Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 11, 2018 6:00pm-6:31pm GMT

6:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines at 6pm. the government threatens to cut off state funding to oxfam and other charities if they fail to properly protect vulnerable people. a russian passenger plane has crashed shortly after taking off from moscow, killing all 71 people on board. the leader of south africa's ruling anc party, cyril ramaphosa, says the future of the country's president, jacob zuma, will be finalised tomorrow. good evening and welcome to bbc news. in a few minutes‘ time, clive myrie will be here with a full round—up of the day's news, when we'll bejoined by viewers on bbc one. but first, the government has threatened to cut off all state funding and help for oxfam and other charities if they fail to ensure that vulnerable people are properly protected.
6:01 pm
the international development secretary, penny mordaunt, has described as "horrific" the behaviour of some of oxfam's workers in haiti, who were accused of using prostitutes in the aftermath of the earthquake there in 2010. and concerns that this could be a wider issue were echoed by the author, and a former president of a charity, dr elaine storkey. yes, it's a horrible idea that there might be even more revelations that we haven't yet seen, and it doesn't surprise me. aid workers in vulnerable places are working their socks off and are open to temptation, but it is very sad that you can imagine them giving into it. in your experience of haiti, how serious a problem is the exploitation of women, and did it get worse after the earthquake? it's similar to the exploitation of women across the world, it's barbaric and relentless, women are prostituted and abused and so on. actually, in defence of the organisations,
6:02 pm
if it weren't for the ngos in places like haiti and chad, the issue of the availability of prostitution would be far worse, massive. so we have to put it in perspective. what you are seeing are very vulnerable women who often have no other means of livelihood, they are poverty stricken, sold into slavery, sex slavery often, and they need to be respected, dignified and helped to exit, rather than exploited. so it's a terrible situation. we have heard from the haitian government over the weekend, the ambassador was with us yesterday, and the government in port—au—prince has spoken today that they are particularly angry, because they say oxfam didn't report it to them, and prostitution is illegal and they would presumably have expected to prosecute the men involved. what calculation do you think the charity would have made? should it have acted differently? all charities are faced with having proper checks and balances
6:03 pm
for all their personnel, the kind of things we would do in the uk if we were appointing anybody to a situation where there are vulnerable adults or children. i would imagine oxfam has those procedures in motion. i haven't seen them, but it would be surprising if they didn't. of course, as well as those safeguarding procedures, they have to have checks and balances and monitor the people working in the area. again, i want to stress that there are many people working for aid agencies all over the world, giving their lives very often, and working their socks off, and we have to see it in perspective to the incredible work they do, even in haiti. haiti wouldn't be where it is at the moment were it not for the timelessness and the amount of money being poured into that country, and the education and vocational schools these ngos have been running. the government warns oxfam it could lose funding, over it's handling of a scandal involving aid workers
6:04 pm
and prostitutes. involving aid workers the international development secretary says the charity lied to her, about the full details of what went on in haiti, seven years ago. of what went on in haiti, if the moral leadership at the top of the organisation isn't there than we cannot have you as a partner. a russian airliner has crashed near moscow, killing all 71 people on board. crashed near moscow, in myanmar borisjohnson sees for himself the villages burned down, forcing rohingya moslems to flee to bangladesh. and, scotland overcome france at murrayfield, to revive their six nations campaign. good evening.
