always set out months in advance and an awful lot is bundled in there, not exactly what was won on the trip. secondly, ifear what was won on the trip. secondly, i fear that it is simply nowhere near the success of some of the european partners, above all, germany. which is by far the biggest european exported to china. and the prime minister seems to be dismissing this whole idea that she had to choose between close relationship with the eu, which would perhaps inevitably mean keeping in line many of the regulations and draws we have at the moment, and a choice between that and a more clean break which would give us greater scope to make global trade deals around the world. can she actually do both? no. she is desperate trying to maintain a balancing act between the half of her cabinet who want to have the
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closest possible relationship with the eu, i:e., some form of customs union, and the hardline brexit crew, who wants no form of customs union because they want to go off and negotiate free—trade deals with lots of other people. the problem they face is this, i want to use a verb thatis face is this, i want to use a verb that is very common in ireland but not so common here, the verb is to do is improve, we are dis— improving trade relations with europe, that is by far the most important trading partner and that is the fundamental problem. —— "disimprove". —— disimproving. we cannot make as much as we might lose in europe and that is the balancing act she has got to do. £9 billion worth is not to be sneezed at, these deals have been done, without an overall free—trade agreement, isn't there a much more that we could and should be doing, without these huge and complex trade deals? absolutely, we have not done too badly in terms of relations with
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china, unfortunately, we do not export the things they want the most, we want to sell them financial services, but that is way down the list of what they actually want to buy, they want to buy the sort of things that germany exports, top—level machine tools and so on. that is one of the problems we have. really, we can do these things without free—trade deals, free—trade deals are a two—way process. we would be opening up the british market enormously to china, which is fa ntastically market enormously to china, which is fantastically competitive, just as we would hope they open up to us. it is manufacturing industry may not be any thing like as chuffed to see chinese imports to britain's soaring. what about other countries where we have historic relations, countries like india, is there a real scope for a big expansion in the amount of trade that we can do there once we have left the european union? the problem with india has
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all been very specific and it is one that britain has always therefore held back from a free—trade deal. once a much easier movement of work permits and freezers, and that is something britain is very nervous about. i think that we have to open up about. i think that we have to open up immigration to more indians, that is precisely what theresa may has promised she will not do. that appears to be another point of friction with the european union, theresa may making it clear, for example, that eu citizens are not going to have the same rights to come and work here after we have left the eu. is she going to have to back down on that, if she is going to get during this transition deal the access to markets that she wa nts ? the access to markets that she wants? she may have two, that is the problem, she sets up hardline demands, and then she finds that actually, she cannot keep with in
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this incredibly tight timescale we have got of reaching agreement u nless have got of reaching agreement unless she bends over and does pretty much what the 27 other members of the european union are asking for, which is to maintain all the freedoms of the single market throughout the transition period. even when we get to the end of the transition period in a couple of yea rs, two yea rs transition period in a couple of years, two years after we are supposed to leave, i fear it won't be enough to have got a final deal with the european union. thank you very much indeed forjoining us this evening. prominent backbench conservative mp and brexiteerjacob prominent backbench conservative mp and brexiteer jacob reece prominent backbench conservative mp and brexiteerjacob reece mark has been caught up in a scuffle tonight while at the university of the western england in bristol, he had been due to address its politics and international relations society. on the line now, somerset reporter james craig, who watched the events unfold. —— jacob james craig, who watched the events unfold. ——jacob reece mogg. ——
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jacob rees—mogg. unfold. ——jacob reece mogg. —— jacob rees-mogg. he was due to speak with students, ticketed event, basically he would have spoken for 30 minutes, then he was due to take questions from the audience, a few minutes after he started speaking, a group of protesters came into the back of the lecture theatre, and started shouting anti—conservative rhetoric at jacob rees—mogg. started shouting anti—conservative rhetoric atjacob rees—mogg. very loudly, trying to shout him down. rather than halting the event, or ignoring them, jacob rees—mogg approach them, walked to the back of the theatre, where they were, and tried to talk them down. at that point, various other members of the audience got involved and that is when this scuffle, various pictures have circulated, you may have seen it happen, a lot of people got involved. it looked to me that jacob rees—mogg himself was pushed and shoved, although he insists he was
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not. it was a very aggressive and an expected scene. seeing some footage of what happened, as i am talking to you, certainly looks as though of what happened, as i am talking to you, certainly looks as thouthacob rees—mogg was pushed around. one report i'm seeing suggests at some stage, someone report i'm seeing suggests at some stage, someone was report i'm seeing suggests at some stage, someone was punched, and indeed, some of those responsible for this protest were masked. there we re for this protest were masked. there were people wearing bandannas, across the lower part of their face, one was also wearing a balaclava. most of them dressed in dark clothing. a lot of the language they we re clothing. a lot of the language they were using and the words they were using seems to be based onjacob rees—mogg and the conservative pa rty‘s rees—mogg and the conservative party's policies and things they clearly disagreed with. they were trying to shout down jacob rees—mogg so that he would not be able to deliver his talk, i don't suppose they expected him to approach them, and try to speak. it was only really when other members in the hall
