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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  February 12, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news — and these are the top stories developing at 11. oxfam is summoned to a meeting with a government minister over allegations some of its staff used prostitutes in haiti — future funding could be in doubt. becky dobson, a veterinary receptionist from worthing, has been named as one of the the britons killed in a helicopter crash over the grand canyon in the united states. jason hill, who was 32, and 30 year old stuart hill also died in the accident, while three other britons, and the pilot, were injured. south africa's governing party is meeting shortly to discuss the future of presidentjacob zuma. it's new leader says mr zuma must stand down or be forced out. also theresa may and the irish prime minister, leo vardkar, are visiting belfast today. it prompts speculation that the democratic unionists and sinn fein are close to a deal on restoring the devolved government at stormont. more details are released about the
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royal wedding. icy winds tore through the mountains at the pyeongchang olympics — wreaking havoc at the snowboard final. alpine skiing had to be postponed for a second day. good morning. it's monday 12th february. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. senior officials at oxfam will today try to convince the international development secretary that they should keep their millions of pounds a year in government funding. it follows revelations that aid workers used prostitutes in haiti in 2011 after an earthquake. the charity's been accused of concealing the full findings of an investigation, which led to four people being sacked and three others resigning. oxfam denies claims of a cover up. our diplomatic correspondent, james landale reports. the allegations of sexual misconduct
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by oxfam aid workers in haiti in 2011 have threatened notjust the charity's reputation, but also the £32 million it gets each year from the government. the international development secretary, penny mordaunt, has threatened to withhold the cash, unless oxfam shows the moral leadership she thinks it's lacked in the way its handled the scandal thus far. the charity has been accused of covering up the full scale of the allegations, that includes staff holding parties with prostitutes. today, ms mordaunt will meet senior figures from the charity and ask them to hand over everything they know about past and current abuses. i'm affording them the opportunity to tell me in person what they did after these events, and i'm going to be looking to see if they are displaying the moral leadership that i think they need to now. ms mordaunt wants to know more about the concerns staff had about the recruitment of workers in haiti,
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and she wants to know what oxfam is doing to stop it ever happening again. ms mordaunt will also meet the charity commission to discuss what more can be done to regulate non—governmental organisations. oxfam has apologised and says it will take further action to improve the safeguarding, vetting and recruitment of staff. james landale, bbc news. let's speak to our correspondent matt cole. that meeting between oxfam and the government is imminent, what questions are oxfam facing? the questions are oxfam facing? the questions which could face the future of the £33 million at mysteries from the government. the government will want to know what oxfa m government will want to know what oxfam knew about the allegations, how thoroughly the investigated and did they cover it up? if they did, maybe they were fearful that people would stop donating large sums. they have to be clear about how clear
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they were about investigating and they were about investigating and the men who resigned or were sacked, what happened next? were they given references and the big 0 on to work for other aid agencies? growing questions for the charity commission as well. it is the regulator and knew that oxfam was looking into this business. the bbc asked them this business. the bbc asked them this morning why they did not do more? they did say they were investigating some allegations of sexual misconduct. why was that not investigated further? it was not clear what the extent and seriousness was. they assured us, the categorically said there was no abuse of beneficiaries. they did not describe allegations of possible crimes, including those involving minors. priti patel has been writing
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about this, claiming that officials in her department at the time did not push investigations on all of this that she wanted to push. in terms of what penny mordaunt will look at today, how much danger is oxfa m look at today, how much danger is oxfam aid's grant end? pretty important if they do not meet the targets and child protection. quite. penny mordaunt was blunt at a big un meeting. there have been warnings in the sector for 20 years that sexual predators have been targeting disaster relief agencies so priti patel was pushing about that at a big un mission. penny mordaunt is no questioning whether they should keep theirfunding and questioning whether they should keep their funding and for her officials
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about whether priti patel has said is true about what happened in the past. —— about what. they are going to be concerned that they will have to be concerned that they will have to come up with some strong answers. 0xfa m to come up with some strong answers. 0xfam is not alone, other agencies talk about the difficulties they have faced. save the children volu nteers have faced. save the children volunteers the information that they have had cases of sexual harassment which led to ten people having their cases handed over to the authorities. another charity said they need a passport system where anyone working in the sector can be signed off to make sure that predators can have very little room to carry out such behaviour. thank you very much. we will keep you updated on that story. 0ur correspondent will grant is in the haitian capital port au prince. he described how people there were reacting. by and large the reaction in haiti to the 0xfam scandal has been twofold. 0n the one hand there is deep anger, resentment at the fact that this organisation,
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ostensibly here to help the country's most vulnerable after the 2010 earthquake, ended up exploiting those people instead. and there is a certain degree of resignation. people here say that the sorts of abuses that are happening were well known. we have reached out to people in the charity sector who say they have certainly heard rumours, and they point to a wider culture of abuse they say has been happening among international organisations. they point at the un peacekeeping force, for example, a very high—profile case of alleged sexual abuse of minors, and the fact the un peacekeeping force was said to have introduced cholera to this country. as for 0xfam, they say they're going to work hard to rebuild public trust, in britain, in their reputation. in fact, they already have a very, very long way to go to rebuild trust in haiti again, too. three british tourists have died in a helicopter crash
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in the grand canyon in the us state of arizona. 27—year—old becky dobson, a veterinary receptionist from worthing, has been named as one of the victims. three other british passengers and the pilot were badly hurt. the foreign office says its providing support to the families of the victims in las vegas — from where our correspondent, james cook, reports. the helicopter came down in rocky, remote terrain, bursting into flames. it appears the survivors were able to get out, despite suffering serious injuries. but three britons on board died at the scene. 27—year—old becky dobson, 30—year—old stuart hill, and jason hill, who was 32. for the survivors, three young britons and the pilot, the ordeal was far from over. rescuers, including local military personnel, were flown in, but had to walk to the crash site using night vision. it was more than eight hours before the injured were flown to hospital in las vegas.
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we weren't able to extract anyone until two this morning. high winds, brown—out dust conditions, rugged terrain, and as you know when you fly in treacherous conditions like this, you have to have special training and special people. it's not clear what caused the crash, which involved a eurocopter ec130. the tour company, papillon airways, says it is the world's largest aerial sightseeing outfits, flying 600,000 people a year. in 2001, six people died when another of the firm's grand canyon helicopters crashed. the foreign office says it is now providing support to the british families of this weekend's victims. james cook, bbc news, los vegas. weeks of negotiations have failed. patience has run out.
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now the leader of south africa's ruling party — the anc — has made it clear that if presidentjacob zuma doesn't quit before a meeting this afternoon, then he'll be asked to step down. president zuma is facing multiple allegations of corruption. sarah corker has more. at an event marking 100 years since the birth of nelson mandela, there was the clearest signal yet that the end of the troubled presidency ofjacob zuma is near. addressing crowds at cape town, anc leader and south african president in waiting, cyril ramaphosa, promised a resolution and decision of the future of jacob zuma. we are currently engaged in discussions around the decisions to a new administration and specifically to resolve the issues of the position of the president of the republic of south africa. for the last week mr ramaphosa and jacob zuma have been
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negotiating the president's exit strategy but with the country in limbo, the anc national executive committee is holding a special meeting later. it is thought the party's governing body will formally ask a jacob zuma to resign. he has faced increasing pressure to quit since december when he lost control of the governing anc. his presidency has been marred by corruption scandals, struggling economy and soaring unemployment. the organisation does not belong to family, does not belong to me, does not belong to this lady, it belongs to everybody in this country. we're degree graduates, we have nojobs. we go door—to—door handing out cvs, we have nojobs. whether he's pushed or resigns, jacob zuma will soon be out of power with cyril ramaphosa
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poised to take his place. if this speech is anything to go by, he is planning to get tough on corruption. chris vandome is an african analyst at the independent international affairs thinktank — chatham house. thank you for coming in. if the anc national executive committee asks presidentjacob national executive committee asks president jacob zuma to national executive committee asks presidentjacob zuma to step down, will be typicalfor presidentjacob zuma to step down, will be typical for him to say no to them? it will be difficult for him to say no but not beyond the bounds of possibility. it is similar to when the previous president was recalled by the national executive committee but jacob zuma recalled by the national executive committee butjacob zuma is playing more tough. there is a real chance he could say no in which case you would have to go to a motion of no confidence in parliament. with the constitution, they would have to
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vote him out of office. a motion of no confidence has been tabled by the opposition for next thursday but it would be rude —— likely the ruling party would want that to be brought forward. this situation with these corruption allegations have gone on for some time already, if he refuses to go as requested, how much further damage does this do to the reputation of the anc? this is a real opportunity for cyril rama poser to save the reputation of their anc. there have been long periods of patronage and corruption underjacob zuma which have done real damage to the party. it is an opportunity for him to get off on the right boots but he will have to be careful because some people in their party have benefited from this patronage network. some have voted forjacob zuma and will not want this to be seen as a witchhunt ought
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to be on release. how much damage has been done to the legacy of nelson mandela at this point, with the anc marking the 100th anniversary of his birth? there's a lot being said about the cyril rama poser and we know it is likely that he was the favourite successor of nelson mandela. there is our lot of hope around him, in terms of the last ten years, the ruling party has presided over a party where there has been a paralysis, right from the top level it has been about political survival rather than long—term strategic thinking. they have as demonstrated institution builder and a development plan in cyril ramaphosa. how has president
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jacob zuma managed to hang on so long with these corruption allegations over him, because of the patronage? yes and also he has survived successive motions of no confidence in parliament which shows thatis confidence in parliament which shows that is still this culture within the anc of sticking together. that is the culture which is borne out of its history of a liberation movement performing underground. thank you very much for your thoughts on that. for more, let's go to lebo diseko who joins us from johannesburg. we are waiting to see what the outcome of that meeting will be.