6:05 pm
the government has warned it will cut funding to oxfam, if it cannot adequately explain it's handling of reports of sexual misconduct, by aid workers in haiti. handling of reports of sexual the international development secretary, penny mordant, says the charity had failed in its moral leadership, and lied to her department. in its moral leadership, she'll meet oxfam representatives tomorrow. in response, they've announced new measures, for the prevention and handling of sexual abuse cases. angus crawford reports. of sexual abuse cases. first haiti, now chad, one of the poorest countries on earth. new allegations that oxfam workers paid local women for sex. the charity says it is shocked and dismayed but can't confirm the reports. and dismayed but can't the head of the mission at the time, roland van hauwermeiren, was the same man who five years later in haiti resigned after admitting using prostitutes. later in haiti resigned four others were sacked. later in haiti resigned as the scandal grows, the international development secretary, penny mordaunt, has sent a strong warning to all british charities receiving public money — they will lose the cash if they can't show a robust
6:06 pm
approach to safeguarding. if they can't show a robust i am very clear, it does not matter whether you have a whistle—blowing hotline, it does not matter if you have got good safeguarding practices in place, if the moral leadership at the top of the organisation is not there, we cannot have you as a partner. she said oxfam didn't give her department the full facts about what happened in haiti. give her department the full facts it's about, was there any harm done? give her department the full facts was there any involvement of the beneficiaries of aid involved? was there any impact on them? the beneficiaries of aid involved? and they told us categorically no. the beneficiaries of aid involved? and they also told us... the beneficiaries of aid involved? that was a lie, wasn't it? the beneficiaries of aid involved? they also told us... the beneficiaries of aid involved? that was a lie, wasn't it? the beneficiaries of aid involved? well, quite. the beneficiaries of aid involved? at a meeting tomorrow, the charity will be given one last chance or be stripped of its taxpayer funding. bbc news asked oxfam for an interview. the request was refused. for an interview. but in a statement, its trustees announced a series of reforms, to strengthen the vetting and recruitment of staff,
6:07 pm
set up an external whistle—blowing helpline, and bring in mandatory safeguarding training for new employees. there have been more revelations about other charities, too. reports that christian aid, save the children and the british red cross have all investigated staff over sexual misconduct allegations. staff over sexual some who know the sector well are not surprised. people need to realise that the vast majority of aid work in crisis situations is extraordinary, it saves lives, it helps people who are very vulnerable, but aid agencies need to do more so that the best people are going into these areas, they are monitored, and these people who are very vulnerable, they have a voice in how this unfolds. who are very vulnerable, they have the government is now demanding every charity receiving taxpayers‘ money disclose all past and current cases of sexual misconduct. a scandal affecting one charity is now threatening to engulf the entire sector. charity is now threatening angus crawford, bbc news. charity is now threatening
6:08 pm
a russian airliner has crashed near moscow, killing all 71 people on board. crashed near moscow, the plane operated by saratov airlines, was en route to the city of orsk in the ural mountains, when it came down near the village of argunovo, minutes after take off. sarah rainsford has the details. minutes after take off. the minutes after take off. remains of the flight are scattered the remains of the flight are scattered in the snow in fields just outside moscow. the fragments of a plane that plunged to the ground minutes after take—off. everyone on board has been killed. the aircraft was an—148 operated by saratov airlines. it says the plane itself shown here was just eight years old and the pilot was experienced. the flight
6:09 pm
and the pilot was experienced. the flight took off from moscow heading for orsk flight took off from moscow heading for0rsk in flight took off from moscow heading for orsk in southern russia and it disappeared from radar is moments later. there was no emergency call from the crew. in orsk tonight there is despair. relatives of the 71 passengers and crew have been gathering but they have been told there is no hope of any survivors. medics have been sent to help calm and comfort them. at the crash site outside moscow, the day breed is spread over a wide area. it was mid—afternoon and people in nearby villagers say they saw the plane full from the sky. this man says it came down in pieces. others have described seeing the flash of an explosion first. police have now cordoned off the area as teams are sentin cordoned off the area as teams are sent in to search for bodies. one flight sent in to search for bodies. one flight recorder has been found but there are no clues yet as to what caused this disaster. the freezing conditions arejust one caused this disaster. the freezing conditions are just one of many factors that investigators are looking at as they continue their
6:10 pm
