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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  February 12, 2018 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 2. oxfam in crisis talks to try to convince the government it should keep its government funding — after the charity's accused of a sex—scandal "cover—up". i think oxfam were economic or with the truth about what they were investigating. they may well have stuck by the letter of the rules, but they certainly did not stick by the spirit. the three britons killed in helicopter crash in the grand canyon are named. three other britons — and the pilot — were injured when the helicopter went down. theresa may and the irish prime minister meet in belfast — could a power—sharing agreement about to be restored in northern ireland? coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with sarah. and it is winter olympics, i'm guessing? it is indeed, and strong winds have been wreaking havoc in pyeongchang. numerous crashes in the women's slope final. many questioning why it went ahead. i will have more later. snow, wind,
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sounds a bit like home! yes, more of that income, a combination of heavy snow and strong winds overnight. we will also be looking further afield where gita, a cyclone, is currently hitting tonga. thanks. also coming up... that's cool — scientists release the first video of a giant iceberg that's broken off the antarctic ice shelf — it's four times the size of london and weighs i trillion tonnes. we'll be talking to a member of the british antarctic survey. hello everyone — this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. as though dealing with a sex scandal on its own wasn't bad enough — now oxfam is facing claims of a cover—up: claims it denies. senior officials from the charity are in emergency talks with the international development
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secretary, to try to prevent government funding being cut, following the scandal involving some of its aid workers and prostitutes. it's claimed the charity failed to give full details of what happened — in the wake of the devastating earthquake in haiti in 2010. all this as many donors consider what to do about their contributions to the charity. matt cole reports. in the worst imaginable circumstances, oxfam staff were meant to be in haiti to help. it's now clear some had a very different agenda. amidst claims of sex parties and prostitutes, oxfam sacked four staff and allowed three others to quit, including their country director, who went on to secure work with another aid organisation. oxfam denies it covered up what happened but now it has emerged the international developmment secretary wants answers about the way it handled the case.
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we are talking about an historic case but it is common in some respects, still live. they still have information they should be giving to the authorities. it is to the department here that oxfam's leaders were summoned to make their case to the secretary of state following her threats to cut millions of pounds of funding if she didn't like their answers. but there are also questions for the charity commission, which regulates these matters, not least how much it new matters, not least how much it knew and why didn't do more. they did say they were investigating some allegations of sexual misconduct. so why wasn't that looked into further? because what was not clear was the extent and seriousness of those, which, as i've said, they assured us, in fact, they categorically said there was no allegations of abuse of beneficiaries. andrew mitchell was the international development secretary when all this took place. i think oxfam were economical with the truth about what they were investigating. they may well have stuck by the letter of the rules, but they certainly did not stick by the spirit. after all, one of the big changes we made in 2010 was to introduce much greater transparency and openness into the way
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international development takes place. i'm afraid oxfam were very clearly in breach of that at the time. there are also questions for civil servants here, after another former secretary of state, priti patel, suggested they dismissed her efforts to question how wide a problem sexual abuse and predatory behaviour is in the charity sector. save the children has volunteered it had 3! claims of sexual harassment last year but if says everyone must do more. i will not sit here pretending you i can wave a magic wand and eliminate all risk tomorrow. but what i can do is assure the british public the people who are ultimately responsible for... these vulnerable women and children, that we will give this our best shot. oxfam says it has now put new safeguarding measures in place including tougher vetting of staff. other charities are calling
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for a new sector—wide passport that workers can take from agency to agency to verify they are suitable and saved to be trusted helping those most in need. matt cole, bbc news. well, our correspondent will grant is in haiti, where he says it's clear aid agencies will need to work hard, to rebuild trust within the country. by and large the reaction in haiti to the oxfam scandal has been twofold. on the one hand there is deep anger — resentment at the fact that this organisation is ostensibly here to help the country's most vulnerable after the 2010 earthquake ended up exploiting those people instead. and there is a certain degree of resignation. people here say the sorts of abuses that were happening were well—known. we have reached out to people in the charity sector here who say they had certainly heard the rumours, and they speak of a wider culture of abuse, which they say has been happening among international organisations. they point to the un peacekeeping force, for example, a
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very high—profile case of alleged sexual abuse of minors, and the fact that the un peacekeeping force was said to have introduced cholera to this country. as for oxfam, they say they are going to work hard to rebuild public trust in britain in their reputation, but in fact they already have a very long way to go to rebuild trust here in haiti too. three british tourists killed in a helicopter crash in the grand canyon, have been named by police in america. becky dobson, jason hill and stuart hill, died on saturday evening. three other britons, and the pilot, were injured. here's james cook. the helicopter came down in rocky, remote terrain, bursting into flames. it appears the survivors were able to get out, despite suffering serious injuries. but three britons on board died at the scene. 27—year—old becky dobson, 30—year—old stuart hill, and jason hill, who was 32. for the survivors, three young britons and the pilot, the ordeal was far from over.
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rescuers, including local military personnel, were flown in, but then had to walk to the crash site, using night—vision goggles. it was more than eight hours before the injured were flown to hospital in las vegas. we weren't able to extract everybody from the crash site until 2am, this morning. high winds, brownout dust conditions, rugged terrain, and as you know, when you fly in treacherous conditions like this, you have to have special training and special people. it's not clear what caused the crash, which involved a eurocopter ec130. the tour company, papillon airways, says it is the world's largest aerial sightseeing outfit, flying around 600,000 people year. in 2001, six people died when another of the firm's grand canyon helicopters crashed. the foreign office says it is now providing support to the british families of this weekend's victims. james cook, bbc news, las vegas. miraya villareal from cbs
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news has been reporting from grand canyon west. what we know right now is that it is still too early in the investigation to really know exactly what may have caused the accident. as we heard the police chief talk about, whether it is something that they are looking at. there are federal investigators that will be on the scene today from both the federal aviation administration, as well as the national transportation safety board. they will be taking a look at everything here, talking to witnesses and also surveying the scene. one thing they mentioned yesterday that is truly important, there is a camera and a black box that was on site on the helicopter. they have retrieved that and they will be reviewing that as well. we also know that tribal leaders from the reservation will be meeting with all of these federal agencies to figure out exactly what they could have done or what will be done in the future to make sure
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this doesn't happen again. theresa may and the irish prime minister, leo varadkar, are visiting belfast for talks with northern ireland's main political parties. there are suggestions the democratic unionists and sinn fein, could be close to a deal to restore devolved government, after the failure of several previous rounds of negotiations. power sharing at stormont collapsed more than a year ago. keith doyle reports. the first visit was the bombard eaa factory in belfast was the last month a surprise respite in the trade disputes orjob security. this visit is seen as a sign that another visit to secure the restoration of the northern ireland executive may be close. northern ireland has been run by civil servants since the - in ruling 5:7 . , ruling democratic * — , ruling 4+? sinn —' democratic'— ,. , ' iii—— —— language —— — ———~ as ’ as elation resulted elation t t fiég fééulféfl “t1. li 11tteit t
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fiég fééulféfl “ti 1§ 11tteit t 5 weekend, eég fééulféfl ie1§ 11tteit t 5 weekend, the eég fééulféfl ie1§ fifii t t 5 weekend, the new eeelefieee; fit. tee weeieeee fee eeiz';r leader marylou eteleeeete; qt tee weeieeee tee ee'q;r leader marylou ifit‘e‘m‘e‘e as“? ' ’ deal is i clear is clear that eieittie e eteef ieeitetiee teet progress .. . eieittie e eteef ieeitetiee teet gggggess has i eieittie e tteef ieeitetiee teet gggggess has been made. the prime progress has been made. the prime is visiting - qarties at. m idietette'vieii—teet the'pa rtiesat the home t f‘jt assembly, h ”w stormont, the home of the essembiy. stormont, the home of the essembty. as stormont, the home of the ossembty. as “— stormont, the home of the ossembty. as - —— along with the as long as the "along—withthe . t irish as long as the "along—withthe t t irish leo varadkar. it may include a workaround, - has of the o fein. the the t t o tug-“se $55le 3356 a, 7 time t tt to tug-“se $55le 3356 a, 7 time for as it faces another huge ireland, as it faces another huge issue: brexit and the irish border thrust of the irish government wants further guarantees that there will
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be no hard border. theresa may has given those guarantees but as yet no clear plans have emerged to show how that will be the case. well this has all the makings of being a gay free deals, these days have come and gone in northern ireland in the past. keith doyle, bbc news. and we can cross to stormont and to our correspondent keith doyle now. the optimism that was there a fewer hours ago seems to be diminishing by the moment. there was optimism, but you don't bring two prime ministers over the talks unless you feel there isa over the talks unless you feel there is a deal in the air, but we have heard from the dup that a deal, they are saying, will be hard to back out today, there are still a lot of issues to be resolved. you are absolutely right, simon. it seems to be frittering away as we speak, but there are some release areas issues to be resolved here, none more so than the irish language will stop sinn fein has said it wanted a stand—alone bill that would increase the level of irish language to an
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official language here at stormont. now, the dup have said they simply do not want that. so what we understand is that there is some sort of a fudge, where there might bea number of sort of a fudge, where there might be a number of different bills going through, and they combine before becoming an actor. so there is some circumnavigating around. the results of the issue of same—sex marriage. sinn fein have been campaigning for that for a long time. the dup have used its powers and the parliamentary powers here, the assembly powers, to block that. there is also the issues of legacy and how to deal with the troubles, the legacy of the troubles. so a few hurdles to get over here, and it seems they might be getting it a little down the line but not over it completely. those who feel theresa may has had a rather hands—off approach to northern ireland after the deal in westminster, in which of course she relies on the dup? yes, there has been criticism of that. she hasn't been over here for a
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proper visit, i will say proper visit, for about 17 months. she was over here during the general election, but that was a short visit and seen by many as campaigning. she has been criticised for not being hands on enough. maybe there has been a lot going on behind the scenes to try and get the devolved assembly back up and running, and she would maybe feel that the reason she would maybe feel that the reason she is here today is that it really is in the air. but, as you say, they still have quite a few hurdles to get over here. there was talk obviously of a talk being done today. i think that is now optimistic. if there is a deal, and it is still an if, but if there is, it is still an if, but if there is, it is still an if, but if there is, it is probably sometime this week. talk to you later, keith, thank you very much. the leadership of south africa's ruling anc is meeting to decide on the future of president zuma. he has remained in office despite repeated calls for him to stand down amid allegations of corruption. the new anc leader, cyril ramaposa, has issued an ultimatum, that mr zuma must stand down, or be forced out. pumza fihlani is in pretoria.
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we understand that people within the ruling african congress have run out of patience. they feel they have given him enough chances to "make the right decision", and he still hasn't, so today is the day they decide to formally asking to step down. if that fails, if he refuses for whatever reason, they are willing to take this matter to parliament, meaning a motion of no confidence or even an impeachment. these are unconfirmed reports of course but what we understand this one of the biggest ticking points is having the possibility of corruption charges reinstated against him. he has indicated he would like some form of security for himself and his family, and should those charges be brought back, you would like the state to pay for his legal bills. we understand this is a matter that the anc is currently taking under advisement. there is a very big question about his chip with a family here, who are said to have used that same relationship to gain
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access to lucrative business contracts, and that is one scandal he has not been able to shake off throughout the ten years he has been south africa's president. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. oxfam has been summoned to a meeting with ministers,over allegations some of its staff used prostitutes in haiti. the charity's government funding could be in doubt. becky dobson is named as one of three britons who died in a helicopter crash over the grand canyon — the others were jason hill and stuart hill. theresa may has arrived at stormont where she and the irish prime minister, are meeting northern ireland's political leaders, amid speculation a deal to restore the devolved government is close. in a moment... the first pictures of an iceberg, which has broken away from the antarctic ice sheet — its four times the size of london. and in sport, vicious cross winds affected the action at the winter olympics today. team gb‘s snowboarder amy fuller said she was lucky to be in one piece after the slopestyle final was touch and go as
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to whether it would go ahead, but it did. fuller had a nasty fall to finish 70. usa's marinakis becomes only the third woman to land a triple axel at the winter olympics, helping her country to team silver. canada won gold. and there was double delight for germany's la rochelle maja, her second gold of the games coming in the biathlon, ten kilometre pursuit today. i will be back with more on those stories after half past. kensington palace has announced more details of the wedding of prince harry and meghan markle at windsor castle. the service, in st george's chapel, will begin at midday on may the 19th, avoiding a clash with the fa cup final. here's our royal correspondent nicholas witchell. they are said to be closely involved in the arrangements
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for their wedding, which is now a little less than 1a weeks away. as already announced, it will take place in the historic setting of st george's chapel within windsor castle on saturday 19th of may. the service will begin at midday with the dean of windsor officiating, and the archbishop of canterbury, justin welby, conducting the marriage itself. room within the chapel is limited, with space for around 800 guests. at one o'clock, the couple, married, as they will be by then, will set off in a carriage procession, and then a long walk procession, and then along the long walk back to the castle for a reception in saint george's hall. the carriage procession, they hope, will fulfil the pledge they made at the time of their engagement to make it possible for members of the public to feel part of the occasion. nicholas witchell, bbc news. let's return to our top story this afternoon and oxfam has been defending its handling of a sex scandal involving former employees in haiti — at a meeting in london with a government minister.
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the aid agency argues that it should keep millions of dollars in funding. our diplomatic correspondent james landale is here. so what is the realistic prospect of any charity like oxfam having its funding cut? i think it is a possibility. the department for international develop are taking this very seriously, and penny mordaunt has very explicitly said, look, if the system is not tightened up look, if the system is not tightened up then they will withdraw funding. there is a huge reputational issue here at stake. notjust for oxfam but also for the british government. clearly oxfam has a massive brand issue now, and they will have to deal with that and cope with what it means to trust worldwide and funding, all of those things but i think the british would also has an issue. that is what this whole issue has done, it has reunited the debate about britain's aid budget. the uk government spends about £13 billion a year on foreign aid. some people thatis
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a year on foreign aid. some people that is a good thing, a demonstration of global engagement comes off power, britain that is best. to others, a waste of money, going to the wrong priorities, money better spent at home. now, when the british government defends that position of spending that money, the way it has done it in recent years, they have said we make sure there is less waste, we' re they have said we make sure there is less waste, we're making sure it is being spent on issues that are in the uk national interest. and i think that argument becomes a lot harder to make when you have exa m ples of harder to make when you have examples of money being spent on prostitutes, and things. the other argument is if you do not punish the class for the bad behaviour of one pupil, class for the bad behaviour of one pupil, that there is a risk of overreaction, and frankly oxfam will also have one eye on the donors, who are now looking at their direct evidence, wondering what to do about that? exactly, and that is the argument of others, people like andrew mitchell, former
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international developers centric who says you cannot tar the whole issue with one brush. haiti, they say, was one exception. it was quite a wild exception. that makes it worse, in a way, doesn't it? and also it is illegal in haiti, prostitution, and if there were children or underaged people involved, and we don't yet know the full facts, then there were crimes punishable in this country. absolutely. potentially criminal behaviour. i think the point people make about how uk is there were thousands of aid workers, literally thousands. it wasn't just like thousands of aid workers, literally thousands. it wasn'tjust like those crises where oxfam is over there, save the children is over there, and they all do their separate bits over a long period of time. for example, the work they have been doing in yemen, syria, sierra leone orthe democratic republic of congo. i eat he was one of those places where you have an earthquake, it is in some, putting pals in —— it is instant.