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some people are saying president jacob zuma wants immunity from prosecution. we have a separation of the judiciary prosecution. we have a separation of thejudiciary here, it is prosecution. we have a separation of the judiciary here, it is very independent. also speculation that he wants his legal fees to be paid by the state, the allegations being that the allegations from state ca ptu re that the allegations from state capture come from when he was president of the country so he has a right to defend himself and the state should pay for that. cyril ramaphosa had said that if president jacob zuma with step—down, this would happen in a way which enhances political unity in south africa, is that wishful thinking on his part? will he persuades presidentjacob zuma to go at this stage and will that aid political unity? that is
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certainly do hope. i was listening to your african analyst about the support that jacob zuma has, he to your african analyst about the support thatjacob zuma has, he is very popular in especially the rural regions and the townships. also an area which has seen a lot of political violence. he has a fair amount of support within the anc as well. you remember we are going towards an election here, they want towards an election here, they want to avoid going into a campaign with a party which is split and fractures. and with the supporters ofjacob fractures. and with the supporters of jacob zuma believing fractures. and with the supporters ofjacob zuma believing he is hard done by. he is facing allegations, nothing has been proved as yet. good to talk to you, thank you very much for that. the headlines. 0xfam is summoned to a meeting with the government over allegations that
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some of the staff used prostitutes in haiti, its future funding could be in doubt. becky dobson is one of the britons who died in a helicopter crash over the grand canyon. theresa may and the irish prime minister are in belfast today, prompting speculation that the democratic unionist party and sinn fein may be close to a deal to restore it is —— devolved government. crosswinds affected the action at the winter 0lympics today. it was touch and go whether the final would go ahead but it did. greig laidlaw was the hero of scotla nd it did. greig laidlaw was the hero of scotland as they beat france in the six nations on sunday. he kicked 22 points as they register their first win in the competition. newcastle united have won their
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first premier league home game since 0ctober, beating manchester united. 0nly 0ctober, beating manchester united. only one goal in the game. more sport later. theresa may and the irish prime minister, leo varadkar, are to visit belfast today for talks with northern ireland's main parties. there are growing indications that the democratic unionist party and sinn fein may be close to a deal to restore devolved government — although a dup source has said agreement is unlikely today. the last administration led by the two parties collapsed more than a year ago. let speak to our correspondent in belfast, keith doyle. —— let us speak to norman smith. they would not be going to belfast if there was not a fair chance to get this deal over the line?|j if there was not a fair chance to get this deal over the line? i think thatis get this deal over the line? i think that is true. there is the suggestion that is growing confidence there will be a deal, but
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whether it is today is questionable. deadlines tend to come and go in northern ireland. sinn fein may be relu cta nt to northern ireland. sinn fein may be reluctant to give up win to theresa may in the irish premier. it could drag on for a few more days but there is a sense both sides are moving towards some form of agreement. listening to arlene foster over the weekend, she was seeing progress had been made. the deputy in dublin stressed this week was a decisive move forward. there was a decisive move forward. there was a decisive move forward. there was a clear warning from the head of the civil service in northern ireland that unless there was an agreement, he suggested by february eight, then he would have to set the budget for the forthcoming year. that means a whole raft of decisions which may be regarded as political decisions, such as reform plans for the nhs, simply will not be taken. all the big debate —— spending
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decisions will be on ice for another year. that will focus minds and sinn fein and the dup so that both sides really do have to get some sort of agreement nailed down quickly. give us agreement nailed down quickly. give us your thoughts, there are lots of detailed issues in northern ireland that need to be sorted out like legacy and irish language for instance, in terms of the deal between the dup and theresa may, in terms of the border question in the big sick negotiations, how do those two things play into what will be happening today? all the signs are that the key issue which has to be solved —— resolved above everything is the irish language parity with english. that is something on which sinn fein cannot compromise. therefore there will have to be some sort of language or some mechanism
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to enable both sides to sign up to that. it has been suggested there may be two or three pieces of legislation, one for the irish language act, one first scots— ulster language which the dup have been pressing for and another piece of legislation looking at other cultural issues. you may end up with all sorts of separate arrangements to accommodate the different sides. it does seem that the issue of the irish language is a pivotal issue. 0ther irish language is a pivotal issue. other issues like same—sex marriage and legacy issues, more so the language issue seems to be the one which has to be salts which will need accommodation on both sides. thank you very much for that. barclays bank has been charged over a 2.2 billion pound loan it made to qatar ten years ago.
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the serious fraud office believes the loan was unlawful, alleging that the money was used to buy shares in the bank. barclays says it will defend the charges and does not expect customers to be affected. london city airport has been closed after the discovery of an unexploded second world war bomb. the airport will be shut all day and all flights have been cancelled, affecting up to 16,000 passengers. the device was found in the nearby river thames. passengers are being urged to check with their airlines before travelling today. a massive search is continuing in snow—covered fields outside moscow where a russian passenger plane crashed on sunday, killing all 71 people on board. hundreds of people are looking for bodies and wreckage from the airliner, which came down minutes after taking off. steve rosenberg reports. in frozen fields near moscow, this is all that remains of flight 703. cctv cameras captured the moment the aircraft smashed into the ground and exploded in a fireball.
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its wreckage strewn for a mile across the russian countryside, half buried in the snow. conditions were treacherous. the emergency services struggled through snowdrifts to reach the crash scene, but it quickly became clear this was no rescue operation. theirjob was to recover the bodies. the saratov airlines flight had taken off from moscow's domodedovo airport with more than 70 people on board. it was bound for 0rsk, 900 miles south—east of moscow in the ural mountains. but minutes after take—off, the plane disappeared from radar. it had crashed near the russian capital. "we saw it burning up in the sky," this eyewitness says, "then it fell. there was a blast, a loud boom." it's unclear what caused the antonov 148 jet to fall out of the sky.
