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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 4, 2018 8:00am-9:01am GMT

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can you play chords with this, or? that very good for the first time.” was lucky, i was just playing that very good for the first timelj was lucky, i was just playing one note. and he very much. —— thank you. hello, this is breakfast with chris mason and tina daheley. a warning that cuts to the royal marines would undermine uk security. a group of mps says it's time for the ministry of defence to ‘cough up‘ to protect the future of britain's elite fighting forces. good morning, it's sunday, 4th february. also this morning: a senior conservative mp accuses ministers of being "vague" and "divided" over brexit. harvey weinstein faces fresh claims of sexual assault, as uma thurman says she was attacked by the film producer in the 1990s in london.
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a jihadist group in syria says it shot down a russian warplane yesterday using a shoulder—launched missile. and in sport, there's a thumping win for wales against scotland, and ireland pip the french in paris with the last kick of the match — it's a thrilling start to the six nations championship. every time i see that, i wonder if it will make it over the bar. and ben has the weather. it's shaping up to be a brighter day for most of us. quite a lot of sunshine but some treat showers, two, brought in on a cold, north—easterly winds. although weather details you need to know on the way. good morning. first, our main story. there's a warning this morning from mps that cuts to the royal marines would significantly undermine uk security and must be stopped. the defence select committee says the government must "cough up", amid speculation of a funding squeeze on the elite fighting unit.
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daniella relph reports. the training, known for being tough and arduous. 6500 royal marines go through it to make them amongst britain's at elite fighting forces. known for their versatility and their ability to respond quickly to situations around the world. the royal marines also provide up to half the personnel for the uk special forces. the defence select committee report warns that further cuts to the marines would damage their ability to be a high readiness unit, quickly deployable, often in difficult circumstances. it also criticises plans to end the use of hms albion as a ship from which beach assaults are made. if there are new and intensified threats you would think we'd be adding to our capabilities, not deleting one of our world beating star capabilities. the committee praises the defence secretary, gavin williamson, for taking control of the defence review but again
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warned that he won't be able to prevent harsh cuts without extra funding from the treasury. the ministry of defence says that protecting the uk is its priority and stress that the royal marines play a vital role in defending the play a vital role in defending the country. daniella relph, bbc news. and injust under 10 minutes, we'll be speaking to the chairman of the defence select committee, julian lewis. susana, there's more disquiet from tory mps over brexit. what can you tell us? here is the sunday telegraph. the sunday times, and other brexit frontpage. brexiteer is thought to install a dream team at number ten. they suggest that we could see jacob rees—mogg, conservative backbencher, installed as chancellor. let's find
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out what is ready going on. what can you tell us? we know that bernard jenkin, a back bench posted here, is the latest one to really come out and say, expresses criticism for philip hammond, the chancellor, who has been someone who was a remainer and certainly those on the backbenches who support a hard brexit haven't been particularly happy with his approach. they're basically saying, bernard jenkin is saying, as far as he is concerned, philip hammond has not adhered to collective ministerial responsibility. he is echoing some of the comments from jacob rees—mogg earlier in the week, where he suggested that the treasury was fiddling the books with regards to brexit. the treasury made clear that is not the case. added pressure on theresa may ahead of an important week, because she and david davies will be meeting with michelle burger to discuss the next stage in the
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price negotiations. thank you. scotland yard is looking into two more allegations of sexual assault against the hollywood film producer harvey weinstein. it brings the total number of women who have reported him to british police to nine. the actress, uma thurman, has also alleged he assaulted her at a hotel in london in the 1990s. our correspondent, simon jones has more. she starred in several films produced by the disgraced movie mogul. it was after the success of pulp fiction that uma thurman says she was targeted by harvey weinstein. now she's the latest woman to speak out in an interview with the new york times. uma thurman claims harvey weinstein pushed her down when she met him in his suite here at the savoy hotel in london. she says he tried to expose himself, he did all kinds of unpleasant things. but she said she managed to wriggle away like a lizard. the next day, she says, a bunch of flowers arrived. a spokeswoman for harvey weinstein
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said in a statement: it comes as scotland yard say they have received two further allegations of sexual assault, one from a woman who claims it comes as scotland yard say they have received two further allegations of sexual assault, one from a woman who claims harvey weinstein assaulted her in westminster in 2011, and another from a woman who says she was targeted in the republic of ireland. that brings the total number of women who have reported the producer to british police to nine. officers in new york and los angeles have also begun investigations. he has denied all allegations of non—consensual sex. harvey weinstein was once one of the most powerful men in hollywood, credited with scores of oscar wins, but he has been thrown out of the organisation that runs the oscars and he's now in rehab, a huge fall from grace from which there is likely to be no return.