work here through the night. sarah raynsford, bbc news, in central russia. the uncle of an 11 year old girl, who was stabbed to death in wolverhampton, has been charged with murder. jasmine forrester was found seriously injured in a house, in the early hours of friday morning, and died later in hospital. delroy forrester, is due to appear in court tomorrow. a five—year—old boy who died after falling into a fast—flowing river in county antrim, has been named as kayden fleck. it happened yesterday on the braid river at ballymena. his body was recovered an hour and a half later, four miles downstream. an hour and a half later, theresa may and some of her senior ministers, are expected to give a series of speeches in the coming weeks, giving more details of the government's brexit plans. it follows criticism that not enough is known about what the future relationship might be, once the uk leaves the european union. once the uk leaves our political correspondent iain watson is here with me will the prime minister be able to silence her critics? is
6:11 pm
to silence her critics? this likely to work? they are hoping is this likely to work? they are hoping that is the case. the government has been accused of kicking the can down the road on the negotiations but within three weeks, that will stop. the tin opener will come out and we will see the contents, the prime minister will be setting out her future vision and some of her ministers will be filling in details. it is a rather tricky task before we get there, to negotiate a transition period for the couple of years after brexit and a spanner was the couple of years after brexit and a spanner was put into the works last week when the commission suggested that britain could face sanctions if it did not apply eu rules during that time. david davis accused them of acting in bad faith. tonight there is growing confidence that the commission will rethink its approach and david davis has been revisiting european capitals to persuade them to persuade the commission to reach a reasonable deal. the commission is sticking to its line, they are saying that a transition period is still not a
6:12 pm
given and that phrase will send a shiver up the spine of british businesses. thank you. the leader of south africa's ruling anc party cyril ramaphosa, says the future of the country's president jacob zuma, will be finalised tomorrow. speaking in cape town at an event marking the centenary of the birth of nelson mandela, mr ramaphosa made it clear that if the president didn't resign, he'd be asked to step down on monday. mr zuma's eight years in office have been marred by numerous corruption allegations. been marred by numerous we are currently engaged, comrades, in discussions around the transition to a new administration and specifically to resolve the issues and the position of the president of the republic of south africa. of the president of the republic the foreign secretary borisjohnson, has held talks with myanmar‘s leader aung san suu kyi, over the rohingya refugee crisis. hundreds of thousands of people have
6:13 pm
been forced to leave myanmar, seeking shelter in neighbouring bangladesh, following a military crackdown, and violence from pro government militias. mrjohnson has called for the safe return of all refugees to their homes, and a full investigation into the violence in rakhine state. investigation into the violence reeta chakrabarti is travelling with the foreign secretary. her report does contain some flash photography. among the burnt out remains at a rohingya home, borisjohnson took in a chilling sight, the charred remains of a former life. sight, the charred he found the site himself although his visit to this region was heavily controlled by the myanmar authorities. can by the myanmar authorities. you work out where ti was? he travels from village was? to village by helicopter, was? from the air you could see whole areas raised to the ground. it is where the myanmar military and buddhist mobs are accused of pogroms against the rohingya. and buddhist mobs are accused
6:14 pm
these pictures of burning villages in the area were filmed by the bbc last year. in the area were filmed you in the area were filmed genuinely have no idea whl it? some rohingya are still here and were brought out by the myanmar authorities to speak to boris johnson. all denied any knowledge of who had destroyed their village. this habitation has clearly been burnt out and deserted. one of the rohingya villagers that i spoke to a little earlier, told me in english, i hope you understand, we are in a very bad situation and unhappy. you understand, we are in a very bad he didn't dare tell me who had burnt this village. one government minister accompanying us told me it was what he called rohingya terrorists who turned on their own people and set fire to their homes. on their own people and set what do you think happened here? on their own people and set a terrorist attack against them. on their own people and set definitely on their own people and set that. earlier in the capital, a meeting with aung san suu kyi, who has attracted international condemnation for not speaking up for the rohingya. condemnation for not speaking what came of their talks?
6:15 pm
condemnation for not speaking i don't think it has come through to her, the whole extent, the horror of what has happened. through to her, the whole extent, it is absolutely devastating and i think what is needed now is some leadership. and i think what is needed some calm, but some leadership, working with the un agencies to get these people back home. working with the un agencies to get but this is what awaits any rohingya who do come back. a settlement with high fences and barbed wire. the myanmar government calls this a reception centre. to date, no one has returned to live here. reeta chakra barti, bbc news, myanmar. now, with all the sport, here's lizzie greenwood hughes, at the bbc sport centre. here's lizzie greenwood hughes, thanks very much. here's lizzie greenwood hughes, good evening. here's lizzie greenwood hughes, scotland fought back to beat france for their first win in this year's rugby union 6 nations championship. for their first win in this year's they won 32 points to 26 in a tight game at murrayfield asjohn watson reports. in a tight game at murrayfield murrayfield
6:16 pm