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became involved, in a very confined area, in the aisle of the lecture hall, really only a couple of feet wide, echoes of the numbers of people there, you can probably see from some of the pictures, it was difficult for people to move around, hence the scuffle and people being shoved around. did this troubled disrupt the event completely, was jacob rees—mogg able to continue with his talk to the students? did not end the event, in less than five minutes, security from the university turned up, and at that point, they asked protesters to leave and most of them did then leave and most of them did then leave the hall. jacob rees—mogg was back down at the front of the lecture hall, trying to almost speak over them and continue his talk. the audience were supportive of that, even people clearly not conservative party supporters were willing jacob rees—mogg to carry on and do the thing he had been booked to do here. the protesters left, police were
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called, although i understand no one has been arrested in connection with this. security remained outside the hall for the duration of it, continue, and jacob rees—mogg took questions from the audience for about 30 minutes, at the end of the event, there was a queue of 100 people who wanted to have their picture taken with jacob rees—mogg. no doubt they were not expecting events to take this turns. do with the latest weather. so, not a bad day's weather coming to an end. showers along the east coast of england particularly but things are changing as we speak. towards the west, a weather front coming in from the atlantic pushing rain across northern ireland, into the western side of both scotland and england and into the heart of wales. some of that rain falling onto wales. some of that rain falling o nto froze n wales. some of that rain falling onto frozen surfaces so watch out
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for eyes first thing if you are on the move on saturday morning. saturday is one of those days, i'm afraid. that front really not moving very far. the eastern fringes of east anglia dry for the most part, perhaps brightness in the western side of scotland and northern ireland later in the day, but temperatures three, four, five, 6 degrees only. sunday, the front is still there but weakening all the while with the best of the sunshine for scotland and northern ireland. not much by way of breeze here. the isobars in the south meaning a cold wind. 5—7 but feeling much colder. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: the us congress has released a controversial memo thought to detail bias on the part of the fbi in its handling of the inquiry in to alleged russian meddling in the us election. darren osborne, the man who drove a van into a crowd of muslim worshippers in north london, is sentenced to life in prison, with a minimum term of 43 years. prominent conservative mp
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jacob rees—mogg has been caught up in a scuffle whilst giving a talk at the university of the west of england in bristol. the pro—brexit mp had been due to address a student politics society. northamptonshire county council says it's facing "severe financial challenges" and has banned all council expenditure theresa may is under pressure to clarify what she hopes to achieve from the brexit negotiations. the french authorities are deploying extra riot police in calais, following clashes between groups of migrants — four of whom are in hospital. 90 migrants are believed to have drowned after their boat capsized off the coast of libya. only three people are known to have survived. ten bodies have been recovered so far. the un's migration agency says the number of people trying to cross the mediterranean to europe has gone up from last year.
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joining me now from paris is mathieu willcocks who recently won a world press photo award for his work photographing the migration of refugees and migrants across the mediterranean. clearly, this appears to have been a tragic incidents, but these sort of incidents that we have been seeing in recent years of these migrants continuing to fall across the mediterranean. yes, absolutely. it seems that even the latest eu effort to try to stop the flow of migrants coming from all over africa but through libya to italy has not worked. it still continues to happen and seems like what happened today
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arejust very and seems like what happened today are just very common. this is one of many that we did not hear about.|j believe many that we did not hear about.” believe you have witnessed similar incidents yourself. yes, for most of 2016 from may until december, i was on board a rescue ship in the mediterranean from a multi —based ngo. i was there on a rescue ship for close to five and a bit of months at sea doing rescues everyday. i have seen a lot and it just seems to get worse now because of the situation of how rescue ships can operate is just getting worse and worse. we are seeing some of the very moving photographs that you have taken off some of the desperate migrants, some of them in the water, some being rescued, others are struggling to try to get help. we
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have been hearing a lot less about this problem. is it simply that the world's attention has moved on? yes, absolutely. there was a slight drop in numbers of crossings during the summer in numbers of crossings during the summer of 2017, but the media association's attention went elsewhere. everyone is looking at trump, i guess. elsewhere. everyone is looking at trump, iguess. but elsewhere. everyone is looking at trump, i guess. but it has not stopped. ngos are forced to operate further north from where we used to operate in 2016 which means that migrants have more seed to cross before they can reach safety and therefore it is a more dangerous time at sea for them and that is why all the capsizing time at sea for them and that is why all the ca psizing is time at sea for them and that is why all the capsizing is that happened yesterday happened in complete obscurity where there is no want to see it there or help. in your experience, what is driving this? is its people traffickers who are exploiting the concerns of people in
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some of these desperate, poorer, conflict ridden countries? absolutely. that is definitely one of the factors that drives people to do these crossings. but people come from so many different regions that it's hard to tell, really. it is ha rd to it's hard to tell, really. it is hard to give one reason. people come from... i have heard that most of the people who drowned in this capsizing were from pakistan but most come from sub—saharan africa and west africa, many from eritrea, so it is hard to tell. for someone like yourself who has witnessed this goes hands for such a long time, how frustrating, how distressing is added to the events like today's unfolds, 90 dead and more migrants likely to take the same risk to get to europe? yeah, it can be very infuriating, especially when it becomes politicised and sort of...