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simon jones, bbc news. a russian militaryjet has been shot down in north western syria, an area held by syrian rebels. the defence ministry in moscow said the pilot had managed to deploy a parachute, but was killed on the ground. sarah corker reports. the burning wreckage of what looks like a russian fighterjet, red stars clearly visible on the wing. this footage posted online appears to show the plane being hit and bursting into flames in a rebel—held area of north—west syria.
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jihadist group hayat tahrir al—sham, formally linked to al-qaeda, said it had shot the plane down with a surface—to—air missile. moscow said the pilot ejected and survived the crash but was killed by rebels on the ground. the sukhoi 25 fighter was shot down near the city of saraqeb, close to a major highway in idlib province. it was back in december when the syrian government, backed by russian air power, launched a major offensive against rebel groups in idlib, the last province under rebel control. but civilians are paying a heavy price. thousands have fled. on friday, rescuers said they pulled the bodies of at least seven civilians from cars hit by air strikes south of aleppo. this incident is a rare loss for the russian air force. opposition groups have in the past shot down syrian planes but rarely those of the russian army, and there are reports that moscow
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has responded by firing cruise missiles from navy vessels in the mediterranean. sarah corker, bbc news. it's the biggest night in american sport. but football fans heading to tonight's 52nd super bowl in minneapolis will be wrapping up warm. it's expected to be a bone—chilling minus 16 degrees when the action gets underway at 11.30pm uk time. the game will be played indoors but the local authorities have set up a trauma centre near the stadium in case any fans find themselves caught out by the freezing conditions. but as you can see in these pictures, fans are certainly making the most of it all. will you be watching it? it is
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tempting. i know nothing about the sports, but the razzmatazz is quite appealing. justin tipuric performing at half—time. more about that later. "time to cough up". that's the message from a group of mps this morning to the ministry of defence following reports that cuts to the royal marines could be on the way. the defence select committee says any reduction in britain's elite fighting forces would be "militarily illiterate". strong language, then. let's speak to the conservative mp, julian lewis, who chairs the committee. good morning. thanks forjoining us. there is clearly real concern from your committee, from constituency mps in plymouth, for instance, where there is a big military base, that there is a big military base, that the government isn't definitively answering this question as to whether or not they will be safe. this review has been conducted in great secrecy, and it was taken away
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from the ministry of defence initially and has onlyjust recently, the secretary of state for defence, gavin williamson, has managed to get the issue brought back to the ministry of defence is that it can be looked at again. when you hear the mod saying, as they have this morning, but protecting the uk will always be our priority, then reinstate a vital role in defending our country, does not reassure you? not at all. we know the mod is about to fight a desperate action in order to preserve the capability that only two years ago with the last review, which was 2015's defence review, was said to be vital and necessary. why has there been this new security capability review conducted by the national security adviser, who is pa rt of national security adviser, who is part of the cabinet office? the
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answer they say is that the threats have intensified and that there are new threats. but if the threats are not greater, what it means is that we have to invest more to meet them, not cut other capabilities that only two years ago not cut other capabilities that only two years ago were not cut other capabilities that only two years ago were regarded as absolutely essential. explain the significance of these amphibious vessels. for those who are not experts in defence, it can sound quite confusing. why are these so important to our defences?“ quite confusing. why are these so important to our defences? if we are involved in a conflict, at any time in the future, far—away from our own shores, there are two things that you need to be able to do. you need to be able to exert are power from the sea. and lands power from the sea. the airpower is going to be exerted from the two new aircraft carriers, the lands power has to be exerted from amphibious assault
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ships. we are not talking about storming the beaches in the teeth of opposition, on a rerun of the normandy landings. we are talking about inserting a significant and substantial force, and more importantly heavy equipment which cannot be done by eric. the only way to do it is by these amphibious assault ships, and doing it quietly, stealthily, as a weak point in the enemy's defences. if we lose a world beating capability, it is hard to see how it could be restored. is anyone going to tell us you will never need to put troops ashour into a theatre of war, at any time in the future? that would be an absurd position to take. how disorientating is this as a conservative? bristol many decades, defence has been traditionally a strong hand for the conservatives, and yet the government seems to have let the story about and the potential future for the marines and the amphibious
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craft rumble of for months on end? this all goes back to a fundamental shift that has taken place under successive governments. first, labour, then conservative coalition, and then conservative. whereby defence expenditure has fallen as a priority compared with what we spend on other high spending departments. for example, in the mid—19 80s, when we last had an assertive russia, coupled with a major terrorist threat in northern ireland, we were not spending barely 2% of gdp as we are now. we were spending between 4.5 and 5.1% of gdp. this was not dissimilar to what we were spending on health and education. now we spent four times on health and 2.5 times on education what we spend on defence. that's why we say that's