in a tight game at murrayfield roused for the first time in murrayfield roused for the first time in this year's 6 nations. france was the first to find their flow. thommo questioning the scottish faithful. this much was expected before defeat to wales, much was demanded. shauna maitland answering the call. having found his stride, thommo collected his kick, laidlaw did not. a response again was needed, huw jones laidlaw did not. a response again was needed, hquones bandit and a hole in the french defence. tries the tale of the first half, pal —— points from penalties in the second. greg laidlaw nervous edging scotland in front. if errors cost them in cardiff, laidlaw punished french m ista kes cardiff, laidlaw punished french mistakes at murrayfield to revive their campaign. scotland proving they are happiest at home. john watson, bbc news. ireland beat italy in the women's 6 nations... megan williams scored their first try and first points of the tournament in the 21—8 win in dublin. newcastle stunned second—placed
6:17 pm
manchester united in the premier league for... theirfirst home win in the league since october... theirfirst home win matt ritchie scored the only goal of the game in the second half. the result means united are still 16 points behind leaders manchester city. are still 16 points behind elsewhere huddesfield beat bournemouth 4—1 and liverpool are 2 — 0 against southampton. bournemouth 4—1 and liverpool are 2 rangers recovered from a poor start in the scottish cup to thrash ayr united 6—1 and reach the quarter—finals. josh windass scoring twice in the snow at somerset park. aberdeen are also through. in the snow at somerset park. now on a freezing—cold day 2 of the winter oympics in south korea, cross country skier andrew musgrave very nearly gave team gb its first medal of the games... the scotsman, who learnt his sport on roller—skis, finished 7th in the ski—athlon after helping set the pace until the final lap of the 30 kilometre course. the pace until the final lap our correspondent andy swiss was watching in pyeongchang. the winter olympics at their most
6:18 pm
wintry, —16 and bone chilling winds but andrew musgrave was about to warm the spirits. and they are underway. cross—country skiing is not a traditional olympic strength for britain, their previous best, the 20 ninth place in sochi for andrew musgrave. with barely a lap to go, there he was remarkably in silver medal position. could he hang on? not quite as the norwegian raced to the old, musgrave faded to seven but with his best events still to come, that is some feat. what a result for andrew musgrave, he could not quite get that first medal for britain but even so, the performance of his life. with a lap and a half to go, i was pretty confident and i thought i would be able to get a medal. ijust could not quite keep up medal. ijust could not quite keep up that pace. it was pretty tough.
6:19 pm
ona day up that pace. it was pretty tough. on a day when some events were postponed due to high winds, one man sword. at the age ofjust 17, postponed due to high winds, one man sword. at the age ofjust17, the american spinning to snowboarding gold, a teenage triumph to light up these games. andy swiss, bbc news. there's much more on the winter olympics on the bbc sport website where you can also watch all the action and highlights... but from me for now — back to you. all the action and highlights... that's it. all the action and highlights... i'll be back with the late news at ten, but now on bbc1, it's time for the news where you are. bye for now. where you are. hello. this is bbc news. more than a third of child deaths and serious injuries caused by neglect in england are linked to parents who drink too much, according to a new parliamentary report.
6:20 pm
it also found that nearly all councils have cut their budgets for alcohol support services. our health correspondent, adina campbell, has more. dad of sixjosh connelly knows first—hand about the damage alcohol can have on a family. his father was an alcoholic, and died when he was nine. i remember one particular incident, he smashed all the windows through, by the door, and he was waving a knife through one of the windows, and the police coming up and taking him away. at the same time i was trying to deal with it all, you're also trying to keep it secret, so it is about just suppressing it, and then you naturally get unhealthy coping mechanisms. the impact of parents abusing alcohol in england are outlined in a new parliamentary report. it found more than a third of child deaths and serious injuries through neglect were linked
6:21 pm
to parents drinking alcohol. while nearly two—thirds of all care applications involved misuse of alcohol or drugs. and children with alcohol dependent parents had feelings of stigma, shame and guilt. the report also used data from a freedom of information investigation, which found almost all councils in england are cutting back their budgets for this kind of care. the government says work is under way on a new children of alcoholics strategy, in addition to new higher duties to target cheap alcohol. josh has turned his life around, but he believes there are many children who will end up suffering in silence. adina campbell, bbc news. the government has mounted a fierce attack on the way oxfam handled allegations of sexual misconduct, accusing the aid agency
6:22 pm
of a failure of "moral leadership". ministers have warned that funding would be withdrawn from any charity that couldn't show proper governance. oxfam received £32 million from the government in the last financial year. it's responded by announcing further measures to improve the management of staff. we can speak now to andrew macleod, who's a visiting professor at king's college london and was a senior adviser to the un. he currently works for the charity hear their cries, which fights sexual exploitation. he joins us live via webcam in central london. let me ask you first, what do you make of the response that oxfam has given to the exposure of these stories, not the least its argument that it's done it a lot since 2011, in terms of improving safeguarding? rubbish, it's weak and its light. go back to what happened. this oxfam person was accused of having sex orgies with prostitutes, some might