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lots of people in need of some kind of support, and loads and loads of aid workers. and the point about it people make is that within that environment, the chains of command we re environment, the chains of command were stretched, and so there were lots of people, short—term contracts, nobody knew who was working for whom, some people find themselves working for other organisations, so those usual chains of command were stretched. people say that is why it was even more open to abuse. the other issue is the man at the centre of these allegations, who left oxfam, but was then working in the charity sector within a yearfor then working in the charity sector within a year for another charity doing very similar work. this is the key point that i think penny mordaunt and others want to deal with now, the reporting back. how do you get this information into the open to some sort of central authority? some charities are talking about having a new passport in system so only if you have a passport that says you are clean, you are good, can you go to a new
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aid crisis when it is one, you can't have these people recycled. the problem with that as it will require a lot of transparency and disclosure and a huge cultural change. that is why i think the —— these things will not be decided today in meetings, it would take a long time. london city airport has been closed after a world war ii bomb was found nearby. the bomb was discovered by divers in the river thames, and police say they should be of to give the all clear sometime tomorrow. the first pictures have been released of an iceberg, which has broken away from the antarctic ice sheet, and its four times the size of london. scientists say they're on an urgent mission to document the marine eco system of the continent, hidden for more than a hundred thousand years. our science correspondent victoria gill has the details. a new perspective on a 6000 square kilometre swathe of floating ice. so the iceberg is 150 kilometres long, 50 kilometres wide,
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and will be about 150 metres deep. you will be able to see the first 20—30 metres above the water, and everything else is underneath. the trillion tonne a—68 iceberg is gradually drifting away from the antarctic continent and into the sea. it's these ice—filled waters and the sea floor beneath them that scientists are now eager to explore. in the british antarctic survey vessel, the james clark ross, a team will spend three weeks studying the marine life that has been locked away here for millennia. they've described it as a treacherous but urgent mission. there are likely to be new species discovered, as researchers seek out the creatures that make their home beneath the vast ice sheet. we have no idea what's living underneath these huge ice shelves. we assume it is animals that are specially adapted to life without green food and vegetarian, so we have a lot of scavengers and carnivores.
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so we expect animals like in the deep sea, that doesn't have light as well. but the team also hopes to understand the processes that caused the iceberg to break away. this could reveal more about just how this fragile, frozen wilderness at the bottom of the world will change as the climate warms. victoria gill, bbc news. joining me now from our cambridge studio is dr huw griffiths.... a marine biologist with the british antarctic survey. this is exciting stuff, but a bit of a race against time, because this thing has broken away, revealing a sea that hasn't seen the light of day, for what, thousands of thousands of years, and thatis thousands of thousands of years, and that is what you want to get back since —— access to, isn't it? that is what you want to get back since -- access to, isn't it? yes, really exciting but also the really challenging part is we want to get there in what we call a year zero, there in what we call a year zero, the year the iceberg moves, because we have had previous expeditions that have collapsed because them got
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their until two or three years later at the earliest and by then they have already seen the ecosystem is changing. what we need is to know what it is like now, and what it was like under the ice. what are your top question, what is top of your mind, in terms of what you need to know? personally, what is there. even as far as what is the sea floor look like? we haven't even got a map of the sea floor of that area so the first thing the ship has to do is map the sea floor with sonar. after that it map the sea floor with sonar. after thatitis map the sea floor with sonar. after that it is pretty much a blank sheet, as far as this environment is concerned. we think we have an idea of the sorts of animals that can cope with the low amounts of food available there but to be perfectly honest, until we get there and pull some of these things up or capture them on video, we have no idea. some of these things up or capture them on video, we have no ideam is difficult to get your head around the scale of what we are looking at here, isn't it? in my brain, i am not a massive football fan, but i like the idea of about a million
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football pitches is the area of that iceberg. that, to me, blows my mind, and if you think that 120,000 years, maybe, is how long that area has been covered in ice, you are talking about a fundamental change to the entire ecosystem. it is like the idea of taking a cave, and the specialised animals that live in that world, and of doing the roof off, and exposing it to daylight for the first time, and letting clamps and other things take over. it is that fundamental. how many are on the trip to find out? is it a whole tea m the trip to find out? is it a whole team of scientists, all with different specialities? yes, over 20 scientists going, plus our regular crew who run the ship, and they are covering everything from the eyes and the water surface all the way through the water column, right down to the mud and the animals on the sea floor, covering even the chemistry of the mad to see how that will change, now that the chemistry of the water is changing above it. —— of the mud. thank you forjoining
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us. ijust —— of the mud. thank you forjoining us. i just want to bring —— of the mud. thank you forjoining us. ijust want to bring you some breaking news, on the main story, of course, the meeting going on at the moment between oxfam and the international developer and secretary over those claims of some of the charity workers using prostitute in how you to seven years ago. just hearing the deputy chief executive of oxfam, penny lawrence, has resigned. she joined executive of oxfam, penny lawrence, has resigned. shejoined oxfam back in march 2006 as an international programmes director. she has more than 30 years of experience in the development field. she has lived and worked in sudan, zimbabwe and ghana, as well as the uk, but would appear at this stage to be the first casualty of this crisis at oxfam. as i was saying, the meeting with the international development secretary penny mordaunt is to defend oxfam's handling of the sex scandal and to try to prevent covenant funding from
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being cut. as soon as we get more on that, that story is just breaking right now, we havejust that, that story is just breaking right now, we have just heard that, that story is just breaking right now, we havejust heard penny lawrence has resigned. we will bring you more on that as we get it. let's have a look at the weather. we don't have a look at the weather. we don't have a look at the weather. we don't have a million football pitches of iceberg we are getting a bit of snow, chris. allan we are and there is more of that to come, particularly tonight venditti tomorrow. we could be looking at areas like scotland, northern ireland, northern england, particularly in the hills. the snow will be coming down heavily, just—in—time for rush hour, which will cause problems. either the whole country is under what all that is somewhere else! this is not now, this is a cyclone, and this island is tonga. this part is fiji, that is the main island of fiji, and that is tonga. the very powerful cyclone, scicluna indeed. tonga. the very powerful cyclone, sciclu na indeed. it tonga. the very powerful cyclone, scicluna indeed. it has been working over the summoned up —— the southern islands in the group. it could become a category five, top category
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cyclone. the wind is potentially gusting to 180 mph, and it has already causing big problems with flooding out and about, rhodes inundated, turned to rivers really. we could be leading up more of the same. it looks like being a serious storm for tonga over the next 2a hours. closer to home, it has to be said it was a beautiful day, but thatis said it was a beautiful day, but that is the calm before some, particularly in scotland, rather difficult weather coming?m particularly in scotland, rather difficult weather coming? it feels to me that this winter is the winter that just keeps on to me that this winter is the winter thatjust keeps on giving. we have had a lot of snow i think this winter, and more of that to come. pieters take a look at what has been going on. plenty of snow showers across the north and west of the uk through the weekend, which has led toa through the weekend, which has led to a covering of snow on the ground. the thing causing concern next is this lump of cloudy fancy working out, just to the west at the moment, this weather system will be bumping into cold airand this weather system will be bumping into cold air and will be bringing some of us a heavy spell of snow. even before the snow arrives, the winds will begin to crank up as well. as we go through this evening and overnight, the winds get very gusty, around the coasts and hills
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of wales on southern england. we could get gusts up to 70 mph in the most exposed areas. it will be a bloody, windy kind of night, you will probably hear the wind rattling on the windows, that kind of night. the main feature with a whether further north is that the rain looks likely to turn to a spell of snow. asi likely to turn to a spell of snow. as i was mentioning before, the snow will be coming down heavily, and just in time for rush hour. how much? five to ten centimetres of snow across the hills of scotland. even through the central belt, there will be enough snow to cause problems i think first thing for the early morning rush—hour commute. the snow will use off across the hills of northern ireland, it will turn i see here, but they could be some problems, across the high ground of the cumbrian fells, the pennines, the cumbrian fells, the pennines, the peak district, the snow could be as disruptive for a time. the further south you go, the more likely is you will have largely rain falling. that weather fan likely is you will have largely rain falling. that weatherfan has become slow moving across east anglia and south—east england, where it will feel particularly chilly tomorrow. even where the sunshine comes out
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for the rest of the country, temperature is nothing special, highs of three or 4 degrees for many full stop as they go through tuesday night, this ridge of high pressure klizan sky, the risk of icy stretches, and then we do it again with this next weather system. chung wins ahead of it and then the rain tends to snow across the high grounds of northern england. could get some lower levels potentially across parts of eastern scotland for across parts of eastern scotland for a time but ultimately on wednesday we will start to get some milder air coming to us. that will boost temperatures late in the day, about 10 degrees of cross parts of northern ireland, wales and western areas of england as well. that is really a hint of what we have got to come over the next few days. what we have covered of that mixture of and snow on wednesday, we are looking at the weather becoming largely dry across southern areas as high pressure builds. generally we should see improvements in temperatures as well, lifting up to the double figures. that is the weather. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: in the past few minutes the deputy chief of oxfam, penny lawrence, has
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resigned. she had worked for oxfam great britain since 2006. earlier today oxfam officials met government ministers in an attempt to keep the charity's funding after its workers we re charity's funding after its workers were accused of hiring prostitutes in haiti. becky dobson is named as one of three britons who died in a helicopter crash over the grand canyon — the others were jason hill and stuart hill. theresa may is to meet the irish prime minister leo varadkar in belfast, as talks continue to restore the power—sharing government at stormont. south africa's ruling anc party are meeting to discuss the future of president jacob zuma. its new leader says mr zuma must stand down or be forced out. sport now on afternoon live, with sarah. the winter olympics. you expect pretty extreme conditions at the winter olympics, but that's been taken to another level today, hasn't it? i know. we have seen all those reports over the opening days, temperatures reaching —15, —20, and now over the last couple of days they have been battling strong crosswinds. the men's darren hill
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was postponed yesterday. the women's giant slalom today. the qualifiers for the women's snowboard slopestyle yesterday, so the final went ahead today at phoenix park in pyeongchang. it went ahead but some athletes were not too happy with the decision. aimee fuller said the winds were "absolutely brutal" — how did she get on? yes, she had a heavy crash on her second run and most didn't make it through any of the runs without a crash over the course of the two matt grimes. aimee fuller was happy to have finished in one piece. she did all right there but we can see coming upjust did all right there but we can see coming up just how the gusts of wind dooley were affecting her over the course of the run, and you can see it was one of the crashes she had
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earlier. she was complaining about the communication they had beforehand. you can see the gusts of a really taking the athletes, there. her big issue was the fact that they didn't get to show off the level they have got to. you know, they have improved on four years ago from when they were all in sochi, but actually the scores were much lower this time—out. actually the scores were much lower this time-out. as i was powering into thisjump, i thought i have got this, then i felt this cost, and it was honestly like riding into a wind tunnel, absolutely brutal. —— ifelt this cost. not howl tunnel, absolutely brutal. —— ifelt this cost. not how i had visualised and prepared four years of preparation to go into today. i don't think it was a crucial of women's female slopestyle, which is a real shame for our sport. this was the winning run. jamie anderson of the united states — champion four years ago —
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she was champion again. managing those conditions well — interesting that winning run there scored her 83.00 — in sochi last time out, her winning run 95.25 — so you can see how these athletes really didn't get to show off what they can do. elsewhere canada won the team figure skating beating the olympic athletes from russia to the gold. and the united states took bronze thanks in no small part to mirai nagasu. she became only the third woman to land a triple axel at the winter olympics — an incredibly difficult move and she went on to nail eight more triple jumps. she was clearly overjoyed at putting in a clean routine and earning a season's—best score atjust the right time. she celebrated like that. and there's been history made in the biathlon today — lara dahlmeier of germany took the biathlon10—kilometre pursuit title, with a near—flawless shooting performance. she's the first woman to win the sprint and pursuit double, after picking up herfirst gold on saturday. and france's martin fourcade has won
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the men's12.5—kilometre pursuit. he was already his country's most decorated winter olympian — this brings his tally of golds to three, and takes him level with record—holder, jean—claude killy, who dominated skiing in the 1960s. canada's mikael kingsbury is the men's moguls champion. he's dominated the event since winning silver in sochi four years ago, with 13 straight world cup wins. now he's added olympic gold — a second gold for canada today. the american teenage snowboarding sensation, chloe kim, is being treated like a rock star in pyeongchang, because of her korean heritage — and she didn't disappoint in half—pipe qualifying. she confirmed her status as favourite to take gold with a jaw—dropping display, throwing in a brilliant series of spins and tricks. she finished way ahead of the pack, but said she was nervous and was looking forward to really letting loose in tomorrow's final. we will see what she brings them.
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away from the winter olympics... ireland's robbie henshaw has been ruled out of the rest of the six nations. the leinster centre dislocated his shoulder in the act of scoring his second try during ireland's bonus—point win over italy in dublin. henshaw has already undergone an operation on his right shoulder but will not recover in time to play a further part in the tournament. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. sera, thank you very much for that. just to update you on the breaking news, the resignation of the deputy chief of oxfam, penny lawrence —— sarah, thank you very much. she says she takes full responsibility for
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the behaviour of staff in chad and haiti, that "we failed to adequately act upon", she says, in response to the claims that oxfam were very slow in forcing three of the aid workers involved in allegations for using prostitutes in haiti after the earthquake in 2010, that oxfam was slow in sacking and asking for the resignations of others. but, as we see, announcing her resignation, she says that concerns about prostitutes we re says that concerns about prostitutes were raised with oxfam, and she says "i am ashamed this happened on my watch and it takes full responsibility." we'll have much more on this, obviously, our main story, as other now former collea g u es story, as other now former colleagues of hers tried to discuss with the government the possibility ofa with the government the possibility of a continuation of government money going to oxfam in the wake of this crisis. you're watching afternoon live. a massive search is continuing in snow—covered fields outside
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moscow where a russian passenger plane crashed yesterday, killing all 71 people on board. hundreds of people are looking for bodies and wreckage from the airliner, which came down minutes after taking off. steve rosenberg reports. in frozen fields near moscow, this is all that remains of flight 703. its wreckage strewn for a mile across the russian countryside, half buried in the snow. conditions were treacherous. the emergency services struggled through snowdrifts to reach the crash scene, but it quickly became clear this was no rescue operation. theirjob was to recover the bodies. the saratov airlines flight had taken off from moscow's domodedovo airport with more than 70 people on board. it was bound for orsk 900 miles south—east of moscow in the ural mountains. but minutes after take—off, the plane disappeared from radar. it had crashed near the russian capital. "we saw it burning up in the sky,"
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this eyewitness says, "then it fell. there was a blast, a loud boom." it's unclear what caused the antonov 148 jet to fall out of the sky. the kremlin has ordered an urgent investigation. president putin offered his condolences to the families of the victims. but that is little comfort to the relatives and friends of those on board flight 703. at orsk airport, grief mixed with disbelief as people realised they had been waiting for loved ones who would never arrive. emergency teams are still searching for victims of this crash and for clues to what caused it. steve rosenberg, bbc news, moscow.