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defence. that's why we say that's defence has fallen too far down the scale. i wonder how much of this is to do with the fact that a huge amount of the government's brain space, its bandwidth, is taken up by making about brexit, as delivering brexit, trying to concentrate on anything else, the meat and drink normally of politics, whether that be defence or schools or hospitals. it just gets forgotten be defence or schools or hospitals. itjust gets forgotten about, too far down the intro. i don't agree at all. this decline has happened four years before the brexit votes. if anything, as you know, it was in the la st anything, as you know, it was in the last dying days of the cameron government is that they actually confirmed they weren't going to let it slip further below even the bearer to present we are spending. brexit has absolutely nothing to do with it. what you should bear in mind is one more statistic, at the
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end of the cold war, quite understandably, we took what was called the peace dividend, we cut the amount of money we spent on defence. we went down from 4.5 to 596, defence. we went down from 4.5 to 5%, we went down below that, but if you come forward rights to the mid—19 90s, several years after we took the peace dividend, we were spending early 2% of gdp on defence, we we re spending early 2% of gdp on defence, we were spending fully 3% in peace time, and that is where the rot set in. there are a few headlines in the newspaper is not just in. there are a few headlines in the newspaper is notjust about brexit but about theresa may and her future. no end of noise and conversation such chatter and speculation amongst mps. is the prime ministers during herjob? that really is something for you to ask toa really is something for you to ask to a politician who is appearing as a party politician. i'm appearing here as the chairman of the defence
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select committee, which is a cross—party select committee, which is a cross— party group produced select committee, which is a cross—party group produced in unanimous support. this sounds like a politician's dancer! bigging personally, i believe the prime ministers should be supported absolutely as long as she doesn't go back. but schmeichel back on her two important pledges. one is that brexit means brexit, in other words, not stay looted or dissipated. the other is that no deal is better than a bad deal. that isjulian lewis conservative politician saying why i will support the minister, but as chairman of the defence committee, my message today is that whichever party is in power, they have a responsibility to defend the country and we need to be spending much nearer 3% of and we need to be spending much nearer3% of gdp and we need to be spending much nearer 3% of gdp on defence. and we need to be spending much nearer 3% of gdp on defencelj appreciate nearer 3% of gdp on defence.” appreciate why you want to draw a distinction between your two hats. i must add that they complement about your one half! was a fantastic piece of hardware. i'm delighted that you
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approve! have a look at the time, which is a tie of the 17th port of logistics regiment. which supplies heavy equipment by c for our amphibious and other forces in far—flung places. amphibious and other forces in far-flung places. i have spotted barge which does is says on the tin, for the royal navy, but thank you for the royal navy, but thank you for the royal navy, but thank you for the explanation of the tie and a hammer as well. tags for your time. goodbye. it's all about the little details. shall we get some weather? i left my hat outside, fortu nately. some weather? i left my hat outside, fortunately. it might be willie have this weekend because it's pretty chilly through the weekend and on into next week. great skies overhead from any. that's how it looks for a weather watcher in norfolk. we will see sales of sunshine today but some wintry showers speeding in on what
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is first on a strong easterly winds. yesterday we had all that cloud and rain at hill snow. that cloud has essentially dissipated overnight. through the first part of this morning, not a through the first part of this morning, nota bad through the first part of this morning, not a bad start for many with spells of sunshine, some showers in east anglia & pleased. a mixture of rain, sleet and snow, potentially icy stretches. further west, wales, north—west england, a widespread frost. some good spells sunshine. for these england, widespread frost. some good spells sunshine. forthese england, eastern scotland, more cloud and wintry showers continuing. in western scotland, northern ireland, a bright is chilly start. these northern areas, probably feel better today or at least the least goals. the winds will be lighter here. when you get the sunny spells, it won't feel too bad. it is the strong winds towards the south that will have a big impact on the feel of the day. 7 degrees in the centre of london. it
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will feel more like freezing. 11 degrees in rome with sunshine ever had with the big six nations clash between italy and england. on sunshine to close out the afternoon at motherwell. three tonight, with clear skies overhead, temperatures willdip clear skies overhead, temperatures will dip away. of more concern is this area of wintry showers pushing in across east anglia, the south—east. most of these will be following as snow by this stage. there could be a due centimetres of snow in places. elsewhere not as many showers, some fog patches and confirmation of those chilly conditions. tomorrow morning, across the south—eastern corner, a few centimetres of snow lying around, could be some icy stretches. that could be some icy stretches. that could cause disruption. generally tomorrow is a nice looking day. chris grayling with blue skies overhead. damages of three to 5 degrees. the frontal system showing its hands up to the north—west.