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the kremlin has ordered an urgent investigation. president putin offered his condolences to the families of the victims. but that is little comfort to the relatives and friends of those on board flight 703. at 0rsk airport, grief mixed with disbelief as people realised they had been waiting for loved ones who would never arrive. emergency teams are still searching for victims of this crash and for clues to what caused it. an update on that meeting which is taking place between 0xfam and the international debate —— development secretary over the allegations that 0xfa m
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secretary over the allegations that 0xfam workers used prostitutes in haiti in the wake of the earthquake in 2011, a spokesman for theresa may confirmed those meetings are happening today. also a meeting with the charities commission as well and the charities commission as well and the government will consider what next steps need to be taken. a spokesman for theresa may also said the international aid ministry has taken action to encourage a zero tolerance approach to sex abuse allegations. the government clearly wa nts to allegations. the government clearly wants to go further and see what else can do to ensure that allegations of this nature do not arise again. that is the latest we have on that meeting which is beginning around now. prosecutors in new york state have filed a lawsuit against the company of the film producer harvey weinstein, who's been accused of sexual abuse by more than seventy women. the state's attorney general alleged that the firm had been guilty of vicious mistreatment of employees. the father of an 8—year—old girl is due to appear in court
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charged with her murder. mylee billingham was found with knife wounds at the home of herfather, william billingham, in walsall last month. she was taken to hospital but pronounced dead shortly afterwards. an nhs campaign is telling parents to take children to a pharmacist if they only have a minor illness. the ads, featuring the voice of a young child, aim to relieve the pressure on gp's surgeries. here's our health correspondent, james gallagher. morning. how can i help? i'd like some advice for my daughter, please. when the kids are ill and you need medical advice, do you think of the pharmacy? this nhs campaign says tummy troubles, teething, and coughs are all best dealt with by a high street pharmacist. it's part of a drive to relieve pressure on doctors' time. figures released as part of the stay well pharmacy campaign estimates around 18 million gp appointments each year and more than 2 million a&e visits are for patients that could be
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treated with over—the—counter medication. it says the appointments cost the nhs more than £850 million each year. pharmacists are highly trained healthcare professionals. they train for five years in the use of medicines and how to get the best out of using medicines, but also in how to treat minor illness, minor disease, and, really importantly, how to understand when perhaps it's more serious and people need to seek extra help. i feel so dreadful! the patients association said the campaign had some merits, but said anyone with a health concern should feel able to turn to their gp. the pharmacy isjust around the corner. i can go and see a fully trained healthcare professional, no appointment needed! james gallagher, bbc news. kensington palace has announced more
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details of the wedding of prince harry and meghan markle to at windsor castle. the service will start at midday meaning there is good news for football fans at it is unlikely to cash with the fa cup final. a royal correspondent reports. it will take place in the historic setting of saint georges chapel and the 19th of may. the service will begin at midday with the dean of winchester officiating and the archbishop of canterbury conducting the manage. room within the chapel is limited, space for 800 guests. after the service is over, the couple will set off in a carriage procession through the centre of windsor and back to the castle for a reception in st george's hall. the carriage procession will fill the pledge lee mead at the time of their engagement to make it possible for members of
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the public to feel part of the occasion. —— fill the pledge they made. hopefully the weather will be better than it is just no, we have the latest. it looks like spring with these flowers coming out. but it is still freezing. some snow and ice this morning, affecting northern and western parts of the uk. snow showers will continue to feed into the west of scotland and the north of scotland, maybe some wintry flurries elsewhere but most of us haveit flurries elsewhere but most of us have it dry and sunny. temperatures 6-8dc. have it dry and sunny. temperatures 6—8dc. this evening and tonight, temperatures drop quickly. a frost in central and eastern areas but cloud increases in the west, with rain accompanied by sleet and snow,
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even down to low levels, across scotla nd even down to low levels, across scotland and eventually into north—west england. watch out in central scotland weather could be some disruption because of the snow. further south and east it will be rain. as it moves further east, brighter skies following behind it. this is bbc news. our latest headlines... 0xfam officials are meeting government ministers to discuss their future funding after allegations its workers used prostitutes in haiti. police in arizona have named three british tourists who died when their sight—seeing helicopter crashed in the grand canyon on saturday. they are 27—year—old becky dobson, 32—year—old jason hill, and 30—year—old stuart hill. pressure mounts on the south african presidentjacob zuma to resign. the anc is currently meeting to decide his fate. the prime minister theresa may will meet the irish prime minister
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leo varadkar in belfast later today as talks continue to restore the power—sharing government at stormont. let's take a look at today's winter olympics action with the bbc sports centre. we've seen incredibly tough conditions at the winter olympics today — vicious cross winds disrupted proceedings and team gb snowboarder aimee fuller said she was "lucky to be in one piece" after the slopestyle final went ahead, despite concerns. joe lynskey has more. embracing the elements is the way of
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these athletes but even they have their limits. the wind blows in from siberia and brings the chill and danger. we are already delayed 30 minutes, it is really windy. it puts no women's slope style final in doubt but after waiting one hour they ruled conditions had cleared. but the wind had only subsided, not gone away. goodness me. this was the slovakian, remarkably she was ok and road again. but these slopes were barely suited for style. we are on the limit of running this contest. for britain's aimee fuller this was an unexpected shot at the medals. with one run left, she tried to take on the wind. it was like riding into a wind tunnel. brutal. it is not
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what i planned or visualise four yea rs of what i planned or visualise four years of prep work to go into today andi years of prep work to go into today and i don't think it was a true show of women's slope style, which is a shame for our sport. amid the gusts and falls, one rider played the smart game. the usa's jamie anderson took the right amount of risk, the gold earned by concentration but a final clouded in controversy. things are more syrian inside the ice rink with the weather problems. the first days have seen the team competition and canada sealed gold with synchronised brilliance. with these games you are often against the elements but these athletes turned danger into style. the united states took bronze in that team figure skating event — thanks in no small part to mirai nagasu. she became only the third woman to land a triple axel at the winter olympics — an incredibly difficult move and she went on to nail
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eight more triple jumps. she was clearly overjoyed at putting in a clean routine and earning a season's—best score atjust the right time. great britain have won the last two skeleton titles previously at the games, thanks to amy williams in vancouver and lizzie yarnold four years ago in sochi. and it looks as though team gb are in with a chance of more this year. laura deas actually outshone yarnold in today's training runs, finishing second and then first. yarnold wasn't far behind though — she was third and fourth quickest. the competition begins on friday, with the final on saturday. and we have a third gold medal to report on. in the last hour, lara dahlmeier of germany won the biathlon
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10km pursuit, with a near—flawless shooting performance in howling winds. she's the first woman to win the sprint and pursuit double, after picking up herfirst gold on saturday. the american teenage snowboarding sensation chloe kim is being treated like a rock star in pyeongchang because of her korean heritage — and she didn't disappoint in half—pipe qualifying. she confirmed her status as favourite to take gold with a jaw—dropping display, throwing in a brilliant series of spins and tricks. she finished way ahead of the pack, but said she was nervous and was looking forward to really letting loose in tomorrow's final. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. for more than a year, the trump administration has said it
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wouldn't engage with north korea until its leader, kimjong un, was willing to discuss dismantling his nuclear weapons programme. but in an interview with the washington post, the us vice president, mike pence, just back from a trip to the winter olympics in seoul, said that if north korea wished to talk, the us would listen. the us secretary of state rex tillerson had this to say during a visit to egypt. as to the vice president's comments about potentially having talks and whether it is the start of the diplomatic process, i think it is too early to judge. as we have said for some time, it is really up to the north koreans to decide when they are ready to engage with us in a sincere and meaningful way. they know what has to be on the table for conversations. we have said for some time that i think it is important that we will need to have some discussions that precede any kind of negotiation, to determine whether the parties
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are in fact ready to engage in something meaningful in order for us to then put together the construct of a negotiation, so we will have to wait and see. let's get more now on 0xfam's meeting later today with the international development secretary. that meeting is happening around now. there's pressure on the government to withdraw the funding it gives to the charity following revelations its aid workers used prostitutes in haiti in 2011 in the aftermath of the earthquake. let's speak to stephen twigg, labour chairman of the commons international development select committee. we appreciate your time today. what questions do you want answered as a result of the meeting going on? what reassu ra nces result of the meeting going on? what reassurances would you like to see? i think 0xfam has serious questions to answer. we are talking about aid workers working with some of the
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most vulnerable people in communities affected by natural disasters and other humanitarian crises and i want to be certain that 0xfa m crises and i want to be certain that 0xfam has put in place systems that learn lessons from some of these appalling events in haiti in 2011. and questions for the charities commission raised this morning. 0ur of their questions for the department for international development? penny mordaunt‘s predecessor pretty patel claimed in a newspaper that when she tried further investigations into this when she was secretary of state, officials were less than willing to do so in the department. officials were less than willing to do so in the departmentlj officials were less than willing to do so in the department. i have read her article and there are a number of questions for the department for international development about 2011 itself, what did they know, but also the concern is that pretty patel has raised. there is a meeting next
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tuesday when parliament returns. it is vital we have a full understanding of what dfid did and what 0xfam did at the time, but also we are learning lessons. i listened to the children's chief executive earlier today. it is important to the sector as a whole is learning all of the lessons from this terrible episode. were you aware of priti patel raising these issues when she was secretary of state? we had heard evidence about the —— not about the specifics of haiti in 2011 but more broadly that there were concerns about some aid workers in parts of the world involved in sexual crimes of various nature. including possibly, says
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priti patel, crimes against children. oxfam is brilliant organisation that does brilliant work with, for example, rohingya refugees, and i don't want people to think we don't appreciate their efforts, but when an aid worker abuse is their position in this way it is the most vulnerable who suffer, be that women, children, anyone else, and it is totally unacceptable and we must have systems in place to ensure this doesn't happen in future. in our own country we have seen tightening of procedures in schools and elsewhere to guard against sexual abuse, violence and harassment. i am a member of parliament and speaking to the bbc, and there have been all such allegations about sexual harassment and other matters in both
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our organisations so this is not exclusive to the aid sector, but it is vital there is reassurance and then cite this don't happen again in future. and the secretary said the aid sector has heard duty —— has a duty to uphold certain values. are you concerned that because of the wider work 0xfam does, allegations of abuse may have been overlooked in some way? that is a good line of questioning which we can pursue mixtures day. it is crucially important aid organisations like 0xfa m important aid organisations like 0xfam demonstrate the highest moral purpose and integrity possible and we should hold 0xfam to exactly the same standard we would hold our schools in this country, the same standard we hold other public institutions. we cannot say that just because an organisation is doing great work elsewhere we somehow turned up blind eye. that is