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the united states has said it is ready to talk to north korea. the statement by vice president mike pence comes after a week of sports diplomacy during the winter olympics. kim jong un‘s sister made an historic visit to south korea and invited the south korean president moon jae—in to pyongyang. mr pence told the washington post that the us would continue to impose tough sanctions, but if pyongyang wanted to talk, the us would do so. our korea correspondent laura bicker reports. "let's meet again", they sing. on the right, a k—pop star. on the left, a pyongyang pin—up. it's a song of korean unification, a nostalgic glance at the past, this time president moon sits even closer to kim jong—un‘s sister. his new friends are not welcomed by all. these hardline conservatives burning the unification flag protest regularly,
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but this time they fear the moon administration is turning its back on the us, while befriending north korea. this, however, doesn't look like two world leaders at odds. this informal chat during an olympic speed skating event appears to have proved pivotal, and mike pence now says the us will talk to north korea, while still imposing sanctions. i think moonjae—in is not getting enough credit. you know, people are calling this the north korean charm offensive. i actually think this is a south korean charm offensive. it's critical that the united states is clear on this, because there's only so much south korea can do working on the nuclear issue. you have to remember north korea does not feel threatened by south korea's nuclear weapons, because south korea has none. north korea is being warned that it will at some point have to discuss getting rid of its nuclear weapons. they know what has to be on the table for conversations. we've said for some time that i think it's
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important that we have — we are going to need to have some discussions that precede any form of negotiation. the north korean guests say farewell for now. president moon must decide if he will visit pyongyang. a lot could depend on america's next move. this breakthrough takes away the policy wedge between the us and south korea. it means there are now both in agreement with how to deal with the north. it also is the first opportunity for meaningful talks to reduce tensions on the peninsula, and also reduce the chance of a military confrontation. laura bicker, bbc news, pyongyang. in a moment the business news with ben. but first a look at the headlines on afternoon live: the deputy chief executive of oxfam, penny lawrence has resigned, claiming ‘full responsibility‘ after its workers were accused
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of hiring prostitutes in haiti. earlier today oxfam officials met government ministers in an attempt to keep the charity's funding. becky dobson is named as one of three britons who died in a helicopter crash over the grand canyon — the others were jason hill and stuart hill. it's worth the wait, i promise you a! you don't want me. you want him. laughter time for the business news on afternoon live — hello, i'm ben bland. here's your business headlines on afternoon live: twenty—first century fox says it will commit to keeping sky news running for at least five years — and will create an separate board to ensure its independence. it hopes the proposal will overcome competition issues surrounding its proposed takeover of sky. did barclays bank give qatar a loan which was then used to buy shares in the bank in 2008? that is the question being investigated by the uk's serious fraud office. it has charged barclays bank
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with unlawful financial assistance. the decision to charge is significant because that's the part of the business that holds the banking licence that allows it to operate in different countries. 50,000 households will be offered a special deal that could cut their energy bills by upto £300 a year — each! the regulator ofgem wants to trial the idea of "collective" switching. that's when large numbers of people swap supplier in one go — which should give them all a better deal. we havejust had one huge budget fuss in the united states. and now there is another one? well, exactly, no soonerwas the last budget bill signed off — just at the end of last week — then president trump reveals his
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budget proposals for 2019. one of the main points is the $1.5 trillion he wants to spend on fixing infrastructure such as crumbling roads, bridges and airports. and what does he want to build? yes — a wall with mexico. so where's all the money going to come from? donald trump says the federal govt will stump up $200bn to do all this. will stump up $200 billion to do all this. the rest? well, that will come from city and state governments and the private sector. the president tweeted in the last couple of hours "this will be a big week for infrastructure. after so stupidly spending $7 trillion in the middle east, it is now time to start investing in our country!" but there are huge questions about what the country can really afford, the national debt is more than $20 trillion and rising. lets get more on this from joe mellor, our new york business correspondent whojoins mellor, our new york business correspondent who joins us now. mellor, our new york business correspondent whojoins us now. some people will say this is too little to solve the problems of crumbling infrastructure, whereas others will
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see it is too much and the government can't afford it. yes, and the camps that will see either of those things are not the ones you would expect, but let's start with the too little. you don't have to go far from where i am sitting now in downtown new york to find an infrastructure project that is essentially stalled, because these states, new york and newjersey, they say they don't have the money and it should come federal coffers, and it should come federal coffers, and they say that because firstly no one wants to be spending money they don't need to spend, but also they have one valid point which is it is actually harder for cities and states to borrow money. they are tied to much tighter deficits, there is legislation in some states which prevents them from running high deficits, so it is not like washington where they can just issue debt and pay for things that way. you are going to see this fight between states and cities intensifying. you will also see a fight in congress because this budget is essentially just fight in congress because this budget is essentiallyjust a wish list by donald trump, saying it is
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what he would like them to spend. you will see people on the right and the left saying, we don't want to add this to our already ballooning deficit. can we talk about harvey weinstein for a minute. deficit. can we talk about harvey weinsteinfora minute. he deficit. can we talk about harvey weinstein for a minute. he is never out of the news, and the fire sale for his company is running into trouble itself, isn't it? absolutely. yesterday afternoon, the very last minute, what essentially has been happening is his company, they have been trying to sell it to an investment company at a very reduced price but at the very last minute the new york attorney general filed a lawsuit to sue the wine stain company, saying he does not wa nt stain company, saying he does not want this sale to benefit the people —— the weinstein company. he does not want this to benefit the people at the weinstein company, and he wants to put into law that the people on the receiving end of that abuse are compensated. the company that was about to take a dover said they would set aside a fund, but my
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understanding —— take it over said they would set aside a fun, but my understanding the new york attorney general does not want to go forward with this until those people are guaranteed compensation. yes, we will look at it again soon. let's have a look closer to home. back here in the uk — the nation's favourite supermarket has been revealed. yes, i was going to ask for a drum roll and a big reveal, but this has given the game away. yes, and it's aldi. the discount supermarket has been stealing market share from its rivals and now it's gone one further. it has come first in a customer satisfaction survey, pushing last year's winner waitrose into fourth place. the big supermarkets, including sainsbury‘s, have been pushed to the bottom of the list — as gareth shaw from which? told us earlier. sainsbury's have finished last in
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our survey and people are feeling a bit ambivalent about their experience. some of the feedback we had, their experience is dull. it is well stocked but not great and a little pricey and that is something sainsbury's will have to take on board, along with the other big supermarkets which have finished right at the bottom of our survey. 0k, right at the bottom of our survey. ok, monday morning, after the weeks before. wow. are things coming down? yes, the board is all green, as you can see. they had a rollercoaster ride last week — but stock markets seem to be bouncing back today. the ftse 100 is higher this afternoon — clawing back some of its losses — but still at its lowest level for more than a year. it's been helped today by a rise in commodities — crude oil prices climbing back up from last week's steep declines. that's helped royal dutch shell and bp shares to rise. there's the barclays share price — buoyant despite the legal case against it. it is always displayed, always goes
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the way you don't expect. yes, as is so often the case. we can read into this that perhaps shareholders and investors think it is not necessarily going to be quite a calamity for the bank, even if the case does not go in its favour. you can see that the share prices up this afternoon. 0k, can see that the share prices up this afternoon. ok, i shall see you later. then, thank you very much. —— the share price is up. don't forget you can tweet us with what you think of any of the day's stories. all the ways of contacting us are stories. all the ways of contacting us are there on the screen right now. afternoon live, 2—5, weekday afternoons, let us know if you have any views on the stories we are covering. you may have a view on the issue of oxfam, and in fact we would like to hear from you. issue of oxfam, and in fact we would like to hearfrom you. are issue of oxfam, and in fact we would like to hear from you. are you looking at your direct debits at the moment, rethinking the amount of money you give to charities such as oxfa m money you give to charities such as oxfam in that way? or are you one of those who, as we have been saying, don't blame the whole classroom just because of the behaviour of one of
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the people involved. a lot of argument is going on about oxfam and in the last few moments we have been hearing about the resignation at senior level. let's speak to our correspondent matt cole is here. penny lawrence has gone. yes, she has resigned amidst everything unfolded over the last days. her boss, the chief executive, has of course this lunchtime been attending the department for international development, having a meeting with the secretary of state penny mordaunt who really wanted some a nswe rs mordaunt who really wanted some answers about what had gone on, who knew what, where, when and why, and they could be taking oxfam's funding away if they didn't like the answers. since that meeting, and we haven't heard from the content of what went on there but we have heard from penny lawrence, the deputy chief executive of oxfam, and she explains ina chief executive of oxfam, and she explains in a statement they have been concerned about the behaviour of staff, not just been concerned about the behaviour of staff, notjust in haiti where this has revolved around, but also
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in chad before those staff were sent to haiti, those allegations regarding staff using prostitutes, to the company director and his team in chad. she was in charge basically at the time as programme director and she said this therefore had happened on her watch. she said she is ashamed that it had happened on her watch and as a consequence she has tendered her resignation. this whole focus on how oxfam reacted to the initial reports of what had happened, and the claim is that they we re very happened, and the claim is that they were very slow in basically sacking those that were named?” were very slow in basically sacking those that were named? i think the questions they are facing is just what they did, what they knew, how fast they acted. for example the country director was allowed to resign before the investigation they we re resign before the investigation they were conducting reached its conclusion. there are questions as to actually whether they had properly brought the authorities, or
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indeed the charity commission which has oversight of these matters, whether it had been fully transparent with what they had been doing and what they knew. in fact, there are questions of the charity commission also on whether it did enough and properly looked into this. these obviously all going back to 2011, these allegations, so it has been some time since the emerged. what is becoming clear is something very wrong went on. these people were meant to be in haiti to help the most vulnerable at the most terrible time and they clearly had a different agenda. we havejust had this statement in the last few moments from penny lawrence, talking about the behaviour of staff in chad, so is that the first time we have been aware it is notjust haiti? no, we were aware of claims of inappropriate behaviour involving prostitutes, six parties in houses run by oxfam, sort of base houses, if you like, for staff. and these
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had revolved around a number of members of staff. some suggestions that some of the staff who ended up in haiti had some oversight potentially of the staff who had been involved in things elsewhere. as a consequence, therefore, the person who had ultimate oversight, penny lawrence, who joined oxfam who had ultimate oversight, penny lawrence, whojoined oxfam in 2006, asa lawrence, whojoined oxfam in 2006, as a leader she had responsibility for teams across 60 countries as well as other jobs for teams across 60 countries as well as otherjobs in the intervening years. she has now basically explained she feels very sorry at the harm and distress caused to oxfam supporters and the wider development sector, because this clearly has ramifications for other aid agencies than oxfam, some of whom themselves have said, yes, they have problems with sexual abuse and harassment by aid workers. they are now very much all trying to focus on what should be done next. i know you are coming back in a few moments because this is a developing story with new details every moment, so matt, thank you forjoining us and we will talk to you later.
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you are watching afternoon live. time to catch up with the weather. good afternoon. over the weekend we have seen some snow showers working and that has left the covering of snow on the ground in staffordshire, blue skies overhead and for many of us blue skies overhead and for many of us sunshine out and about, but on the satellite picture, this area of cloud to our west, it will be bringing a mixture of rain and some heavy snow for some of us overnight tonight. more on that in a second. firstly, the evening progressed. across england, wales and scotland, largely clear skies, but wind is picking up the northern ireland. a band of rain here will turn to snow but ahead of our front, it gets windy. gusts could reach 50—60 mph in the south for a time of night and on land it would be very blustery as well. you can't help but notice the blue changing to white. we are expecting rain to change to snow overnight, with heaviest falls across northern ireland, scotland and northern england particularly over high ground. it could cause
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problems out and about for the early morning rush hour. 5—10 centimetres of snow expected across higher parts of snow expected across higher parts of scotla nd of snow expected across higher parts of scotland and even lower down we could see a few centimetres in the central belt, all expected to cause travel disruption. 5—10 centimetres across the higher parts of northern ireland, and also some snow for the cumbrian fells, the peaks of the pennines. there could be some snow mixed in with this band of rain down here as it moves eastwards. very slow moving across the east on tuesday and the rain lingering in south east anglia and east england where it will feel pretty cold. the sunshine comes out but it will not do too much for the temperatures. a cold day, three orfour the higher on tuesday. then the band finally clears from eastern england and we will be left with clearing skies. frost and ice could be an issue before the next system works in from the west. this one again will have a mixture of rain and hill snow, mostly quite high up across the hills of northern england and
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scotland, but potentially some for a time getting down to lower levels, particularly across central and eastern scotland. eventually milder airwill be eastern scotland. eventually milder air will be moving in, temperatures lifting to 10 degrees later in the day across northern ireland, western parts of england and wales as well. this is a trend towards the end of the week. temperatures lifting, it will turn milder, and drierfor many of us as well. that is your weather. hello, you're watching afternoon live. today at 3pm... oxfa m oxfam sees its first resignation over allegations of use of
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prostitutes in haiti. the deputy chief executive of oxfam, penny lawrence, has resigned, claiming "full responsibility" after the charity's workers were accused of hiring prostitutes in haiti. jeremy corbyn says he is disgusted by the scandal. oxon been clearer about it. the three britons killed in helicopter crash in the grand canyon are named. three other britons and the pilot were injured when the helicopter went down. theresa may and the irish prime minister meet in belfast — could a power—sharing agreement about to be restored in northern ireland? coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. sarah has that, and the latest from pyeongchang. yes, and it has been all about the high winds at the winter olympics. the women's slopestyle went ahead, despite concerns britain's amy fuller crashed out and finished 17th. more on that later. and with the weather, chris fawkes. we are going to be taking a look at cyclone gita, currently hitting tonga. but here in
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the uk, a combination of strong winds and heavy sniper some of us overnight that could cause some problems into tuesday morning's rush—hour. thanks. also coming up — that's cool — scientists release the first video of a giant iceberg that's broken off the antarctic ice shelf — its four times the size of london and weighs a trillion tonnes. hello everyone — this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. oxfam has seen its first resignation since the aid agency faced allegations of sexual misconduct by disaster relief staff following the haiti earthquake in 2010. now the charity's deputy chief executive penny lawrence has resigned saying she took "full responsibility" for the behaviour of staff in chad and haiti "that we failed to adequately act upon". mark goldring, the chief exec of oxfam, said he "deeply respected penny's decision to accept
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personal responsibility". her resignation comes after senior officials from the charity met the international development secretary, to try to prevent government funding being cut. all this, as many donors consider what to do about their contributions to the charity. matt cole reports. in the worst imaginable circumstances, oxfam staff were meant to be in haiti to help. it's now clear some had a very different agenda. amidst claims of sex parties and prostitutes, oxfam sacked four staff and allowed three others to quit, including their country director, who went on to secure work with another aid organisation. oxfam denies it covered up what happened but now it has emerged the international developmment secretary wa nts a nswers about the way it handled the case. we are talking about an historic case but it is common in some respects, still live. they still have information they should be giving to the authorities. it is to the department here that oxfam's leaders were summoned
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to make their case to the secretary of state following her threats to cut millions of pounds of funding if she didn't like their answers. but there are also questions for the charity commission, which regulates these matters, not least how much it knew and why didn't do more. they did say they were investigating some allegations of sexual misconduct. so why wasn't that looked into further? because what was not clear was the extent and seriousness of those, which, as i've said, they assured us, in fact, they categorically said there was no allegations of abuse of beneficiaries. andrew mitchell was the international development secretary when all this took place. i think oxfam were economical with the truth about what they were investigating. they may well have stuck by the letter of the rules, but they certainly did not stick by the spirit. after all, one of the big changes we made in 2010 was to introduce much greater transparency and openness into the way international development takes place. i'm afraid oxfam were very clearly in breach of that at the time. there are also questions for civil servants here,
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after another former secretary of state, priti patel, suggested they dismissed her efforts to question how wide a problem sexual abuse and predatory behaviour is in the charity sector. save the children has volunteered it had 31 claims of sexual harassment last year but if says everyone must do more. i will not sit here pretending you i can wave a magic wand and eliminate all risk tomorrow. but what i can do is assure the british public the people who are ultimately responsible for... these vulnerable women and children, that we will give this our best shot. oxfam says it has now put new safeguarding measures in place including tougher vetting of staff. other charities are calling for a new sector—wide passport that workers can take from agency to agency to verify
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they are suitable and saved to be trusted helping those most in need. matt cole, bbc news. let's speak to our correspondent matt cole. so we have a high—profile resignation. is this the first of more to come, what do you think?m is the first, it doesn't get an awful lot bigger. penny lawrence, the deputy chief executive of oxfam. he was not her boss at the time. here wasn't and has expressed his sadness that she is going and respect her decision to go, but in her part in the statement she has explained that in the last few days they had become aware there were allegations concerning the staff and their behaviour in haiti from an earlier mission in chad. and therefore she says that she was
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automatically their boss at the time, she should have been aware of the allegations in chad, and therefore that these people could go on to hide the to do what has now unfolded went on, in terms of the use of prostitutes. it led to some sackings and resignations too. she says it happened on her watch and therefore she is ashamed and takes full responsibility. as a result, therefore, she has resigned. it has been accepted clearly by oxfam and we now move on to really try to find out what has gone on between penny mordaunt with her threat to remove some £30 million worth of funding a year that the government gives to oxfa m year that the government gives to oxfam if she doesn't like what she heard from mark goldring and admitting they have this lunchtime. this is the difficulty for oxfam, the reputational damage not just this is the difficulty for oxfam, the reputational damage notjust in terms of government funding, but any viewer who has a direct debit going to oxfam, they will be looking at that. a point picked up on by jeremy corbyn, the opposition leader, who ina corbyn, the opposition leader, who in a statement explained he had been a lifelong supporter of oxfam, and this would be his point of concern.