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pushing its way in front west on tuesday. as that runs into cold the potential for snow in places. tuesday. as that runs into cold the potentialfor snow in places. you can see the front weakening as it goes but still with the potential to bring snow. it looks very chilly, wintry certainly biting back through the week ahead. looking cold. one of the main tenets of christianity is friendship to your neighbour. but new analysis seen by the bbc suggests the vast majority of people who describe themselves as church of england are opposed to immigration. 87% of anglicans think the number of immigrants coming to britain should be reduced according to university of bristol research. so is it possible to be a christian and opposed to immigration? breakfast‘s graham satchell reports. sausages, bacon and a warm welcome. this is the anglican church of the martyrs in leicester. it is open to everyone. families, students, homeless people, migrants. jane has been helping out here for more than a decade. for me, it is part of my faith to serve and encourage people to help people.
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some people leave their own country not out of choice but because they have to. as a christian, it's about being welcoming, welcoming to the stranger. evernice is just one migrant who's been warmly welcomed, coming to britain from zimbabwe 16 years ago. i felt the same christian principles of loving your neighbour as yourself. it's what they hold dear. so it was easy for them to welcome me because of their christian faith. so surprising then that the vast majority of people who describe themselves as church of england are opposed to immigration. university of bristol researchers analysed a series of british social attitude surveys. they found 87% of anglicans think the number of immigrants coming to britain should be reduced. it compares to 77% of people who say the same thing with no religion. church leaders say they have work to do. we don't have a great history in this country and the church of england of having
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welcomed immigrants, way back since the ‘50s and ‘60s, and we still have a long way to go in order to enable, to help, to educate congregations to be able to express a more fuller welcome to those who both enter our churches and also come to our country. the study also found a difference between those who go to church every week and those who call themselves christian but don't go to church. 66% who regularly go to church say migrant numbers should be reduced whereas its 86% for who say they're christian but rarely attend. the church of england, you go to some of them and it feels like a branch meeting of momentum in some cases. david kurten is a ukip member of the london assembly. he's still a committed christian but stopped going to church after the eu referendum. i was shocked at one point because the vicar of the church was actually against brexit and he started using the pulpit to preach against
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brexit and for people like me who think, well, it's not so much that i've left the church but perhaps the churche has left that me. but aren't christians meant to love your neighbour as yourself? well, absolutely, but that doesn't mean you support rapid mass immigration. back in leicester, breakfast is still going strong. so is it possible to be a christian and be opposed to immigration? richard worsfold is the vicar here. intellectually, i'm sure it's possible for people to make an argument for that. whether i would accept that argument is another matter. there are complex arguments here about cultural attitudes, christian teaching, politics, the difference between economic migrants and refugees. but if the surveys are right, there remains a huge disconnect between the hierarchy in the church and the majority of its congregation. graham satchell, bbc news. time now for a look at sunday's newspapers. the reverend sally hitchiner is here
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to tell us what's caught her eye. welcome. it would be interesting to get your take on that story and what you think about that research, the idea that people who call themselves christian and go to church or am i supposed to immigration compare to people who call themselves christian but don't go to church. i'm not surprised at all. people often use the church of england label to describe their sense of spirituality and, if they are not really wanting to affiliate to anything in particular, but are wanting to have a safe label that they feel is reflective of their sense of god being there, where being important to them, a sense of morality, perhaps, they often will take the church of england as a safe thing for them. sometimes they will go to church once or twice a year as well. that's relatively sensible as a way of doing that. the people who go to church every sunday are hearing from
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a pulpit that you should love your neighbour and welcome refugees will stop why we have people of all political spectrums in churches, and you are vicars, there may well be an ideological shifts towards one or the other. if a fine balance for you about reflecting on what's going on in the worlds and current affairs which then collides with politics, the extent to which when you were preaching you inject what might be a political view, as some would see it, into talking about faith. is a full cycle to me. jesus was very political so he would talk about current issues. people interpret that in different ways. —— it is a false dichotomy. there are different ways of interpreting it but it's not an option to not care about the poor if you are aiming to care about christ. let's dive into the papers. you have picked out this news story from page six of the observer.