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wrong and unacceptable. the standard must be there. but it is clear this is not just about must be there. but it is clear this is notjust about 0xfam, there are wider concerns raised about other aid organisations which we must address, and there is a much broader global issue here about the abuse of male power, as save the children put it today. it must be addressed, yes, by dfid but also by all of us, to make sure these things don't happen again in future. you have said specifically in relation to oxfam that you would remain a supporter of their work if the charity can demonstrate it has learned from this and puts robust systems in place, but more broadly are you concerned that all of this could be used by opponents of dfid to curb aid spending? yes, that is a concern. let's be clear, i have been to jordan with 0xfam to see the amazing
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work they do with syrian refugees will stop i know they're doing work with the rohingya refugees in bangladesh. but there will be some who see an opportunity to say this is somehow a consequence of our commitment to aid. it isn't. it is individuals abusing their power and it is completely wrong and must be rooted out. 0xfam has questions to answer, dfid does, the charity commission, the wider sector, but let us not throw the baby out with the bath water. the work done by these organisations to relieve humanitarian crises and address poverty is vital and i am confident that the clear majority of aid workers are not involved in any of this appalling activity and are as horrified about it as we are. thank you. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour,
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but first the headlines on bbc newsroom live. 0xfa m 0xfam is summoned to a meeting with the government over allegations some of its staff used prostitutes in haiti. its future funding could be in doubt. becky dobson is named as one of three britons who died in a helicopter crash in the grand canyon. the others were jason hill and stuart hill. theresa may and leo varadkar are in belfast this lunchtime prompting speculation that sinn fein and the dup are close to restoring stormont. the uk's serious fraud office has charged barclays bank with "unlawful financial assistance" related to billions of pounds raised from qatari investors in 2008. the same charges were bought against barclays plc injune last year. the decision to charge barclays bank as well is significant because it
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holds the banking licence that allows it to operate in different countries. discount chain aldi has taken the top spot in a supermarket satisfaction survey. the consumer association, which, questioned nearly 7,000 shoppers. waitrose, previously the number one in the annual survey, came fourth. only 2% of parents have taken advantage of shared parental leave. around 285, 000 couples are eligible every year for it, whereby parents can share 50 weeks of leave and 37 weeks of pay after they have a baby, but take—up has been low. the uk's serious fraud office has charged barclays bank with "unlawful financial assistance" related to billions of pounds raised from qatari investors in 2008. the move to charge barclays bank as well as its holding company is significant because it holds
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the banking licence that allows it to operate in different countries. so, if barclays was found guilty, it could lose that crucial licence. joining us now is fran boait, executive director of positive money, which campaigns for change within the banking system. we are talking about events which happened about ten years ago. it is astonishing it has taken until now to get to this point, but what difference could it make? it was ten yea rs difference could it make? it was ten years ago but it is a symptom of how dysfunctional our banking system was then. from our perspective as an organisation set up after the crash, how dysfunctional it still is. ten yea rs how dysfunctional it still is. ten years ago we saw barclays doing a dodgy deal with cat —— years ago we saw barclays doing a dodgy deal with cat -- qatar to raise money to avoid a government bailouts so it wouldn't be in the
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same category as banks like rbs, but it was in serious financial trouble and it had to opt for what could amount to criminal charges for its operations. the public at the time, not only did we see too big to fail banking, which we still have, but too big to jail bankers. we have heard today that this could actually bea heard today that this could actually be a case that ten years on there is a big bank with people in it that actually could face going to jail. you say ten years on but is it likely anything will actually change? i looked at the share price and it is up today, so investors and ba rclays are and it is up today, so investors and ba rclays a re not and it is up today, so investors and ba rclays are not overly and it is up today, so investors and barclays are not overly worried. people are pretty confident that this potentially will not happen and i think that is a symptom of the confidence the banking system and financial system at large, especially in the uk, has in itself,
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acting potentially outside the law. we don't know what the final charges will be but i think it is worrying that they are so confident they will not actually really affect them. the question we must ask ourselves is what kind of banking system do we want? we still have one that is self—serving, it does not serve the public or people, and actually it would be good if what came out of this was some justice and a bigger conversation around what banking system we need. one which we will talk about again, i am sure. aldi has been stealing market share from its uk supermarket rivals, and and now it's gone one further. the discounter has come first in a customer satisfaction survey, pushing last year's winner waitrose into fourth place. the big supermarkets, including sainsbury‘s have been pushed to the bottom of the list, as gareth shaw from "which?" —— pushed to the bottom of the list.
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retail analyst kate hardcastle joins me now. aldi seems to be getting customers through the door and they're happy when they get inside. there has been some criticism, and packing your bags there has been described as an 0lympic bags there has been described as an olympic sport! but this brand has disrupted the marketplace. we were being served by large supermarket brands which were overcharging us and stuffing our baskets and trolleys with products we do need, creating lots of waste, and not putting us first as customers. aldi and lidl have both come into the marketplace to offer value for money, which means they have high—priced items but also basics. if you look at the big supermarkets,
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they have been pushed to the bottom of the list, particularly sainsbury‘s which i think his ninth place, and the responses the customer said it is a bit boring, they get everything they want but not necessarily value for money. what is aldi doing and what will these other supermarkets be looking at doing? retail looks over at shoulder too much. tesco were considering a discount brand and sainsbury‘s also did so. discount brands are good at being lean and thatis brands are good at being lean and that is how we describe in business taking out all the frills. it doesn't look very pleasant at times but they have been very successful with their special buying sections, which can be fishing equipment,
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footballs, anything. there is still room for growth also. the big brands have a lot to do notjust in turning their plans and, being distracted into other business areas and getting back into groceries, but building trust and faith back from consumers who feel pretty sorry about how they have been treated for yea rs. about how they have been treated for years. it is a big thing that takes time for a big organisation. a little bit of optimism in the markets after all the roller—coaster we sold last week. morrow we get the latest inflation figures showing how quickly prices are rising for the goods we buy. expected to be about 2.996, goods we buy. expected to be about 2.9%, slightly down on 3% but still above target. the price of crude
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also affects the price of things in shops because it is the cost of getting those things to stores. ba rclays up 0.1% getting those things to stores. barclays up 0.1% as well. the makers of the new film peter rabbit have apologised after facing a backlash over their depiction of a character's allergy. sony has had to apologise this morning after complaints about a scene in the much—loved classic. during one part of the story peter and his friends throw blackberries at a boy, who is allergic to the fruit, even shooting one into his mouth, until he is forced to use an epipen to treat his reaction. it has prompted a furious backlash and calls for it to be withdrawn from cinemas. allergy uk says the film, due to be released in the uk next month, "mocks" allergy sufferers and trivialises a life threatening condition. we can speak now to carla jones, chief executive of allergy uk, and the writer liz fraser, a mum of four, who doesn't agree with the criticisms aimed at the film.
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she's in our cambridge studio. good morning to both of you. why do you not agree with the criticism?” have not seen the clip or the context in which it is running, so they may have some sort of resolution, but basing it on what you have just said and what we have heard this morning, for me this is pa rt heard this morning, for me this is part and parcel of the massive over sanitised childhood where we can't show children anything that would be remotely upsetting, anyone could ta ke offe nce remotely upsetting, anyone could take offence from it. we could look at the scene and say it is great because this opens discussion within classrooms about something many children may not have heard of, they might not know what a epipen is. it is about bullying and teasing and people are bullied and teased. maybe there is a place in films for
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children for a child who is bullied, and in this case something very serious. i think this has come through parenting forums perhaps with everybody saying it is a terrible thing and boycott the film. maybe we should say this happens in real life and maybe we should discuss it and kids can learn something. does she have a point? i think the focus of the film is that it is aimed at children, who are impressionable. yes, we would expect the whole of society to understand allergies more, although it still isn't today, the film trivialises it. the focus of the film is for young children. they're very impressionable and they might not understand the wider context of getting the adrenaline auto injector injection and the consequences of allergic disease. we think the message is wrong and this part of
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the film should be removed. does it raise awareness potentially the issue of allergies and therefore encourage discussion?” issue of allergies and therefore encourage discussion? i think the issue is it is aimed at children and thatis issue is it is aimed at children and that is supposed to be a funny film. the feedback we have had from our peer organisations across the globe who have seen the film already because it has been released in those countries, this scene is supposed to be funny, but allergic disease and reaction is not funny. some people might equate that to tom and jerry some people might equate that to tom andjerry and some people might equate that to tom and jerry and other cartons whether it's violence involved. if someone hits me over the head with a hammer lam hits me over the head with a hammer i am pretty sure it will hurt, so you understand that. but a lot of people do not understand allergic disease and the true impact it has on the person going through the severe allergic reaction. it can cause death. it is very serious and
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trivialising it is not acceptable. and undoubtedly many children will not understand it, although their pa rents not understand it, although their parents will, one would hope understand the seriousness of having an allergy. sony pictures said it was wrong for the films to include the segment even in a cartoonish slapstick way. is it ever acceptable to treat a particularly sensitive issue like this in a cartoonish or slapstick way? of course sony had to say that. i had not seen it so i don't know whether the dead to trivialise it or whether... the thing with humour is that we should be allowed to use humour about anything. that is one of the brilliant things about it. if it is done right, you can touch of the most difficult subject and treated with humour and it does not mean your trivialising it or being insulting. as a parent of four, my
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concern is that this cacophony of this is insulting, demeaning, trivialising, our children are growing up in a world where they don't know what is ok to say at all. kids films have always handled sensitive subjects in our humorous way. an allergic reaction is traumatic for a young child and having to see it mocked and poor trade as if it is ok for others to do is not acceptable. we now of incident is in the uk where it is happening and we have seen face analyses —— fatalities in schools from food being thrown at children. lam glad from food being thrown at children. i am glad sony have apologised and i hope they retract this segment. we are out of time. the headlines are coming up but first here is the weather. it looks pretty good behind me but
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it is deceiving because while we have clear blue skies it is actually quite cold. we have had some snow and ice this morning across northern and ice this morning across northern and western areas of the uk. further snow showers coming into western and northern scotland. you might see some flurries elsewhere but for the majority of us it is dry and sunny but pretty chilly. maximum temperature is 5—8. this evening, clearer skies in central and eastern areas, it will turn cold and frosty, but further westmoor cloud is moving in with more rain and snow, even down to low levels and western areas and the central belt of scotland. some snow coming into north—west england as well. further south and in eastern areas, as the sleet and snow and rain moves, mainly rain.