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he says he is utterly disgusted by the allegations, and i am sure there are plenty of others who have regular donations going to oxfam, who may have similar views. but it is not, one should say, just oxfam who are concerned about these issues. this is a specific case which oxfam is accused of pretty much mishandling, and not being as forthright about what was going on with government, with the charity commission, which oversees this, but other charities have put their hands up other charities have put their hands up and said we have problems with sexual harassment too. we are working on it, it is very difficult that they are trying to put in pleasures. for example save the children are trained to put forward the idea of a passport that all aid workers can have so if they move from agency to agency they can be tracked and vetted that they are suitable people because there have been warnings for some 20 years or so now that sexual predators have bright tried to target relief organisation to get themselves access to children and women in some
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of the most honourable situations that can be. it is the apparent lack of transparency, allegations swishing around of a cover—up. while they put out a press race of the time, they said there was not fraud involved but they didn't say what was involved. indeed, they kept very quiet on the details. the country director, who penny lawrence in her resignation statement refers to, had beenin resignation statement refers to, had been in chad previously, and there we re been in chad previously, and there were claims of prostitutes being entertained, shall we say, at an oxfa m entertained, shall we say, at an oxfam run house there. he then moved on to haiti, but then when this new development came about in haiti, he was actually allowed to resign before he was sort of met with the end of the process that saw other people sacked. it is understood he went on to work for another aid agency. therefore there are questions as to what level of reference he might have got to secure that new post, again within the aid agency world, if you like.
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so it is something i think that penny mordaunt was pretty forthright about in her comments in the last day or so, about wanting to know what went on. she says yes it is historical but there are current implications, not least for what safeguarding processes the likes of worse than her. —— oxfam have. the government has said it will be considering further steps in the light and admitting they have had today to survey said they want to go further in terms of what they expect of organisations like this, in terms of organisations like this, in terms of safeguarding. we await relieved to hearfrom penny mordaunt, international developing secretary, in the light of her meeting on whether she will make good on that threat of removing £30 billion a year from oxfam. michael, thank you. three british tourists, killed in a helicopter crash in the grand canyon, have been named by police in america. becky dobson, jason hill and stuart hill, died on saturday evening. three other britons, and the pilot, were injured. here's james cook. the helicopter came down in rocky, remote terrain,
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bursting into flames. it appears the survivors were able to get out, despite suffering serious injuries. but three britons on board died at the scene. 27—year—old becky dobson, 30—year—old stuart hill, and jason hill, who was 32. for the survivors, three young britons and the pilot, the ordeal was far from over. rescuers, including local military personnel, were flown in, but then had to walk to the crash site, using night—vision goggles. it was more than eight hours before the injured were flown to hospital in las vegas. we weren't able to extract everybody from the crash site until 2am, this morning. high winds, brownout dust conditions, rugged terrain, and as you know, when you fly in treacherous conditions like this, you have to have special training and special people. it's not clear what caused the crash, which involved a eurocopter ec130. the tour company, papillon airways, says it is the world's largest aerial sightseeing outfit, flying around 600,000 people year.
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in 2001, six people died when another of the firm's grand canyon helicopters crashed. the foreign office says it is now providing support to the british families of this weekend's victims. james cook, bbc news, las vegas. miraya villareal from cbs news has been reporting from grand canyon west: what we know right now is that it is still too early in the investigation to really know exactly what may have caused the accident. as we heard the police chief talk about, whether it is something that they are looking at. there are federal investigators that will be on the scene today from both the federal aviation administration, as well as the national transportation safety board.
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they will be taking a look at everything here, talking to witnesses and also surveying the scene. one thing they mentioned yesterday that is truly important, there is a camera and a black box that was on site on the helicopter. they have retrieved that and they will be reviewing that as well. we also know that tribal leaders from the reservation will be meeting with all of these federal agencies to figure out exactly what they could have done or what will be done in the future to make sure this doesn't happen again. theresa may and the irish prime minister, leo varadkar, are visiting belfast for talks with northern ireland's main political parties. there are suggestions the democratic unionists and sinn fein, could be close to a deal to restore devolved government, after the failure of several previous rounds of negotiations. power sharing at stormont collapsed more than a year ago. keith doyle reports. the first visit for the prime minister this morning was the bombardier factory in belfast. last month, a surprise settlement in a long running trade dispute sawjobs secured here. mrs may's visit to belfast is seen as as sign that another
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settlement may be close. northern ireland has been run by civil servants since the power—sharing executive collapsed in january last year. tensions between the ruling parties, the democratic unionists and sinn fein, over implementing the irish language and same—sex marriage as well as an overall acrimonious relationship, has resulted in 13 months of stalemate. at the weekend, the new sinn fein leader, mary lou mcdonald, indicated that some sort of deal might be in the making. but it seems that may now be the case. the prime minister was last in northern ireland during the election campaign, and has been criticised for what some described as a hands hands—off approach to restoring the power—sharing executive. today's visit is a clear indication that progress has been made. the prime minister is meeting the parties at stormont, the home of the assembly along with the irish
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premier, leo varadkar. the speculation is the deal to restore the power—sharing assembly may include a workaround to resolve the issue of the official status of the irish language, which has been a bitter source of division between the dup and sinn fein. restoring the power—sharing executive would come at a crucial time for northern ireland as it faces another huge issue, brexit and the irish border. the irish government wants further guarantees that there will be no hard border. theresa may has given those guarantees, but as yet, no clear plans have emerged to show how that will be the case. while this has all the makings of being a day for deals, these days have come and gone in northern ireland in the past. keith doyle bbc news. are we holding our breath just getting the diary out? i don't want my breath, it may be very unpleasant. they were saying a david eales, i'm pretty sure this is not. it might be a weekly deals. the two prime ministers by being here you would think that a deal is in the airand here you would think that a deal is in the air and there are some progress being made. there is
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progress being made. there is progress being made but they are not over the line yet. there are still that big important issue about the irish language and its official status. the dup does not want a stand—alone bill that would raise the irish singer to an official act which here. for sinn fein, it is exactly what they want. they have to reach some kind of compper myers. there is some talk of having maybe three different bills going through the same time and i come together in one act. there is also the issue of same—sex marriage and how to deal with the legacy of the troubles here. quite a few hurdles to get over here. whether we will get a deal to see power coming back to storm on today, i think that is highly unlikely. but if it happens, and it is a big if, it could well be this week. keith, talk to you later, thank you. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines, the deputy
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chief executive of oxfam, penny lawrence has resigned , claiming ‘full responsibility‘ after its workers were accused of hiring prostitutes in haiti. earlier today oxfam officials met government ministers in an attempt to keep the charity's funding becky dobson is named as one of three britons who died in a helicopter crash over the grand canyon , the others were jason hill and stuart hill. theresa may has arrived at stormont where she and the irish prime minister, are meeting northern ireland's political leaders, amid speculation a deal to restore the devolved government is close. in sport, tricky crosswinds affected the olympics. amy poehler had a nasty fall and finished 17th. usa became only the third woman to land a triple axel at the olympics, helping her country to team bronze. canada won gold command away from
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the winter olympics, ireland's bradley henshaw has been ruled out of the six nations after dislocating his shoulder. i will be back with more after half—past. the leadership of south africa's ruling anc is meeting to decide on the future of president zuma. he has remained in office despite repeated calls for him to stand down amid allegations of corruption. the new anc leader, cyril ramaposa, has issued an ultimatum, that mr zuma must stand down, or be forced out. pumza fihlani has been following the story in pretoria. the markets are going a bit bizarre, because of various leaks and suggestions he has a ready gone. what is happening? that's correct, just a few moments ago there were rumours that the anc has made its decision to recall the president, which is why the markets went all haywire. but shortly after that we
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had confirmation from the presidential spokesperson that dismissing those reports as nothing more than fake news. we are awaiting official word from the anc. they have been meeting for a total of three hours now, thrashing out what should happen next with president jacob zuma. we understand today is d—day. this is the day they decide to recall him. the anc president sorana poser to recall him. the anc president sora na poser has to recall him. the anc president sorana poser has acknowledged it is causing disunity. he once this sorted. correct. he was addressing the rally yesterday in cape town, where he stressed unity needs to be restored to the african national congress, but he also spoke about the divisions within the party, not least because of the swirling corruption charges related to a number of anc mps, and also questions around president jacob zuma's legacy, and his links or allegations to corruption. allegations he has denied of course.
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but they are very desperate for the party to rebuild its image and shake off and cut ties with the legacy of presidentjacob off and cut ties with the legacy of president jacob zuma. that option of forcing him out, how likely is that, how could it be done? one of the things being debated at the moment. the anc has been very keen to avoid this process being overtaken by opposition parties, who i should add our knocking on the door at the moment. what the anc could do if the president refuses to take down is ta ke president refuses to take down is take this matter to parliament. that would be a motion of no—confidence, a vote that would be passed by members of the african national confidence —— congress, which would strip him of role. if that fails, they could impeach him, which means he loses all his benefits as a former state leader. thank you very much. despite an agreement allowing rohingya moslems to return to myanmar, from refugee camps in bangladesh, many say they won't go home.
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hundreds of thousands of people fled a military crackdown and violence from pro government militia groups myanmar last year, but now wa nt safety gua ra ntees and the right to citizenship, before going back. well, three aid workers from one charity, have been filming video diaries of their work helping the rohingya, at the worlds largest refugee camp in bangladesh. chris rogers reports. the world's largest refugee camp. this is home to more than 800,000 rohingya muslim refugees, escaping persecution in buddhist—dominated myanmar. dr ramiz momeni, genevieve jones—hernandez and sarah wade have travelled the world helping refugees. but nothing can prepare them for what lies ahead. the humanitas charity are heading deep into the camp, where there is no aid to a medical centre. we are walking to set up our clinic, where no one else has reached yet. so obviously it's going to be tough. there are so many babies,
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newborns, 1a days old. they don't have any food, starving. dr momeni: an underweight baby... she was prescribed vitamins butjust for her, not for the baby. honestly, it's like the baby's... yeah... dying. so, we've just organised for her to go and get referred, because she needs to go to a hospital and for that she needs to have her id card. tell her that we're very sorry, she lost the baby. i think we expected to turn up and be working alongside a lot more organisations or volunteers. we've worked within the syrian refugee crisis, and it was full of organisations and volunteers and people there on the ground, and i think we expected this to be slightly similar, and it isn't. her pulse is very low, so we're just
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rushing to the hospital. we've got these newly arrived rohingyas and severe, severe dehydration. there is an absolute lack of aid for these people. larger international aid organisations complain myanmar has blocked aid convoys and staff reaching the refugee camp. it's time for the team to head home, but more refugees arrive, in biblical numbers. all of these people are tired, sick, hungry, and yet have hungry, and yet to have reached their final destination in this camp and set up home. it's not so much that it's a difficult thing to be here.
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i think it would be a more difficult thing to leave, knowing that we are leaving these people in such a dire situation. this is my last exit from the camp, because we're heading home tomorrow. somehow, they're incredible. they cheer. and, you know the way that i see it, we're here to be a positive influence, a positive... you know, so we have to come with energy, come with smiles, come with balloons, bubbles, as well as the medicine. show them that people care. views in london can see more of that report on insight out. you're watching afternoon live. the first pictures have been released of an iceberg, which has broken away from the antarctic ice sheet, and its four times the size of london. scientists say they're on an urgent mission to document the marine eco system of the continent, hidden for more than a hundred thousand years.0ur science correspondent victoria gill has the details.
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a new perspective on a 6000 square kilometre swathe of floating ice. so the iceberg is 150 kilometres long, 50 kilometres wide, and will be about 150 metres deep. you will be able to see the first 20—30 metres above the water, and everything else is underneath. the trillion—tonne, a—68 iceberg is gradually drifting away from the antarctic continent and into the sea. it's these ice—filled waters and the sea floor beneath them that scientists are now eager to explore. in the british antarctic survey vessel, the james clark ross, a team will spend three weeks studying the marine life that has been locked away here for millennia. they've described it as a treacherous but urgent mission. there are likely to be new species discovered, as researchers seek out the creatures that make their home beneath the vast ice sheet. we have no idea what's living underneath these huge ice shelves. we assume it is animals that are specially adapted to life
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without green food and vegetarian, so we have a lot of scavengers and carnivores. so we expect animals like in the deep sea, that doesn't have light as well. but the team also hopes to understand the processes that caused the iceberg to break away. this could reveal more about just how this fragile, frozen wilderness at the bottom of the world will change as the climate warms. victoria gill, bbc news. earlier i spoke about this antarctic iceberg expedition with dr huw griffiths, a marine biologist with british antarctic survey. yes, really exciting but also the really challenging part is we want to get there in what we call year zero, the year the iceberg moves, because we have had previous expeditions that have collapsed because they didn't
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get there until two or three years later at the earliest and by then they have already seen the ecosystem is changing. what we need is to know what it is like now, and what it was like under the ice. what are your top questions, what is top of your mind, in terms of what you need to know? firstly, what is there. even as far as what does the sea floor look like? we haven't even got a map of the sea floor of that area so the first thing the ship has to do is map the sea floor with sonar. after that it is pretty much a blank sheet, as far as this environment is concerned. we think we have an idea of the sorts of animals that can cope with the low amounts of food available there but to be perfectly honest, until we get there and pull some of these things up or capture them on video, we have no idea. it is difficult to get your head around the scale of what we are looking at here, isn't it? in my brain, iam nota massive football fan, but i like the idea of about a million football pitches is the area of that iceberg. a million football pitches?! is the
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area of that iceberg. that, to me, blows my mind, and if you think that 120,000 years, maybe, is how long that area has been covered in ice, you are talking about a fundamental change to the entire ecosystem. it is like the idea of taking a cave, and the specialised animals that live in that world, and lifting the roof off, and exposing it to daylight for the first time, and letting plants and other things take over. it is that fundamental. so how many are on the trip to find out? is it a whole team of scientists, all with different specialities? yes, over 20 scientists going, plus our regular crew who run the ship, and they are covering everything, from the ice and the water surface all the way through the water column, right down to the mud and the animals on the sea floor, and covering even the chemistry of the mud to see how that will change, now that the chemistry of the water is changing above it. time to have a look at the weather with chris fawkes. for some of us as ball of heavy snow awaits us tonight and tomorrow. before we get there,
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we have some strong winds to content with across england and wales. gusts could reach 70 mph. the thing that grabs your eye is the blue turning to turn to white. we are expecting a speu to turn to white. we are expecting a spell of heavy snow overnight across higher parts of northern ireland, scotla nd higher parts of northern ireland, scotland and northern ireland. how much now? around five to ten centimetres is likely, the snow coming down thick and heavy for the tuesday morning rush—hour. likely to cause some problems out of about on the roads in scotland. higher parts of northern ireland and northern ireland could see similar amounts of snow. the risk of some disruption has further south it is going to be rain that falls, and that band of rain that falls, and that band of rain will clear. feeling cold wherever you are. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: the deputy chief executive of oxfam, penny lawrence, has resigned — claiming ‘full responsibility‘ after the charity's workers
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were accused of hiring prostitutes in haiti. becky dobson is named as one of three britons who died in a helicopter crash over the grand canyon — the others were jason hill and stuart hill. theresa may is to meet the irish prime minister leo varadkar in belfast, as talks continue to restore the power—sharing government at stormont. south africa‘s ruling anc party is meeting to discuss the future of president jacob zuma. its new leader says mr zuma must stand down or be forced out. sport now on afternoon live, with sarah. the winter olympics. you expect pretty extreme conditions at the winter olympics, but that‘s been taken to another level today, hasn‘t it? plenty of snow, plenty of cold temperatures, —22, —25 degrees, but they have had a viciously strong cross winds in the last couple of days. the men‘s downhill was postponed yesterday.