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talking about this age—old demonstration and protests and march taking place in london yesterday about the health service. at the queen not —— need to lock let this slip away from us. all sorts of different people saying they are deeply concerned about the levels of cuts the nhs is facing. i am deeply proud of the nhs. you remember the olympic games were that wonderful opening ceremony, when we were posting it here. they highlighted the nhs. we are of the world, as one protester said. with the fact that anybody can get care at the point of access being free. we need to fight for that to be maintained. i think we need to take very seriously when doctors on this scale are telling us that they are concerned. the government would argue it is putting money in but there is always a
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clamourfor more. money in but there is always a clamour for more. this story you picked is to do with a millionaire flat will stop new millionaire flat given the green light.” flat will stop new millionaire flat given the green light. i think this highlights the inequalities we are facing. you hear stories like the tower at granville were just ten miles, ten minutes walk away, there we re miles, ten minutes walk away, there were these million pound flats. over 26,000 of these approved by london councils. if you compare that to just 6,000 for 23 portable homes approved in the whole of london in 2016 to 2017, that's a drop by three times since 2014 to 15. i wonder he was buying them? already we have this problem where these multi—million pound flats are empty and parts of london. if he were really concerned about the exploitation from people from abroad and foreigners coming in, have concern about people buying up high—end properties and is not living in them but renting them at
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dublin property prices in our capital cities and around the country. oligarchs fergie dulner with the money has come from, they have to prove the money is from. that's where we should be putting our concerns that's where we should be putting our concerns about immigration and keeping our nation for what it was intended to be, for us and those who need it. shall we talk about korean beer? you picked out this story from the sunday times. all about the big royal wedding we are counting down to. and advice for megan marko about what she should and should not do the night before. i am a massive fan of the royals. megan has brought such a sense of glamour. as someone who does a lot of
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weddings, don't over do it the night before. we can't legally married to delete—macro before. we can't legally married to delete— macro marry before. we can't legally married to delete—macro marry someone if they have been drinking. have you ever had to not marry someone because you smelt alcohol on their breath? not yet, but i'll always keep a fresh pot of coffee on the go! thank you. stay with us, the headlines are coming up. hello, this is breakfast with chris mason and tina daheley.