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brightening up in the afternoon. this is bbc news — and these are the top stories developing at 12. 0xfam is summoned to a meeting with the government over allegations some of its staff used prostitutes in haiti — its future funding could be in doubt. it is vitally important that the sector as a whole is fully learning the lessons from this terrible episode. becky dobson is named as one of three britons who died in a helicopter crash over the grand canyon — the others were jason hill and stuart hill. south africa's governing party is meeting shortly to discuss the future of presidentjacob zuma. it's new leader says mr zuma must stand down or be forced out. also... theresa may and the irish prime minister, leo vardkar, are in belfast today. it prompts speculation that the democratic unionists and sinn fein are close to a deal on restoring the devolved government at stormont.
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kensington palace reveals more details about the wedding of prince harry and meghan markle at windsor castle. the service, in st george's chapel, will begin at midday on may the 19th icy winds tear through the mountains at the pyeongchang 0lympics — wreaking havoc at the snowboard final. alpine skiing had to be postponed for a second day. good afternoon. it's monday 12th february. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. senior officials at 0xfam will today try to convince the international development secretary that they should keep their millions of pounds a year in government funding. it follows revelations that aid workers used prostitutes in haiti
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in 2011 after an earthquake. the charity's been accused of concealing the full findings of an investigation, which led to four people being sacked and three others resigning. 0xfam denies claims of a cover up. i spoke to our political correspondent earlier. penny mordaunt will want to know 0xfam's view about these allegations, how thoroughly the investigated. did they cover it up? perhaps they became fearful that people would stop donating large sums for disaster relief if it became public. they have to be clear about how —— how thorough were about investigating and what happened next to the men who resigned? were they given references, did they go on to work for other agencies? 0xfam is
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facing growing questions and also so is the charity commission. it knew 0xfa m is the charity commission. it knew 0xfam was looking into this business. the bbc as then this morning why they did not do more? they did say they were investigating allegations of sexual misconduct. why was that not looked into further? what was not clear was the extent and seriousness of these. they assured us, they categorically said there was no allegation of abuse of beneficiaries. they did not disclose their allegations of possible crimes, including those involving minors. penny mordaunt's predecessor, priti patel, has been writing about this, claiming that officials in her department did not push investigations on all of this that she wanted. in terms of what penny mordaunt will look at today, how much danger is the aidan grant
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for 0xfam? how much danger is the aidan grant for 0xfam ? priti how much danger is the aidan grant for 0xfam? priti patel suggests that if charities do not make the grade on child protection, they should not get a grant. priti patel was quite blunt on her assessments. she lost thejob blunt on her assessments. she lost the job before christmas. blunt on her assessments. she lost thejob before christmas. she blunt on her assessments. she lost the job before christmas. she was blunt at a un meeting, trying to push this. british officials downplayed the broader issue. there have been warnings in the sector for several years that creditors have been targeting disaster relief agencies. so penny mordaunt as well as talking to oxfam to question theirfunding, may as talking to oxfam to question their funding, may have a few questions for her own officials in terms of what priti patel has been saying, if it is true and could they have done more. 0thers saying, if it is true and could they have done more. others will be concerned they have to come up with good strong and sellers. across the sector, 0xfam is not alone. 0ther
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agencies, like save the children volunteered the information they have had sexual complaints in the last year or so. ten people had their cases handed over to the authorities. what is needed is a passport system so that anyone working in the sector can be signed off on pcs. this should make sure that creditors have little room to carry out this behaviour. —— signed off and be safe. 0ur correspondent will grant is in the haitian capital port au prince. he described how people there were reacting. by and large the reaction in haiti to the 0xfam scandal has been twofold. 0n the one hand there is deep anger, resentment at the fact that this organisation, ostensibly here to help the country's most vulnerable after the 2010 earthquake, ended up exploiting those people instead. and there is a certain degree of resignation. people here say that the sorts of abuses that are happening were well known. we have reached out to people in the charity sector who say they have certainly heard rumours, and they point to a wider culture of abuse they say has been happening among international organisations.
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they point at the un peacekeeping force, for example, a very high—profile case of alleged sexual abuse of minors, and the fact the un peacekeeping force was said to have introduced cholera to this country. as for 0xfam, they say they're going to work hard to rebuild public trust, in britain, in their reputation. in fact, they already have a very, very long way to go to rebuild trust in haiti again, too. we can talk to a former senior official at the united nations. andrew macleod is a former senior official at the un and now advisor for hear their cries, an organisation fighting sexual exploitation. thank you forjoining us. how robust is the united nations and the
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charity sector in terms of vetting potential staff and volunteers who might be working with vulnerable people? not very robust at all. the precursor to the national crime authority has been warning since 1999 that as we crack down on predators in the developed world, they will develop in the developing world. the best access is tojoin they will develop in the developing world. the best access is to join a children's charity. it might sound disgusting, which it is. it is the same reason why in the 1950s and 19605 same reason why in the 1950s and 1960s predators joined the scouts and things like that. for over 20 yea rs, and things like that. for over 20 years, the un and aid agency knows they are being targeted but do they have their best in training and training and prevention and prosecution? the answer is, no. very
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few charities unlike save the children hand over information to the police. take this 0xfam case, evenif the police. take this 0xfam case, even if all the prostitutes were adults, that broke the law. 0xfam should not have fired people let people resign, they should've taken them to the police. the question is, given the individual concerned is a belgian national, if any of those prostitutes were children, i am not sure if they were or were not, then he should be handed over to the belgian police for breaching belgian sex tourism laws. the people at 0xfa m sex tourism laws. the people at 0xfam who helped that could have breached laws in the united kingdom so if 0xfam take this seriously, they should be done at scotland yard asking for an investigation on them. given everything you have said and talking broadly about the sector,
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priti patel, the previous secretary said she had raised concerns about possibly children being abused by workers in the charity sector, does that sound plausible to you?m absolutely does. i go back to national crime authority warnings. the estimated 3% of men have paedophilic tendencies. if you say that there are hundreds and thousands of aid workers, 3% of which is tens of thousands and people working in areas where civil society has collapsed and there is the ability to access children, the natural consequence is that as a great amount of sexual abuse going on because people are not held to account. what we are not seeing is thatis account. what we are not seeing is that is the secret conspiracy of paedophiles. it isjust that is the secret conspiracy of paedophiles. it is just a that is the secret conspiracy of paedophiles. it isjust a natural consequence of failure to crack down
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on the problem when there have been warnings from over 30 years. i have been working wonders for nine years in australia, the united states and the united kingdom. priti patel is the united kingdom. priti patel is the first politician who has taken seriously in any of these countries. also penny mordant is saying this is a moral leadership failure. 0xfam still do not get it. we should be prosecuting people. if oxfam or any other charity fails to demonstrate that it has the most robust vetting procedures in place, be that a passport system and so forth, showed that the charity was government funding? yes, it should. the vast majority of aid workers around the world a re majority of aid workers around the world are very good, a lot of good work is done in that world. you
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cannot cut aid, you have to fix it. if there is a charity which as you said, they do not have the most robust procedures, absolutely cut funding to that individual charity. but they must begin the chance to show they are collecting things? absolutely but very quickly. when you have a scandal like this with 0xfam, they were of moderate —— moral leadership as penny mordaunt said. they are not showing they understand what went wrong here. prostitution is illegal in haiti. they should take it to the police. what about the moral side? you are being sent there to help the most vulnerable people in the world and you do not understand how bad it is that you are abusing these people? thank you very much for your time today. andrew mcleod there from an
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organisation fighting sexual exploitation. three british tourists have died in a helicopter crash in the grand canyon in the us state of arizona. 27—year—old becky dobson, a veterinary receptionist from worthing, has been named as one of the victims. three other british passengers and the pilot were badly hurt. the foreign office says its providing support to the families of the victims in las vegas — from where our correspondent, james cook, reports. the helicopter came down in rocky, remote terrain, bursting into flames. it appears the survivors were able to get out, despite suffering serious injuries. but three britons on board died at the scene. 27—year—old becky dobson, 30—year—old stuart hill, and jason hill, who was 32. for the survivors, three young britons and the pilot, the ordeal was far from over. rescuers, including local military personnel, were flown in, but had to walk to the crash
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site using night vision. it was more than eight hours before the injured were flown to hospital in las vegas. we weren't able to extract anyone until two this morning. high winds, brown—out dust conditions, rugged terrain, and as you know when you fly in treacherous conditions like this, you have to have special training and special people. it's not clear what caused the crash, which involved a eurocopter ec130. the tour company, papillon airways, says it is the world's largest aerial sightseeing outfits, flying 600,000 people a year. in 2001, six people died when another of the firm's grand canyon helicopters crashed. the foreign office says it is now providing support to the british families of this weekend's victims. james cook, bbc news, los vegas. let us take you straight to belfast
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where we have some images of the may arriving there. the irish prime minister is also there this lunchtime for talks with the main parties in northern ireland. theresa may is just arriving at stormont. there is speculation that the democratic unionist party and sinn fein are close to a deal to restore devolved government. 0ur correspondent is there. they would not both be there if there were not clear signs a deal could be done? certainly be either science. as you have seen, the prime minister has just arrived. —— certainly could be their signs. this really get some sort of indication that progress has been made. the last 13 months northern ireland has been run by civil servants as the devolved assembly has been suspended. what