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the women‘s giant slalom today. the qualifiers for the women‘s snowboard slopestyle yesterday, so the final went ahead today at phoenix park in pyeongchang. it was touch and go whether it would go ahead. it went ahead but some athletes were not too happy with the decision. plenty of unhappy athletes afterwards. yes, you have to feel for aimee fuller, trained for this for aimee fuller, trained for this forfour for aimee fuller, trained for this for four years, for aimee fuller, trained for this forfour years, then for aimee fuller, trained for this for four years, then literally blown away with the gust of wind. yes, on the basis of wind, and you think of aimee fuller, when you see other events like the men‘s downhill yesterday, and the women‘s giant slalom postponed yesterday, i know there is some flexibility so some
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athletes were confused. aimee fuller said she was confused at the start about the messages coming across. let‘s look at her run to see how it impacted her. this was her second run. all competitors in this event bed actually fall stops the bag. this was her head a crash and impacted her score. she finished 17 jew. —— all competitors in this event jew. —— all competitors in this eve nt ha d jew. —— all competitors in this event had actually fallen. . some of the average bid wanted to go ahead, so there were mixed views. as i was powering into thisjump, i thought i have got this, then i felt this gust, and it was honestly like riding into a wind tunnel, absolutely brutal. it's not howl it's not how i would have expected, how i had planned and visualised four years of prep work to go into today. i don't think it was a true show of women's female slopestyle, which is
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a real shame for our sport. this was the winning run. jamie anderson of the united states — champion four years ago — she was champion again. she managed those conditions well — interesting that winning run there scored her 83.00 — in sochi last time out, her winning run 95.25 — so you can see how these athletes really didn‘t get to show off what they can do. it doesn‘t matter to her. she still has a double gold, but you can see the impact of those conditions. elsewhere, canada won the team figure skating beating the olympic athletes from russia to the gold. and the united states took bronze thanks in no small part to mirai nagasu. she became only the third woman to land a triple axel at the winter olympics — an incredibly difficult move and she went on to nail eight more triple jumps. she was clearly overjoyed at putting in a clean routine and earning a season‘s—best score atjust the right time. she was clearly overjoyed at her
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pa rt she was clearly overjoyed at her part in that bronze winning performance. let‘s have a look at some of the other medals that have been won today. lara dahlmeier of germany made history the biathlon winning 10—kilometre pursuit title, with a near—flawless shooting performance. she‘s the first woman to win the sprint and pursuit double, after picking up herfirst gold on saturday. and france‘s martin fourcade has won the men‘s 12.5—kilometre pursuit. he was already his country‘s most decorated winter olympian — this brings his tally of golds to three, and takes him level with record—holder, jean—claude killy, who dominated skiing in the 1960s. canada‘s mikael kingsbury is the men‘s moguls champion. this second gold for the nation. he‘s dominated the event since winning silver in sochi four years ago, with 13 straight world cup wins. now he‘s added olympic gold to his haul. ireen wust became the most
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successful dutch olympian of all time — she won the women‘s 1500m speed skating title. it‘s her 10th games medal which also meant she became the most successful olympic speed skater. in the women‘s ski jump, favourite maren lundby won gold with a massive finaljump of a hundred and ten metres. she held her nerve on the last leap to win gold by 1a points. it‘s norway‘s second gold of the games — their first in women‘s ski jumping. that, simon, is yoursport for that, simon, is your sport for now. sarah, thank you very much. the leadership of south africa‘s ruling anc is meeting to decide on the future of president zuma. he has remained in office despite repeated calls for him to stand down amid allegations of corruption. the new anc leader, cyril ramaposa, has issued an ultimatum, that mr zuma must stand down, or be forced out. with me is stephen chan, professor of world politics at soas university of london.
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it isa it is a case of when, not if now?m isa it is a case of when, not if now?m is a case of wine, and i think it will be a short when. i think the likelihood is he will be asked to be standard on —— it is a case of when. will be all at that meeting be prepared to say that his time is up? no, ithink prepared to say that his time is up? no, i think you will have had enough time to work the telephone, lobbying very hard, trying to find sufficient loyalists to make it difficult to move against him, but i don‘t think he has the numbers. in your view, has he got to go? yes. he has been someone who has been a bad president, notwithstanding the corruption scandals, but he has really been dragging the party‘s name into disrepute and with elections not too far away the party needs a chance to rebuild, so i think what the party is thinking about is not of the welfare of south africa but also the future status of
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the party. with the country as it is, cyril ramaphosa could well be saying, be careful what you wish for... indeed, very much saying be careful what you wish for. the country is in a mess and whoever comes after him will not have an easy fix. in fact it is one of these terrible jobs where you can‘t win in the short term. the financial situation south africa is m, financial situation south africa is in, really largely because of mismanagement and incompetence, it is so deep that i think they will be very surprised when they find out just how deep it is and how little money there is in the kitty. jacob zuma will no doubt be working out the best possible way out, and that means looking after himself financially, where he will live, things like this. we have seen this of course not far away with robert mugabe? gallery—mac they were very gentle with robert mugabe, very -- they were very gentle with robert mugabe. a great appliance of customs. it doesn‘t really apply in south africa which is a much more
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cosmopolitan country. the anc is not in position to promise him a deal, they are not a military group taking over with command over these things. they can‘t promise him anything by way of a soft landing, and i think for that reason he has been resisting very hard. the comparison is inevitable because of the similarities with what happened with mugabe, but elsewhere in africa is there a sense that after decades of corruption in some of these countries, people are just saying, enough is enough?” of these countries, people are just saying, enough is enough? ithink there are two parts to this, certainly enough is enough, but also they are saying, but you have no further planned for the future. you area further planned for the future. you are a man of the past, you have no way forward you can take us, and i think people are not only looking at how
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long people have been around monopolising power, but how little they have done without power for the benefit of people, and people would like government to produce some benefit. so, when, if, cyril ramaphosa finds himself in charge, what is the priority, the first thing to be done? he needs to get their electricity flowing again. the electricity situation, the water problem in the south of the country, it isa problem in the south of the country, it is a complete mess, and none of these things were foreseen by the administrations. chronic underinvestment in all of these key services. to show he is a president in touch with the needs of the people he will almost have to deal with these services and work to restore trust after that in the government. how will historyjudge jacob zuma? apart from being a bad president, was he a bad man? who knows whether he was a bad man full stop he was a man with a very u nfortu nate stop he was a man with a very unfortunate background. he was the least educated of the anc leaders. he spent time in prison, he suffered for the cause, like everyone else, but in my opinion he was manifestly choice for the president. of all of
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the southern african majority rule president he has been by far the worst. he had no sense of technocratic command of what a modern south african leader would need at all. professor stephen chan, thank you very much for coming in. rescue workers in russia say they‘ve recovered the second black box from the passenger plane that crashed yesterday near moscow. all 71 people on board the regional jet died when it came down shortly after take—off. it‘s not yet known what caused the crash. steve rosenberg reports. slowly, painstakingly, they searched in the snow. 1000 emergency workers, in the countryside outside moscow. the recovery teams formed lines, and inch by inch combed frozen fields, looking for body fragments, and pieces of the antonovjet. the russian winter had concealed much of the horror of this crash. in deep snow this place even looks like a winter wonderland, but it is the scene of the tragedy. there were no survivors. all 71 passengers
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and crew were killed. so why did this russian passenger jet crash — minutes after take—off? well, among the possible causes investigators are focusing on are bad weather, human air and mechanical failure. —— human error. in the town of orsk, where the plane was heading, the list of the victims of flight 703 has become a makeshift memorial, a place for laying flowers and lighting candles, and for remembering those who didn‘t make it home. katya lost her mother natalya in the air crash. "to the very end, i hoped she‘d be alive", katya says. "then i saw the list — my mother was the last name but one." it is an official day of mourning in orsk, a russian town that is struggling to come to terms with its loss. steve rosenberg, bbc news, moscow.
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the united states has said it is ready to talk to north korea. the statement by vice president mike pence comes after a week of sports diplomacy during the winter olympics. kim jong un‘s sister made an historic visit to south korea and invited the south korean president moon jae—in to pyongyang. mr pence told the washington post that the us would continue to impose tough sanctions, but if pyongyang wanted to talk, the us would do so. our korea correspondent laura bicker reports. "let‘s meet again", they sing. on the right, a k—pop star. on the left, a pyongyang pin—up. it‘s a song of korean unification, a nostalgic glance at the past. this time president moon sits even closer to kim jong—un‘s sister. his new friends are not welcomed by all. these hardline conservatives
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burning the unification flag protest regularly, but this time they fear the moon administration is turning its back on the us, while befriending north korea. this, however, doesn‘t look like two world leaders at odds. this informal chat during an olympic speed skating event appears to have proved pivotal, and mike pence now says the us will talk to north korea, while still imposing sanctions. i think moonjae—in is not getting enough credit. you know, people are calling this the north korean charm offensive. i actually think this is a south korean charm offensive. it‘s critical that the united states is clear on this, because there‘s only so much south korea can do working on the nuclear issue. you have to remember north korea does not feel threatened by south korea‘s nuclear weapons, because south korea has none. north korea is being warned that it
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will at some point have to discuss getting rid of its nuclear weapons. they know what has to be on the table for conversations. we've said for some time that i think it's important that we have — we are going to need to have some discussions that precede any form of negotiation. the north korean guests say farewell for now. president moon must decide if he will visit pyongyang. a lot could depend on america‘s next move. this breakthrough takes away the policy wedge between the us and south korea. it means there are now both in agreement with how to deal with the north. it also is the first opportunity for meaningful talks to reduce tensions on the peninsula, and also reduce the chance of a military confrontation. laura bicker, bbc news, pyongyang. and the laura bicker. this is ben
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bland, and he will be bringing us the business news injust a moment —— that was laura bicker. but first a look at the headlines on afternoon live... the deputy chief executive of oxfam, penny lawrence, has resigned, claiming ‘full responsibility‘ after its workers were accused of hiring prostitutes in haiti. earlier today oxfam officials met government ministers in an attempt to keep the charity‘s funding. becky dobson is named as one of three britons who died in a helicopter crash over the grand canyon — the others were jason hill and stuart hill. theresa may has arrived at stormont where she and the irish prime minister are meeting northern ireland‘s political leaders, amid speculation a deal to restore the devolved government is close. hello, time to bring you the business headlines on afternoon live. i am business headlines on afternoon live. iam ben business headlines on afternoon live. i am ben bland. did barclays bank give qatar a loan which was then used to buy shares in the bank in 2008? that is the question being investigated by the uk‘s serious fraud office. it has charged barclays bank with
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"unlawful financial assistance". the decision to charge is significant because that‘s the part of the business that holds the banking licence that allows it to operate in different countries. adverts for various products from ben &jerry‘s and martmite to dove soap could disappear from sites like youtube and facebook. unilever, the company behind 400 of the biggest brands has threatened to pull ads if sites don‘t do enough to tackle extremist and illegal content. the british—dutch firm warned "it is in the interest of digital media firms to act before advertisers stop advertising." 21st century fox says it will commit to keeping sky news running for at least five years — and will create a separate board to ensure its independence. it hopes the proposal will overcome competition issues surrounding its proposed takeover of sky. and what‘s your favourite supermarket? well, the discount chain aldi has taken the top spot in a supermarket satisfaction survey. the consumer association which? questioned nearly 7000 shoppers. waitrose, previously the number one in the annual survey, came fourth. so the uk‘s serious fraud office has
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charged ba rclays bank? how much trouble ivm? —— are they in? the charge that‘s been brought it "unlawful financial assistance". this relates to something that happened 10 years ago. back in 2008 — remember, the midst of the financial crisis — barclays took a £12 billion loan from qatar holdings, which is owned by the state of qatar. under the deal barclays reloaned just over £2 billion back to qatar holdings. the serious fraud office alleges that loan was used either directly, or indirectly, to buy shares in barclays, which the sfo says is unlawful financial assistance. in the last ten years we have seen. . . banks — from time to time — get a slap on the wrist and a fine and it doesn‘t seem to harm them too much. is this a big deal? yes and the holding company barclays plc has already been charged over the same matter. but this move — to charge
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barclays bank as well — is significant because this is the part of the business that holds the banking licence that allows it to operate in different countries. so, if barclays was found guilty, it could lose that crucial licence. in theory there is the risk of that. it could lose their right to operate asa bank it could lose their right to operate as a bank in various parts of the world. but even if convicted there are banks — ubs, bnp, credit — who have been convicted over other matters and continued operating. earlier, we spoke to fran boyt, executive director of positive money, which campaigns for change within the banking system. it was ten years ago but it was a real function of how dysfunctional it was then. we were set up after the crash, and how dysfunctional it still is today. we saw barclays ten years ago doing a dodgy deal essentially with qatar to raise around £118
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essentially with qatar to raise around £11.8 billion from qatar and others, in order to avoid a government bailout, so it wouldn't be in the same category as banks like rbs, but clearly it was in serious financial trouble and it has had to opt for what could amount to criminal charges for its operations. i think the public at the time, not only did we see too big to fail banking, which we still have, but we saw too big to jail anchors. that was fran boyt from positive money. the government‘s trying to get more parents to use shared parental leave? yes — the marketing campaign is encouraging new parents to "share the joy". around 285, 000 couples are eligible every year for shared parental leave, but take—up "could be as low as 2%",
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the department for business said. experts say that as well as a lack of understanding of what is on offer, cultural barriers and financial penalties are deterring some parents from sharing parental leave. the government minister trying to get us all to do this was on five live this morning, and he said he actually can‘t take it up himself? yes, good point. the business minister andrew griffiths is due to become a dad i think in april, and he explained that because he is an office holder, as mps are, rather than an employee, he was ineligible. go figure! it is quite extraordinary that even the minister in charge of encouraging all this is in a situation where he can‘t make use of it? let‘s speak to sarahjackson, the chief executive officer of working families. yes, think of it as transferable maternity leave because that is what it is and it is dependent on the mother employment status. she has up to 50 weeks of leave and then with pc can transfer
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to the father of her child or the other parent. if she wishes to. —— with pay that she can then transfer. he has to be eligible, have been working long enough in his workplace, or if he happens to be the small business minister, unfortunately he is not eligible, and similarly with the armed forces or the police, rules are different, so or the police, rules are different, so it is complicated. there is also a pay issue. it is paid at the same level as statutory maternity pay, £141 per week, roughly half the national living wage, so there are all sorts of reasons why it is difficult for parents to think they might take it up, even as shimmering they have heard about it. however, for those who do, it is a nice policy. it allows couples to decide how they can share leave in the first year of a child's life. it is a way of keeping women in touch with the workplace and so beginning to tackle that gender pay gap. it is also a way of going with the grain
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of what young fathers want, which increasingly we know is to spend time at home and be engaged parents. iamjust time at home and be engaged parents. i am just wondering, sarah, if i was running a small business, ok, the shared parental leave rate you mention, £141, it is required by law. some businesses are being encouraged to be more generous, but actually if it is going to hit them financially why would they bother? it is really about getting people back to work. i think it is about creating that equality between men and women at work, and we do see a lot of the very large businesses in the country now matching the offer they make to their women on maternity leave, to any staff member who takes shared parental leave, male or female, and that is where we are seeing the take—up, although the government is seeing across the uk it is about 2%. some employers we work with, some of the big city names, where you can get up to six months of full paid leave, they are seeing a 30% take—up among their men, so it is really about
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supporting and enabling the men in your workforce to feel happy as fathers, because what we see, we do an annual parent survey with bright horizons, and we have been tracking over the last few years the way young fathers are increasingly resentful about their lack of worklife balance leader balance. they blame their employer and this year for the first time we see the men taking the career compromises women are taking —— their lack of worklife balance, and they blame their employer. sarah thanks very much, chief executive of working families. let's have a quick look at the markets. yes, the boards are green, recovering from the rather torrid week they had last week. the ftse is up, not as much as it earlier, but still in positive territory, largely helped by rising oddities, crude oil up, and that in turn helps the big energy companies and all of that —— tried in
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commodities. barclays and all of that —— tried in commodities. ba rclays is and all of that —— tried in commodities. barclays is fairly flat, darren o‘shea by barely worth mentioning. well, -- down by a shade, but barely worth mentioning. yes, barely a whisker. thank you, ben, for now. kensington palace has announced more details of the wedding of prince harry and meghan markle at windsor castle. the service, in st george‘s chapel, will begin at midday on may the 19th, avoiding a clash with the fa cup final. here‘s our royal correspondent nicholas witchell. they are said to be closely involved in the arrangements for their wedding, which is now a little less than 14 weeks away. as already announced, it will take place in the historic setting of st george‘s chapel within windsor castle on saturday 19th of may. the service will begin at midday with the dean of windsor officiating, and the archbishop of canterbury, justin welby, conducting the marriage itself. room within the chapel is limited, with space for around 800 guests. at one o‘clock, the couple, married, as they will be by then, will set off in a carriage procession, and then along the long walk back to the castle for
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a reception in saint george‘s hall. the carriage procession, they hope, will fulfil the pledge they made at the time of their engagement to make it possible for members of the public to feel part of the occasion. nicholas witchell, bbc news. the makers of the new film peter rabbit have apologised after facing a backlash over their depiction of a character‘s allergy. sony has had to apologise this morning after complaints about a scene in the much—loved classic. during one part of the story peter and his friends throw blackberries at a boy, who is allergic to the fruit, even shooting one into his mouth, until he is forced to use an epipen to treat his reaction. it has prompted a furious backlash and calls for it to be withdrawn from cinemas. allergy uk says the film, due to be released in the uk next month, "mocks" allergy sufferers and trivialises a life threatening condition." time for a look at the weather...