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good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. there's a warning this morning from mps that proposed cuts to the royal marines would significantly undermine uk security and must be stopped. there are two things you need to be able to do and that is to exert air
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and land power. if we lose that capability it is hard to see how it will be restored. if anyone can tell us will be restored. if anyone can tell us that we won't need to put marines into a theatre of war in the future will be absurd. a senior conservative mp has accused ministers of being "vague" and "divided" over brexit. bernard jenkin, who was on the board of the official leave campaign, said civil servants deserved an "unambiguous and united direction" from ministers, singling out the chancellor philip hammond for criticism. it comes ahead of key ministerial meetings this week on the uk—eu relationship. scotland yard is looking into two more allegations of sexual assault against the hollywood film producer harvey wein—steen. scotland yard is looking into two more allegations of sexual assault against the hollywood film producer harvey weinstein. it brings the total number of women who have reported him to british police to nine. the actress uma thurman has also alleged he assaulted her on two occasions. she broke her silence in an interview in the new york times. mr weinstein's team say the accusations are false. how airlines seat passengers will be
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investigated in a new review. it comes after accusations that flight operators are deliberately splitting up groups so they pay extra to sit together. the civil aviation authority says passengers are paying as much as £400 million each year to be re—allocated, and one in ten didn't know they would incur an extra cost to sit with loved ones. it's the biggest night in american sport. but football fans heading to tonight's 52nd super bowl in minneapolis will be wrapping up warm. it's expected to be a bone—chilling minus 16 degrees when the action gets under way at 11.30pm uk time. the game will be played indoors but the local authorities have set up a trauma centre near the stadium in case any fans find themselves caught out by the freezing conditions. but as you can see in these pictures, fans are certainly making the most of it all. this lot look well—prepared. this
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quy this lot look well—prepared. this guy is warming his fingertips. imagine if you got caught up in a queue? are you watching it tonight? i doubt it. you know when you work on a story and you talk it up. i've had plenty of those moments. one game, is it just plenty of those moments. one game, is itjust a blip? well, we are talking about the start of the six nations championship. 15 matches,
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but we had two very different matches yesterday. ireland beat the french with a monster of a drop goal. scotland's rugby revival came a cropper at the hands of the welsh, beaten 34—7 at the principlaity stadium. here's our sports correspondentjoe wilson. six nations predictions — scotland had their best chance in decades, wales would struggle with so many injuries. by half—time in cardiff, rethink. commentator: interception, opportunity for wales and it's gareth davies, can anyone catch the scrum—half? davies for the corner, harris can't get there, a try for wales! scotland had a fair bit of the ball early on but wales used it with composure and commonsense. leigh halfpenny scored his first try in five years and then he started the second half with another. no way back now for scotland and for their fourth try wales really turned it on. llanelli scarlet connections all over the pitch.
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west is best, as they say there. steff evans' sense of direction was perfect. 34—7, final score. we've trained really well in the last two weeks and i said to the players, "i think we'll batter them." we took what we've been doing on the training pitch and being clinical and we went out there and produced a really good performance. it's funny, isn't it, in the six nations how emotions and optimism and pessimism can change afterjust one match. in paris, everything changed it seemed in the space of a teddy thomas sprint. finally some french magic in the drizzle. ireland had seemed in control up until this, it meant france led by a point and still they led with the clock turned red. time was gone but ireland still had one last chance if they could get the ball tojonny sexton, if he could get his dropkick to make it. commentator: here it comes... it looks good... he likes it!
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nigel owens' arm goes up! 15-13. two memorable wins in radically different ways. that's the first saturday done. joe wilson, bbc news. they recycled it 40 times before they got it tojonny sexton. no pressure at all. here it goes from behind the post. visit them to make it? he is watching it all the way. yes! johnny sexton is the toast of dublin. the boys worked so hard. all our
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goals would have crumbled if we lost today. it's great to be in the position of getting an away win. england start their championship in rome against italy at 3 o'clock. england's are also the defending champions in the women's six nations. the red roses play after the men at 5.30. ireland's women faced a tough opener against france in toulouse yesterday. the french side were relentless, scoring four tries in total, including two from jade le pesque. 24—0 to them for a bonus point win. two premier league games this afternoon — strugglers newcastle against crystal palace and then what could be a cracker at anfield liverpool taking on tottenham. there were goals everywhere yesterday. a first for alexis sanchez for his new club manchester united — they beat huddersfield — and arsenals new boy pierre emerick aubameyang made an impressive debut
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as they put five past everton. joe lynskey reports. new arrivals at the emirates face a special kind of pressure, but this january, arsenal have gone all out to bring in the best. commentator: mkhitaryaan, in towards aubameyang, he chips the goalkeeper, it's a lovely finish. at £56 million, they'll hope it's just the start of the aubameyang dynasty. but on a day when arsenal put five past everton, it was an old head who broke new ground. a first hat—trick for aaron ramsey in his nine years at the club. and fresh faces have brought fresh hope. it looks like they have the quality to integrate with the game we want to play. they are quick, sharp movement, agile and want the ball. the transfer window puts the strain on football's relationships. february is time to show affection. alexis sanchez marked his old trafford welcome with a first united goal. he is the archetypal modern superstar at a club with a poignant past.