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they are trying to do is get the dup and sinn fein back into government. the problems have been that initially, well they have always had a difficult relationship but they broke up so to speak because of a row over an energy scheme and then fundamental differences over the irish language and same—sex marriage so that is why the two parties have not been able to come together. they are hoping now that with the irish taoiseach and the prime minister here, they can bring them together and make some kind of compromise. 0bviously and make some kind of compromise. obviously there are lots of issues to be sorted out, legacy issues, current issues, if you were to pinpoint the things which have to be donein pinpoint the things which have to be done in orderfor the pinpoint the things which have to be done in order for the steel to pinpoint the things which have to be done in orderfor the steel to be done, all which would you say they are? the dup leader has said there will be no deal... bringing the
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irish language to be on par an official language here. there would be no deal on her watch. she said the fundamentally want a stand—alone bill on the irish language. —— sinn fein said. that is where they cannot meet. there may be some sort of compromise here where there may be a number of different bills put together and that might end up giving both sides what they want. this is difficult. the idea is there will be some sort of deal but a deal todayis will be some sort of deal but a deal today is looking less likely. the dup will have difficulty selling that to the wider party. perhaps it is more appropriate to talk about a deal later this week rather than today. the headlines. oxfam is
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summoned to a meeting with the government over allegations that some of its staff use prostitutes in haiti. its funding could be in doubt. becky dobson is named as one of three britons who died in a crash over the grand canyon. theresa may has been meeting workers in belfast. her visit prompts speculation that a deal to restore the devolved government in stormont may be closer. time though for sport. we've seen incredibly tough conditions at the winter olympics today — vicious cross winds disrupted proceedings and team gb snowboarder aimee fuller said she was "lucky to be in one piece" after the slopestyle final went ahead, despite concerns. joe lynskey has more. embracing the elements is the way of these athletes but even
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they have their limits. here, the wind blows in from siberia and brings the chill and danger. we are already delayed 30 minutes, it is really blowing a hooley. it put the women's slopestyle final in doubt but after waiting one hour they ruled conditions had cleared. but the wind had only subsided, not gone away. goodness me. this was slovakia's klaudia medlova. remarkably she was ok and rode again. but these slopes were barely suited for style. we are on the limit of running this contest. for britain's aimee fuller this was an unexpected shot at the medals. with one run left, she tried to take on the wind. she has gone huge. it was like riding into a wind tunnel. brutal. it is not what i planned or visualised four years of prep work to go into today and i don't think it was a true show
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of women's slopestyle, which is a shame for our sport. amid the gusts and falls, one rider played the smart game. the usa's jamie anderson took the right amount of risk, the gold earned by concentration but a final clouded in controversy. things are more serene inside the ice rink with no weather problems. the first 3 days have seen the team competition and canada sealed gold with synchronised brilliance. with these games you are often against the elements but these athletes turned danger into style. great britain have won the women's skeleton title at the last two games and it looks as though team gb are in with a chance of more medals this year. laura deas actually outshone sochi champion lizzie yarnold in today's training runs, finishing second and then first. yarnold wasn't far behind though — she was third and fourth quickest.
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and today's third gold medal has been won by lara dahlmeier of germany, who took the biathlon10km pursuit, with a near—flawless shooting performance. she's the first woman to win the sprint and pursuit double, after picking up herfirst gold on saturday. that's all the sport for now. thank you very much. to south africa now. weeks of negotiations have failed. patience has run out. now the leader of south africa's ruling party — the anc — has made it clear that if presidentjacob zuma doesn't quit before a meeting this afternoon, then he'll be asked to step down. president zuma is facing multiple allegations of corruption. sarah corker has more. at an event marking 100 years since the birth of nelson mandela,
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there was the clearest signal yet that the end of the troubled presidency ofjacob zuma is near. addressing crowds at cape town, anc leader and south african president in waiting, cyril ramaphosa, promised a resolution and decision of the future of jacob zuma. we are currently engaged in discussions around the transition to a new administration and specifically to resolve the issues of the position of the president of the republic of south africa. for the last week mr ramaphosa and mr zuma have been negotiating the president's exit strategy but with the country in limbo, the anc national executive committee is holding a special meeting later. it is thought the party's governing body will formally ask jacob zuma to resign.
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he has faced increasing pressure to quit since december when he lost control of the governing anc. his presidency has been marred by corruption scandals, struggling economy and soaring unemployment. the organisation does not belong to family, does not belong to me, does not belong to this lady, it belongs to everybody in this country. we're degree graduates, we have nojobs. we go door—to—door handing out cvs, we have nojobs. whether he's pushed or resigns, jacob zuma will soon be out of power with cyril ramaphosa poised to take his place. if this speech is anything to go by, he is planning to get tough on corruption. let us go to south africa. he has
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resisted pressure to go, will he go now? they will be upset that people in the anc have run out of patience, they have given him enough chances to make the right decision and he still has not so today they may formally decide to ask him to stand down. if he refuses, they are willing to take this matter to parliament for a motion of no confidence or even an impeachment. is he asking for anything which might encourage him to step down? there are unconfirmed reports that a big sticking point is having
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corruption charges reinstated against him. he would like more security for himself and his family that if the charges are brought back he would like this state to pay for his legal bills. we understand the anc is taking this under advisement. there is also his relationship with afamily there is also his relationship with a family here who use their relationship to get access to lucrative business contracts. he may not be able to shake this story off. how would the idea of a deal go down with ordinary south africans? and how would this affect the anc going forward with a new leader? this would be a very difficult position for us at 0ran foes. he says he wa nts a for us at 0ran foes. he says he wants a new government, he is largely seen as an upstanding citizen who follows the rule of the
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law. —— for cyril ramaphosa. the current judicial system law. —— for cyril ramaphosa. the currentjudicial system is very independent so it is difficult to see what deal the anc could strike with the president which would be upheld by the law courts. thank you very much. kensington palace has announced more details of the wedding of prince harry and meghan markle at windsor castle. the service will start at midday, meaning there's good news for football fans as it is unlikely to clash with the fa cup final. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. they are said to be closely involved in the arrangements for their wedding, which is now a little less than 1a weeks away. as already announced, it will take place in the historic setting of st george's chapel within windsor castle on saturday the 19th of may. the service will begin at midday with the dean of windsor officiating, and the archbishop of canterbury, justin welby, leading the service itself. room within the chapel is limited, with space for around 800 guests. at one o'clock, the couple, married, as they will be by then,
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will set off in a carriage procession, and then a long walk back to the castle for a reception in saint georges hall. the carriage procession, they hope, will fulfil the pledge they made at the time of their engagement to make it possible for members of the public to feel part of the occasion. nicholas witchell, bbc news. nicholas is with me now, when their wedding was announced a lot of people were talking about the clash with the fa cup final but that is not going to happen now? the fa cup final kicks off late in the afternoon, weddings generally in the morning. now it is a midday start. good for the television audience in the united states. i imagine they
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thought about that so it will start at seven o'clock on the east coast in america. the carriage procession will be at 1pm, which is eight o'clock in the morning in new york. so people who are interested in these sorts of things will be getting up early in america and tuning in. tell us more about the carriage procession.” tuning in. tell us more about the carriage procession. i imagine it will be the same carriage that was used by william and kate after their wedding. it is quite a long processional route. they go through the centre of windsor and some distance south of the town before then joining distance south of the town before thenjoining the long distance south of the town before then joining the long processional tree—lined route, the long walk, back to the castle. there is plenty of space for people who wish to feel pa rt of space for people who wish to feel part of this special occasion,
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plenty of space for them to see the newly managed couple. —— newly married. the sunshine is always a consideration. i would married. the sunshine is always a consideration. iwould imagine married. the sunshine is always a consideration. i would imagine they have an escort at the castle. it is not something they will talk about. it isa not something they will talk about. it is a long route but they will ta ke it is a long route but they will take care of all of that, i am sure. lots more details to come in the coming months but thank you very much for now. time though for the weather forecast. any sign of it warming up? in a word, no. it could get more lively over the next 2a hours. broadly sunny today with a few
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showers in broadly sunny today with a few showers in the broadly sunny today with a few showers in the north—west broadly sunny today with a few showers in the north—west of the uk. but overnight, it could be quite significant, strong winds buffeting england and wales with gusts of 70 miles an hour in coastal areas. look at the rain, turning to wait further north. it will turn to snow. heaviest falls of snow overnight will be across northern ireland, scotla nd will be across northern ireland, scotland and northern england. around five to ten centimetres of snow is expected. it will arrive just in time for the morning rush hour. it will come down heavily. similar amounts of snow across northern ireland and northern england as well. 0therwise northern ireland and northern england as well. otherwise it should be rain in the south. the rain will be rain in the south. the rain will be slow to leave east anglia and south—east england, it will linger into the afternoon. sunshine behind
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that. it feels cold wherever you are. temperatures for degrees at best. that is your weather. this is bbc news. our latest headlines... 0xfam officials are meeting government ministers to discuss their future funding after allegations its workers hired prostitutes in haiti. police in arizona have named three british tourists who died when their sight—seeing helicopter crashed in the grand canyon on saturday. they are 27—year—old becky dobson, 32—year—old jason hill, and 30—year—old stuart hill. pressure mounts on the south african presidentjacob zuma to resign. the anc is currently meeting to decide his fate. theresa may is meeting the irish prime minister leo varadkar in belfast as talks continue to restore the power—sharing government at stormont. there's pressure on the government to withdraw the funding it gives to the charity following revelations its aid workers used prostitutes in haiti