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here‘s chris fawkes. hello. over the weekend we have seen snow showers moving in northern and western areas, leaving a covering of snow on the ground in staffordshire, blue skies ahead and many of sunshine for many of us out and about, but looking on the satellite picture, this cloud to our west, it will be bringing a mixture of rain and some heavy snow for some of us overnight tonight. with the evening forecast, across england, wales and scotland, largely clear skies but the wind is picking up in northern ireland with a band of rain working in here which will turn to snow. ahead of whether fried in here which will turn to snow. ahead of whetherfried it in here which will turn to snow. ahead of whether fried it gets very windy. gusts could reach 70 miles per hour —— gusts could reach 50—60 mph in the south. you can‘t help but notice the blue changing to wait. yes, we are expecting rain turning to snow overnight with the heaviest
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falls across northern ireland, scotla nd falls across northern ireland, scotland and of course northern england particularly over high ground but this snow could cause problems out and about for the rush hour to work. 5—10 centimetres expected across higher parts of scotland, and even lower down we could see a few centimetres across the central belt, all enough to cause some transport disruption. 5-10 cause some transport disruption. 5—10 centimetres across the higher parts of northern ireland, and there will be summoned the peaks and the pennines and the cumbrian fells for time. this then pushes eastwards. the front itself is very slow moving across eastern areas for tuesday, the rain probably lingering for much of the afternoon across east anglia and south—east england where it will feel pretty cold but elsewhere the sunshine comes out, but it won‘t do much for the temperatures. a cold day, 3—4d, the higher on tuesday. the band then clears away from eastern england and we will be left with clear skies for a of frost and ice could be an issue tuesday night before the next system works and
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from the west. this one again will have a mixture of rain until snow, most of it will be quite high up across the hills of northern england and scotland but potentially a bit of snow for a time getting down to lower levels particularly across central and eastern scotland but eventually milder air will be working in the temperatures lifting to 10 degrees late in the day in ireland, western parts of england and wales as well and that is a trend we really see towards the end of the week, temperatures lifting, it will turn milder and dryerfor many of us as well. that is your weather. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. today at 4pm — oxfam sees its first resignation over allegations of sexual misconduct by its relief staff in haiti; deputy chief executive penny lawrence steps down, claiming ‘full responsibility‘. jeremy corbyn says he‘s utterly disgusted by the scandal. oxfa m oxfam should have been more open and clearer about it at the very beginning, both to the charity
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commission and to the department for international development, who were funding part of the work that they do. the three britons killed in helicopter crash in the grand canyon are named. three other britons — and the pilot — were injured when the helicopter went down. theresa may and the irish prime minister meet in belfast — could a power—sharing agreement about to be restored in northern ireland? coming up on afternoon live, all the sport — and we‘re looking at the winter elop pics. that's right, first it was cold in south korea, now it is windy. at the winter olympics in pyeongchang, it is actually having quite a serious effect on some of the competitors. more later. chris fawkes, that has taken the wind out of your sails, that is what you are going to say. we kind of do it all again today, a combination of a night of strong winds and heavy snow, likely to cause problems. we will be looking further afield as well at cyclone gita, which is hitting tonga at the moment. talk to
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you later on. also coming up up but and the first pictures tf ~ 7 r f 77 f— sheh and the first pictures tf ~ 7 r f 77 f— shelf that and the first pictures tt 77 7 7 7 77 77 shelf that weighs i trillion hello everyone — this is afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. oxfam has seen its first resignation since the aid agency faced allegations of sexual misconduct by disaster relief staff following the haiti earthquake in 2010. now the charity‘s deputy chief executive penny lawrence has resigned, saying, "as programme director at the time, i am ashamed that this happened on my watch and i take full responsibility‘. mark goldring, the chief exec of oxfam, said he ‘deeply respected penny‘s decision to accept personal responsibility‘. her resignation comes after senior officials from the charity met the international development secretary, to try to prevent government funding being cut. all this as many donors
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consider what to do about their contributions to the charity. matt cole reports. in the worst imaginable circumstances, oxfam staff were meant to be in haiti to help. it‘s now clear some had a very different agenda. amidst claims of sex parties and prostitutes, oxfam sacked four staff and allowed three others to quit, including their country director, who went on to secure work with another aid organisation. oxfam denies it covered up what happened but now it has emerged the international developmment secretary wa nts a nswers about the way it handled the case. we are talking about an historic case but it is, in some respects, still live. they still have information they should be giving to the authorities. it is to the department here that oxfam‘s leaders were summoned to make their case to the secretary of state following her threats to cut millions of pounds of funding if she didn‘t like their answers. but there are also questions for the charity commission, which regulates these matters, not least how much it knew
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and why didn‘t do more. they did say they were investigating some allegations of sexual misconduct. so why wasn't that looked into further? because what was not clear was the extent and seriousness of those, which, as i've said, they assured us, in fact, they categorically said there was no allegations of abuse of beneficiaries. andrew mitchell was the international development secretary when all this took place. i think oxfam were economical with the truth about what they were investigating. they may well have stuck by the letter of the rules, but they certainly did not stick by the spirit. after all, one of the big changes we made in 2010 was to introduce much greater transparency and openness into the way international development takes place. i‘m afraid oxfam were very clearly in breach of that at the time. there are also questions for civil servants here, after another former secretary of state, priti patel, suggested they dismissed her efforts to question how wide a problem sexual abuse and predatory behaviour is in the charity sector.
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save the children has volunteered it had 31 claims of sexual harassment last year but if says everyone must do more. i will not sit here pretending you i can wave a magic wand and eliminate all risk tomorrow. but what i can do is assure the british public, and the people who are ultimately responsible for, these vulnerable women and children, that we will give this our best shot. oxfam says it has now put new safeguarding measures in place including tougher vetting of staff. other charities are calling for a new sector—wide passport that workers can take from agency to agency to verify they are suitable and saved to be trusted helping those most in need. matt cole, bbc news. earlier i spoke to matt about the
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resignation of penny lawrence. she has resigned over everything that has resigned over everything that has happened over the last couple of days. her boss mark goldring has been attending this meeting with the international department for development. penny mordaunt wanted a nswe rs development. penny mordaunt wanted answers about what went on, who knew what, when and why. the threat hanging over oxfam of taking away £30 million a year of funding for them if she did not like the a nswe rs. them if she did not like the answers. we have not heard the content answers. we have not heard the co nte nt of answers. we have not heard the content of what went on, but we have heard from penny lawrence, who is the deputy chief executive of oxfam. ina the deputy chief executive of oxfam. in a statement, she says they had become aware of concerns raised by staff not just in become aware of concerns raised by staff notjust in haiti, where this has all revolve around, but chad as well before the staff were sent to haiti. she is aware these allegations involving the use of prostitutes relating both to the country director and to the team in
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chad were raised before they went to haiti. she was in charge basically as programme director. she said this therefore had happened on her watch. she says she is ashamed it had happened on a watch, and as a consequence she has tendered her resignation. this focuses on how oxfa m resignation. this focuses on how oxfam reacted to the initial reports of what happened. the claim as they we re very of what happened. the claim as they were very slow in basically suck sacking those that were named. were very slow in basically suck sacking those that were namedlj think the questions that they are facing is just what they did, what they knew, how fast they acted. for example, the country director was allowed to resign before the investigation they were conducting reached its conclusion. there are questions as to whether they had properly brought the authorities. the charity commission which has oversight of these matters, whether it has been fully transparent with what they were doing, what they
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knew. in fact, there are questions of the charity commission or so as to whether it did enough, and whether it properly looked into this. this obviously all goes back to 2011, these allegations. it has been some time since it emerged. what has become clear is that something very wrong went off. these people were meant to be in how you do to help the most honourable at the most terrible time, they clearly had a different agenda. three british tourists killed in a helicopter crash in the grand canyon, have been named by police in america. becky dobson, jason hill and stuart hill, died on saturday evening. three other britons, and the pilot, were injured. here‘s james cook. the helicopter came down in rocky, remote terrain, bursting into flames. it appears the survivors were able to get out, despite suffering serious injuries. but three britons on board died at the scene. 27—year—old becky dobson, 30—year—old stuart hill, and jason hill, who was 32. for the survivors, three young britons and the pilot,
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the ordeal was far from over. rescuers, including local military personnel, were flown in, but then had to walk to the crash site, using night—vision goggles. it was more than eight hours before the injured were flown to hospital in las vegas. we weren‘t able to extract everybody from the crash site until 2am, this morning. high winds, brownout dust conditions, rugged terrain, and as you know, when you fly in treacherous conditions like this, you have to have special training and special people. it‘s not clear what caused the crash, which involved a eurocopter ec130. the tour company, papillon airways, says it is the world‘s largest aerial sightseeing outfit, flying around 600,000 people year. in 2001, six people died when another of the firm‘s grand canyon helicopters crashed. the foreign office says it is now providing support to the british families of this weekend‘s victims. james cook, bbc news, las vegas. miraya villareal from cbs
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news has been reporting from grand canyon west. what we know right now is that it is still too early in the investigation to really know exactly what may have caused the accident. as we heard the police chief talk about, whether it is something that they are looking at. there are federal investigators that will be on the scene today from both the federal aviation administration, as well as the national transportation safety board. they will be taking a look at everything here, talking to witnesses and also surveying the scene. one thing they mentioned yesterday that is truly important, there is a camera and a black box that was on site on the helicopter. they have retrieved that and they will be reviewing that as well. we also know that tribal leaders from the reservation will be meeting with all of these federal agencies to figure out exactly what they could have done or what will be done in the future to make sure this doesn‘t happen again.
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here, theresa may and the irish prime minister, leo varadkar, are visiting belfast for talks with northern ireland‘s main political parties. there are suggestions the democratic unionists and sinn fein, could be close to a deal to restore devolved government, after the failure of several previous rounds of negotiations. power sharing at stormont collapsed more than a year ago. keith doyle reports. the first visit for the prime minister this morning was the bombardier factory in belfast. last month, a surprise settlement in a long—running trade dispute saw jobs secured here. mrs may‘s visit to belfast is seen as as sign that another settlement may be close. northern ireland has been run by civil servants since the power—sharing executive collapsed in january last year. tensions between the ruling parties, the democratic unionists and sinn fein, over implementing the irish language and same—sex marriage, as well as an overall acrimonious relationship, has resulted in 13 months of stalemate.
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at the weekend, the new sinn fein leader, mary lou mcdonald, indicated that some sort of deal might be in the making. but it seems that may now be the case. the prime minister was last in northern ireland during the election campaign, and has been criticised for what some described as a hands—off approach to restoring the power—sharing executive. today‘s visit is a clear indication that progress has been made. the prime minister is meeting the parties at stormont, the home of the assembly along with the irish premier, taoiseach leo varadkar. the speculation is the deal to restore the power—sharing assembly may include a workaround to resolve the issue of the official status of the irish language, which has been a bitter source of division between the dup and sinn fein. restoring the power—sharing executive would come at a crucial time for northern ireland as it faces another huge issue, brexit and the irish border. the irish government wants further guarantees that there will be no hard border. theresa may has given those
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guarantees, but as yet, no clear plans have emerged to show how that will be the case. while this has all the makings of being a day for deals, these days have come and gone in northern ireland in the past. keith doyle bbc news. let‘s go to keith in storm on. we are hissing —— in storm want, what is the nude music like, is there a sense we‘re —— what is the mood music like? we have been talking all afternoon and every time you come to meiama afternoon and every time you come to me i am a little less optimistic there will be a deal today. i think thatis there will be a deal today. i think that is still the case. looks like there are some insurmountable hurdles to bring about any deals today, despite the prime minister and the taoiseach being here today trying to spur them on. the issue of the irish language is the big stumbling block it seems. there are press co nfe re nces , we stumbling block it seems. there are press conferences, we were told earlier on that there would be some
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sort of a news conference between the two prime ministers at about half past four. we haven‘t heard anything about that now. the question is if they stand up and give a press conference, what will they say if the no deal has been reached? sinn fein will do a news conference at 4:30pm as well so we‘ll have to see what comes out of that. i have to say the mood music is not certainly not for any deal today. if there is to be a deal, it may be later this week. if you are watching this in northern ireland, you will be very fed up because we have had nearly a year of this, and this impasse has made people pretty fed up. absolutely, it has been the 13 months where northern ireland has really been run by civil servants. there has been no power—sharing executive, no assembly, there is no northern ireland government here. and people really don‘t want to see the —— they rarely want to see the normal things, the proper things, the hospitals, schools, the roads, all of those decisions have been put on hold, any kind of big decisions.
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the people of northern ireland want to see progress, a devolved government return. this issue about the irish language, people who don‘t live in northern ireland might think thatis live in northern ireland might think that is a rather strange thing to be arguing about but it is an incredibly polarising issue here in northern ireland, the status of the irish language, and whether that is an official language of the government here or not. sinn fein wa nt government here or not. sinn fein want a bill that has that, a stand—alone bill that pushes that through, the democratic unionist party has said they absolutely do not want that. it seems to be the polarising issue here, whether progress has been made on that today, we will literally have to wait and see. we might have to wait just 15 minutes or so, we will be back to you shortly, keith. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the deputy chief executive of oxfam, penny lawrence, has resigned, claiming for responsible to you after its workers were accused of hiring prostitutes in highly too.