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this was the day they marked 60 years since the munich disaster. tributes were paid, too, at the hawthorns on west brom's first chance to mark one of their own. the death of cyrille regis was felt hardest here. but the emotion couldn't inspire the team to victory. a crucial 3—2 win for southampton leaves albion cut adrift at the bottom. it was a shame because it was a special day in a lot of ways, but obviously not a special result. as much as we sort of have to and puffed in the second half we couldn't find a way to get back into it. pardew‘s side may look in hope to bournemouth to see how quickly things can change. they came from behind to beat stoke and go seven clear of trouble. two wins in four days may have transformed the cherries' season. while at the top, manchester city showed few signs of fading but they are at least showing they‘ re human. commentator: raheem sterling with surely the miss of the season. it's usually city's opponents
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wanting the ground to swallow them up, but this time burnley looked to make city pay. this goal sealed a 1—1 draw and a rare taste of regret for the runaway leaders. they will surely still be future champions, but this was the weekend football paid its respects to its past. joe lynskey, bbc news. there was a rare defeat for celtic in the scottish premiership. they went down 1—0 at kilmarnock, only the second time that they've lost to scottish opposition under brendan rodgers. youssouf mulumbu's first goal in four years gave killie their first win over celtic for five years. aberdeen won yesterdays to cut celtics lead to eight points. you can find the other results on the bbc sport website. great britain are up against it in the davis cup. they have to win both of today's singles rubbers if they're to beat spain in their davis cup world group tie in marbella.
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jamie murray and dominic inglot were beaten in straight sets in the doubles by pablo carreno busta and feliciano lopez yesterday. cameron norrie and liam broady are due to play for gb in the singles but captain leon smith can select kyle edmund if he is fit. you can follow it all on bbc two from 10 o'clock this morning. it could be fantastic, or it could bea it could be fantastic, or it could be a spanish win. kud is the big word. thank you. this is the point where we say goodbye. you are off to read the news on the andrew marr show. yes, i am, you are off to read the news on the andrew marr show. yes, iam, but first, the weather. for many people as we go through
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today, there will be is a lot of sunshine, the sunnier of the two weekend days. yesterday's cloud was responsible for the patchy cloud and he'll slow. still some patchy cloud, but good spells of sunshine coming through. a feed of wintry showers into is anglia and the south east. snow over high ground. blustery winds towards the south—west. north east england seeing a feel showers. this is the picture we are expecting at ten o'clock this morning. spells of sunshine across parts of scotland. i cannot call out a wintry shower anywhere. however, the further west you are, the fewer showers there will be. the strength
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of the wind will have a big effect on the feel of the day. in glasgow 6 degrees will feel like almost 6 degrees, but add on the strength of the wind in london, temperatures will feel closer to freezing. 11 degrees in rome today for the big clash between italy and england in the six nations. under those clear skies it will get very cold here. the most disruptive weather will be in the early hours of monday across the south east. the wintry showers will gang together, mostly bringing snow by this stage. there could be a few centimetres. combine that with the risk of ice and we could have a disruptive rush—hour in parts of the south—east tomorrow. after the fog
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patches clear elsewhere, it's looking like a bright day. temperatures aren't impressive, between three and 6 degrees. this frontal system showing itself in the north—west by the end of the afternoon. there will be further snow going to delete—macro as the day goes on. there was a chance of more snow on tuesday and perhaps more snow on tuesday and perhaps more spells of snow throughout the country during the rest of the week. it is certainly going to feel like winter. it has just it hasjust gone it has just gone quarter to nine. tinnitus may be perceived as a condition that only affects older people. but new research suggests the majority of uk parents are unaware children can also have it. now advice has been sent out to teachers, as there may be one child in every classroom with the hearing condition according to british tinnitus association. we'rejoined now by 10 —year—old george, who has
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tinnitus, and his mum, niki. doctor roya nikkah kennedy is also with us. she is an expert in the condition. thank you for coming in. how is it for you? it is hard sometimes i don't know if it is just background sound or it is just me. it is hard because i don't know if it is real or not. i asked my mum if she can hear it too and sometimes she can hear it too and sometimes she can't. that is really annoying for me because i thought i could hear something but it's not. rome for you as a parent it must be difficult because you can't be sure what george is describing or prior to diagnosis what it was. no. i
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thought he had a hearing problem, so we took him to the doctors. he would come home with headaches and he was emotional and upset by it. getting the diagnosis has helped us a lot. veronica, what is the knitters? the diagnosis has helped us a lot. veronica, what is the knitters7m is any noise you get in your ears. children describe it differently. george can tell is how his is, but some children may say it sounds like a buzzing bee. someone else said it sounded like footsteps. if you are trying to get to sleep and you hear footsteps in the dark, that is quite scary. george, how is it for you in terms of what it sounds like? does it vary or is it the same thing? it's mostly just a it vary or is it the same thing? it's mostlyjust a high—pitched noise. sometimes it can change. once i thought i heard someone screaming, but it turned out it was my two knitters.