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in 2011 in the aftermath of the earthquake. 0xfam has announced it is improving measures to prevent sexual abuse cases. this is the story so far... this is a shudderingly awful tale, terrible on every single level. he was a 68—year—old man, using an 0xfam villa to invite young women to use for sex in a country that had just been through a devastating earthquake. what bit of that was normal or acceptable? it is not normal or acceptable, that is what we said at the time and i would say now. that was completely unacceptable. oxfam was actually proactive in going to the british
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public, the department for international development and the charity commission to explain there had been serious misconduct and we had taken action. there are thousands and thousands of very brave people who work for 0xfam who will be utterly distraught and horrified by these stories. i think it is shocking and it doesn't matter how good the safeguarding practices are in an organisation, if that organisation does not have the moral leadership to do the right thing, and where in particular they have evidence of criminal activity, to pass that information to the relevant authorities, including prosecuting authorities, that is an absolute absence of leadership. it is really shocking. it is shameful and it is unacceptable. and the worst part of it is that
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even though those crimes will have been reported to the haitian authorities, no action will have been taken. we should all be more vigilant as to what is going on in places like haiti, what is the political, socio economic situation? the best way to do that is to give a greater voice to those who are receiving aid, haitians, people on the ground. it is appalling. i think it is something we should condemn and the haitian government now is about to summon the 0xfam representatives in haiti together and share those reports and to explore those legal steps that have to be taken against those people. stephen twigg is the labour chairman
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of the commons international development select committee. he said there are a number of questions about what the international development department knew at the time and said it was correct that the behaviour of 0xfam's staff is held to the highest standard. it is crucially important aid organisations like 0xfam demonstrate the highest moral purpose and integrity possible and we should hold 0xfam to exactly the same standard we would hold our schools in this country, the same standard we hold other public institutions. we cannot say that just because an organisation is doing great work elsewhere we somehow turn a blind eye. that is wrong and unacceptable. the standard must be there.
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but it is clear this is notjust about 0xfam, there are wider concerns raised about other aid organisations which we must address, and there is a much broader global issue here about the abuse of male power, as save the children put it today. it must be addressed, yes, by dfid but also by all of us, to make sure these things don't happen again in future. we can speak to andrew mitchell who was international development secretary at the time of the 0xfam scandal in haiti. hejoins us now from north london. we said un report we showed a few minutes ago talking about the horrendous conditions in haiti following the earthquake. —— we said you in the report. when did you become aware of the allegations of use of prostitutes by aid workers in haiti? the first i knew was when i
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read the times newspaper last friday andi read the times newspaper last friday and i was obviously extremely shocked to see that. but i also took steps to find out from the department for international development what we knew at the time. although 0xfam reported there we re time. although 0xfam reported there were regulatory breaches and misbehaviour, they did not spell out what it was. had they, it would have been escalated to me immediately by officials in the department but because the seriousness was not set out, officials did not report it to me at the time. had they done so i would have immediately taken necessary action. those officials didn't feel there was anything that merited further questions. when you say 0xfam didn't inform the government about this in 2011 because 0xfam came to the conclusion that staff were not guilty of exchanging sex for aid, what was your reaction? i realised they made
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a terrible error of judgment. your reaction? i realised they made a terrible error ofjudgment. 0xfam should have been open about what happened, particularly since the british taxpayer gives them very large sums of money. the failure to do so was shameful, as 0xfam have admitted. an error ofjudgment? or perhaps a cover—up because they were concerned about losing funding. they will need to explain precisely why they did what they did to the secretary of state penny mordaunt in their meetings today. what we are clear about is whether or not they we re clear about is whether or not they were abiding by the letter of the law they certainly were not abiding by the spirit of the law and they should have come clean at that time and made clear what happened. they did not do that and they will need to account for that today in their meeting with the secretary of state. i want to ask you about the claims made by priti patel, penny
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mordaunt's predecessor, in the telegraph today, where she says alongside the use of prostitutes there was possibly the abuse of children in haiti, and she claims when she raised concerns with department officials and wanted investigations to be taken further that they were not, officials were resista nt to that they were not, officials were resistant to that. what is yuri action? —— your reaction? resistant to that. what is yuri action? -- your reaction? she must speakfor action? -- your reaction? she must speak for herself and the charges that she makes are extremely important and needs to be investigated. officials advise ministers so i am certain that if she felt something needed to be investigated she would have made sure it was investigated at the time. would you accept, i spoke to andrew makalio from the organisation hear their cries, and he was talking
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about the general culture and that it was well—known that paedophiles tried to getjob in the charity sector to give them access to vulnerable children, and he is talking about the wider culture of sexual explication, do you think this is something the department should have been looking at more closely before now? sadly we know that paedophiles tried to insert themselves into all sorts of different circumstances where children are involved. i am sure that the aid sector is no different in that respect. but the culture of openness and transparency in the department for international development and throughout the sector, in recent years, has been extremely important and has been prioritised by the government. it means we must now look and check where failure is occurred that we
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remedy the circumstances that allowed them to car and ensure nothing like this can happen in future. if oxfam in 2011 was not putting anything in its report to the government which raised any flags with officials for further questioning, does it suggest that the department of socials needs to be more forensic and probing and not necessarily trust the paperwork arriving on their desks?” necessarily trust the paperwork arriving on their desks? i think that would be unduly hard on officials. they must be told the truth and given total transparency, particularly by any organisation receiving british taxpayer money. i am clear that the paper trail shows that the fault lay with oxfam for not being candid, open and transparent with officials so we knew the full circumstances involved. can i ask you about what you think should happen to oxfam funding from government, £30 million per year? should there be some sort of sanction or do they need to be
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given an opportunity to quickly demonstrate they have toughened up their procedures? very much in the second. they will have to satisfy the secretary of state, who i have no doubt will ask some tough questions today, that their procedures and checks and balances have completely changed so this could never happen again. when we spend british taxpayer money helping to alleviate poverty and misery around the world we must be able to look the british taxpayer in the eye and say when we take a pound of your money and spend it like this, we are really getting 100 pence of delivery on the ground as you would expect. and that is the justification for spending the money, that it is spent well and in accordance with what the taxpayer would expect, and it is delivering. a massive search is continuing in fields outside moscow where a
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russian passenger plane crashed yesterday, killing all 71 people on board. hundreds of people are looking for bodies and wreckage for the airliner which came down minutes after taking off. in frozen fields near moscow, this is all that remains of flight 703. cctv cameras captured the moment the aircraft smashed into the ground its wreckage strewn for a mile across the russian countryside, half buried in the snow. conditions were treacherous. the emergency services struggled through snowdrifts to reach the crash scene, but it quickly became clear this was no rescue operation. theirjob was to recover the bodies. the saratov airlines flight had taken off from moscow's domodedovo airport with more than 70 people on board. it was bound for 0rsk 900 miles south—east of moscow in the ural mountains. but minutes after take—off, the plane disappeared from radar. it had crashed near the russian capital. "we saw it burning up in the sky," this eyewitness says, "then it fell.
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there was a blast, a loud boom." it's unclear what caused the antonov 148 jet to fall out of the sky. the kremlin has ordered an urgent investigation. president putin offered his condolences to the families of the victims. but that is little comfort to the relatives and friends of those on board flight 703. at 0rsk airport, grief mixed with disbelief as people realised they had been waiting for loved ones who would never arrive. emergency teams are still searching for victims of this crash and for clues to what caused it. the father of an eight—year—old girl is due to appear in court charged
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with her murder. mylee billingham was found with knife wounds at the home of herfather was found with knife wounds at the home of her father william in walsall home of her father william in wa lsa ll last home of her father william in walsall last month. she was taken to hospital but pronounced dead shortly afterwards. prosecutors in new york state have filed a lawsuit against the company of the film producer harvey weinstein, who's been accused of sexual abuse by more than 70 women. the state's attorney general alleged that the firm had been guilty of vicious mistreatment of employees. barclays bank has been charged over a £2.2 billion loan it made to qatar ten years ago. the serious fraud office believes the loan was unlawful, alleging that the money was used to buy shares in the bank. barclays says it will defend the charges and does not expect customers to be affected. for more than a year, the trump administration has said it wouldn't engage with north korea until its leader, kimjong un, was willing to discuss dismantling his nuclear weapons programme. but in an interview with the washington post, the us vice president, mike pence, just back from a trip to the winter olympics in seoul, said that if north korea wished to talk, the us would listen. the us secretary of state rex tillerson had this to say
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during a visit to egypt. as to the vice president's comments about potentially having talks and whether it is the start of the diplomatic process, i think it is too early to judge. as we have said for some time, it is really up to the north koreans to decide when they are ready to engage with us in a sincere and meaningful way. they know what has to be on the table for conversations. we have said for some time that i think it is important that we will need to have some discussions that precede any kind of negotiation, to determine whether the parties are in fact ready to engage in something meaningful in order for us to then put together the construct of a negotiation, so we will have to wait and see. the headlines on bbc newsroom live.