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people should realise that the mediterranean is not a political stage, it is a graveyard by now and we should get on, crack on and try to rescue these people instead of just putting obstacles in the ways of the rescuers. many thanks for joining us in sharing your experiences. police investigating the death of one of the most famous stars from the golden era of hollywood, natalie wood, back in 1981 have named her husband, the actor robert wagner, as a "person of interest". the actress was found dead after going missing from a yacht off the coast of california. our los angeles correspondent james cook reports. # i feel pretty # oh, so pretty # i feel pretty and witty and gay...# in life, natalie wood captivated the camera. in death, mystery endures. by the age of 25, she had three oscar nominations one for this classic,
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rebel without a cause. but in 1981, her body was found in a cove off california's catalina island. she had been sailing with her husband robert wagner, co—star christopher walken and the boat's captain. i believe robert wagner was with her up until the moment she went into the water. originally, the death was ruled an accident. natalie wood always said her greatest fear was of dark water. and yet that first official explanation for how she drowned off the coast here was that she slipped from her yacht as she tried to climb into an inflatable dinghy, alone in the middle of the night. 30 years on, in 2011, the inquiry was reopened. any questions? is robert wagner a suspect? no. and now? i think it's suspicious enough to make us think something happened. i don't think she got in the water
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herself or fell in the water. as we have investigated the case over the last six years, i think he is more of a person of interest. he was the last person with her before she disappeared. there was always talk of a blazing argument between them on the night she disappeared. now witnesses on other boats have corroborated that story including a woman who says she saw the couple arguing. saw figures, male and female, whose voicees were recognised as being robert wagner and natalie wood arguing at the back of the boat. police say robert wagner has refused to speak to them since the case reopened. let's meet natalie's husband, ladies and gentlemen, robert wagner. now 87 years old, he has always denied involvement in his wife's death, which despite these developments, remains a mystery. high—tech tracking collars
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with cameras attached have given us this incredible bear‘s—eye view of polar bears life in the arctic. cameras have been fitted to nine female polar bears, in a attempt to discover how the animals are managing to find enough food on the diminishing arctic ice. our science correspondent victoria gill has the story. a polar bear‘s view of the arctic. these remarkable images were captured by cameras inside tracking collars that scientists fitted to female polar bears. the researchers had to work for three arctic spring seasons, from 2014, two 2016, to capture and collar nine solitary bears. each animal wore a collar for around ten days before the cameras inside were retrieved, revealing these unique insights into their behaviour. the aim was to understand whether the animals were getting enough to eat during the critical spring thaw.
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arctic sea ice is decreasing at about 14% every decade. the bears use that ice to hunt for their prey, seals. so as well as fitting them with tracking and camera containing collars the researchers injected the bears with a metabolic tracer. this showed that wild bears have a higher metabolic rate than previously thought and that most of them were unable to catch enough food to meet their energy needs. it's really quite fascinating to learn the basic behaviours of these animals and how they are using the sea ice environment. this is in the spring, where temperatures can get down to —20, —30 celsius, so it's pretty inhospitable. it would be almost impossible for research are to be out on the sea ice in those conditions for an extended period of time. there's very little information that exists on the basic behaviours of
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these animals on the sea ice and so the camera collars provide us with an insight into what the bears are doing. the scientists say this new technology, following their every move and every meal, reveals just how the predators will be affected as their icy environments transforms around them. now it's time for newswatch, with samira ahmed. this week — is the bbc‘s coverage of president trump too negative and too excessive? hello and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. with the prime minister on an important trade mission to china, did the bbc‘s political editor ask the wrong questions? and how well has the bbc reported on president trump and his first year in power? the purpose of the prime minister's
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trip to china this week was to promote trade. but at a news conference on wednesday, the bbc‘s political editor laura kuenssberg had matters closer to home on her mind. to get things done, leaders have to be able to lead. the prime minister says she will fight on but concedes something has to shift. prime minister, on the journey here, you acknowledged that you and your government have to do more to be convincing. what is it that you plan to do differently and will you stand up to your critics? several viewers felt that was not the time and place for such a question. barbara fierek put it like this: "laura kuenssberg asked mrs may a question in front of the major media reporters of the world regarding her cabinet‘s loyalty and disarray. i felt it was very undermining for her to use that opportunity to have a dig very publicly at theresa may's party, and it was not appropriate to the occasion. surely herjob was to report on the visit."
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and paul smith added: on friday, laura kuenssberg pursued the same theme in an interview with the prime minister. people are asking you again and again to be clearer about your priorities. how long can you stay on, do you believe? well, let's be very, very clear about this. i've set out what my vision is. i've set out and i've said to people that at every stage where we can fill in the detail, we will do so and that's exactly... but how long can you stay on? that line of questioning prompted more complaints, including this from tony webb: on tuesday night, donald trump addressed a joint session
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of the united states congress in his first state of the union address, just over 12 months since he took office. to say it's been a newsworthy and controversial first year

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