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—— tinnitus. -- tinnitus. that must have been scary. this book can help and it has some exercises. we took it to school to show his teacher. we try to explain it through pictures. having someone to talk to clamp the what he means. the key thing is how widespread is it is and how important it is that teachers and others are aware that someone in the class could be dealing with it. it's just as common in children as it is in adults. it has been neglected
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because children might try to tell you, but you have been too busy doing something else, so children feel brushed off. there are a series of books. they relate to different age groups. the workbooks in them, which children are used to doing and it helps them to get their thought out. is there a cure? not so much a cure, but a lot of things can make it easier. if you understand what it is, you have strategies. for a lot of children, and george will tell you, he is a bit ofa of children, and george will tell you, he is a bit of a warrior. if you, he is a bit of a warrior. if you worry, things will get worse. you can work on that and if you are
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less stressed, your tinnitus will fade into the background. and how this school help you, george? when i do hear these noises, my teacher lets me sit in the library and do my work with a friend. does that help? yes? and who you as a parent, are you reassured now that you know what it is? yes. it helped having contact with the school. that's where i worried most because he wouldn't be to talk to me if he was at school. i needed to know that someone will be there doing something to help him. he deals with it so much better now. it'sjust over a year he deals with it so much better now. it's just over a year since he deals with it so much better now. it'sjust over a year since he has been diagnosed and we are a long way on in terms of dealing with things. thank you all for coming in. we really appreciate it. darkest hour, a film depicting winston churchill's war time efforts, could be set for a bumper
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month after being nominated for nine baftas and six oscars. hoping to win an academy award is the team that transformed lead actor gary oldman into the wartime leader. now, the make—up artists behind the transformation are preparing for their own close up on the red carpet. brennan nicholls reports. you cannot reason with a tiger when your head is in its mouth! gary oldman's performance in darkest hour has intime critical acclaim. turning him into churchill has been hailed asa him into churchill has been hailed as a masterpiece in make—up. him into churchill has been hailed as a masterpiece in make—upm takes over three hours to apply the make up. we have to shave his head. it takes almost four hours for make up it takes almost four hours for make up and costume. he would be filming
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all day and then afterwards his make up all day and then afterwards his make up is removed. gary oldman convinced a top make—up artist to come out of retirement to work on the film. it's the bestjob i have done to date and i'm glad it is getting the recognition it deserves because of all the hard work we have put in, as well as all the people behind—the—scenes. so many people are involved. we are getting the credit, but the number of people involved is amazing. the 39-year-old make up artist has a cb full of blockbusters to his name, but this is the first oscar nomination.“ you look at the texture, the broken
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veins around his nose, just spending a bit more time preparing, that's why our days were so long. ijust wanted to paint those pieces perfectly to make sure they match. david flies out to los angeles for the oscar nominations lunch and then he is back for the baftas. he will then go back to los angeles for what could be his finest hour. it's the biggest sporting show on earth. tonight 100 million americans, and millions more around the world will tune in to watch the 52nd super bowl. justin timberlake will perform in the half—time show and advertisers are reportedly paying almost $8 million for a 30 second slot. so what's all the fuss about? we'rejoined now by team gb hockey gold medallist sam quek who's somewhat obsessed with the sport.
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good morning. good morning. why the obsession? what got you hooked? to be honest, i see it as more than a football game, it's a spectacle. i went to wembley to see it and i fell in love with it. it's going to be a spectacle and the scale of it is on another level. in the uk it is getting bigger and bigger and bigger. one of the other things i heard is that over 1.3 billion chicken wings will be consumed. justin timberla ke will chicken wings will be consumed. justin timberlake will be performing. pink will be singing the national anthem. you have pop music, football, sports, you can't miss the
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event. it's all about the statistics. apparently, 25% of americans said the television adverts were the most important aspect of the super bowl. it absolutely huge. you saw the figure, $8 million for 30 seconds. it's not just a normal advert, there will be people like matt damon, gordon ramsay, so much money is spent on this one night of sport. whenever i find myself watching it, i think, i'm not i the
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