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oxfam is summoned to a meeting with the government over allegations some of its staff used prostitutes in haiti. if its future funding could be in doubt. becky dobson is named as one of three britons who died in a helicopter crash in the grand canyon. the others were jason hill and stuart hill. theresa may has been meeting workers in belfast today. her visit to northern ireland, along with the irish prime minister, leo vardkar, prompts speculation that a deal to restore the devolved government at stormont may be closer. london city airport has been closed after the discovery of an unexploded second world war bomb. ordnance disposal teams have arrived at the scene. the airport will be shut all day and all flights have been cancelled, affecting up to 16,000 passengers. the device was found in the nearby river thames. passengers are being urged to check with their airlines before travelling today.
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tolu adeoye told us the latest. you can probably see their empty ru nway you can probably see their empty runway behind me. normally would expect planes to be taking off and landing every 20 minutes but everything was cancelled today, 261 flights, affecting 16,000 passengers, after the discovery of a world war ii bomb. it was discovered near the airport at around 5am yesterday morning and the decision was taken to close the airport at 10pm. we heard from the ceo, robert sinclair, who said he apologises and recognises the inconvenience to passengers. this airport deals with both domestic and european flights for erebor lines such as british airlines, klm, lufthansa. some flights are being transferred to other airports but people are being asked to check before they travel, with major disruption. there is a 200 metre cord and in the area. many
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residents were evacuated from their homes. we are told things should be up homes. we are told things should be up and running again tomorrow morning. tributes are coming into the victims of their helicopter crash at the grand canyon in arizona at the weekend. we received this tribute to jason hill, who died alongside his brother stewart and another briton. three other britons and helicopter pilot were injured. this is from the law firm where jason worked. they say he was a well—respected lawyer, loved by all of those who worked with him at the firm in their milton keynes office. he joined as a trainee before qualifying in their corporate apartment in 2011. he was hard—working, full of energy and enjoyable to work with and they are greatly saddened by the news of his
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death and that of his brother, stewart. their thoughts are with the family at this difficult and tragic time. we will have the weather forecast coming up but first... the makers of the new film peter rabbit have apologised after facing a backlash over their depiction of a character's allergy. sony has had to apologise this morning after complaints about a scene in the much—loved classic. during one part of the story peter and his friends throw blackberries at a boy, who is allergic to the fruit, even shooting one into his mouth, until he is forced to use an epipen to treat his reaction. it has prompted a furious backlash and calls for it to be withdrawn from cinemas. allergy uk says the film, due to be released in the uk next month, "mocks" allergy sufferers and trivialises a life threatening condition. earlier i spoke to carla jones from allergy uk, and the writer liz fraser, who told me why she doesn't agree with calls for the film to be banned. for me this is part and parcel
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of the massive over sanitised childhood where we can't show children anything that could be remotely upsetting, anyone could take offence from it. we could look at the scene and say it is great because this opens discussion within classrooms about something many children may not have heard of, they might not know what a epipen is. it is about bullying and teasing and people are bullied and teased. maybe there is a place in films for children or a child who is bullied, and in this case about something very serious. i think this has come through parenting forums perhaps with everybody saying it is a terrible thing and boycott the film. maybe we should say this happens in real life and maybe we should discuss it and kids can learn something. does she have a point? i think the focus of the film is that it is aimed at children, who are impressionable. yes, we would expect the whole of society
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to understand allergies more, although it still isn't today, the film trivialises it. the focus of the film is for young children. they're very impressionable and they might not understand the wider context of giving the adrenaline auto injector injection and the consequences of allergic disease. we think the message is wrong and this part of the film should be removed. does it raise awareness potentially of the issue of allergies and therefore encourage discussion? i think the issue is it is aimed at children and that is supposed to be a funny film. the feedback we have had from our peer organisations across the globe who have seen the film already because it has been released in those countries, this scene is supposed to be funny, but allergic disease and reactions are not funny.
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some people might equate that to tom and jerry and other cartons where there is violence involved. if someone hits me over the head with a hammer i am pretty sure it will hurt, so you understand that. but a lot of people do not understand allergic disease and the true impact it has on the person going through the severe allergic reaction. it can cause death. it is very serious and trivialising it is not acceptable. and undoubtedly many children will not understand it, although their parents will, one would hope, understand the seriousness of having an allergy. sony pictures said it was wrong for the films to include the segment even in a cartoonish slapstick way. is it ever acceptable to treat a particularly sensitive issue like this in a cartoonish or slapstick way? of course sony had to say that. i have not seen it so i don't
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know whether they did trivialise it or whether... the thing with humour is that we should be allowed to use humour about anything. that is one of the brilliant things about it. if it is done right, you can touch the most difficult subject and treat it with humour and it does not mean you're trivialising it or being insulting. as a parent of four, my concern is that this cacophony of this is insulting, demeaning, trivialising, our children are growing up in a world where they don't know what is ok to say at all. kids films have always handled sensitive subjects in a slapstick way. an allergic reaction is traumatic for a young child and having to see it mocked and portrayed as if it is ok for others
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to do is not acceptable. we know of incidents in the uk where it is happening. the british antarctic survey has captured the first footage of an iceberg four times the size of london, which broke away from the continent's ice sheet last year. the footage has been released at the start of what the scientists say is an "urgent mission" to document the marine ecosystem that was exposed when the giant berg drifted away. our science correspondent victoria gill has more. a new perspective on a 6,000 square km swathe of floating ice. the trillion—tonne a68 iceberg is gradually drifting away from the antarctic continent and into the sea. it's these ice—filled waters and the sea floor beneath that scientists are now eager to explore. in the british antarctic survey vessel the james clark ross, a team will spend three weeks studying the marine life that has
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been locked away here for millennia. they have described it as a treacherous but urgent mission. there are likely to be new species discovered as researchers seek out the creatures that make their home beneath the vast ice sheet. but the team also hopes to understand the processes that caused the iceberg to break away. this could reveal more about just how this fragile, frozen wilderness at the bottom of the world will change as the climate warms. in a moment the news at one. first the weather. over the weekend we saw snow showers in northern and western areas. for many of us, a lot of sunshine. but on the satellite picture, an area of cloud to the west. this will bring a
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mixture of rain and some heavy snow for some of us overnight tonight. the evening forecast, across england and wales and scotland, largely clear skies, but the wind picking up in northern ireland were a band of rain will turn to snow. ahead of the weather front, it gets windy. 60—70 mph around exposed coast in the south. you can't help but notice the blue changing to wait. we expect rain turning to snow overnight with the heaviest snowfall across northern ireland, scotland and northern england, particularly high ground. this could cause some problems for early morning rush—hour. 5—10 centimetres across higher parts of scotland and even lower down we could see a few centimetres across the central belt. this is enough to cause some transport disruption. 5—10 centimetres across higher parts of northern ireland and the cumbrian
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fells, peaks northern ireland and the cumbrian fells, pea ks and northern ireland and the cumbrian fells, peaks and pennines. in the south, we could see a little bit of snow mixed in with the band of rain moving east. slow moving across eastern areas, with the rain lingering across east anglia and eastern england on tuesday afternoon. elsewhere, the sun comes out but it will still be a cold day. the band of rain clears from eastern england and we will be left with clearing skies for a time so frost and ice could be an issue on tuesday night before the next weather system comes in from the west. this will have a mixture of rain and hail snow. this will be high in the hills of northern england and scotland, but it could get to lower levels in central and eastern scotland. temperatures lifting late in the day. it is a trend we see towards the end of the week. temperatures will lift, it will get milder and
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dryerfor many will lift, it will get milder and dryer for many of us as well. his street. oxfam is in crisis talks with the government over the scandal of aid workers using prostitutes in haiti, seven years ago. the international development secretary at the time says the charity didn't explain the full extent of what happened. i think oxfam were economical with the truth about what they were investigating. they may well have stuck by the letter of the rules but they certainly did not stick by the spirit. the government is now threatening to cut funding to oxfam, of more than £30 million.
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we will have reaction from haiti. also this lunchtime: three britons killed in the helicopter crash in the grand canyon, have been named. theresa may and the irish prime minister are in belfast, amid new hopes power sharing can be restored at stormont. there are new details of prince harry's wedding
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