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mickey dobson is named as one of the three britons who died in a helicopter crash over the grand canyon. theresa may has been meeting ireland‘s leader in stormont, they are seeking to end a deadlock between sinn fein and the ulster unionist. in sport, vicious cross winds affected all of the athletes in the winter lyrics today to stop amy fuller said she was lucky to be in one piece after the snow style final. she had a nasty fall and could eventually only finish 70. —— 17th. away from the winter olympics, ireland‘s robbie henshaw has been ruled out of the rest of the six nations after dislocating his shoulder scoring in ireland‘s win over italy on saturday first of more
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just after half past four. the leadership of south africa‘s ruling anc is meeting to decide on the future of president zuma. he has remained in office despite repeated calls for him to stand down amid allegations of corruption. the new anc leader, cyril ramaposa, has issued an ultimatum, that mr zuma must stand down, or be forced out. pumza fihlani has been following the story in pretoria. some rumours a while ago that he may already have gone, but at the moment no change. yes, correct, some rumours that a deal has been struck and that the african national congress decided to recall him but that was followed very closely by a denialfrom a that was followed very closely by a denial from a spokesman, that was followed very closely by a denialfrom a spokesman, who that was followed very closely by a denial from a spokesman, who said this was nothing but fake news. at the moment, all eyes squarely fixed on an official announcement from the ruling party. they have been meeting just finally figuring on five hours
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now. this is a group that has high power, and if there is a decision to be made about his future it would be coming from the group that our meeting here today. there are 112 of them, each may want to have their say, which may account for the time this is taking. is there a sense that at the end of that meeting there will be a decision? it certainly seems that way. the anc has always tagged itself as a party thatis has always tagged itself as a party that is about consensus, able to negotiate. there is only one decision to get to, and that is that presidentjacob decision to get to, and that is that president jacob zuma should decision to get to, and that is that presidentjacob zuma should be removed from office will stop selling it might take persuading some owners of the african national congress, who may still be loyal to the president, but speaking yesterday, the new leader of the anc said he wants to bring a unity for the party. but also showing a big sense he is the man in charge of the
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party now, and that he will effectively try to persuade people that still feel differently about what should happen to president jacob zuma, so we are expecting a decision today, whatever the outcome. in terms of those words, forcing him out, what would that mean in practice? they have been very keen to avoid a forced exit out of power. what they have been trying to do is persuade him to make him see it as best interest of not only the anc but for the country for him to step down. but if that doesn‘t work, they are prepared to take the matter to parliament. this would include a vote of no confidence, which would be voted on by members of the african national congress. alternatively, they could follow the route of impeachment, which would see that the president is stripped of all his benefits as a former statesman. for now, thank you very much. despite an agreement allowing rohingya moslems
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to return to myanmar, from refugee camps in bangladesh, many say they won‘t go home. hundreds of thousands of people fled a military crackdown and violence from pro government militia groups myanmar last year, but now wa nt safety gua ra ntees and the right to citizenship, before going back. well, three aid workers from one charity have been filming video diaries of their work helping the rohingya, at the worlds largest refugee camp in bangladesh. chris rogers reports. the world‘s largest refugee camp. this is home to more than 800,000 rohingya muslim refugees, escaping persecution in buddhist—dominated myanmar. dr ramiz momeni, genevieve jones—hernandez and sarah wade have travelled the world helping refugees. but nothing can prepare them for what lies ahead. the humanitas charity are heading deep into the camp, where there is no aid to a medical centre. we are walking to set up our clinic, where no one else has reached yet. so obviously it‘s going to be tough. there are so many babies,
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newborns, 14 days old. they don‘t have any food, starving. dr momeni: an underweight baby... she was prescribed vitamins butjust for her, not for the baby. honestly, it‘s like the baby‘s... yeah... dying. so, we‘ve just organised for her to go and get referred, because she needs to go to a hospital and for that she needs to have her id card. tell her that we're very sorry, she lost the baby. i think we expected to turn up and be working alongside a lot more organisations or volunteers. we've worked within the syrian refugee crisis, and it was full of organisations and volunteers and people there on the ground, and i think we expected this
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to be slightly similar, and it isn't. her pulse is very low, so we're just rushing to the hospital. we've got these newly arrived rohingyas and severe, severe dehydration. there is an absolute lack of aid for these people. larger international aid organisations complain myanmar has blocked aid convoys and staff reaching the refugee camp. it‘s time for the team to head home, but more refugees arrive, in biblical numbers. all of these people are tired, sick, hungry, and yet to have reached their final destination in this camp and set up home. it's not so much that it's a difficult thing to be here. i think it would be a more
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difficult thing to leave, knowing that we are leaving these people in such a dire situation. this is my last exit from the camp, because we‘re heading home tomorrow. somehow, they‘re incredible. they cheer. and, you know the way that i see it, we‘re here to be a positive influence, a positive... you know, so we have to come with energy, come with smiles, come with balloons, bubbles, as well as the medicine. show them that people care. chris rogers reporting, and viewers in london can see more of that report on "inside out," tonight at 7.30, on bbc one — and on the bbc iplayer. the first pictures have been released of an iceberg, which has broken away from the antarctic ice sheet, and it‘s four times the size of london. scientists say they‘re on an urgent mission to document the marine eco system of the continent, hidden for more than a hundred thousand years.0ur science correspondent victoria gill has the details. a new perspective on a 6000 square
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kilometre swathe of floating ice. so the iceberg is 150 kilometres long, 50 kilometres wide, and will be about 150 metres deep. you will be able to see the first 20—30 metres above the water, and everything else is underneath. the trillion—tonne, a—68 iceberg is gradually drifting away from the antarctic continent and into the sea. it‘s these ice—filled waters and the sea floor beneath them that scientists are now eager to explore. in the british antarctic survey vessel, the james clark ross, a team will spend three weeks studying the marine life that has been locked away here for millennia. they‘ve described it as a treacherous but urgent mission. there are likely to be new species discovered, as researchers seek out the creatures that make their home
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beneath the vast ice sheet. we have no idea what‘s living underneath these huge ice shelves. we assume it is animals that are specially adapted to life without green food and vegetarian, so we have a lot of scavengers and carnivores. so we expect animals like in the deep sea, that doesn‘t have light as well. but the team also hopes to understand the processes that caused the iceberg to break away. this could reveal more about just how this fragile, frozen wilderness at the bottom of the world will change as the climate warms. victoria gill, bbc news. a short while ago, dr huw griffiths, a marine biologist with british antarctic survey, told me more details about the challenges the expedition will face: yes, really exciting but also the really challenging part is we want to get there in what we call year zero, so the year the iceberg moves, because we have had previous expeditions to ice shelves that have collapsed, that have
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collapsed, but they didn‘t get in until two or three years later at the earliest, and by then they have already seen the ecosystem is changing. what we need is to know what it is like now, and what it was like under the ice. what are your top questions, what is top of your mind, in terms of what you need to know? firstly, what is there. even as far as what does the sea floor look like? we haven‘t even got a map of the sea floor of that area so the first thing the ship has to do is map the sea floor with sonar. after that it is pretty much a blank sheet, as far as this environment is concerned. we think we have an idea of the sorts of animals that can cope with the low amounts of food available there but to be perfectly honest, until we get there and pull some of these things up or capture them on video, we have no idea. it is difficult to get your head around the scale of what we are looking at here, isn‘t it? in my brain, iam nota massive football fan, but i like the idea of about a million football pitches is the area of that iceberg. a million football pitches?! is the area of that iceberg. that, to me, blows my mind,
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and if you think that 120,000 years, maybe, is how long that area has been covered in ice, you are talking about a fundamental change to the entire ecosystem. it is like the idea of taking a cave, and the specialised animals that live in that world, and lifting the roof off, and exposing it to daylight for the first time, and letting plants and other things take over. it is that fundamental. so how many are on the trip to find out? is it a whole team of scientists, all with different particular specialities? yes, over 20 scientists going, plus our regular crew who run the ship, and they are covering everything, from the ice and the water surface all the way through the water column, right down to the mud and the animals on the sea floor, and covering even the chemistry of the mud to see how that will change, now that the chemistry of the water is changing above it. chris fawkes is herewith the
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weather. you had your honeymoon in this area, didn‘t you? you‘ll agree us, a few years back. that a cyclone gita, a very powerful cyclone, potentially going to beat category five. you can see the eye of the storm going right towards the southern tonga group. if that would hit, it is the kind of thing that would obliterate houses on the island. 180 mph gusts. they are damaging, devastating wind gusts. we have received some impact, in terms of flooding across parts of tonga. it might be one of those stories where things get worse before they get better. not looking great. let's look a bit closer to home first we had some beautiful weather earlier but that is the calm before the
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storm, is it? a double whammy over night, some strong winds to come, and also some heavy snow likely to cause some problems out and about. let‘s ta ke cause some problems out and about. let‘s take a look at what has been going on. after the recent snowfall across northern and western part of the uk, snow on the ground, most of us the uk, snow on the ground, most of us seeing some sunshine today. it is this area cloud approaching the british isles that will be the troublemaker. overnight and into tomorrow to give us some disruptive weather. first of all, a 11, first to come along is the winds, expected to come along is the winds, expected to guest to something to 65 to 70 mph or so around the exposed coasts of england and wales was dubbed very blustery, blowy kind of night. then we will start to see the rain turned to snow. the heaviest falls and is now will be across the north of the uk, particularly over the higher ground. northern ireland, northern england, scotland, that is where we will see some of the heaviest falls of snow. how much now can we expect?
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it will come along very heavenly —— heavily just in it will come along very heavenly —— heavilyjust in time for the rush—hour. five to ten centimetres of snow, one to three through the central belt, and although the snow will be easing away from northern ireland, we will be left with a legacy of icy conditions, heavy snow for a time also affecting the cumbrian fells, the peaks and the pennines as well. the further south you go, more of a mixture of rain, a bit of wintry mess mixed in but it is less likely to cause issues for stop the weather front becomes slow moving as we head into the afternoon soa moving as we head into the afternoon so a cold grey and damp day. temperatures at best, three or 4 degrees for many of those first as we had through tuesday night, we could have an ice risk, but we are looking at the next weather system approaching. again, it is another weather system that will be bringing a mixture of rain and hill snow across northern ireland and scotland, though i would not be surprised for a time if i saw a bit
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of snow getting down to lower levels. come the afternoon, temperatures lifting to 10 degrees across western part of england and wales. we will eventually turn that bit milder. that is a trend to the weather, towards the weekend we can. most of us will see temperatures lifting into double figures. the best of the drier weather into the south of the uk. an area of high pressure building in but most of us will enjoy the dry weather by the time we get to the weekend. we will see some changes but before we get there, tonight and tomorrow morning, we are likely to see some disruption duties now, particularly across higher parts of scotland, northern england and northern ireland as well. that is the latest weather. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: the deputy chief executive of oxfam, penny lawrence, has resigned — claiming ‘full responsibility‘ after the charity‘s workers were accused of hiring prostitutes in haiti.
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becky dobson is named as one of three britons who died in a helicopter crash over the grand canyon — the others were jason hill and stuart hill. theresa may is to meet the irish prime minister leo varadkar in belfast, as talks continue to restore the power—sharing government at stormont. south africa‘s ruling anc party is meeting to discuss the future of president jacob zuma. its new leader says mr zuma must stand down or be forced out. sport now on afternoon live with hugh. we expect pretty extreme conditions at the winter olympics but that‘s been taken to another level today, hasn‘t it? and particularly bad in terms of the wind. that's right, simon. it was already the coldest winter olympics and now it seems to be the windiest. the men‘s downhill was postponed yesterday and the women‘s slalom was postponed today. and look at these pictures, before the event
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eventually got underway with the final in pyeongchang, but it eventually went dead. there were a lot of complaints from that athletes andindeed lot of complaints from that athletes and indeed the commentators, about why it went ahead at all, issues are wanting to make sure you have is safe but also they have a whole schedule in pyeongchang they have to get through. sure, but you have to feel for someone like aimee fuller, because four use of training virtually goals in a gust. yes, britain‘s aimee fuller finishing 17th. she would have expected a lot better. a heavy crash came on her second run and she was actually lucky to finish in one piece. when you look at these pictures just five of the 25 athletes in the entire field didn‘t fall on the cause, and you can see she is lucky to get back up you can see she is lucky to get back up on her board, herfeet, and she
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said during that moment when the wind picked felt like a sail was attached to personal board, and another competitor called an unfair and said it wasn‘t there to women‘s snowboarding, so you can understand why was so frustrated. as i was powering into thisjump, i thought i have got this, then i felt this gust, and it was honestly like riding into a wind tunnel, absolutely brutal. it's not how i would have expected, how i had planned and visualised four years of prep work to go into today. i don't think it was a true show of women's female slopestyle, which is a real shame for our sport. this was the winning run. jamie anderson of the united states — champion four years ago — she was champion again.
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she managed those conditions well — interesting that winning run there scored her 83.00 — in sochi last time out, her winning run 95.25 — so you can see how these athletes really didn‘t get to show off what they can do. elsewhere, canada won the team figure skating beating the olympic athletes from russia to the gold. and the united states took bronze thanks in no small part to mirai nagasu. she became only the third woman to land a triple axel at the winter olympics — an incredibly difficult move and she went on to nail eight more triple jumps. she was clearly overjoyed at putting in a clean routine and earning a season‘s—best score atjust the right time. she finished her routine eventually with such incredible poise, and she was absolutely delighted with her pa rt was absolutely delighted with her part in that bronze medal victory. let‘s look at some of the other medals won today. and there‘s been history made in the biathlon today — lara dahlmeier of germany took the biathlon10—kilometre pursuit title, with a near—flawless shooting performance. she‘s the first woman to win the sprint and pursuit double, after picking up herfirst gold on saturday. and france‘s martin fourcade has won the men‘s 12.5—kilometre pursuit.
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he was already his country‘s most decorated winter olympian — this brings his tally of golds to three, and takes him level with record—holder, jean—claude killy, who dominated skiing in the 1960s. canada‘s mikael kingsbury is the men‘s moguls champion. this second gold today for the canada after the figure skating triumph. he‘s dominated the event since winning silver in sochi four years ago, with 13 straight world cup wins. now he‘s added olympic gold to his haul. ireen wust became the most successful dutch olympian of all time — she won the women‘s 1500m speed skating title. it‘s her 10th games medal which also meant she became the most successful olympic speed skater. in the women‘s ski jump, favourite maren lundby won gold with a massive finaljump of a hundred and ten metres. she held her nerve on the last leap to win gold by 14 points. it‘s norway‘s second
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gold of the games — their first in women‘s ski jumping. a lot of history but a surprise or two might as well. that is all your sport for now. more coming up in the next hour —— a surprise or two as well. now on afternoon live let‘s go nationwide and see what is happening around the country. sabet choudhury is in bristol, where inside out west have found that in the last ten years, the number of individuals killed or injured on britain‘s road has fallen for everyone except cyclists — with a very low prosecution rate for motorists who injure them. we will be speaking to sabet about that in just we will be speaking to sabet about that injust a we will be speaking to sabet about that in just a minute. and carol malia is in newcastle, where they are wishing the angel of the north a very happy 20th birthday. that makes me feel very old, because i remember when the angel of the north was being put up! but first to sabet in bristol. what did inside out west discover
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about road collisions involving cyclists? we live in a time when our roads are busier than ever and despite the huge amount of traffic the good news is the roads are generally getting safer, unless that is you are a cyclist. let me give you some figures. in the last decade the number of people killed or seriously injured ina number of people killed or seriously injured in a car on british roads fell by 31%, but the number of cycling casualties rose by 43%, so what we at inside out wanted to find out is how many cases where cyclists have been killed or injured have been successfully prosecuted, and to get the numbers we sent out a freedom of information request to our police forces in the west, and only one responded, which was welcher. they say out of 185 incidents they had in 2016 —— wiltshire. just 16% were prosecuted
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or sent on a driver improvement course, and what we found in cases that do make it to court, is the sentencing from the victim‘s or family‘s point of view, it is fairly lenient, but police tell us they do ta ke lenient, but police tell us they do take cyclist safety very seriously and they have put initiatives in place to protect them on the roads. we are all used to dealing with these numbers, but behind every single one of them of course is a very personal story. that is the very personal story. that is the very sad part of it, and it is very dramatic in many cases, where victims who do survive are left with life changing injuries, and they feel let down by the justice system. we spoke tojohn, who was knocked off his bike in a hit—and—run incident in bristol last year and left for dead on the road. he is a father of two and i have to say he was extremely lucky to survive. he was extremely lucky to survive. he was ina was extremely lucky to survive. he was in a coma and is now recovering from brain injuries. i'm still not at work yet. i can't drive. i find social situations quite difficult. i've tried not to affect the children too much. i tried to do as much as i can with them.