6:23 pm
have been underage, it's not proved they were, but it's not been proved that they weren't. at minimum, this oxfa m that they weren't. at minimum, this oxfam person broke the law in haiti, and oxfam didn't even report this person to the haitians. if the prostitutes were underage, this man has broken uk sex tourism laws. if oxfa m has broken uk sex tourism laws. if oxfam were serious, and i challenge oxfa m oxfam were serious, and i challenge oxfam to do this, going down to scotla nd oxfam to do this, going down to scotland yard tomorrow with all of the information and asking scotland ya rd to the information and asking scotland yard to do an investigation, work these prostitutes underage or not, and if they were, this man has broken uk sex tourism laws, and oxfa m broken uk sex tourism laws, and oxfam leaders may have broken the law by aiding and abetting this man. if they were serious, they would be down at scotland yard and asking scotla nd down at scotland yard and asking scotland yard to investigate for the you know the charity sector, and this is striking statistic in the sunday times coverage of this story, suggesting that 120 workers from different charities, who are british, have been accused in the
6:24 pm
last year or so of some kind of sexual abuse. obviously, that covers a lot of situations, it could be harassment of colleagues, it might not be out in other countries, and some of those allegations might not be substantiated or true but is that afair be substantiated or true but is that a fair reflection of the scale of the problem? no, it's the tip of the iceberg. we estimate there are 60,000 victims of the un peacekeeping loans in the last ten yea rs peacekeeping loans in the last ten years to see that calculation, go to the website of hear their cries. i was an aid worker, i spent the 90s in yugoslavia and rwanda, the 2000 in pakistan and afghanistan, and i know the industry well. the problem is you have a lot of white men in positions of power, with a lot of wealth, going to underprivileged countries where the rule of law has broken down, and abuse takes place. we've got to understand, for the mums and dads, your viewers who want their taxpayer dollars or charitable donations to good food, we have a
6:25 pm
duty to make sure that good is done for the new majority of aid workers are good people, but like the catholic church, there is a small number of people who are doing the most venous access, and we only know that the charity is taking it seriously not if they report to the charity commission but to the police. —— a small knot of people are doing the most heinous acts of these people are breaking sex tourism laws and need to go to jail we spoke earlier to elaine storkey, a former president of a charity, what a lot on sexual exploitation in countries like haiti, and she said that she understands all of the angen that she understands all of the anger. she said you've got to keep it in perspective, and i'm sure you would share that view, that aid workers are an insult in this activity and will be appalled, but she was concerned there is a risk that, in a sense, in the moral anger that, in a sense, in the moral anger that politicians and journalists sweep up, the people could end up
6:26 pm
getting hurt will be people in countries in need, because people will stop giving money and governments would withdraw funding. yes, and that's a valid concern. what i'm saying is you should jail perpetrators. you can threaten to cut aid to individual charities if they do not undertake to nominate their staff to the police if they are accused of priti patel, the former secretary of state for international development, has written to the un, asking for a new protocol, that whenever there is an accusation against a uk national tour uk staff are, the uk prosecuting authorities and the un should do is a joint investigation, it is that oxfam has done an internal investigation first, and i think whenever there is an accusation, especially for child sex crime, the british authorities need to be brought in right away, because people are breaking uk laws. if a charity not undertake to immediately inform the british prosecuting
6:27 pm
authorities, you cut the funding to that charity, but you are right, don't risk that absolutely important humanitarian development aid that needs to go around the world, don't tar every aid worker with the brush, but here's the thing, it isn't the individual rapist that is really evil, the real evil is the administrators, the ceos and trustees who, for two to three decades, have been turning a blind eye to this issue on this issue goes back to the 1990s, kofi annan mentioned it in his book, ban ki—moon mentioned it, it's been going on for three decades and it's time to stop, and we are only stopping when individual perpetrators go to jail and trustees go to jailfor perpetrators go to jail and trustees go tojailforaiding and perpetrators go to jail and trustees go to jailfor aiding and abetting. professor andrew macleod, involved in the charity hear their cries, which fight sexual exploitation, thank you for being with us. time for a look at the weather with tomasz. the and today but also some insurers
6:28 pm
and sending in some beautiful pictures. this is a nice one from molly from antrim in northern ireland, continuing with those showers do this evening and into tomorrow. this low pressure moved over us tomorrow. this low pressure moved over us during last night, rattling our windows in
6:29 pm
6:30 pm

33 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on