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i try to do as much as i can with them. i think the kind of understand that i'm not quite the same as i used to be. it's really affected every part of my life, all due to, you know, someone hitting me from the back of the bike and, you know, driving off. simon, injohn‘s simon, in john‘s is simon, injohn‘s is the shocking and sad part is the person who hit him has never been found, and the police have told him it unlikely they ever will. and you can see our report on that in inside out west tonight at 7:30pm. sabet, thank you very much for that. it is time to say happy birthday to an angel. not you! laughter let‘s cross now to carol malia in newcastle. happy birthday to the angel — although when it was first erected it caused quite a lot of controversy? i remember walking on the wing of the angel of the north when it was being erected, horizontal of course, andi being erected, horizontal of course, and i was with that artist, and i remember it as clear as everything andi remember it as clear as everything and i still tell my kids, mummy has
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worked on the wings of the angel, and they think i was abseiling or something. we are running a series of set two special report looking at what it has been to the north—east and what it has meant in terms of ha rd and what it has meant in terms of hard cash, and it has meant hard cash. we have a hotel nearby which was once, i‘m sure they don‘t mind me saying, just a pub, and was once, i‘m sure they don‘t mind me saying, justa pub, and it was once, i‘m sure they don‘t mind me saying, just a pub, and it is now 29 bedroom hotel rammed virtually every week with visitors, we have the blinking highbridge, the millennium bridge, everything that followed on in cultural terms from the angel but it was the angel of the angel but it was the angel of the herald that changed on tyneside, so we are very the herald that changed on tyneside, so we are very fond of our into now, but at the time it was controversial. people said it might interfere with our keep —— tv signals, with a planes coming into newcastle airport. and at the end of colliery, people thought, we are going to have an angel, mystified, this time 20 years ago, but now
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they. and two decades years later, has the angel put gateshead "on the map"? pro—business correspondent has been looking into what this has meant and obviously i spoke about the hotel that has benefited —— our business correspondent has been looking into what this has meant. people go and wa nt to what this has meant. people go and want to touch the feet of the angel and it has become a bit of an impromptu tribute, a memorial place for lots of people who obviously have lost loved ones and they have gone to hang their little keepsakes on the bushes nearby. it has meant an awful lot to businesses who now use it as part of their marketing, so the angel helps smooth their business deals, if you like, and recently we had the report that the north—east is perhaps going to be most affected by brexit. we‘ll have to see the shape that takes, but we will take
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any help we can and angel seems to be part of that help we need at the moment. the angel of the north, i believe, in newcastle, i think. it's the angel of the north, and i heard it referred to on telly the other day as rusty rita. near newcastle or something like that, yeah, but i can't think what it is. i'm sorry, i can't think of the name. carol, everybody around the country is working out how the young cub reporters must be back there. laughter thank you both forjoining us on nationwide. thanks. and if you‘d like to see more on any of these stories, you can find them on the bbc iplayer, and a reminder we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm, here on afternoon live. rescue workers in russia say they‘ve recovered the second black box from the passenger plane that crashed yesterday near moscow. all 71 people on board the regional jet died when it came down shortly after take—off. it‘s not yet known what caused the crash. steve rosenberg reports. slowly, painstakingly,
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they searched in the snow. 1000 emergency workers, in the countryside outside moscow. the recovery teams formed lines, and inch by inch combed frozen fields, looking for body fragments, and pieces of the antonovjet. the russian winter had concealed much of the horror of this crash. in deep snow this place even looks like a winter wonderland, but it is the scene of the tragedy. there were no survivors. all 71 passengers and crew were killed. so why did this russian passenger jet crash — minutes after take—off? well, among the possible causes investigators are focusing on are bad weather, human error and mechanical failure. in the town of orsk, where the plane was heading, the list of the victims of flight 703 has become a makeshift memorial, a place for laying flowers
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and lighting candles, and for remembering those who didn‘t make it home. katya lost her mother natalya in the air crash. "to the very end, i hoped she‘d be alive", katya says. "then i saw the list — my mother was the last name but one." it is an official day of mourning in orsk, a russian town that is struggling to come to terms with its loss. steve rosenberg, bbc news, moscow. just to let you know we are awaiting a news conference in stormont. sinn fein have said they will be speaking. this is the c here at stormont. you can see the microphone no, you can‘t —— this is the scene
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here at stormont. couple of people milling around waiting. we are not expecting, frankly, much ground—breaking information from that, but we will take you to that as soon as it happens. as soon as theresa may and leo varadkar talk about the possible restoration of power—sharing in stormont. the united states has said it is ready to talk to north korea. the statement by vice president mike pence comes after a week of sports diplomacy during the winter olympics. kim jong un‘s sister made an historic visit to south korea and invited the south korean president moon jae—in to pyongyang. mr pence told the washington post that the us would continue to impose tough sanctions, but if pyongyang wanted to talk, the us would do so. our korea correspondent laura bicker reports. "let‘s meet again", they sing. on the right, a k—pop star.
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on the left, a pyongyang pin—up. it‘s a song of korean unification, a nostalgic glance at the past. this time president moon sits even closer to kim jong—un‘s sister. his new friends are not welcomed by all. these hardline conservatives burning the unification flag protest regularly, but this time they fear the moon administration is turning its back on the us, while befriending north korea. this, however, doesn‘t look like two world leaders at odds. this informal chat during an olympic speed skating event appears to have proved pivotal, and mike pence now says the us will talk to north korea, while still imposing sanctions. i think moonjae—in is not getting enough credit.
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you know, people are calling this the north korean charm offensive. i actually think this is a south korean charm offensive. it‘s critical that the united states is clear on this, because there‘s only so much south korea can do working on the nuclear issue. you have to remember north korea does not feel threatened by south korea‘s nuclear weapons, because south korea has none. north korea is being warned that it will at some point have to discuss getting rid of its nuclear weapons. they know what has to be on the table for conversations. we've said for some time that i think it's important that we have — we are going to need to have some discussions that precede any form of negotiation. the north korean guests say farewell for now. president moon must decide if he will visit pyongyang. a lot could depend on america‘s next move. this breakthrough takes away the policy wedge between the us and south korea. it means there are now both in agreement with how to deal with the north.
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it also is the first opportunity for meaningful talks to reduce tensions on the peninsula, and also reduce the chance of a military confrontation. laura bicker, bbc news, pyongyang. in a moment the business news with ben, but first a look at the headlines on afternoon live: the deputy chief executive of oxfam, penny lawrence, has resigned, claiming ‘full responsibility‘ after its workers were accused of hiring prostitutes in haiti. earlier today oxfam officials met government ministers in an attempt to keep the charity‘s funding. becky dobson is named as one of three britons who died in a helicopter crash over the grand canyon — the others were jason hill and stuart hill. theresa may has arrived at stormont where she and the irish prime minister are meeting northern ireland‘s political leaders, amid speculation a deal to restore the devolved government is close. in seeking to end a deadlock in the talks among sinn fein and the ulster unionists. hello, time to bring you the business headlines
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on afternoon live. i‘m ben bland. did barclays bank give qatar a loan which was then used to buy shares in the bank in 2008? that is the question being investigated by the uk‘s serious fraud office. it has charged barclays bank with "unlawful financial assistance". the decision to charge is significant because that‘s the part of the business that holds the banking licence that allows it to operate in different countries. more than 4,400 furtherjobs have been saved among carillion workers. the official receiver — who works on behalf of the insolvency service and the courts — says it‘s done that by transferring "prison facilities management and defence bases catering and cleaning contracts to new providers." however, it adds: "employment could not be secured for a further 59 employees working on paused construction projects and regrettably they will leave the business later this week." more than 6,600 jobs have now been saved — and almost 1,000 lost after the collapse. 21st century fox says it will commit to keeping sky news running
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for at least five years — and will create a separate board to ensure its independence. it hopes the proposal will overcome competition issues surrounding its proposed takeover of sky. adverts for various products from ben &jerry‘s and martmite to dove soap could disappear from sites like youtube and facebook. unilever, the company behind 400 of the biggest brands has threatened to pull ads if sites don‘t do enough to tackle extremist and illegal content. the british—dutch firm warned "it is in the interest of digital media firms to act before advertisers stop advertising." 50,000 households have been offered special deal that could cut their bills by up to £3000 a year, each! the regulator wants to trial collective switching where thousands of people swap supplier in one go, which should give them all a better
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deal. that has never happened. the music ran out before your headlights. i don‘t short—change you! laughter yes, for the week, business headlines —— before your headlines. the uk‘s serious fraud office has charged ba rclays bank? what‘s going on? is it isita is it a big deal? the charge that‘s been brought it "unlawful financial assistance". this relates to something that happened 10 years ago. back in 2008 — remember, the midst of the financial crisis — barclays took a £12 billion loan from qatar holdings, which is owned by the state of qatar. under the deal barclays reloaned just over £2 billion back to qatar holdings. the serious fraud office alleges that loan was used either directly, or indirectly, to buy shares in barclays, which the sfo says is unlawful financial assistance. the move is significant because this charges against barclays bank, that that of the business that holds the banking licence and if the case goes against barclays it could lose that crucial license. you mentioned 21st—century fox and
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this proposed takeover is at risk dragging ona this proposed takeover is at risk dragging on a bit? that is putting it mildly. the latest proposal put forward is to try to placate the competition‘s regulator to create an independent board commit to keeping sky news going for at least five yea rs. sky news going for at least five years. these were all stumbling blocks the competition regulator flagged up. they were worried the murdoch family would have too much control over the the uk so the competition regulator now presents these as part of its final report to these as part of its final report to the culture secretary, plans to do that by the beginning of may and he will then make a decision we understand by the middle ofjune. 0k, to understand by the middle ofjune. ok, to the united states. donald trump has been tweeting, but it looks like we are heading for another battle of the budgets. yes, and the last one was onlyjust signed off, and now he reveals his budget proposals for 2019. one of the main points is the $1.5
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trillion he wants to spend on fixing infrastructure such as crumbling roads, bridges and airports. and what does he want to build? yes, a wall with mexico. he says the federal govt will stump up $200 billion to do all this. the rest? well that will come from city and state governments and the private sector. so it is a busy day in the business world. let‘s get the take of laura lambie, senior investment director at investec. could this unsettled markets weaken the dollar perhaps, the white house budget? we are quite far through the process and a number economic commentators have been as a result raising their forecast which has had quite a positive result on impact today, the us markets all rallying nicely, and that was on the back of a big dip last week, albeit
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that on friday there was a sign of positivity in the us markets, which then spread to around the world. so i think we are possibly far down the road on this and we will wait to see what trump's administration is going to say on how they will spend that extra budget, but no doubt a positive impact on gdp, which is good. laura, what about this 21st—ce ntu ry good. laura, what about this 21st—century fox proposal? do you think this idea of an independent board and the plan to keep sky news going forfive years board and the plan to keep sky news going for five years will be enough to alleviate the concerns of the competition regulator?” to alleviate the concerns of the competition regulator? i suspect not. one can cast one's mind back to win the murdoch family bought the sunday times and the claims and promises were made on that that were later reneged upon, —— and the times, sol later reneged upon, —— and the times, so i think one is to take these announcements with a pinch of salt. and of course fox is being sought by walt disney in a tie—up,
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so sought by walt disney in a tie—up, so that may well happen prior to the initial takeover of sky by fox. let‘s touch of the barclays story. from time to time banks get a fine and a slap on the wrist, and the music keeps on playing. will this be any different this time? i don't think this is a slap on the wrist. if it is by the serious fraud office. we haven't had a huge amount of experience of these types of allegations in the uk. in the usa there has been a number of banks that have come under prosecution, and they haven't lost their banking licence. obviously if ba rclays were to their banking licence. obviously if barclays were to be found guilty of this offence, and were proven to be not fit and proper, they could lose their global banking licence, but i suspect it is unlikely it will go that far, and there will be some sort of admission of guilt and some sort of admission of guilt and some sort of admission of guilt and some sort of compromise made with the serious fraud office by barclays. laura, thanks very much, laura lambie from investec in glasgow.
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markets? yes, let's take a look. roller—coaster ride last week and things are looking up so far at the start of this week. the ftse100 is up, being helped by commodities, oil in particular, the price of the barrel going up. that helps the oil price, royal dutch shell, bp, all of that. there‘s the barclays share price — buoyant despite the legal case against it. out this week — inflation data in the uk and also the us — market watchers say those will be key to future movements. can we see the american markets? no, but they are doing better as well. there we are, as if by magic! recovering some of the losses they saw last week and that is what the pound is doing for you against the dollar. on that note, with the american markets, we will leave it there. you're right. quit well you are behind! laughter —— whilst you are behind. that‘s it from your afternoon live team for today — next, the bbc news at five.
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let‘s catch up with the weather with chris. a lot of sunshine out and about but lurking on the satellite picture this area of cloud to our west, it will be bringing a mixture of rain and some heavy snow for summer us of rain and some heavy snow for summer us overnight tonight. more on that in a second. firstly, the evening forecast. england, wales, scotland, largely clear skies but the wind is picking up in northern ireland, band of rain working in your turning to snow. ahead of our front it gets very windy and gusts could reach 50—60 mph in exposed coasts for a time of night and inland it would be very blustery as well. we can‘t help but notice the blue changing to white. yes, expecting rain turning to snow overnight with the heaviest falls across northern ireland, scotland and northern england particularly on high ground. this snow could cause some problems out and about for the early morning rush hour. 5—10
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centimetres expected across higher parts of scotland and even lower down we could see a few centimetres across the central belt, all enough to cause some transport disruption. 5-10 to cause some transport disruption. 5—10 centimetres across the higher parts of northern ireland and there will also be snow over the cumbrian fells, the pea ks will also be snow over the cumbrian fells, the peaks and the pennines for a time fells, the peaks and the pennines fora time and fells, the peaks and the pennines for a time and even in the south there could be some snow mixed in with this band of rain pushing eastwards. the front itself is very slow moving across eastern areas for tuesday. in south east anglia and england it will feel pretty cold but elsewhere the sunshine comes out but will not do much for the temperatures. cold day. three or four decrease is nigh on tuesday. the band of rain finally clears from eastern england and we will be left with clearing skies for a time, so frost and ice could be issues for a time adjusting it before the next system works in from the west, and this one again will have a mixture of rain and hill snow. most snow
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high up in the hills of northern england and scotland but potentially a bit of snow for a time getting down to lower levels particularly across central and eastern scotland. milderair across central and eastern scotland. milder air eventually lifting in with temperatures rising to 10 degrees late in the day, across northern ireland, parts of western england and wales as well. that is a trend towards the end of the week, temperatures twisting, turning milder and drierfor temperatures twisting, turning milder and drier for many temperatures twisting, turning milder and drierfor many of temperatures twisting, turning milder and drier for many of us as well. that is your weather —— temperatures lifting. today at 5: a high—level resignation at oxfam following the allegations of sexual misconduct by its staff in haiti. the charity‘s deputy chief executive said she took full responsibility for the scandal surrounding aid workers seven years ago, as labour demanded more openness. oxfam should have been more open and clear about it
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at the very beginning. both the charity commission and the department of international development, who were funding part of the work that they do. we‘ll have the latest developments and we‘ll be talking to an mp and former aid worker. the other main stories on bbc news at 5: in the grand canyon have been named — three other britons and the pilot were injured when the helicopter went down.
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